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Indispensable Kitchen Gadgets

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JTMacc99, if you have room in your freezer just stick the cylinder in there indefinitely even if you have no plans to use it anytime soon.  You can even put smaller containers inside of it to save space.  That way, you're ready to go whenever the spirit moves you.

 

I also let my custard sit in the fridge overnight to ripen.  I don't know if it makes a difference in flavor but it's my habit.

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Thank you.  Yes, the cylinder will have a permanent home in the freezer.  I was thinking about putting it in a big ziplock bag to keep it from picking up any freezer stink. 

 

The issue was that I didn't actually have the unit in my hands for anywhere near 24 hours when we HAD to give it a try.  I'm big on new stuff and love change, and I have passed along that enthusiasm to my children.  It was my fault for taking out the recipe booklet and talking about all of the things we could make with the new machine.  "We have to wait until tomorrow" was falling on deaf ears.

 

 

 

I also let my custard sit in the fridge overnight to ripen.  I don't know if it makes a difference in flavor but it's my habit.

The directions told me that after whisking everything together (It was 4c of whole milk yogurt drained for a couple hours in cheesecloth, milk, sugar, cocoa powder, a little vanilla and a pinch of salt) to let it sit for 2-4 hours or overnight.  This was an instruction I didn't understand.

 

I assumed it was to make sure the stuff was nice and cold. I wasn't sure if there were any other benefits.

Edited by JTMacc99

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Use a vegetable peeler and an egg slicer to make nice uniform slices of kiwi. Cut off both ends, peel and then slice with egg slicer.

My Mom has an ancient egg slicer that is seriously heavy duty(probably 70s vintage) but I've tweaked the wires on a few newer ones. Not an issue if the kiwi is fairly soft, but my son prefers them a bit more firm and that's when I've had troubles.

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My nephew bought me this cherry pitter a few years ago as a gift (probably out of desperation as to what you get your Auntie for her birthday).  It seemed rather silly to me because while I love fresh cherries, I never cook with them so...When cherries came back into season I ran across it in that kitchen cabinet that holds all the stuff you seldom or never use, so I gave it a try. 

 

First, I thought it worked very well - pitted the cherries with minimal waste.  Advisory:  Access to pitted cherries may result in you consuming a rather large bowl without realizing.

 

Second, I discovered I could easily half the pitted cherries and throw them in Greek yogurt.  It is so so tasty!  I tried it in ice cream but discovered the cold starts to freeze the natural liquid in the cherries and gives them a texture that I don't care for.

 

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I'm Kitchenaid Mixer's bitch. I love it. I didn't even want it. My mom sent it to me via my dad the last time I moved. Now I can't imagine my life without it. My mother's tip would be to see about finding one 2nd hand. I know mine was significantly less than the true charge. I painted my kitchen cobalt blue to match it when I moved into my house. Now I want the ice cream attachment. 

 

 

Edited by latetotheparty

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I recently bought a danish dough whisk. I really like it. I make a lot of no knead bread, but I haven't used it for that yet. I have used it for hot cross buns and muffins, and it is just a great tool. It mixes quickly and cleans up easily as well. Saves me have to wash my hands and a wooden spatula. Recommended if you bake a lot of bread or quick breads.

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You'll love it! Mine sat fairly dormant for over a year because I had a medical problem that affected my mobility, but last holiday season, I broke that thing out with a vengeance and haven't looked back.

 

I think that the first thing I made was Ina Garten's honey vanilla pound cake. Many of us on the "Barefoot Contessa" forum have struggled with the recipe and as it turned out, the mixer isn't the issue. ???? But I've made tons of things new and old that have turned out just great.

 

My tip is to use a smaller bowl, if possible, for adding dry ingredients. If I had a wish, it would be for the mixer head to tilt back a little further. I find it sometimes awkward to try to gradually add dry ingredients (especially if the mixer is running) from a large bowl. It also may be in part to where I have the mixer placed on my counter. I don't have a whole lot of room.

 

Have fun!

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So I just bought a 6quart KitchenAid mixer today.  I'm so excited!  But overwhelmed.  Tips/ideas?   First thing to make?

I can't tell you the first thing to make, but weirdly one of my favorite uses for it is to shred chicken when I am making something like enchiladas.  I boil the chicken breasts to cook through and then toss in with the paddle attachment. It perfectly shreds the chicken for taquitos, enchiladas, tacos, chicken salad etc. And I don't burn my hands. 

 

I got the ice cream attachment for my birthday! Made my first ice cream this weekend. So delicious. And, as suggested above, the bowl now has a place in my freezer. 

 

Use a vegetable peeler and an egg slicer to make nice uniform slices of kiwi. Cut off both ends, peel and then slice with egg slicer.

 

I use the egg slicer to slice strawberries nice and evenly. I do have the same issue you do, sometimes I can twing the threads depending on the strawberry, but it makes it so much easier when making something like strawberry shortcake. 

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I also love my Kitchen Aid mixer.  I got it on sale years ago and use it for all of my baking that require a mixer.  I love to make pound cakes, and that mixer is great for creaming the butter and sugar.  It gets so nice and fluffy it looks almost like whipped cream (almost).  There would be no way I could do that with a hand mixer.  I keep it on a low shelf in the laundry room (next to the kitchen) because it takes up so much space on the counter.  However, I'm tired of having to carry that heavy thing into the kitchen when I need it (and I'm afraid I'll drop it one day and either kill one of my always-underfoot cats or cut off one of my feet.  I just might have to leave it on the counter and give up the space.

 

The other gadget that I couldn't do without is my microwave popcorn popper.  It's a Presto PowerPop (endorsed by Orville Redenbacher!) and I love it.  If you haven't used one, all you do is put one of the cardboard 'concentrator' saucer-like inserts in the bottom--they are easily available at Wal-mart and you get a few in each pack for a couple of dollars), add a spoon of veg oil and a handful of popcorn.  The microwave does the rest in about 3 minutes.  It's good tasting old-fashioned popcorn.  And it would be healthy if I didn't have the bad habit of drizzling some butter-flavored Orville Redenbacher oil over the top instead of using real melted butter (or leaving that part off entirely).  It tastes close to real movie popcorn.  I need to get a new one, though.  Mine has been used so much that even when I scrub it, it still looks grungy--and I found a chip out of the top the other day.  (I've had it for years.)

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Drats!  Just realized I am out of the flimsy pie tins that come with frozen pie shells.

 

I find them very handy for making individual servings of nachos for my kids since no one likes the same toppings.

 

Cinco De Mayo is a terrible time to realize that.

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Books Rule, I keep my big-ass Kitchen-aid on a tea towel pushed back into a corner of my counter.  When I need it, I just slide it out on the towel.  Sort of out of the way and no heavy lifting.

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Good idea, Qoass!  I'm giving my kitchen a good scrubbing this week and I'll make a place for it on the counter when I move some things around.

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We eat white rice (steamed) several times a week.  I left my rice cooker when I moved, so I just make it on the stove top.  Mom lived with me for several years and bough a fancy rice cooker/steamer but I think she only used it once and then it got stored in a bottom cabinet and she just made rice on the stove top after that.

 

Yesterday I decided to unearth it because I wanted to make more rice than normal.  Got it out, cleaned it up, washed the dish, read the manual even...and it was a total fail.  First, it is the worst manual ever.  Second, looking for additional guidance I googled it and found little to no information, none of it useful.  Third, it is a fancy thing so there are tons of buttons and a timer.  I followed the directions and tried to start it and no go.  I reread to make sure I had done it correctly and still not working.  The thing thinks it is on a delay timer but the timer is set to zero.  Called Mom to see if she had any ideas - nope!  Had my kids read the manual and try to figure it out.  Between all of us - a college graduate, a junior in college and a high school student who is in AP classes - we couldn't get it to work.

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DeLurker I have a rice cooker but it's only got 2-3 buttons & it's easy. The interior has a water fill line to use based on the number of scoops of rice I want. (The scoop came with the cooker.) Fill to the water line, add the rice, close the lid & push the button. I think brown rice requires a different button but I've never made it. If you can get it to work it's wonderful to use. Edited by ramble
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forumfish - I checked the manufacturer's website and found very little helpful information.  The thing comes with a removable cap that goes over the steam vent and you can close/lock the steam vent or leave it open.  That part is not even listed in the manual nor any of the other manuals I found on line.

 

Sadly, I don't have regular access to a kindergartener.  They do have a great way of not over-thinking things!

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I've always done rice in the microwave for 25 years at least.  I like my grains separated so I use either long grained white rice or brown rice, rinsed well.  I cup of rice to a 2 qt pyrex bowl.  1 3/4 water.  Do not salt.  Bring it to a rolling boil then put it on 20% power covered, 22:22 for white; 44:44 for brown (my son mocks me for that).  This way there's no problem with bottom scorching and you have an automatic timer.

 

I'm also a big fan of the egg slicer.  I use it for olives and mushrooms too.  You can slice 4 olives at a time.

 

My solution to keeping measuring spoons without a ring is I have hooks on the wall next to the stove where I keep small whisks, tongs, my small Oneida serving spoons and spatulas for easy access while cooking.  A pie server is perfect for serving pizza and removing the first piece of lasagna.

 

Wisconsin is the home of the Mirro factory that practically invented aluminum cookware.  I have a big old 12 qt, heavy pot pressure canner that is great for simmering a gallon of chili, but more importantly I'm pretty good at pressure canning it too, as well as turkey/chicken stock.  It can hold 6 qt jars.  Anything low acid or with meat has to be pressure canned.  I've only had to replace the rubber ring once, and I'm sure the newer ones are much easier but I will probably never replace it.  If you want the best jar opener ever look in the canning department.

Edited by QuelleC
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If freezing is of interest then getting a food saver is a great investment. I have vac-sealed fresh fish, traveled through five states and tossed them into the freezer. Eaten a few months later the fish tasted the same as if ithey were just caught. Same with things like pork chops... the fat stays fresh and tasty.

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If freezing is of interest then getting a food saver is a great investment. I have vac-sealed fresh fish, traveled through five states and tossed them into the freezer. Eaten a few months later the fish tasted the same as if ithey were just caught. Same with things like pork chops... the fat stays fresh and tasty.

I stopped using mine because the bags were getting expensive.  I found that it was better if I flash froze the items first on a pan because the vacuum process squeezed out juices if I didn't, sometimes interfering with the seal.  Or veggies would end up in a clump.  Any tips to share?  Oh, I should add that if yours has an attachment to vacuum seal a mason jar that's a great way to save things that spoil quickly like oyster crackers and the lid can be reused for that particular purpose.  Thanks for making me think of working with the food saver again.

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I stopped using mine because the bags were getting expensive.  I found that it was better if I flash froze the items first on a pan because the vacuum process squeezed out juices if I didn't, sometimes interfering with the seal.  Or veggies would end up in a clump.  Any tips to share?  Oh, I should add that if yours has an attachment to vacuum seal a mason jar that's a great way to save things that spoil quickly like oyster crackers and the lid can be reused for that particular purpose.  Thanks for making me think of working with the food saver again.

 

Aren't the bags supposed to be reusable?  I have never reused mine, but the QVC spokesperson says they are.

 

I do have and use the mason jar sealing attachment, plus mine came with three canisters that are also useful for chips, popcorn, cereal, etc.  I kind of love the new one they've been hawking on QVC, but can't justify throwing away my perfectly good, yet kind of huge and old fashioned looking one.  As for flash freezing, I, too, always do that with meat, which is about 80% of what I use it for anyway.  Otherwise you either have to cut your bag extremely large to avoid the juice coming out, or it will not seal properly.  They suggest putting a paper towel at the end of the meat to absorb the juice, but then the paper towel is stuck to the frozen meat.]

 

It also works really well for hard cheeses like parmesan or romano that I prefer to buy in a chunk.  In that case, I do cut the bag pretty large so I can keep resealing it after each use.  Since the cheese is so expensive, it is worth using a bit extra bag material up front.

 

This is a product that definitely works as advertised, but whether or not someone will actually use it depends on how they shop and cook.

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Thank you, it's all coming back to me.  I do remember washing a few of the bags although the ends got curly.  I recall now that I would easily reseal chip bags too! 

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I had no idea such a thing existed, and added it to my Amazon wish list immediately. We really do live in magnificent times!

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Anyone have experience with a roaster oven? 

 

I've been thinking one might be a good alternative for hotter days, but don't necessarily need to make enormous amounts of food (I think most are big enough to cook a 20 lb turkey in).  So if I could use one, but cook in a smaller pan that would be ideal.  I see on websites where you can make things like bundt cakes in it so I am assuming I can, but was worried about how even the temperature heated/circulated.

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This isn't exactly a kitchen gadget, just a convenient item I just bought and used yesterday.

 

I make chicken broth frequently, and when I do I strain it through cheesecloth. The cheesecloth is pretty expensive $4 for about 3 or 4 uses). It tends to fall apart when I strain the broth through it, and it isn't wide enough to be able to gather up the edges and squeeze to get all the liquid out.  I was in the store yesterday and I saw a package of flour sack cloths, 10 for less than $8.  The label on the package said it could be used for cleaning or culinary uses, straining and cheese making. Since I was planning to make chicken broth, I decided to buy it and test it out.  It worked great.  Each cloth was plenty large enough to fit in the colander with enough excess hanging off the sides that I could gather it up.  Best of all it's reusable. I rinsed it out and will wash it next time I do a laundry and I can use it again.   

 

I'm sure these cloths have been around forever, but I thought they were just for cleaning, so I didn't bother.  Glad to have decided to try them out. 

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This isn't exactly a kitchen gadget, just a convenient item I just bought and used yesterday.

 

I make chicken broth frequently, and when I do I strain it through cheesecloth. The cheesecloth is pretty expensive $4 for about 3 or 4 uses). It tends to fall apart when I strain the broth through it, and it isn't wide enough to be able to gather up the edges and squeeze to get all the liquid out.  I was in the store yesterday and I saw a package of flour sack cloths, 10 for less than $8.  The label on the package said it could be used for cleaning or culinary uses, straining and cheese making. Since I was planning to make chicken broth, I decided to buy it and test it out.  It worked great.  Each cloth was plenty large enough to fit in the colander with enough excess hanging off the sides that I could gather it up.  Best of all it's reusable. I rinsed it out and will wash it next time I do a laundry and I can use it again.   

 

I'm sure these cloths have been around forever, but I thought they were just for cleaning, so I didn't bother.  Glad to have decided to try them out.

ALenore, where did you find these? I have had the same gripe about cheesecloth, too!

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Floursack cloths are the best dish towels ever.  I thought everyone knew that?   I buy the cheapo ones at Walmart, no need to buy expensive ones. 

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I said a while back I have a few old fashioned flat gauze diapers (never used as diapers) from 25 years ago and I reuse them for straining stock too.  Just rinse them well after laundering to make sure there's no soap in your stock!

 

No need to buy kitchen twine either at twice the price.  Just go to the hardware section and make sure it's 100% cotton in the guage that looks right.  You'll have that sucker for years and years for 1.29.

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I couldn't find kitchen twine last Thanksgiving no matter how hard I looked in the local grocery stores.  I finally asked the guy at the butcher counter and he said they no longer sell it (at Kroger/Ralph's) because not enough of it moved.  He gave me some from the butcher counter - a generous amount too.

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This is a great thread.  I've gotten some good ideas for xmas stocking stuffers (e.g., mini wet measuring beakers).  I have several things in my kitchen that when I use them I think to myself "what a fabulous invention" and they are:  Kitchen Aid mixer, food processor, microplane grater and my Braun immersion blender that also came with a very small processor which is great for mincing cilantro, parsley, almonds. And I love my old Black and Decker toaster oven for reheating pizza slices, toasting buttered hamburger/hot dog rolls, and baking/broiling small amounts of food...so nice not having to heat up the kitchen. Thanks for the tip re: using the Kitchen Aid to shred boiled chicken!  

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I've never found a noticeable difference in the microwaves we have had, except for the color on the keypad.  My parents got a new one in black (since that color went better with their kitchen) and it turned out the keypad lighting did not make the various buttons distinctive enough for them.  Withing 2 weeks they replaced it with a white one that had more contrast on the buttons.

 

Just did a quick check on Consumer Reports - there was no clear cut ratings winner by brand nor did a higher price result in a higher rating.  The majority of the tested microwaves scores were fairly tightly clustered and common brands often had a model in the higher and lower ends of the spectrum.  The usable capacity varied a lot within similar sized ovens (based on how much counter top real estate they took up).  In the midsized rated ovens, the usable capacity varied from 0.5 - 0.8 cubic foot (a GE Profile Spacemaker model had one of the highest costs, the lowest capacity and the lowest rating).  For large ovens, the usable capacity varied from 0.5 - 1.5 cubic foot (a GE Profile JE model had the second highest rating, the largest usable capacity, and a midrange price (and only $30 more than the midsize GE Profile Spacemaker I called out previously)).

Edited by DeLurker

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I happen to be remodeling my kitchen and the contractors hands down recommend Panasonic, for what that's worth. That's what I went with but my particular model ran over the $125 you are looking to stay under.

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I've been pretty lucky with microwaves.  My first one was in the mid 80's and cost me over $300 From Wards or Sears! But it lasted something like 15 years.  I went without one until my son insisted I buy a $50 Haier model at Shopko or Kmart about 7 years ago and it's running fine.  Maybe not the capacity you're looking for but they revolve and as long as they hold a dinner plate that's fine. We use it several times a day.

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Help! Our microwave died and I'm seeking recommendations for a budget counter-top microwave oven. Mom would like to keep it under $125. I figure Labor Day Weekend sales will help -- good timing, huh?

 

Our old one was 1.2 cubic feet and 1200 watts. We could stand to go as low as 1000 watts, but prefer not to get much smaller in terms of capacity. The old one was a Kenmore (Sears) but we are staying away from that this time 'cause this was the second replacement -- first one died under warranty, so they replaced it. Then it died and they gave us this one. We got good customer service from Sears, but the microwaves themselves weren't too reliable.

 

I've looked online and read reviews, but I want to get feedback from people I trust (as much as you can trust people you've never met!). Thanks!    :)

Have you looked at the review on The Sweet Home website? (sorry no link, stupid iPad. It's thesweethome.com) That's the website I go to for reviews these days - they do their own tests and look at reviews on Amazon, Consumer Reports, etc. I refer to that site a lot these days. I bought an LG model earlier this year from Best Buy for around $125 that I'm happy with. I needed a small one due to space constraints but still wanted decent power (1000 watts) and it was the only model that fit the bill. So far so good!

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I've never had a microwave, but we're redoing the kitchen to prep for eventual sale, so one will be going in.  This discussion has been very helpful - thank you all.

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My top three are my rice cooker (normal thing) and two little basic gadgets, a cheese slicer from probably the 50s or 60s (it'll slice a block of cheese at time same time) and this hand held thing from pampered chef to help break up ground beef as its frying.

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Anyone have experience with a roaster oven? 

 

I've been thinking one might be a good alternative for hotter days, but don't necessarily need to make enormous amounts of food (I think most are big enough to cook a 20 lb turkey in).  So if I could use one, but cook in a smaller pan that would be ideal.  I see on websites where you can make things like bundt cakes in it so I am assuming I can, but was worried about how even the temperature heated/circulated.

My mom has a big one that she's had forever, and I think my grandma had it before her. She mainly uses it when she needs to do a big batch of meat, like turkey/ham for the holidays, when she wants to keep her regular oven open to bake other things. I've also seen her use it like a giant Crock Pot to make chili, pulled pork, etc. for large gatherings.

As for baking cakes and things, she hasn't done it a lot, just a few times when something was up with her regular oven, and it worked fine. She had to put the pan on a cooling rack or something so that it wasn't sitting directly on the bottom, so it would have air flow around it more like a regular oven. I'd definitely check out your user's manual. You're right that it was nice to bake something without heating up the whole kitchen! She would probably use it more, but she doesn't have a handy place to keep it.

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Anyone have experience with a roaster oven? 

 

I've been thinking one might be a good alternative for hotter days, but don't necessarily need to make enormous amounts of food (I think most are big enough to cook a 20 lb turkey in).  So if I could use one, but cook in a smaller pan that would be ideal.  I see on websites where you can make things like bundt cakes in it so I am assuming I can, but was worried about how even the temperature heated/circulated.

 

No personal experience with a roaster oven, but what about a deluxe toaster oven? I got a Breville Smart Oven Pro that I use all of the time to bake. It was expensive, but totally worth it. Now I can bake french fries when it's 90 degrees outside!

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Even though I checked the dimensions and it is only a few inches bigger than my current toaster oven, it would take up too much countertop real estate.

 

Odd, my last house was tiny with a tiny kitchen and very little counterspace.  This place is so much bigger, the kitchen is at least twice the size and has lots and lots of counterspace, yet I still run out!

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It's a beast, true. Sometimes the counter space problem is all about how it is arranged. I had an apartment that technically had a fair amount of counter space but it was so chopped up that it was basically useless.

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I love my toaster oven.  I often have just a baked potato for lunch or supper and the size is right.  I have pans that fit from previous ovens (this is my third over 20 years) and this one came with a pizza stone.  OK, I'm addicted to baked potatoes and if I have some chicken it can go in there too.  Just right for one or two.

 

It's Kenmore and has convection which is great for evening out baking temps but I haven't done a lot of baking.  We don't eat sweets and I'll bake bread in the regular gas oven. 

 

The toaster oven has lots of settings and the best part it heats up very quickly.  This one has a thermometer that shows the increasing temp then the bake time starts when it reaches temp.  What's not to love about an oven that shuts itself off.  If I'm keeping pancakes on warm or heating up plates (we keep it cold in the house in the winter) it only takes a min or two to get it up to temp. Unfortunately electrical costs more here than gas.  Toaster ovens heat up so fast I keep a towel and the pizza stone on top to sort of insulate it to save energy.

 

You're lucky to have a big roaster oven, those things last forever.  I never thought of baking in one.

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My toaster oven has a convection setting, but I have never used it. I don't really know when to go with convection over regular cooking. What types or categories of food does it best suit?

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My toaster oven has a convection setting, but I have never used it. I don't really know when to go with convection over regular cooking. What types or categories of food does it best suit?

Haha same with me. Now I just replaced my regular oven and that one also has a convection oven, so now I am inundated with technology I don't even know how to use. I believe it's supposed to be really good for baking, but I don't know how to time it so I never use it. Any experts with advice?

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Just advice, all convection is, is a fan built in to circulate and keep the temp more even.  You know how they tell you to rotate your cookies and cupcakes halfway through?  Convection makes it more likely they'll be evenly baked.  It comes on with my bake function, I just hit the fan icon to turn if off most of the time.  It comes in handy when keeping things warm that would get soggy without some circulation.  I envy your new oven, I need one badly.

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Haha same with me. Now I just replaced my regular oven and that one also has a convection oven, so now I am inundated with technology I don't even know how to use. I believe it's supposed to be really good for baking, but I don't know how to time it so I never use it. Any experts with advice?

I find that with my convection toaster oven things cook a bit faster, and more evenly. No other differences that I've noticed.

I had to get a new oven last year and since it was 3 days before Thanksgiving I didn't have a lot of choices. I ended up with one with a convection setting but I still haven't tried it.

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