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S03.E03: Et in Arcadia

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At Osborne House, Albert relishes the opportunity to spend time with the family away from London. Victoria is desperate to get back to the Palace and the business of politics.

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With apologies -- but nothing was up, there was no "episode" option on the topic start-up, and I was **dying to get in here and vent.

First of all: ugh.  Freak-o-dora is making Lehzen look like a Hello Kitty doll.  At least her former governess had Victoria's interests at heart.  I expect the Queen's wicked stepsister has only her own agenda to drive.

Waiting for Russell to invent the whoopie cushion and slip it on Palmerston's seat before a full session of Parliament.   

John Sessions' reax to Albert's garden lecture was my favorite moment from this ep.  Not even the nekkid dip into Poldarkian waters was close.  (PBS: Come. ON!!  It's a butt. Stop the blur.)

Not a huge fan of Vic's new wardrobe, but at least the muumuus are gone.  So that's *one thing I asked for.

Now: where's my Ernst???

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I recognize his attitude was consistent with the times in which he lived, but Albert needs to recognize that marrying the Queen did not make him King.  He needs to step back and let her do her job.  And he needs to stop picking on poor Bertie!  I miss Lord M . . . .

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And so another episode comes and goes with no Ernst in sight and no promise of Ernst in the preview for next week. 

Palmerston is rapidly becoming my favorite part of this Ernst-less new world. 

My short-lived mild interest in Francatelli and Skerrett was obliterated this episode as they returned to being tedious.  

I also don't understand leave-taking SOPs at Buckingham Palace. Francatelli seems to have given a rather extended notice while Skerrett's wasn't, but they're both still there for the same amount of time? I'd always been under the impression that getting secretly married was a really good way to get booted out of your Victorian-era service job, and Victoria's irritation with Skerrett made it seem even weirder to me that she got to work a notice. But maybe I'm just misinformed? 

I'm also not sure that Victoria would get too worked up about Francatelli turning in his notice. She doesn't strike me as someone who notices the household staff unless she has direct dealings with them, like she does Skerrett. 

I also thought the fight between Albert and Victoria was way over-the-top for it to happen in front of witnesses, so to speak. I'm sure they had their battle royales like any other couple, but it just seemed really unregal for them to have a fight in front of other people that degenerated into him openly dissing her and her chucking a beverage at him. 

On the plus side, I enjoyed Penge's bitter drumming. 

4 minutes ago, voiceover said:

John Sessions' reax to Albert's garden lecture was my favorite moment from this ep.  Not even the nekkid dip into Poldarkian waters was close.  (PBS: Come. ON!!  It's a butt. Stop the blur.)

Sessions was great there! I also do not understand the butt blurring. I think we Masterpiece viewers can handle a butt. 

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Bertie seemed to have a vision problem.  Is there historical evidence for this?  What eye tests and treatment were available then?

Feodora was Victoria's half sister, not step sister.  They had the same mother but different fathers.

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They are really re-writing history, showing Victoria interceding on Bertie's behalf, questioning Albert's methods of educating and discipling him.  Both she and Albert despaired of Bertie, finding him slow, undisciplined, and nowhere near the perfection (in their eyes) that was his older sister.  I thought Victoria pretty much let Albert call the shots about all aspects of raising their children.  

Other things that came to mind:  Bertie is still up and doing his lessons at whatever time they are eating dinner?  Also, would a servant really strip off on the beach known to be frequented by the Queen?  Would that servant have time off to go swimming on a daily basis?  

Finally,when did Darlene Shiley become Darlene Marcos Shiley in the list of supporters?  Did that happen long ago and I'm only now realizing it?  

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Dear god please no more Chartists tonight.  They're milked all the drama from that already.  We get it, Victoria cared deeply about the common people.   LOL    I'm actually glad Feodora is there to add  some drama because Victoria's martyred sigh and Albert's whispery voice is getting to me.  

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Even if it was unrealistic, I enjoyed the dickens out of Victoria throwing that water into Albert’s face. 😆He just annoys the 💩 out of me. I want to take a pair scissors to those foppish curls that are always in his face.

Joseph is a hottie! Add me to the no butt blurring posse. 😏

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4 minutes ago, LittleIggy said:

 I want to take a pair scissors to those foppish curls that are always in his face.

Haha My grandparents also watch Victoria, and any time we discuss the show, the conversation always winds around to how annoying his hair in the face is.  

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53 minutes ago, Calvada said:

Finally,when did Darlene Shiley become Darlene Marcos Shiley in the list of supporters?  Did that happen long ago and I'm only now realizing it?

I've caught that in a couple of PBS shows over the last week.  It was new to me, too.  Not something you really pay attention to, but when it changes, you know something's different.

I'm finding this season utterly boring.

Edited by Quilt Fairy
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40 minutes ago, LittleIggy said:

Even if it was unrealistic, I enjoyed the dickens out of Victoria throwing that water into Albert’s face. 😆He just annoys the 💩 out of me. I want to take a pair scissors to those foppish curls that are always in his face.

I know I sound like a broken record about this, but the man was friggin' BALDING at this stage!  Having him remain floppy haired on the show (to increase the sexy factor?) is so frustrating.

ETA: The initial image I used was from 1854.

Edited by Brn2bwild
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'Bout time Victoria started raging.   Albert's hair gets longer and darker each episode.   Wasn't he balding by then?

The Duchess and studly footman is such a trope, but it's 100% better than Skerrit and Francotelli.  

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“Welcome back to the palace, Your Royal Bickersons.”

If I want to see people sniping at each other and snarling about power struggles, I don’t need electricity and connectivity for that.

The first two seasons had some lovely magical moments.  I miss that!  

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11 minutes ago, Brn2bwild said:

I know I sound like a broken record about this, but the man was friggin' BALDING at this stage!  Having him remain floppy haired on the show (to increase the sexy factor?) is so frustrating.

ETA: The initial image I used was from 1854.

The 1848 daguerreotype shows he didn’t have those curls during the time period referenced here.

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This was the first episode that fully engaged me this season.  Part of it is the new cast slowly growing on me.  Laurence Fox is quite entertaining as Lord Palmeston. And it did his jerk of a character wonders to show some much needed shades of humanity and behave as a gentleman with the unfortunate duchess. So let me get this straight - her husband treats her like dirt and cruelly separates her from their son because her fortune is from trade and while that money was good enough for him, she isn't.  Oh, yeah, I am rooting for the duke to drop dead ASAP.

I see Penge is back to being Old Misery Boots.  Are Francatelli and Skerritt going to remain on the show after quitting and running their hotel?  That seems rather contrived.

Feodora playing Victoria and Albert against each other - it seems a scheme that will surely end badly.

I miss Ernst.

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2 hours ago, TVFAN said:

I recognize his attitude was consistent with the times in which he lived, but Albert needs to recognize that marrying the Queen did not make him King.  He needs to step back and let her do her job.  And he needs to stop picking on poor Bertie!  I miss Lord M . . . .

Albert and his attitude were getting on my nerves.  While I could agree that it's good for the kids to get out and play and run around, his "I know better than you, and I'm right" tone of voice made me want to smack him.

Lord Palmerston is a great addition to the show.  He amuses me, and is a good foil for Victoria.  I hated Feodora at first, but now she makes me laugh with her passive-aggressive sarcasm. 

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This episode seemed all over the place to me.  I was getting whiplash trying to follow Palmerstone moving from Snidely Whiplash to Dudley Do-right,  Is he good, is he bad?  Does Victoria love or hate him?  I'm getting confused here.

The duchess and the footman saga can come to no good but I confess the footman is damned easy on the eyes especially without the wig.  And get rid of the blur, please.  This is hardly a show that garners an audience of children.  It's not like someone is using it as a history lesson.  Sadly, no more ocean so no more sea bathing scenes.

9 hours ago, Zella said:

I also thought the fight between Albert and Victoria was way over-the-top for it to happen in front of witnesses, so to speak. I'm sure they had their battle royales like any other couple, but it just seemed really unregal for them to have a fight in front of other people that degenerated into him openly dissing her and her chucking a beverage at him. 

That was just too bizarre for words.  I know that people get carried away by their emotions but the royals seem so concerned with public appearance that this was difficult to image actually happening.  Even when she's been angry with someone before, Victoria went the "freeze them out" route and never raised her voice.

And would any door in the castle be locked against the queen?  Found that hard to believe as well.  I'm surprised she didn't get some guard to break it down.

I wondered about eyesight problems with Bertie as well.  It seemed that he was squinting a lot when trying to see things at a distance.  Although he did pretty darned well with a bow and arrow, nailing those squares dead on.  

I think Victoria was genuinely distressed with Skerret t leaving and I can see why.  Skerrett was the one constant in her life that she could count on after Lehzen left.  I don't see that she'd be distressed about Francatelli, though.  I doubt she even knew his name and replacing him is Penge's job.

Penge and the drum was hilarious.

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10 hours ago, Zella said:

I was wondering if it was supposed to be dyslexia and if that was historically accurate. 

I wondered the same.

The footman (Joseph?) had admitted to Penge he was swimming.  The duchess said he was running an errand for her. I guess society dictated that Penge couldn't call her on the discrepancy?  

I find it hard to believe that Palmerston would stop pursuing the duchess because the other lady in waiting told him he should. 

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26 minutes ago, TexasGal said:

I guess society dictated that Penge couldn't call her on the discrepancy?  

I would imagine so. But now Penge has a piece of information to use as necessary.

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32 minutes ago, TexasGal said:

I wondered the same.

The footman (Joseph?) had admitted to Penge he was swimming.  The duchess said he was running an errand for her. I guess society dictated that Penge couldn't call her on the discrepancy?  

I thought that maybe when the Duchess told Penge that he was with her that Penge then thought that both the Duchess’ story and Joseph’s stories were half true — that Joseph was with the Duchess nude swimming or something else inappropriate. Penge was then kinda in awe that Joseph get himself a Duchess. 

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I don't think Penge would have been in awe of Joseph nabbing a duchess. He's been shown to be very disgusted with rumors that Joseph was more than friendly with his previous female employer. This would've been even more scandalous proof of him not knowing his place, and it also undermined Penge's authority, two big no nos for a servant.

I think the most charitable conclusion Penge could've come to was that Joseph was doing her a favor and being discreet, but Penge isn't a charitable man. 

He probably suspects there's something going on between them, but I think Joseph getting his job back is just Penge not being able to call the duchess a liar to her face.

I'm sure Penge is going to make Joseph's life a living hell now as payback.

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10 minutes ago, Nolefan said:

Penge was then kinda in awe that Joseph get himself a Duchess. 

I doubt it.  He'd be more likely to be furious that Joseph was acting "above his station".

2 minutes ago, Zella said:

I'm sure Penge is going to make Joseph's life a living hell now as payback.

Absolutely. I wouldn't want to be in Joseph's shoes.  Lots of crap Penge can pull to punish him.

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11 hours ago, TVFAN said:

I recognize his attitude was consistent with the times in which he lived, but Albert needs to recognize that marrying the Queen did not make him King.  He needs to step back and let her do her job.  And he needs to stop picking on poor Bertie!  I miss Lord M . . . .

I don’t think that Albert thinks he is King. The Osbourne bathroom picture shows me that Albert knows his place is to assist Victoria. I just think he feels he has lost his wife’s respect because he always seems to give her the wrong advice on state matters (ex. the ship speech from S2 and the Chartist stuff). Now Victoria is looking to another man for advice, Palmerston — a man he thought was a buffoon but is looking more knowledge than him. Funny you mentioned Lord M, because this is how Albert was shown to feel about Lord M., too. And to add to Albert’s feelings of inferiority, it seemed to me that Victoria was low key flirting with Lord Palmerston right in front of Albert. As for Bertie, Albert was way out of control, but I feel his heart was in the right place and did not intend to bully him. I thought that it was interesting that Albert took Victoria’s criticism of him re Bertie to heart and was much gentler with Bertie in the archery scene. I think Victoria is too permissive with Bertie’s bad behavior, and Albert is too strict. They both need to find some middle ground.

Edited by Nolefan
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7 minutes ago, Nolefan said:

I thought that it was interesting that Albert took Victoria’s criticism of him re Bertie to heart and was much gentler with Bertie in the archery scene.

 

The archery game was a rather ingenious way to learn letters. My brother struggled with dyslexia, and learning to read was very hard for him as a result. He would have loved that game!

Speaking as someone who used to teach, I thought Albert's treatment of Bertie was too severe and a rather ineffective way to approach education (drill and kill), but from a 19th century standpoint, it was a pretty standard approach to teaching. I doubt that real-life Victoria would have looked askance at it or accused Albert of bullying her son. In fact, my impression is she shared Albert's disappointment in and exasperation with Bertie. 

Edited by Zella
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12 hours ago, voiceover said:

 (PBS: Come. ON!!  It's a butt. Stop the blur.)

I KNOW. I think America can handle a bare bottom. 

11 hours ago, Calvada said:

Finally,when did Darlene Shiley become Darlene Marcos Shiley in the list of supporters?  Did that happen long ago and I'm only now realizing it?  

Another of the big donors used to be Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner, and now it's the Conrad Prebys Foundation. I wonder if these are tax adjustments? All that stuff did change in the most recent tax package.

2 hours ago, Kohola3 said:

I was getting whiplash trying to follow Palmerstone moving from Snidely Whiplash to Dudley Do-right,  Is he good, is he bad?  Does Victoria love or hate him?  I'm getting confused here.

I think Victoria is finally seeing beyond her personal dislike of Palmerstone and realizing he's an effective politician with whom she shares some opinions.

24 minutes ago, Zella said:

In fact, my impression is she shared Albert's disappointment in and exasperation with Bertie. 

Victoria and Albert despaired over Bertie. They thought he was a hopeless bounder (which he kinda was) who wouldn't amount to anything.

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2 hours ago, Zella said:

The archery game was a rather ingenious way to learn letters. My brother struggled with dyslexia, and learning to read was very hard for him as a result. He would have loved that game!

Speaking as someone who used to teach, I thought Albert's treatment of Bertie was too severe and a rather ineffective way to approach education (drill and kill), but from a 19th century standpoint, it was a pretty standard approach to teaching. I doubt that real-life Victoria would have looked askance at it or accused Albert of bullying her son. In fact, my impression is she shared Albert's disappointment in and exasperation with Bertie. 

I've read a few books on the royal family and both Albert and Victoria were very hard on Bertie.  Victoria blamed Bertie for Albert's death from Typhoid fever.  Albert was visiting Bertie who was misbehaving in college when he fell ill.  I think Bertie was  a very damaged person because of his parents.  I would love for PBS to do a series on Bertie aka Edward VII.  He was quite the character.

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1 hour ago, dubbel zout said:

Victoria and Albert despaired over Bertie. They thought he was a hopeless bounder (which he kinda was) who wouldn't amount to anything.

Victoria and Albert tried very hard to make Bertie into a duplicate of his father. Like the game he was playing with Vicky, every activity he did had to be educational. It's not shocking that when he rebelled, he went the full nine yards with it.

 

14 minutes ago, monakane said:

I would love for PBS to do a series on Bertie aka Edward VII.  He was quite the character.

The trend-setting fashions that came about because of him alone would be great. I would have never guessed he is responsible for the vertical crease in men's trousers (because he had gained so much weight and realized the effect was a bit slimming).

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I am enjoying the Lucy Worsley episodes after Victoria.  Last night was all about fashion - really interesting!

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I really don't like what they're doing with Feodora. It's not only contrived but it's entirely fictional. What exactly is she hoping to achieve, anyway? How does playing Victoria and Albert against one another benefit her in any way? Does she think Albert with divorce Victoria and marry her? Does she think this makes one or both of them more reliant on her? It's just annoying.

Speaking of annoying, Albert was a right royal pain in the ass in this episode. My take on it is that he likes being on the Isle of Wight because he feels more autonomous there and in charge. But clearly Victoria was not happy there and there was really no need for her to be there. It almost felt like she was being held against her will. For Albert to accuse her of needing adoration was petty and childish. He just wanted to stay put and play king of the isle.   

I hope they are not going to continue to follow the lives of Skerrett and Francatelli after they leave the palace. They are only mildly interesting by being associated with the royal family and other servants. Off on their own I would have no interest in them whatsoever. I think the show has severely overestimated the audience's interest in them. 

That said, I did like the scene where Skerrett blurted out to Victoria she was quitting and Victoria's reaction. You could see she was devastated.

The show seems to be trying to tell us Bertie was dyslexic. The way he described the letters "swimming around" is exactly what dyslexics see. Obviously this would have gone undiagnosed in the 19th century but I don't know if there is any historical accuracy for it. I cannot find any online.

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I'm also not sure that Victoria would get too worked up about Francatelli turning in his notice. She doesn't strike me as someone who notices the household staff unless she has direct dealings with them, like she does Skerrett. 

Except that he left once before and she basically ordered him back into service because the new cook was dreadful. Given her appetite (something ignored on this show, admittedly) I can believe she'd be fussy about who is making her meals. Plus she was already in a grumpy mood to begin with.

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47 minutes ago, Kohola3 said:

I am enjoying the Lucy Worsley episodes after Victoria.  Last night was all about fashion - really interesting!

Yeah Mistress of the Wardrobes!  Great indeed, I have them saved on my DVR

Count me in on the love/lust for Lord Palmerston as well.  I think historically by this timeline he is suppose to be much older than he is being portrayed but IDC!  I loves me some eye candy and since we no longer Lord M I need something to drool over.  And speaking of that...

Enh I don't mind Albert's curly locks, yeah by this time his hair was short (but not bald) but I understand why they are keeping it longer, more eye candy.  I think he's rather handsome and somewhere on the PBS website there is an interview with him and he is in regular clothes...MEOW he is a hottie!  And speaking of hotties.........I'm not minding the Francatelli Skerritt story line.  Yeah it's a bit dull but nothing too draining and there is an interview of these 2 characters on PBS in regular clothes as well MEOW!!  The actor that plays Fracatelli is sooo HAWT and the actress of Skerrit is stunning!  I just didn't realize how attractive these people were until you get them out of their work clothes.

Yeah this season has really gone off the rails as far as historical accuracy goes but enh I don't mind.  I love the engaging personalities like Mr. Penge so so what if it's not 100% correct.  I'm still entertained if nothing more than seeing beautiful people prance around in fancy clothes and bring the DRAMA!

Edited by Dirtybubble
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16 minutes ago, iMonrey said:

Except that he left once before and she basically ordered him back into service because the new cook was dreadful. Given her appetite (something ignored on this show, admittedly) I can believe she'd be fussy about who is making her meals. Plus she was already in a grumpy mood to begin with.

Thank you! I forgot about that, so yes, maybe he would have been on her radar more than a normal servant. Maybe that's why he seemed to be working an endless notice--to find time to find a suitable replacement. LOL

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The scene of Skerritt's resignation was really well done. I could feel both their hearts breaking. Nice buildup with the scene in the ocean, where Skerritt says something along the lines of never having been in the water before, and then without hesitation, running in to save Victoria. That was an awesome "bathing suit" by the way.

What I could have done without was the view of a barechested Francatelli lounging in bed after "putting those twenty minutes to good use." I had an immediate flashback to Austin Powers.

austin_powers_l.jpg.093604471e19246ae7b7e2215130086c.jpg

Just me? Ok, then.

I also enjoyed the standoff between Palmerston and Feodora, and the reference to a past affair between the other lady-in-waiting and Palmerston. Ernst and Palmerston in the same room would be epic.

Liking the new footman, unpixellated, very much. Shante, he can stay. Chartists, Evil Feo and Francatelli can sashay away.

Can someone do a gif of Penge drumming? That was one of the highlights! "bitter" is the perfect descriptor for it!

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4 minutes ago, Kaiju Ballet said:

Ernst and Palmerston in the same room would be epic.

I think this is the spin-off series that we all need. . . . 

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16 hours ago, Zella said:

On the plus side, I enjoyed Penge's bitter drumming. 

 

7 minutes ago, Kaiju Ballet said:

Can someone do a gif of Penge drumming? That was one of the highlights! "bitter" is the perfect descriptor for it!

I laughed so much every time they showed him.  His "bitter" drumming was everything.

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16 hours ago, voiceover said:

First of all: ugh.  Freak-o-dora is making Lehzen look like a Hello Kitty doll.  At least her former governess had Victoria's interests at heart.  I expect the Queen's wicked stepsister has only her own agenda to drive.

I don't understand the purpose of Feodora being part of this season.  She serves no purpose, and she's not a particularly convincing villainess if that's what she's supposed to be.

16 hours ago, Zella said:

Palmerston is rapidly becoming my favorite part of this Ernst-less new world.

My first thought about Palmerston is always about how tall he is.

I don't care if it's historically accurate or not.  Victoria and Albert's fight at the table in front of everyone was highly entertaining.

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Laurence Fox is quite entertaining as Lord Palmeston.

This reminded me.  I thought Victoria's exchange with Palmerston when she was giving him four things to do was quite good on Jenna's part.

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I don't see that she'd be distressed about Francatelli, though. 

ETA: I think Victoria suspected that Francatelli and Skerritt were romantically linked.  She didn't think they were married, but upon reading Francatelli's resignation, she likely feared that Skerritt's would soon follow.

Edited by Ohmo
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39 minutes ago, iMonrey said:

I really don't like what they're doing with Feodora. It's not only contrived but it's entirely fictional. What exactly is she hoping to achieve, anyway? How does playing Victoria and Albert against one another benefit her in any way? Does she think Albert with divorce Victoria and marry her? Does she think this makes one or both of them more reliant on her? It's just annoying.

Speaking of annoying, Albert was a right royal pain in the ass in this episode. My take on it is that he likes being on the Isle of Wight because he feels more autonomous there and in charge. But clearly Victoria was not happy there and there was really no need for her to be there. It almost felt like she was being held against her will. For Albert to accuse her of needing adoration was petty and childish. He just wanted to stay put and play king of the isle.   

I hope they are not going to continue to follow the lives of Skerrett and Francatelli after they leave the palace. They are only mildly interesting by being associated with the royal family and other servants. Off on their own I would have no interest in them whatsoever. I think the show has severely overestimated the audience's interest in them. 

That said, I did like the scene where Skerrett blurted out to Victoria she was quitting and Victoria's reaction. You could see she was devastated.

I thought it was written very clearly that Victoria is needing adoration. Actually, I feel like the show is hitting us over the head about it. The way she was basking in the glow of the crowds cheering for her while she sat alone by the window in her room after the return to Buckingham Palace really cements this to me — she almost had a pathological look on her face. Was it clear that Victoria didn’t want to be at Osborne House? Yes, but sometimes you have to do things to make your spouse (or family) happy (like actually going on vacation and spending quality time with them without letting your work interfere) but (as a recurring theme in this show) sometimes it is unclear when Victoria is acting as the Queen or Albert’s wife. Was Albert being petty and childish when he laid that bit of honesty on her in their bedroom at Osborne? Heck, yes. But, on the other side of the coin, she seemed to come across to me as uninterested in her husband and family.

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41 minutes ago, Kaiju Ballet said:

The scene of Skerritt's resignation was really well done. I could feel both their hearts breaking. Nice buildup with the scene in the ocean, where Skerritt says something along the lines of never having been in the water before, and then without hesitation, running in to save Victoria. That was an awesome "bathing suit" by the way.

I was a little shocked at the extent to which Victoria was so mean to Skerrett when she resigned. Not even a “Congratulations” or “While I am devastated to lose you, I am glad you are happy.” Nothing to even acknowledge that Skerett was a person and not just her dresser. I thought is was really cold. 

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10 minutes ago, Nolefan said:

I thought itwas written very clearly that Victoria is needing adoration.

I think that is Albert's perception.  Victoria is the monarch.  She has seen what has happened in France.  She wants to be as inclusive as possible in matters like the Chartists because she doesn't want the British people to turn on her.  The Isle of Wight is too far away.  Albert sees it as needing adoration.  I think Victoria sees it as good strategy as a monarch.

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14 hours ago, magdalene said:

Feodora playing Victoria and Albert against each other - it seems a scheme that will surely end badly.

yeah, she's undermining the monarchy and shell be lucky if she keeps her head if not spending her life in the Tower. I just found it had to believe that Albert actually locked Victoria out.  I'm certain the staff has a spare set of keys and if they had too would've knocked the doors down.

I also agree that this is the least interesting season. I  just have one question: Tommy Knights character should've aged a bit by now right?

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28 minutes ago, Ohmo said:

 

ETA: I think Victoria suspected that Francatelli and Skerritt were romantically linked.  She didn't think they were married, but upon reading Francatelli's resignation, she likely feared that Skerritt's would soon follow.

I don’t think Victoria had a clue and probably did not care to know. The reason Victoria seems to like the servants is that they all focus only on her. This is the main reason she liked Lehzen so much. Lehzen only served her and she did not have to share Lehzen’s affections with anyone else (and while Lehzen’s job was caring for her children, Lehzen was ready to drop the kids to go on trips with Victoria and did not seem that concerned when Vicky almost died). I think one of the reason Victoria hates Osborne so much is the amount of time Albert focuses on their children while there, instead of on her. 

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1 minute ago, madhacker said:

I  just have one question: Tommy Knights character should've aged a bit by now right?

I think they found the Fountain of Youth at Buckingham Palace, and it's a state secret.  That's why nobody in the cast has aged, despite over 10 years elapsing. :) 

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7 minutes ago, Ohmo said:

I think that is Albert's perception.  Victoria is the monarch.  She has seen what has happened in France.  She wants to be as inclusive as possible in matters like the Chartists because she doesn't want the British people to turn on her.  The Isle of Wight is too far away.  Albert sees it as needing adoration.  I think Victoria sees it as good strategy as a monarch.

I agree there is a strategy involved in keeping yourself visible. But, it is a balancing act. It is like being a celebrity. But like a lot of celebrities, too much self promotion while ignoring your family destroys your family. At that point, she better hope her people’s love will fill the hole left in her life when Albert is gone because he is not feeling attended to. 

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I am enjoying the Lucy Worsley episodes after Victoria.  Last night was all about fashion - really interesting!

I hate to say it but it drives me nuts the way she can't seem to pronounces her "r's." She sounds a bit like an upper class Elmer Fudd.

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The scene of Skerritt's resignation was really well done. I could feel both their hearts breaking.

When Skerrett blurted out that she wanted to leave her service and then babbled on about her marriage, the look Victoria got on her face made me go "Uh-oh. She's mad." But then Victoria sat down and put her face down into her hands and you could see her crumbling. That was an unexpected turn and surprising way to end the scene. It was like the straw that broke the camel's back and the last thing she needed to hear when she was already so miserable. 

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What I could have done without was the view of a barechested Francatelli lounging in bed after "putting those twenty minutes to good use." I had an immediate flashback to Austin Powers.

Did it occur to anyone else that the actor might have been wearing fake chest hair? It looked very odd and patchy. Most men shave or manscape their chests these days so sometimes men have to wear fake hair in period pieces. 

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I think that is Albert's perception.  Victoria is the monarch.  She has seen what has happened in France.  She wants to be as inclusive as possible in matters like the Chartists because she doesn't want the British people to turn on her.  The Isle of Wight is too far away.  Albert sees it as needing adoration.  I think Victoria sees it as good strategy as a monarch.

I'm sure Victoria does crave adoration to some extent but Albert is being just as selfish as Victoria in this instance and it doesn't serve anyone's interest except for Albert's to remain at Osbourne House. It's not good for the monarchy and it doesn't really matter much to the children either - they can spend just as much time with their father in London. So even if both parties are motivated by self interest I still say Albert's is the more selfish one. Victoria's is more practical. 

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 she's undermining the monarchy and shell be lucky if she keeps her head if not spending her life in the Tower.

Heh. I realize you're being facetious but they didn't really do that anymore by the 1840s. 

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26 minutes ago, Nolefan said:

I was a little shocked at the extent to which Victoria was so mean to Skerrett when she resigned. Not even a “Congratulations” or “While I am devastated to lose you, I am glad you are happy.” Nothing to even acknowledge that Skerett was a person and not just her dresser. I thought is was really cold. 

I didn't see that scene as Victoria being mean.  I saw her as struggling to speak without breaking into tears.   She didn't say very much, but her face froze, she started to get tears in her eyes, and turned away as soon as she could.  That's when we saw her break down and cry.

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26 minutes ago, Nolefan said:

I was a little shocked at the extent to which Victoria was so mean to Skerrett when she resigned. Not even a “Congratulations” or “While I am devastated to lose you, I am glad you are happy.” Nothing to even acknowledge that Skerett was a person and not just her dresser. I thought is was really cold. 

But that's realistic for the period.  Victoria was not a particularly warm and loving woman except to her hubby (and certainly not in this episode) and the classes simply didn't mix in that way.  Victoria is a queen, Skerrett just a dresser.  They had nothing in common, did not share secrets unless they were overheard and then Skerrett would never presume to talk about them.  People of the lower class were pretty much invisible and easily replaced.  

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16 hours ago, Calvada said:

They are really re-writing history, showing Victoria interceding on Bertie's behalf, questioning Albert's methods of educating and discipling him.  Both she and Albert despaired of Bertie, finding him slow, undisciplined, and nowhere near the perfection (in their eyes) that was his older sister.  I thought Victoria pretty much let Albert call the shots about all aspects of raising their children.  

Other things that came to mind:  Bertie is still up and doing his lessons at whatever time they are eating dinner?  Also, would a servant really strip off on the beach known to be frequented by the Queen?  Would that servant have time off to go swimming on a daily basis?  

Finally,when did Darlene Shiley become Darlene Marcos Shiley in the list of supporters?  Did that happen long ago and I'm only now realizing it?  

Very true, Victoria left most of the child rearing to Albert/Nannies..she didn’t like kids very much.  While a bit of poetic license is ok, I hate the evil half sister storyline, in reality the two hardly saw each other.  Servants definitely did not go swimming when they knew skipping Sunday service meant instant dismissal.  Wait until Penge the grumpy butler catches the hunky footman sneaking out of the Duchess’ bedroom!

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14 minutes ago, iMonrey said:

Heh. I realize you're being facetious but they didn't really do that anymore by the 1840's

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yeah, I know but Victoria could have her deported quietly. Elizabeth I would've had her hanged.

Edited by madhacker
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Of Lucy Worsley:

2 hours ago, iMonrey said:
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I am enjoying the Lucy Worsley episodes after Victoria.  Last night was all about fashion - really interesting!

I hate to say it but it drives me nuts the way she can't seem to pronounces her "r's." She sounds a bit like an upper class Elmer Fudd.

If I didn't enjoy her sly sense of humor and the enthusiasm she brings to all her topics so much, this would likely bother me, too (it's my kind of thing), but I hardly even hear it with Lucy anymore.  Wikipedia says she worked with a speech therapist to try to correct the problem "to no avail".  I find knowing she tried to be endearing!

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2 hours ago, iMonrey said:

I hate to say it but it drives me nuts the way she can't seem to pronounces her "r's." She sounds a bit like an upper class Elmer Fudd.

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I guess I haven't noticed but since I usually have difficulty with accents I always have closed captioning on.

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