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Spartan Girl

"Oh HELL No!" Movie Moments That Anger Up the Blood

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14 hours ago, DollEyes said:

If I were Eliza, when Higgins asked for his slippers, I'd have to thrown them right upside his head, the sexist asshole.

I'd be throwing something heavier than slippers.

I wouldn't hate a movie remake that uses the revival's tweaked ending.  In the meantime, here's a clip from the revival's ending for those that haven't gotten a chance to see it on stage.

Perhaps a warmer goodbye than he actually deserved, but I'd like to think that Eliza decided that being a lady meant being a bigger person and she wanted a more amicable farewell on her terms.

Edited by Spartan Girl
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I had always heard that GBS’s will or estate or someone in charge thought they had protected the Pygmalion ending with a clause forbidding new dialogue to be used, which is why the musical’s last scene uses phrases already used earlier in the story.

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Queen and Slim had plenty of upsetting moments, but the one that made me furious was Junior shooting the SWAT officer in the face for no reason other than he just hated cops and wanted to feel like a big man. Queen and Slim killed that other cop in self defense, but Junior had no such excuse. It was such a stupid waste of two lives, it devastated his poor father, and maybe even contributed to

the cops gunning down Queen and Slim even though they were unarmed at the end.

.

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6 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

Queen and Slim had plenty of upsetting moments, but the one that made me furious was Junior shooting the SWAT officer in the face for no reason other than he just hated cops and wanted to feel like a big man. Queen and Slim killed that other cop in self defense, but Junior had no such excuse. It was such a stupid waste of two lives, it devastated his poor father, and maybe even contributed to

  Reveal spoiler

the cops gunning down Queen and Slim even though they were unarmed at the end.

.

Yeah, that whole movie lost me from about minute six.

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The whole dinner scene in Knives Out when the family drags Marta into their "political" (i.e. racist) discussion, using her as an example of a "good" immigrant. And then promptly handing their plates for her to ctake away. Just...fuck you.

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I was flipping through the stations last night and came across Twister, a guilty pleasure of mine.  It reminded me that, as much as I couldn't stand Melissa (with one or two exceptions) Bill was a horrible fiance.  Here Melissa was trying to deal with a frightening situation that's she's completely unfamiliar with and not prepared for and trying to keep up with a bunch of rough and tumbled adrenaline junkies whom she just met and what does he do?  He sticks her in the car with probably the most obnoxious one of the bunch while he get rides along with his soon to be ex-wife in a situation that Melissa simply can't cope with (her break up comment was one of the few moments when I agreed with her).  I don't know if I'd have stayed with him either.

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1 hour ago, Shannon L. said:

I was flipping through the stations last night and came across Twister, a guilty pleasure of mine.  It reminded me that, as much as I couldn't stand Melissa (with one or two exceptions) Bill was a horrible fiance.  Here Melissa was trying to deal with a frightening situation that's she's completely unfamiliar with and not prepared for and trying to keep up with a bunch of rough and tumbled adrenaline junkies whom she just met and what does he do?  He sticks her in the car with probably the most obnoxious one of the bunch while he get rides along with his soon to be ex-wife in a situation that Melissa simply can't cope with (her break up comment was one of the few moments when I agreed with her).  I don't know if I'd have stayed with him either.

That whole movie is an Oh HELL No!

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21 hours ago, Shannon L. said:

I was flipping through the stations last night and came across Twister, a guilty pleasure of mine.  It reminded me that, as much as I couldn't stand Melissa (with one or two exceptions) Bill was a horrible fiance.  Here Melissa was trying to deal with a frightening situation that's she's completely unfamiliar with and not prepared for and trying to keep up with a bunch of rough and tumbled adrenaline junkies whom she just met and what does he do?  He sticks her in the car with probably the most obnoxious one of the bunch while he get rides along with his soon to be ex-wife in a situation that Melissa simply can't cope with (her break up comment was one of the few moments when I agreed with her).  I don't know if I'd have stayed with him either.

I LOVE Twister – such a guilty pleasure – and I agree with everything you wrote.  Jami Gertz is so bad in it, Bill is such a dickhead, the plot is ridiculous, but I love it so much!  The special effects were incredible, Helen Hunt was at peak awesomeness, the supporting gang of adrenaline junkies (minus Jeremy Davies, whose character never made sense) was great, Lois Smith and her beef were absolute gold – ugh, I may need to track that one down during my plentiful downtime at home.

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The entire existence of the movie Wired is one giant HN moment for me. I couldn't begin to find the words to adaquately explain why, so I'll let The Cinema Snob do it for me:

 

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I'm not exactly sure if it makes my blood boil, but my husband and I are currently and randomly watching a movie called The Games Maker featuring a not-very-likeable main character named Ivan Drago.

No, it's not some Rocky spin-off. This Ivan Drago is a kid and he surely won't grow up to be an overly aggressive boxer.

I guess it's not a copywrtten name, but could the writers have chosen something a little less recognizable? It makes it hard to get into this movie...

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I "had" to watch Bad Mom's and I was... not a fan. I especially hated how the reactions to the character of Gwendolyn. The PTA at a middle school would not have any influence in hiring or firing people, deciding which kids played in the soccer game, etc. "At least" the staff members were sort of... half-hearted, but it was still absurd.

What can be expected from a movie where a PTA election is treated like an actual election?  Even the average PTA member could probably not care less who the president is.

I don't care if Amy was not taking it as seriously as some (I'm surprised she didn't promise better cafeteria food.)  It wasn't written well enough to come off as satire.

If I was supposed to love Amy and think she was some breath of fresh air, I did not. Her daughter calling her selfish was one of the few moments I enjoyed. Nearly every character was selfish, including the ones who "weren't supposed to be," like Kiki. It's pathetic for a husband to ask a wife to come back home because he can't handle his crying kids. It's worse for the wife to (obnoxiously) refuse without even looking further into the situation because she's going to accompany her friend (who she'd been spending a lot of time with, meaning her stupid husband must have been taking care of the kids) to the PTA election. Did any of her kids even go to that school? What if there actually had been something wrong with the kids at home?

 

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I now get why William Goldman hated Saving Private Ryan because Captain Miller shouldn't have let Ryan talk him into not taking him back and he shouldn't have told him "Earn this" before he died. Jeez Captain, Ryan already would have had survivors guilt with his brothers dead he didn't need you adding to it! You're the one who made the decision for your unit to stay!

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Father of the Bride: The wife and daughter of the title character up the wedding into a virtual royal deal so that by the time the whole thing's over, they've got debts bigger than some nations- yet why is the title character supposed to be the spoilsport with the audience expected to root against merely because he objects to but doesn't stop this opulent waste from going down  even though he's the one who actually COULD?

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When Bestie 1 got married she and her husband chose right after Christmas because they assumed that most venues would already be decorated for the holiday and would save money. They were correct. Now they paid for the wedding themselves so they had to be far more careful with finances than Annie chose to be but it still worked out great. They found all sorts of ways to save money (the judge who married them was a longtime friend and colleague of her dad's and she waived her fee as their wedding present, they had their favorite barbecue place in town do the catering so the food was yummy and affordable, another colleague agreed to do the music with his fee being a plate of food, we got our dresses at David's Bridal, the tuxes were all rented, etc) and none of it prevented us from having a great time.

46 minutes ago, Blergh said:

The wife and daughter of the title character up the wedding into a virtual royal deal

Given how much money was spent on this thing it would have made more sense if Brian had been a lesser royal. Annie and Nina were acting like everything that George was objecting to were normal parts of the average wedding and they weren't! Ok, fine, Annie doesn't want to have the reception at The Steak Pit but surely they could have done the catering rather than Franck's fancy chef friend? They didn't actually say that Annie had a fancy designer dress but it was implied in the montage so why didn't she go to a place like David's Bridal to save money? Annie had a long time interest in art yet she apparently had no friends or acquaintances with a talent in photography who could take the pictures? There wasn't a single bakery in town who could provide a more affordable cake that was just as impressive as the one Franck showed them? And they chose the cake based on a picture with no indication of a taste test! All I can think is that their contract with Franck stipulated that the client cannot sub in alternatives to his crazy expensive vendors even if it would prevent bankruptcy.

This movie is infuriating yet I can still get sucked in if it shows up as an option so it's a never ending cycle.

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The other ridiculous thing about Father of the Bride is that the Banks live in San Marino, one of the very wealthiest zip codes in the country.  In reality, Annie's stupid wedding shouldn't have been this unbelievable financial burden to begin with.

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2 hours ago, NUguy514 said:

The other ridiculous thing about Father of the Bride is that the Banks live in San Marino, one of the very wealthiest zip codes in the country.  In reality, Annie's stupid wedding shouldn't have been this unbelievable financial burden to begin with.

I hated how much they wanted to spend on the wedding and understood George's angst, but I had mixed feelings about all of it.  On one hand, I agree:  San Marino is a very wealthy neighborhood and George owned a successful business.  Nina also pointed out that they didn't take fancy vacations or buy her expensive jewelry (and there was a 3rd thing, but I forget what it was), so yes, they would have been able to afford it.  However, on the other hand, you don't get and keep that kind of wealth by spending a ton of money on things like a huge, ridiculously expensive weddings.  They probably didn't have expensive jewelry or take fancy vacations so that they could pay for their kids' college outright and not take out loans and so that they could stay on that nice street, in that night neighborhood, with good schools, etc.  So, I get what you're saying, but I also don't think it was out of line for him to want them to scale it down a little. 

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1 hour ago, Shannon L. said:

Nina also pointed out that they didn't take fancy vacations or buy her expensive jewelry (and there was a 3rd thing, but I forget what it was),

I think it was not going to Europe, expensive jewelry, or driving fancy cars.

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8 hours ago, Blergh said:

Father of the Bride: The wife and daughter of the title character up the wedding into a virtual royal deal so that by the time the whole thing's over, they've got debts bigger than some nations- yet why is the title character supposed to be the spoilsport with the audience expected to root against merely because he objects to but doesn't stop this opulent waste from going down  even though he's the one who actually COULD?

I was just thinking about this movie! What pissed me off is the damn wedding planner. How did this guy not think about the logistics for having a reception in someone's backyard? The father was paying a shit ton of money, so it was up to the wedding planner to either see if it was legal to have a 100+ people park around the neighborhood or talk the family out of having the wedding in the backyard and in a hall that accommodates for that. Because of him, George didn't even get to eat or even interact with his daughter (let alone the father/daughter dance) during the reception.

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On 8/24/2020 at 4:43 PM, Ambrosefolly said:

I was just thinking about this movie! What pissed me off is the damn wedding planner. How did this guy not think about the logistics for having a reception in someone's backyard? The father was paying a shit ton of money, so it was up to the wedding planner to either see if it was legal to have a 100+ people park around the neighborhood or talk the family out of having the wedding in the backyard and in a hall that accommodates for that. Because of him, George didn't even get to eat or even interact with his daughter (let alone the father/daughter dance) during the reception.

I hate that after everything we don't get to see George get to enjoy any of the reception. He never got to talk to Annie, and no father/daughter dance. 

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On 8/23/2020 at 10:38 AM, die Frau said:

What can be expected from a movie where a PTA election is treated like an actual election?  Even the average PTA member could probably not care less who the president is.

I don't care if Amy was not taking it as seriously as some (I'm surprised she didn't promise better cafeteria food.)  It wasn't written well enough to come off as satire.

I think the PTA being a knock down/drag out event is a "mostly in fiction but not in real life" thing.  I'm sure there are some people who treat it as the end all but growing up I don't even think there was a PTA at my school.  I have friends who are teachers and friends with school aged kids and I never even hear them talk about it.  I'm sure it's big in some places but it seems more to be a device to create drama for suburban moms in movies and on TV these days.

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I was watching Double Jeopardy last night.  The movie is about 21 years old and I myself probably hadn't seen it in over 15 years.  It's not perfect by any means but it's still incredibly watchable and man, Ashely Judd was a star.  I had a difficult time enjoying the movie after a while because I couldn't shake the thought of what he who shall not be named did to her both personally and professionally.  It just made me so sad.

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An “oh hell no moment” from me is in A Few Good Men.  Demi Moore has screwed up the case almost beyond repair.  She has goaded and lectured Danny throughout to get him to trial.  Fine, but every setback during the trial has been because of her.  Now their only shot left risks a court martial for Danny . . . not her, just Danny.  Danny says (actually screams) no and she makes a biting comment calling him a coward.  I wasn’t wild about her character, but in that moment I hate her outright.  I hate that he apologizes to her and she gets to “win” because his friend is really the one who changes Danny’s mind, not her.

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I still get angry when Shang and the army abandon Mulan in the mountains.

And yes, now that I'm older I do understand that Shang was in a tough position: whatever he felt about being deceived, he didn't want to execute Mulan, but if they took her back to the imperial city with them, he wouldn't have a choice. Leaving Mulan behind was giving her a chance to get away, so it was of those "cruel to be kind" moments.

But that doesn't change the fact that they left her half naked in the snow still recovering from her injury. Leaving her horse and clothing with her doesn't make it any less shitty, and you could tell Shang was feeling seriously guilty about it before Mulan caught up with them in the city to warn them about the Huns.

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On 8/23/2020 at 4:54 PM, VCRTracking said:

I now get why William Goldman hated Saving Private Ryan because Captain Miller shouldn't have let Ryan talk him into not taking him back and he shouldn't have told him "Earn this" before he died. Jeez Captain, Ryan already would have had survivors guilt with his brothers dead he didn't need you adding to it! You're the one who made the decision for your unit to stay!

War movies often like to play things fast and loose with military discipline, but I'm sure that if a captain tells a private "you're coming with me, I have orders to take you off the line" then the private doesn't get to refuse just because "I want to stay with my buddies."

I think the final line from Hanks would have been much better coming from Ed Burns' character, who had just seen his whole unit killed to save Ryan (a guy he wasn't interested in saving in the first place). Hell, you can write a different version of this from that character's point of view, where Captain Miller is a tyrant whose Ahab-like obsession with saving Ryan leads to the deaths of all his men and the rescue of a guy who shows no gratitude or understanding of the lengths they went to to get to him.

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7 hours ago, Danny Franks said:

War movies often like to play things fast and loose with military discipline, but I'm sure that if a captain tells a private "you're coming with me, I have orders to take you off the line" then the private doesn't get to refuse just because "I want to stay with my buddies."

I think the final line from Hanks would have been much better coming from Ed Burns' character, who had just seen his whole unit killed to save Ryan (a guy he wasn't interested in saving in the first place). Hell, you can write a different version of this from that character's point of view, where Captain Miller is a tyrant whose Ahab-like obsession with saving Ryan leads to the deaths of all his men and the rescue of a guy who shows no gratitude or understanding of the lengths they went to to get to him.

That would certainly have been a more interesting take.  Really, after the first twenty minutes, Saving Private Ryan is such an incredibly derivative film filled not with characters, but with caricatures.

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2 hours ago, NUguy514 said:

That would certainly have been a more interesting take.  Really, after the first twenty minutes, Saving Private Ryan is such an incredibly derivative film filled not with characters, but with caricatures.

Thank you! I always wondered what people liked about this movie. I was mostly bored and annoyed throughout.

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17 minutes ago, supposebly said:

Thank you! I always wondered what people liked about this movie. I was mostly bored and annoyed throughout.

All the talk was about the 25 minutes showing the amphibious attack on Omaha Beach

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1 hour ago, supposebly said:

Thank you! I always wondered what people liked about this movie. I was mostly bored and annoyed throughout.

I liked a lot of the performances - Ed Burns, Giovanni Ribisi, Barry Pepper, Tom Hanks himself - and the effects and cinematography.

The actual story is rather daft, once they make it off Omaha Beach.

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Which is why the cry that Shakespeare in Love robbed Saving Private Ryan of the best picture Oscar still baffles me.  SIL was clever and novel.  SPR, not so much.

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23 minutes ago, Crs97 said:

Which is why the cry that Shakespeare in Love robbed Saving Private Ryan of the best picture Oscar still baffles me.  SIL was clever and novel.  SPR, not so much.

The only major downside is who it gave an Oscar to.

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Another moment from School Ties that infuriates me, involving Anthony Rapp as Magoo, probably the most despicable character he's played other than Mark from Rent. Anyway, Magoo is the most antisemitic of out of all the boys (which says a lot) and once David is outed for being Jewish, he's so awful to him that its impossible to believe that they were ever friends. Anyway, towards the end of the movie Chris O'Donnell's character flat-out calls Magoo a bigot, and the jaw-dropping response?

"I resent that!"

Are you fucking kidding me?! At least some of the other boys, pieces of shit that they were, OWNED UP to being bigots. But this chinless little pissant spent the better part of the movie tormenting his former friend and spewing out prejudiced garbage and being a shameless bigot in, but he doesn't like being called a bigot?! Ughhhhhhhhhhh.

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“Call me by your name”; the so called touching father/son  scene near the end where Elio’s father lets him know he was aware of  the sexual relationship  going on between  his son and the older graduate student Oliver.

What set me off was that the father almost seemed to be living vicariously through his son’s affair, talking about how he never had the courage to do something similar in his youth and had regrets.  So sending the guys  off alone  earlier in the films;  It almost seemed to me his pimped out his son.   I know we are supposed to think  that the Professor was this ideal  understanding father but it just gave me the creeps.   Then claiming his wife/Elio’s mother had no idea what was going on.

Imagine the Professor doing the same thing to his precocious 17 year old daughter with an older graduate student.

It doesn’t help at all that Timothy  Chalamet looked all of  13/14 and Armie Hammer looked in his 30’s.

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"Crazy, Stupid, Love": The young son somehow being encouraged to stalk and harass that girl he is in love with. The parents' relationship is obviously messy and complicated beyond something that can be applied to a young teenager's experience, so stop trying to draw parallels, movie. And at the end his parents and the stalked girl act as if his behaviour is adorable. No! Stop that! He needs to learn boundaries!

"The Devil Wears Prada": An oldie but goodie: Andie's so-called friends and boyfriend. Why is it okay for them to have demanding careers (her boyfriend is a cook and also never home!) but she must be shamed for her demanding job and being ambitious. It's also established that she wants to do it for a year and then branch out, so why be so nasty to her? If she loses herself in that job indefinitely, that's the point where constructive criticism is warranted. But she was just starting out and they were unsupportive jerks.

"Marriage Story": That scene at the end where Nora says that she got 5 useless percent more of custody against Nicole's wishes. The quiet horror of that moment really hit me hard. Such self-serving and predatory behaviour. I mean, Charlie can deal, he's aware that she's opposing counsel and that she doesn't have his best interests at heart, obviously. Divorce is hard and once he stops deluding himself that it will change nothing, he has a clear view and it's sad but so is life often. But the way Nora takes Nicole at her most vulnerable and hurt and gets her a drawn-out, antagonistic, dehumanizing divorce that lines her pockets with Nicole's money and then acts as if that is a "win" for Nicole. And then at the end robbing Nicole of her agency, disrespecting her decisions and once again reducing her to passive bystander in her own life. Those five percent are probably also cosmetics to distract from the fact that a different, less antagonistic, less traumatizing strategy might have yielded the same results much quicker and cheaper. That look of dawning shock and recoginition on Nicole's face is some of Johansson's best acting ever IMO.

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6 hours ago, katha said:

"The Devil Wears Prada": An oldie but goodie: Andie's so-called friends and boyfriend. Why is it okay for them to have demanding careers (her boyfriend is a cook and also never home!) but she must be shamed for her demanding job and being ambitious. It's also established that she wants to do it for a year and then branch out, so why be so nasty to her? If she loses herself in that job indefinitely, that's the point where constructive criticism is warranted. But she was just starting out and they were unsupportive jerks.

 

The real villains of The Devil Wears Prada have always been Andie's friends.  Like you said, this was a temporary position for Andie and was a way for her to bypass 3-5 years of grunt work at another job (the book makes this fact clearer).  And then, none of her friends had the moral high ground in respect to their chosen professions.  Nate is a chef who would also be pulling 70 hour work weeks, her female friend worked in an art gallery and lord knows the hijinks that go down in the art world, and the other male friend worked on Wall Street.  I will never understand why someone thought those fields were better than a fashion magazine.  And yet, they were all so eager to get the free stuff Andie got through her job.  

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On 9/17/2020 at 7:20 AM, katha said:

"Crazy, Stupid, Love": The young son somehow being encouraged to stalk and harass that girl he is in love with. The parents' relationship is obviously messy and complicated beyond something that can be applied to a young teenager's experience, so stop trying to draw parallels, movie. And at the end his parents and the stalked girl act as if his behaviour is adorable. No! Stop that! He needs to learn boundaries!

That's such a wrong, jarring beat for the movie. I don't mind the kid having a crush on his babysitter, just like I don't mind the babysitter having a crush on the dad. Not that unusual in either case. And in the latter, it's presented as unrealistic and inappropriate and something that Steve Carell's character is mortified by when he finally realises.

But she gives the kid nude pictures of herself at the end! That's not just inappropriate, it's illegal. But it's meant to be charming and a reward for him "not giving up" despite her making it clear she wasn't interested and it's so gross.

That kid is going to grow into such a toxic, entitled nightmare of a man, thanks to the fawning treatment he gets from everyone in his life, not least his dad who encourages all his worst behaviour because it's "noble" to persevere.

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5 hours ago, Danny Franks said:

That's such a wrong, jarring beat for the movie. I don't mind the kid having a crush on his babysitter, just like I don't mind the babysitter having a crush on the dad. Not that unusual in either case. And in the latter, it's presented as unrealistic and inappropriate and something that Steve Carell's character is mortified by when he finally realises.

But she gives the kid nude pictures of herself at the end! That's not just inappropriate, it's illegal. But it's meant to be charming and a reward for him "not giving up" despite her making it clear she wasn't interested and it's so gross.

That kid is going to grow into such a toxic, entitled nightmare of a man, thanks to the fawning treatment he gets from everyone in his life, not least his dad who encourages all his worst behaviour because it's "noble" to persevere.

Even worse was the way the stupid kid treated his dad for "stealing" the babysitter from him, when that wasn't at all what happened. It would have been nice if instead of stalking a girl and nagging Steve Carrell to "get his mother back", he would have gotten mad at the mother, since she was the one WHO CHEATED and broke up their family.  That bratty behavior would have been more realistic and justifiable, not to mention better writing in general.

Edited by Spartan Girl
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See, I thought the parents' situation was ugly and messy but kinda interesting. He had obviously stopped putting in the effort to work on his marriage and left her emotionally alone in certain ways. Instead of communicating that, she lashes out and has an affair. Certainly ugly and destructive behavior, but also something they might have worked on with a therapist. Instead, he goes on a destructive revenge spree as well and the movie then pretends that giving a melodramatic speech at their kid's school event (WTH???) makes everything magically fine again.

I think the Gosling/Stone storyline is nice and the Carrell/Moore plot has potential and is well acted, but the movie is certainly strange in its resolution.

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1 hour ago, katha said:

See, I thought the parents' situation was ugly and messy but kinda interesting. He had obviously stopped putting in the effort to work on his marriage and left her emotionally alone in certain ways. Instead of communicating that, she lashes out and has an affair. Certainly ugly and destructive behavior, but also something they might have worked on with a therapist. Instead, he goes on a destructive revenge spree as well and the movie then pretends that giving a melodramatic speech at their kid's school event (WTH???) makes everything magically fine again.

I think the Gosling/Stone storyline is nice and the Carrell/Moore plot has potential and is well acted, but the movie is certainly strange in its resolution.

I really thought the storyline was going to be him getting over his wife and moving on - probably with Marisa Tomei's character. The weird, left turn it took was jarring. It felt like a story where a different writer stepped in and liked Moore's character so much they changed the plot on the fly.

'She's not a callous cheater who coldly dumped her husband, she's a sympathetic figure who committed a minor faux pas that her husband really needs to get over.'

I still really like the movie, especially the Gosling/Stone storyline, and the farcical climax where all secrets are revealed is so much fun that I just grin all the way through it.

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5 minutes ago, Danny Franks said:

really thought the storyline was going to be him getting over his wife and moving on - probably with Marisa Tomei's character. The weird, left turn it took was jarring. It felt like a story where a different writer stepped in and liked Moore's character so much they changed the plot on the fly.

'She's not a callous cheater who coldly dumped her husband, she's a sympathetic figure who committed a minor faux pas that her husband really needs to get over.'

Yeah I call bullshit on all that. She didn't just cheat, she wanted to skip right to a divorce. No counseling no apologies or anything in between. And she callously dropped that bombshell and blathered in about the affair when he was obviously shocked and hurt and had the nerve to jump out of the car when she wouldn't stop yammering about it? You can miss me with the "he stopped trying" shit.

Yeah, it might have been wrong for him to go on the revenge sex spree. But again: SHE WAS THE ONE WHO WANTED THE DIVORCE. He was SINGLE, he had moved out, and ergo he was free to do whatever he wanted. She had no right to play the victim.

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11 minutes ago, Spartan Girl said:

Yeah I call bullshit on all that. She didn't just cheat, she wanted to skip right to a divorce. No counseling no apologies or anything in between. And she callously dropped that bombshell and blathered in about the affair when he was obviously shocked and hurt and had the nerve to jump out of the car when she wouldn't stop yammering about it? You can miss me with the "he stopped trying" shit.

Yeah, it might have been wrong for him to go on the revenge sex spree. But again: SHE WAS THE ONE WHO WANTED THE DIVORCE. He was SINGLE, he had moved out, and ergo he was free to do whatever he wanted. She had no right to play the victim.

I don't think it was wrong at all for him to go and have sex with all those women. He was trying to move on, even if it wasn't in the healthiest way, as his wife had made it clear she was doing.

The scene where he blurts out that he's slept with X amount of women and she looks hurt and says, "well, you sure showed me" is so annoying. He wasn't doing any of that to prove anything to her, or to hurt her, he was doing it to prove something to himself. But she's made to look like she has a right to be upset.

I get it, relationships are messy and unfair and people don't always behave rationally, but it still feels off.

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Ella Enchanted is a cute, if very flawed movie, and one its biggest flaws is just before the climax (and possibly the central theme).

Premise: Our heroine Ella was given the "gift" of obedience as a baby by her awful fairy godmother Lucinda, which means Ella has to do everything she's told (and, yeah, it's as comical, but also as horrible, as it sounds). Ella finally gets fed up with the spell (it took her long enough, but okay), goes on a quest to find Lucinda to take back the spell, and on the way Ella falls in love with Prince Charmont, whose evil Uncle Scar- er, I mean, Edgar, is plotting to kill him to take the throne. Edgar gets wind of Ella's obedience curse, and orders her to assassinate Prince Charmont. Ella has her friend Slannen tie her to a tree to prevent it from happening. Lucinda happens to appear, Ella tells her of her dilemma and begs her to take the spell back. Lucinda's response? 

"Get rid of [the spell] yourself! Don't blame me for your problems!"

Um, the fuck?!

Look, I appreciate stories that teach personal responsibility and not playing the victim, because it's important to learn in order to survive adulthood. HOWEVER, that doesn't apply here, because Ella is the victim, the spell is most certainly not her fault, and Lucinda is absolutely responsible for Ella's predicament! And it's framed as Ella just needing to grow up or some such crap, even though, again, this is not her fault! We even see how she's struggled her whole life to maintain her identity and values, even though the spell often wreaks havoc in her life and relationships!

And, yeah, Ella is able to break her own spell, so good for her, but teaching kids that everything is their fault is just as bad as teaching them that nothing is their fault!

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On 10/1/2020 at 9:05 AM, Wiendish Fitch said:

I appreciate stories that teach personal responsibility and not playing the victim, because it's important to learn in order to survive adulthood. HOWEVER, that doesn't apply here, because Ella is the victim, the spell is most certainly not her fault, and Lucinda is absolutely responsible for Ella's predicament!

THIS!

I saw the film and like you, I appreciate the message of trying to make one's own decisions and take personal responsibility.  However, the magic was stronger than Ella until she fell in love with the prince and was able to THEN overcome it.  All it did was make her a virtual slave of her family (and everyone else) until that point.  One could argue she could have left home but she still would have been affected by the "gift" of obedience.

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17 minutes ago, magicdog said:

THIS!

I saw the film and like you, I appreciate the message of trying to make one's own decisions and take personal responsibility.  However, the magic was stronger than Ella until she fell in love with the prince and was able to THEN overcome it.  All it did was make her a virtual slave of her family (and everyone else) until that point.  One could argue she could have left home but she still would have been affected by the "gift" of obedience.

The kicker is, Ella DID take responsibility! She had the gumption and agency to finally say "screw this, I'm going to go to Lucinda and demand she take back the spell"! If Ella had just sat on her ass for the rest of the movie and whined about her lot in life, then, yes, maybe Lucinda would have a point (mind you, I said "maybe") and the theme would have some validity. 

It also pisses me off that Ella's mom's dying order to her was to never tell anyone about the spell. That's... really, really stupid, for the following reasons:

1. Anyone with 2 brain cells to bang together can figure out that Ella is unable to resist any order. And, guess what?! That's exactly what happens with Ella's evil stepsisters!

2. If you were under a spell that caused you to obey every order, would you go around telling everyone? Of course not! Survival instinct and good ol' common sense would naturally prevent you from doing so!

3. Giving your obedience-cursed daughter an order on your deathbed is just automatically crappy.

4. By making Ella unable to tell anyone, you're taking away her ability to, oh, I dunno, go to a friendly witch or wizard who might be able to help her remove the spell!

 

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Basically everything that happens in School Ties after Brendan Fraser's character is outed as Jewish.  God, everyone was horrible and needed their asses kicked!  And Sally?  Fuck her!

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5 hours ago, GHScorpiosRule said:

Every SINGLE thing that Judge Hoffman in The Trial of the Chicago 7 said and did. Everything. I'd  break this board if I listed them.

Yup, not to mention all the shit the cops pulled to entrap them, especially sending in that agent to pose as a protestor to seduce her way into the group. And of course the police brutality.

Edited by Spartan Girl
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I love Crazy Rich Asians, but the opening scene bugs the crap out of me for one reason: even before they knew what racist assholes worked at the hotel, they allowed the kids to spread mud all over the floor of that fancy, expensive hotel. Judging from later scenes, they didn't seem like the type of family who would allow their kids to behave in such a manner. 

Edited by Shannon L.
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So many things in Promising Young Woman made me angry. This is gonna be a long post, so please bear with me:

First and most obviously that it was easy for Cassie to find so many douchebags that were willing to take advantage of a drunk girl under the guise of “rescuing” her. Even knowing how the opening was going to turn out, I saw red when Adam Brody took her back to his place and plied her with another drink when was pretty fucking obvious that the LAST thing a girl that can barely stand needs is another fucking drink.

But I was really mad at Cassie when she got her former friend drunk and paid a guy to stay with her so that the friend would think something happened. That was really fucked up, and the one time I think she went too far. Because what if the guy she paid off decided to try something anyway?! Cassie herself made it clear she didn’t trust men, what made her think she could make sure nothing would happen?! And even though her intention was only to scare her and make her understand how Nina felt...did she really deserve it? Yeah, letting the dean think her daughter was assaulted was messed up and crossed a line too (even though again the daughter was unharmed), but the dean was at least complicit in protecting Nina’s rapist. All the friend did was just not believe her. Which makes her a shitty friend, sure, but nowhere near as culpable as the others. So yeah, I was definitely on her side when she told Cassie “Never fucking contact me again.”

Also the rape tape, which we don’t actually see, but hearing it was awful enough.

The fact that Ryan did nothing but laugh and watch and tries to defend himself by saying he didn’t do anything wrong made me angry. No, Ryan, you did NOTHING. There’s a difference. And even though in hindsight it was obvious Ryan was exactly the kind of Nice Guy Cassie was leery of, it still made me gasp in outrage when he dropped the act and called her a fucking failure.

And then there was that ending.

Maybe it wouldn’t have been so bad if the murder hadn’t been so excruciatingly long and drawn out, if the guy had just whacked her over the head with the lamp. But forcing us to watch her struggle and hear her suffocated crying and screaming while her murderer sniveled like a bitch, and then to watch him and his friend BURN HER BODY, and Ryan completely cover for those assholes to save his own ass...there are no words. Yes, Cassie made sure he went down for her murder and her posthumous fuck-you texts to Ryan were awesome...but 

you can’t enjoy revenge when you’re dead. It hardly seems worth it to enjoy Cassie’s revenge when you think about Gail, her parents, and even Nina’s mom and how it would affect them when they only wanted the best for her. Especially her poor dad, when he expressed to Cassie how much he missed the way she used to be.

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