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David T. Cole

UnREALity vs. Reality: How does UnREAL stack up?

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How do you like the show's take on reality shows? Does it ring true to you? How about just regular old real-life? Discuss here.

Edited by stacey
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I am so interested in this show, and I would love to hear from previous contestants on Bachelor/Bachelorette types of shows. I did hear that holding back food but giving them plenty of alcohol was a true thing.

Edited by truelovekiss
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If I had to bet, I'd bet with this being very true to what goes on behind the scenes. Since this one season is devoted to the Bachelor, I'd like to see future seasons go after other well-known reality shows. Top Chef, Housewives, Survivor, etc. The producers of the actual shows may not like it, but hey.....that's reality TV. :)

I am so interested in this show, and I would love to hear from previous contestants on Bachelor/Bachelorette types of shows. I did hear that holding back food but giving them plenty of alcohol was a true thing.

That won't happen. Non-disclosure agreements are thick and usually come with a million dollar fine if anyone talks. I know this from two different contestants on two different reality shows who are friends, and they won't tell me squat. :)

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I am so interested in this show, and I would love to hear from previous contestants on Bachelor/Bachelorette types of shows. I did hear that holding back food but giving them plenty of alcohol was a true thing.

As a huge fan of The Challenge (Formerly MTV's Real World/Road Rules Challenge), I'm sure the booze is true. Those kids have so much alcohol and nothing else to do except exercise and drink. No TV. No computer access. I loved the pilot but at the same time it is a bit hard to watch because if I stop and think about the real people in front of the camera its horrifying. Especially on shows that seem to cast for the unstable (The Challenge, Bachelor/ette, ANY of the "of love" shows that VH1 did, Bad Girls Club, etc).  

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I don't watch the Bachelor or the Bachelorette, but didn't one of the girls commit suicide?

Yes, in 2013 but it looks like it was unrelated to her time on The Bachelor. She seems to have had severe PMDD and her boyfriend had told her he didn't love her anymore. The story is horrifying since mom was on the phone with her when she did it. But that also doesn't mean she really was a stable person when she was on The Bachelor.  

 

However here's a slide show of 27 reality stars who have passed on, almost all due to self-inflicted situations (suicide or drugs). And doesn't count any recent ones like Ryan Knight of The Challenge who killed himself before the most recent season was aired. 

 

One thing that strikes me is that the viewing public tend(ed) to view The Bachelor/ette as "above" the shenanigans as compared to Rock of Love or Flava of Love, yet I would presume both are equally guilty of the same BS. 

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It was mentioned in the episode thread how the cast and crew spend so much time together that relationships must start up, break up, etc. That jogged my memory that Jeff Probst dated someone from a season of Survivor for a while, but it didn't last. I've heard he's a real ass. Just like the lady on this show.

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I am so interested in this show, and I would love to hear from previous contestants on Bachelor/Bachelorette types of shows. I did hear that holding back food but giving them plenty of alcohol was a true thing.

Production definitely keep the booze flowing and the pilot pretty much nailed the atmosphere of that first night. It's way longer than it appears on TV and by the time the rose ceremony comes around, the sun is rising, which is why they usually move it inside to a dark room. People mag did an interview with a BN alum, if you want to check it out, but it seems to me like a PR spin from the BN camp

 

http://www.people.com/article/unreal-deanna-pappas-stagliano-bachelor-bachelorette-premiere-reaction

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... I'd like to see future seasons go after other well-known reality shows. Top Chef, Housewives, Survivor, etc. The producers of the actual shows may not like it, but hey.....that's reality TV. :)...

I love your idea of future seasons featuring Survivor and Housewives style shows;-)

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So far it's not the bigger things that impress me like how the contestants have psychological issues or past traumas that are ignored by production. It's the small things I appreciate seeing like how they wrangle the women into having one on one time and being able to see all the camera people and crew hanging around watching. I feel like that's the behind the scenes part that inevitably gets lost. Smash, Empire, Nashville. Sometimes I want to see the boring business stuff. Because the drama makes it just like any other show. You sold me on a very specific premise.

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After binging the episodes that were released online, it looks like the show airs in real time. There were a couple mentions of "I watched last night's episode." That doesn't ring true to me because, for one, nobody on the crew spends their precious free time watching a stripped down version of last week's workload and in reality, these shows are filmed a few months in advance. Unless it's something like American Idol that involves live audience participation, the show is at least 75% filmed (if not entirely complete) by the time it premieres.

Edited by rho
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After binging the episodes that were released online, it looks like the show airs in real time. There were a couple mentions of "I watched last night's episode." That doesn't ring true to me because, for one, nobody on the crew spends their precious free time watching a stripped down version of last week's workload and in reality, these shows are filmed a few months in advance. Unless it's something like American Idol that involves live audience participation, the show is at least 75% filmed by the time it premieres.

As far as I could tell they were only commenting on the premiere episode.

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I spoke with a reality casting director who worked on lower level shows once, and he told me they look for people whose psychological tests show them to be messed up but not dangerously so.

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In another thread, I've commented more than once about how I believe shows such as The Bachelor(ette) are shot*. I figured this is a more appropriate thread to share my ideas. One or two people keep mentioning that the whole show is planned from beginning to end and implied that the show-by-show methodology explored on UnREAL is unrealistic. However, I partially disagree.

 

I thought that the production practices that are presented on UnREAL aren't a misrepresentation of what happens on the real Bachelor(ette) series. I had the impression that they assemble the show on a weekly basis, and of course, as HotForBacon mention, it's completed before it's aired. BUT...All along the show is shot with the producers' objectives in mind.

Or in other words, one way of shooting doesn't invalidate the other. TPTB only have a limited time to shoot (and shape) the show. The producers can manipulate what we see all they want, but I thought for the sake of the production schedule, they have to shoot and assemble as they go.

 

*My knowledge based on a brief experience I had with my country's version of an American reality show. (And no, it wasn't The Bachelor.) 

Edited by C76
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I don't watch the Bachelor/ette shows, but my understanding is that almost all reality shows that do not involve audience participation/voting are filmed significantly in advance of airing. Some of them are still in production when airing begins, but even those are near completion with the majority of episodes in the can when the show finally airs. 
 

Each day is a lot of footage (multiple camera teams following people around, angles, etc) and it's a lot of work shaping those into what eventually becomes the narrative for the show.

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This is a very interesting blog by Possessionista. She speaks with a crew member of the Bachelor and they talk about what is true on this show and what would never happen.

http://www.possessionista.com/2015/06/how-real-was-unreal.html

Thanks for the linked article!

It sounds like Unreality is fairly close to "reality". Sure, it is filmed long before it broadcasts but the rest of the show seems very on point. This has been quite a year for behind the scenes shenanigans on reality shows. Just look at this seasons Married At First Sight (everyone), The Bachelorette (Kaitlyn and Nick), and The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (Kim Richards). I think Unreality more "real" than the actual edited reality shows that we watch. The behind the scenes drama seems more interesting than the manufactured drama (I would love to see the footage, if any exists, of Kim Richards at the Polo Lounge)

Edited by Vicky8675309

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How do you like the show's take on reality shows? Does it ring true to you?

If anything I think they're being too nice...

If anyone is interested, a previous The Bachelor contestant wrote a book about her experience called I Didn't Come Here To Make Friends.

And how did she get around the NDA?

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One year later, ‘I Wanna Marry Harry’ winner reveals behind-the-scenes ‘brainwashing’

They actually had a therapist come on set at one point and talk to a few of us who were saying it wasn’t him. We found out later that it wasn’t a real, licensed therapist. It was just someone from the production team.

 

What did the therapist say?

“You have to learn how to trust your mind. I understand that you’re in a different country, and you don’t know what’s going on, but you have to trust the people here. It’s not good for you to keep questioning.” It was really crazy.

 

Wow. Watching at home, I’d wondered if the production staff had more of a “wink, wink, go along with it” attitude behind the scenes.

No, no. They were really trying everything they possibly could to convince us that this was him. Even little things in the middle of the night—they have cameras in your room while you’re sleeping. Not the camera crew, just stationery cameras. They keep an eye on you and they can still record everything that you say.

 

Sometimes, people from production would stand outside your room, when you’d think that they didn’t know you were up. They’d whisper, “You have to get him back to Buckingham Palace. The Royal Family’s very upset. They’re not happy about the show. It’s this new thing they’ve never done before, and they’re trying to be up and up with social media, and the way that the world is.” They really messed with us.

 

Did anyone on the production team ever explicitly say, “This is Prince Harry?”

Yeah. Several times. The way that they did it was more subtle, so that it really got to you. Your own reality started breaking down, and you were totally lost as to what was really going on. After Kingsley [actor Paul Leonard, as the show’s butler-in-residence] sat us down and told us, “This is him,” production was like, “It’s such a great relief to let it out, that, yeah, this is Prince Harry, but this doesn’t mean you have to treat him any differently.” And then they’d always refer to him as His Royal Highness. They did a great job. I’ll give them that.

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A fake therapist has to be beyond even the scum barriers these shows usually have.  

 

Between US and UK law there has to be something to cover this.  It sounds actionable (maybe even civilly and not just with a lawsuit).

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Each day is a lot of footage (multiple camera teams following people around, angles, etc) and it's a lot of work shaping those into what eventually becomes the narrative for the show.

That alone makes it impossible for the show not to work ahead.

 

A fake therapist has to be beyond even the scum barriers these shows usually have. 

Between US and UK law there has to be something to cover this. It sounds actionable (maybe even civilly and not just with a lawsuit).

 

It doesn't sound like the fake therapist was doing anything illegal. There was no therapeutic relationship with the contestants. It's appalling, but I think the entire premise of these kinds of dating shows is appalling. This is how you want to find someone? This is how you want to get your 15 minutes of fame? 

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The fake therapist thing intrigues me. If I understand correctly, almost anyone can claim to be a counselor/therapist. One cannot claim the educational credentials or certifications if they don't have them, but one can hang out the shingle (maybe this is regulated by state) and treat patients. If that's allowed, it's not too much of a stretch to say that someone can lie about being a therapist, as long as he/she isn't in a therapeutic relationship with an individual. Which it appears the "Harry" show did, and got away with.

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The budget on I Wanna Marry Harry seemed to all go towards renting the mansion. They probably couldn't have afforded a real therapist. (I read that Matt negotiated in his contract to keep his "Harry" wardrobe.

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Josh Kelly (Jeremy on the show) was a guest on the AfterbuzzTV Aftershow for Unreal this week and said that he's made friends with several former contestants from The Bachelor who have become big fans of the show, and that they've said the show feels real to their own experience. I don't know if that means anything since that info comes second hand from someone on the show, but I found it interesting.

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Would Adam really have been able to stand by and watch one of the contestants doing their private one-on-one interviews?? That was a little far-fetched to me (yes, on this show).

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I find the racism in this show interesting and very realistic when I think about shows like The Bachelor.  The producers say that it's the public who wouldn't accept it if "The Suitor" picked a black woman, but I kind of feel it's their own racism talking, I mean goodness, what would happen if a black woman were actually desired, OMG, alert the media, and naturally the black woman gets cut, so it proved my point.  The media in America wants to make sure that black women are totally on the bottom, dating wise.  Sure some folks would balk if a white "suitor" chose a black woman, but they'd watch next season and from what I've seen, if you see something enough times, you get used to it.

 

I've read that that's part of why there won't be a black Bachelor. If he picks a non-black woman, the interracial component will freak people out; if he picks a black woman, that makes the show a "black show," which would appeal to a smaller audience. There would probably be fewer white contestants in the pool overall. Also from what I understand (I don't watch the franchise), they always pick someone from the previous season, and black people never make it far enough to be remembered.

 

I do get a sense of entitlement from Anna, although that may be because I don't like her. And I do think Quinn is casually racist. She's probably not dropping n-bombs, but I'd imagine her world is entirely white and that's fine with her, and we know she says shit like "Obama isn't really black" so my guess is she thinks of people of color (and by that I mean all non-white people, not just black people) in terms of stereotypes.

 

I can buy that the audience would like Adam and Faith. America loves a cutie almost as much as they love a mean girl. Plus, they do actually have chemistry, even if its not romantic, but I can see people reading it as romantic if they didn't know the truth. 

Yeah, for me, the best romantic relationships have friendship at the center of them - I would totally have a mud fight with a boyfriend in that situation - so the buddy aspect might work to their advantage. They would need to throw in some hand-holding, kissing, etc., so that they didn't totally read as "just friends," but I also think they'd come across as people who genuinely enjoy spending time together (because they do!) in a way that's not there with Anna or Grace. Also Faith is salt-of-the-earth relatable in a way that Grace and Anna aren't, so I think people would be happy that she got the guy.

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I do get a sense of entitlement from Anna, although that may be because I don't like her. And I do think Quinn is casually racist. She's probably not dropping n-bombs, but I'd imagine her world is entirely white and that's fine with her, and we know she says shit like "Obama isn't really black" so my guess is she thinks of people of color (and by that I mean all non-white people, not just black people) in terms of stereotypes.

 

 

Yes, I do think Anna is totally entitled; which is why it would kill her if Grace or Faith won.  Anna seems very generic to me, nothing special about her, forgettable face.  

 

I also think that's a good point about Quinn.  She says that the country wouldn't accept it if The Suitor picked a black woman, when what she's probably doing is projecting her own racism on the country.  Especially when she says dumb shit like, "Obama isn't really black."  She probably doesn't even see black people as human beings.  I can't see a black bachelor either, but my point was, why couldn't a white bachelor pick a black woman?  It's not like it doesn't happen in real life (http://www.blackfemaleinterracialmarriage.com/).

 

I wasn't surprised Chet cheated on Quinn, I was surprised that she was shocked; I mean Quinn's no spring chicken.  

Edited by Neurochick
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I'm not sure what's up with Anna.  She might think she's entitled to win because she wanted to leave after her father's death and they convinced her that Adam really liked her and that she had a shot.  But Anna also reminds me of girls I knew in college, who thought they were entitled to the best of everything because they were white.

 

If I'm being honest, I find this sort of offensive.  Unless they straight-up told you that they were entitled to things because they're white, I think it could be other stuff.  Admittedly, things like being rich, growing up privileged, maybe private school....etc are all tied in with race at some level.  I think Anna's issue is she's pretty (if in a generic way), skinny, blonde, and smart (at least, we're led to believe that since she's a lawyer)...and that's why she feels entitled to the win.  I think that's what happens on these shows most of the time.  Women are told that they're special snowflakes so many times that they can't for a second believe that someone might pick someone else. 

 

 

Especially when she says dumb shit like, "Obama isn't really black."

Wait - did she say this on the show?  If so, I totally missed it.  Was it on the first episode when she flipped because a black girl was the first introduction?

Edited by VartanFan
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Yes, it was one of her first lines. She freaked out when Shaniqua was first out of the limo because the person who's first out is supposed to be "wifey material." The black gay producer started rattling off all her (impressive) credentials, and ended with "We have a black family in the White House!" Quinn retorted "Obama's barely black." I'm paraphrasing, but that's what happened. It struck a chord with me because I have heard "You're not really black" so damn many times, because I went to an Ivy and speak a certain way (read: not Ebonics). But to those people, black = negative "oh no you di'int!" stereotypes.

 

Look what happened when the black contestants were asked to make themselves memorable. They were told to turn up, get loud, start fights, be confrontational - because that's reality show blackness.

Edited by Empress1
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I've been thinking about something else...I feel like we're supposed to feel like the Adam/Rachel relationship is the love connection, or something.  But I find it odd then that we didn't get any of the prelude to the sex.  We've still never seen them kiss and I didn't think there was really any romantic moment in them hooking up.  There was that 'look' when she was on top of him and so I think both of these guys are, sort of disposable to her.  Which is sad...especially when there's so much pretty.

That's the thing, I think it's been established and made pretty clear since the second or so episode that Adam and Rachel are attracted to each other and I think most viewers have just been expecting the inevitable hook up. So there is no question she is attracted to him and wanted to have sex with him.

 

Their chemistry has been off the charts since the first episode. And I agree that Rachel has been producing and manipulating Adam since the beginning, but I don't think she slept with him to blackmail him or otherwise control him. He's been subtly pursuing her all season, and she kept pushing him away.

 

In this episode, Rachel made it clear that there's a big difference between her job and her dreams. Her job involves getting Adam on board with Royal Love and to get him to propose to one of the women. And her job usually requires her to be a monster. Her dreams involve being happy and being romantic--and that's where Adam comes in. They've had romantic (or lustful) feelings for each other for a while, but Rachel was not about mixing her professional and personal lives. But with Chet's psychotic behavior in the car and Jeremy's confusing feelings, and her feelings of self-disgust about convincing Adam to do Royal Love, I think Rachel was once again realizing how much of Satan's asshole this show really is. Only instead of interrupting a wedding and going psycho on-camera, she gave into her feelings and slept with Adam. Maybe Adam will end up marrying one of the women. But Rachel doesn't care. In essence, she was giving the finger to 'Everlasting.'

 

 

I also think that's a good point about Quinn.  She says that the country wouldn't accept it if The Suitor picked a black woman, when what she's probably doing is projecting her own racism on the country.  Especially when she says dumb shit like, "Obama isn't really black."  She probably doesn't even see black people as human beings.  I can't see a black bachelor either, but my point was, why couldn't a white bachelor pick a black woman?  It's not like it doesn't happen in real life (http://www.blackfema...almarriage.com/).

 

I wasn't surprised Chet cheated on Quinn, I was surprised that she was shocked; I mean Quinn's no spring chicken.

I'm hurt. Women of a certain age are supposed to be cheated on?

 

But I agree with you about racism and racial issues, Neurochick. There have been shows with interracial relationships, but these have largely been shows with people of color as show-runners (Scandal, How to Get Away With Murder, The Game, Girlfriends). ER also had an interracial relationship, but the showrunners were white.

And why is Quinn okay with a Latina being Adam's bride but not a black woman?

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I find the racism in this show interesting and very realistic when I think about shows like The Bachelor.  The producers say that it's the public who wouldn't accept it if "The Suitor" picked a black woman, but I kind of feel it's their own racism talking, I mean goodness, what would happen if a black woman were actually desired, OMG, alert the media, and naturally the black woman gets cut, so it proved my point.  The media in America wants to make sure that black women are totally on the bottom, dating wise.  Sure some folks would balk if a white "suitor" chose a black woman, but they'd watch next season and from what I've seen, if you see something enough times, you get used to it.

 

 

I've read that that's part of why there won't be a black Bachelor. If he picks a non-black woman, the interracial component will freak people out; if he picks a black woman, that makes the show a "black show," which would appeal to a smaller audience. There would probably be fewer white contestants in the pool overall. Also from what I understand (I don't watch the franchise), they always pick someone from the previous season, and black people never make it far enough to be remembered.

 

 

There are also societal factors at play.  I've got a black friend who won't date black men (neither she nor her mother know who her father is and she's afraid she'll inadvertently end up dating her brother).  Whenever she has put up profiles on dating site she specifies this.  Inevitably she ends up getting matched with black men. (I think she needs to stop trying dating sites: there's an Irish guy that hangs out in our local pub with us that's she's totally meant to get together with.)

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There are also societal factors at play.  I've got a black friend who won't date black men (neither she nor her mother know who her father is and she's afraid she'll inadvertently end up dating her brother).  Whenever she has put up profiles on dating site she specifies this.  Inevitably she ends up getting matched with black men. (I think she needs to stop trying dating sites: there's an Irish guy that hangs out in our local pub with us that's she's totally meant to get together with.)

 

Regarding the dating sites, those aren't societal factors, those are lazy dating sites, which is what Everlasting and shows like The Bachelor are, lazy, take the path of least resistance.  

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Yeah, the name Shan(m?)iqua stuck out to me too and I wondered about lazy writing. Based on my own experience, a Spellman grad who clerked for a Supreme Court Justice and plays the violin (am I making the last part up? I thought a producer said it) would be unlikely to be named Shaniqua.

I actually used to work with a Shaniqua and she'd changed it to Shane (I only knew her old name because she told me) because she thought Shaniqua was holding her back.

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Also to the poster who spoke about the "beauty" hierarchy re: paleness of skin. "Shamiqua" looked as white as the South American to me. Only the name is "black," and unlikely in a girl as clearly middle class as she was.

She might have been pale, but the legacy of slavery has left African Americans perpetually stuck at the bottom of racist caste system. Being light skinned, beautiful, well educated and professionally accomplished likely got her cast on the show and allowed her to stay for as long as she did, but it wasn't enough to overcome the stigma of being black in the eyes of Quinn and the network.

Yeah, the name Shan(m?)iqua stuck out to me too and I wondered about lazy writing. Based on my own experience, a Spellman grad who clerked for a Supreme Court Justice and plays the violin (am I making the last part up? I thought a producer said it) would be unlikely to be named Shaniqua.

She was playing her violin as she got out of the car (or was it a carriage?) to meet Adam for the first time in the pilot.

Edited by xqueenfrostine
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She might have been pale, but the legacy of slavery has left African Americans perpetually stuck at the bottom of racist caste system. Being light skinned, beautiful, well educated and professionally accomplished likely got her cast on the show and allowed her to stay for as long as she did, but it wasn't enough to overcome the stigma of being black in the eyes of Quinn and the network.

 

 

I agree, that's why I think Quinn is a racist witch who pushes her own racism on the country and I was a bit annoyed that they let her go, but I'm sure Quinn was happy.

Edited by Neurochick
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Yeah, the name Shan(m?)iqua stuck out to me too and I wondered about lazy writing. Based on my own experience, a Spellman grad who clerked for a Supreme Court Justice and plays the violin (am I making the last part up? I thought a producer said it) would be unlikely to be named Shaniqua.

I actually used to work with a Shaniqua and she'd changed it to Shane (I only knew her old name because she told me) because she thought Shaniqua was holding her back.

Spelman (one L) class of 1995 here. There were plenty "Shamiqua" type names. Lots of African/Afrocentric names. Regular American names. Point is, there is no such thing as a name that would not be heard at Spelman or that ladies with the unconventional names were less well-rounded than others. Or less successful post-graduation. Shoot, my name is "regular" in Louisiana where I'm from and folks cannot pronounce it for shit. I might as well be named Shamiqua:)

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Speaking of names Shiri Appleby has a unique/ethnic name. It's not a common name. Whenever she's on a talk show the host usually has a hard time pronouncing it. Shiri helped the host pronounce he name. She also explained that her name is a Hebrew name and means my song. Then she told a funny joke about people saying her name like she's an 80 year old Jewish grandma.

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Spelman (one L) class of 1995 here. There were plenty "Shamiqua" type names. Lots of African/Afrocentric names. Regular American names. Point is, there is no such thing as a name that would not be heard at Spelman or that ladies with the unconventional names were less well-rounded than others. Or less successful post-graduation. Shoot, my name is "regular" in Louisiana where I'm from and folks cannot pronounce it for shit. I might as well be named Shamiqua:)

 

Unfortunately, there are multiple studies that show that discrimination against people with Afrocentric names for jobs (and housing!) is a thing.  Obama even referenced this phenomenon in his eulogy for Rev. Pinckney.  Not saying a Spelman grad named Shaniqua has less of what it takes to be successful post-grad than a Shane, but she'll have a steeper hill to climb to achieve the same success through no fault of her own.

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On the topic of Shamiqua, I still find the idea that someone who had clerked for a Supreme Court Justice would wind up on Everlasting one of the most unrealistic things on this show, especially because there was no backstory explanation about her changing her life course or anything. I feel like that was one of those things the writers threw in there because it sounded impressive without realizing or thinking through what it really meant. Getting a clerkship at the Supreme Court means a person is performing at an incredibly high level in a career where spending time on a reality show won't exactly be looked fondly on. Why would she risk all that for this stupid show?

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On the topic of Shamiqua, I still find the idea that someone who had clerked for a Supreme Court Justice would wind up on Everlasting one of the most unrealistic things on this show, especially because there was no backstory explanation about her changing her life course or anything. I feel like that was one of those things the writers threw in there because it sounded impressive without realizing or thinking through what it really meant. Getting a clerkship at the Supreme Court means a person is performing at an incredibly high level in a career where spending time on a reality show won't exactly be looked fondly on. Why would she risk all that for this stupid show?

 

Maybe she wants a career in television as some sort of political pundit or legal correspondent?   That's the only reason I can think of for why someone might go from clerking for a SCOTUS justice to a reality show contestant.  There's a history of some cross over between news show contributor and reality TV.  Elisabeth Hasselback, from The View and Fox and Friends, got her first TV break as a contestant on Survivor.  

Edited by xqueenfrostine

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Elisabeth Hasselback, from The View and Fox and Friends, got her first TV break as a contestant on Survivor.

 

...and a pox on Survivor for this.  Sorry, but I just can't handle her screechiness. 

 

I don't think Quinn would want Shamiqua gone because she was black; I think she would want her gone because she was bad tv.  She was normal and dignified...She didn't like Mary until she was off her meds because she was bad tv.  Once she was sniping and catty, Quinn liked Mary.  If Shamiqua created good tv in any way (like apparently letting adam feel her ass in the massage scene), Quinn would have liked her and wanted her to stay.  I think Quinn is an equal opportunity bitch...if you are making her or the show look good, she likes you.  To do that, you need to be catty, bitchy, slutty, and so on.  Quinn is an asshole.

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I don't think anyone's suggesting that Quinn wanted Shamiqua gone because she's black, but that she never took her seriously as a contestant and likely would never have taken her seriously because she's black.  And that's not fan speculation.  She expressed that sentiment the first time we ever saw Shamiqua.

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And why is Quinn okay with a Latina being Adam's bride but not a black woman?

The network wanted him to marry the Latina woman, not Quinn. They said it would play well with the Telemundo demographic.

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