Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
OtterMommy

S01.E07: Wherever You Are Is My Home

Recommended Posts

Quote

On the verge of losing the farm, the Cuthberts must do whatever it takes to save it. Anne is reminded of the strength of friendship and love.

Share this post


Link to post

For all that this series is a lot grittier than its source material, Anne's buoyant determination to view the trip to the city as a potentially important Hero's Journey and irritation at Jerry's presence undercutting that, was quite funny, as well as her spinning elaborate histories for each item with Pawn Shop Guy from the second episode.  Mentioning him, quite a few minor characters popped in again from earlier appearances.

A bit of an up-and-down episode for Jerry, between getting the shit kicked out him but seeming to finally get Anne to be friendlier.  I'd also guess whatever wages Miss Barry is providing him are probably more generous than what the Cuthberts offered, so let's call that a win overall.  And he may yet get the chance to get revenge on those thieves (it's hard to see how this could be anything other than a one-episode story next year, but Anne crushing on the younger one is funny).

I really liked the meeting between Anne and Gilbert in town.  Sounds like he might be MIA a bit, though I guess that depends on how much time passes between seasons.

Historical notes:  I expect some people were confused by Anne referring to the Boer War, but she means the First Boer War (1880-1881).  The conflict we typically think of as the Boer War now (1899-1901) is more properly the Second Boer War, and obviously Anne doesn't use a number here in reference to the first since the second hasn't happened yet.  Also, Josephine Barry's house is Castle Kilbride in Baden, Ontario -- way too splendid, incidentally, to have existed in Prince Edward Island at this time.  That's fancier than Fanningbank (the Lieutenant Governor's residence) or Beaconsfield, the most famous private residence of the period.

This episode was directed by Stargate SG-1 actress Amanda Tapping, who, from her IMDb, has evidently been doing a lot of TV directing in recent years.

Edited by SeanC
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

Man. I was loving the Anne & Gilbert scenes in this episode. Those two have mad chemistry for kids so young. When they just stared at each other and Jerry was all "uh, byyyeee" (which, LOL) I thought they were just adorable. Although it's quite the shift from the novel having the truce much, much earlier. I was figuring that Gilbert would end up replacing Jerry on the farm as free labour at Green Gables.  I have to say that I've loved this series and all of its changes (okay, Matthew trying to kill himself excepted).  The casting on the whole has been exceptional. I'm officially a fan. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

I'm oddly worried about how Gilbert will get from running away to sea to teaching to medicine. I don't want to miss out on Dr Blythe and his off page moments of medical genius. I really think both the Sullivan version and one this have done lovely jobs of casting. Lucas Zuman and Jonathan Crombie both make excellent Gilberts and Annabeth McNulty continues to be amazing! (Although I like Meagan Follows' dreamier Anne too).

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

2 hours ago, Keener said:

I have to say that I've loved this series and all of its changes (okay, Matthew trying to kill himself excepted).

I thought that part was a little much (I could imagine Matthew getting to a place like that, but not that fast), though thinking on the houseguests, I expect it's no coincidence that this episode establishes that there's a handgun in the house.

Actually, a farm like that would obviously have a rifle or two (even if, on PEI, there's not much to hunt; it'd mostly be for shooting foxes and rabbits), but I'm kind of surprised they have a pistol. 

Edited by SeanC
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, satrunrose said:

I'm oddly worried about how Gilbert will get from running away to sea to teaching to medicine. I don't want to miss out on Dr Blythe and his off page moments of medical genius.

Since show!Gilbert's father died from illness, it kind of already lays the groundwork for him becoming a doctor eventually. In the books he just seemed to randomly go to medical school for no particular reason, as far as I remember.

When those robbers were robbing Jerry, I thought Anne was going to show up and break a plank over each of their heads. I did wonder why casting hired a pretty good looking actor to play one of those robbers. Looks like it's going to play into the story somehow. Wonder what they're planning to do, rob Green Gables? Pull some kind of con? I'm gonna be annoyed if Green Gables get in financial trouble again just after getting out.

Can't wait to see more, though. I can't believe it's already the season finale!

Share this post


Link to post

Was this the finale?

I was disappointed in the storyline with Matthew and Marilla and having to give up Green Gables. The story was off from what I remember it.

I wish that Anne got the money back that was stolen from Jerry.

Again, the church ladies didn't know who Rachel was talking about.  How big is Avonlea?  Marilla was a regular church goer. Please do not tell me that they didn't know who she was.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, greekmom said:

Again, the church ladies didn't know who Rachel was talking about.  How big is Avonlea?  Marilla was a regular church goer. Please do not tell me that they didn't know who she was.

I don't know why this show insists on suggesting that people in Avonlea don't know each other. It's impossible for people in a small town like that to not at least frequent the same church, or the same community events. Heck, even with Ruby Gillis' fire the whole town came out to help. It is virtually impossible for people not to know each other at least in passing. It's not Charlottetown! 

Edited by Keener
  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post

Yeah, they have done this several times this series, which makes no sense.  In a close-knit farming community, it would not have been surprising if Mr. Barry and some of the other farmers had pitched in to help Matthew with his new crop.  

Yet, on the flip side, the town still has a quick gossip mill, where they talk about people they don't know?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
10 hours ago, Bec said:

Wonder what they're planning to do, rob Green Gables? Pull some kind of con?

I got the impression they were looking for a place to lay low.

Share this post


Link to post

I'm assuming it's room and board in exchange for farm labor?  But Jerry needed actual income for his family?

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Camera One said:

I'm assuming it's room and board in exchange for farm labor?  But Jerry needed actual income for his family?

But they arrived around New Years, no? So there's no farming really to be had just yet. I got the impression that the guys were planning to rob the place (not realizing it was devoid of any goods anyway, although the money hasn't yet been deposited). It'll be curious what happens once Jerry gets a good look at them.  How have the guys not realized that Anne was the one who'd been talking to their target in Charlottetown?  

Personally I'd hoped for Gilbert to be the one who'd do room and board. He needs a family, he's a diligent worker and to be sure he wouldn't mind being in Anne's orbit. 

Edited by Keener
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
7 minutes ago, Keener said:

I got the impression that the guys were planning to rob the place (not realizing it was devoid of any goods anyway, although the money hasn't yet been deposited).

If that was their goal, you'd think their fallback on scoping things out would be rob the Barrys, who are right next door.

Sort of related, I credit the costume designers for how Diana's clothes are obviously much more expensive than anything we see Anne or any of the other girls in school wear, without being overly gaudy.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
On 2017-05-01 at 11:42 AM, Bec said:

When those robbers were robbing Jerry, I thought Anne was going to show up and break a plank over each of their heads. I did wonder why casting hired a pretty good looking actor to play one of those robbers. Looks like it's going to play into the story somehow. Wonder what they're planning to do, rob Green Gables? Pull some kind of con? I'm gonna be annoyed if Green Gables get in financial trouble again just after getting out.

Can't wait to see more, though. I can't believe it's already the season finale!

I'm finally catching up to this episode. I liked it except that I was perplexed by the choice to end with these "villains" moving in when so much disaster had already befallen this family. The other thing that they left hanging was how Jerry (and Anne) dealt with Jerry being robbed of the money from the sale of the lovely horse. Did they explain what happened to Jerry? Did he give them the money Josephine Barry gave him as wages? Why is he so conveniently gone when the "boarders" arrive?

24 minutes ago, Keener said:

It'll be curious what happens once Jerry gets a good look at them. 

Yes, I was just about to post that, but you beat me to it.  I suppose Jerry could be back at his family home for a Christmas visit? But he was there when they were decorating the tree and back then that would have been Christmas Eve. Still, he may not be able to recognize them... but I think they would recognize him.

I don't think these guys know anything about Green Gables. I think they just chose it as a likely place to get away with their next con. Far enough away from their last "job" that they wouldn't be suspicous. But this whole story line is completely new to me. I can't remember any adventure at all that included thieves/con-men. Does anyone (with a better memory of the books than me) know of a plot line like this in any of them? It's bothering me that this season is ending on something so wholly outside of Anne's story.

Edited by Anothermi

Share this post


Link to post
Just now, Anothermi said:

Does anyone (with a better memory of the books than me) know of a plot line like this in any of them?

No, there's nothing like this in the books.  If they're going to be doing several seasons about the young Anne, you're likely to see a lot of wholly made-up content going forward, even if (as I suspect) they incorporate stuff from some of the later books into it in different forms.

I swear there was at least one episode of the 1970s Little House on the Prairie like that, though.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, SeanC said:

I swear there was at least one episode of the 1970s Little House on the Prairie like that, though.

Hee. I was prepared to accept it coming from LMM books that weren't even about Anne, but purloining plots from another author?!!!  ;-)

Share this post


Link to post

This show hasn't captured my heart. I didn't buy the Matthew suicide plot, but am happy he lives.  When they stray too far from the books, it isn't pleasant to watch. Too pessimistic and boring. Now we have to worry about Anne being raped by a violent boarder, who is coincidently the one who beat up Jerry.  Ugh!  I found Marilla/Matthew out of character in certain parts, and the dress lady turning up in the nick of time with bullets scattered all over the floor...sigh! Although 'Anne' in the pawn shop was amusing, there haven't been enough amusing moments in the show by and large.

The language hasn't captured the spirit of the book and there is not enough focus on nature/Avonlea.  We got one comment on snow I guess. Gilbert an orphan too. Sigh!  I still hope it's renewed as I will watch anything 'Anne' related, but it is not the show of my dreams. I suppose the opening credits warn us that it is 'ahead by a century', but the constant dramatic scenes and contemporary themes means the show is not 'escapist' for me. It had been improving over the past few weeks, but this was probably my least favourite episode (next to ep. 2). 

It isn't to say I don't like all of it. The Avonlea schoolhouse scenes have been good, and I like what they did with the characters of Josephine Barry/Jerry.  The casting has also been generally excellent and the show looks lovely.  Even though Josie doesn't look as described in the books, she is certainly perfectly nasty.

Overall,  the writing/dialogue lets the show down for me.  I don't want dour AoGG with themes of bullying/suicide/PTSD/violence etc.

Edited by insubordination
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post

I think the heavily off-book parts show how mediocre the writing is.  The strength of the series is in the impeccable cast, the beauty of the cinematography and the LM Montgomery source material.  I don't mind a more sombre look at the period, but you can't just throw in a suicide attempt out of nowhere.  Even the financial troubles plot was not alluded to at all.  What was Marilla's relationship/reactions to Matthew's old girlfriend showing up?  That would have been interesting to explore, but we don't even get a full conversation between them. Why is this version of Avonlea, the community, so reticent to help?  What about all the other Avonlea farmers affected by the sinking?  In another thread, we were discussing the lack of clarity about their invented Gilbert situation - how was their farm managed when they were away in Alberta?  

And at the end of they day, how did the thieves, pawning off Green Gables' treasures, Gilbert working at the docks, etc. develop Anne's character in any way?  This episode felt more like plot machinations rather than character exploration.  Even in the last two episodes, the Diana/Anne separation was very temporary and they could have explored how that affected Anne. They're only halfway through the book, but Anne's relationship with Gilbert and Marilla have both been fast-tracked to where they are by the end of the novel.  As much as I've deeply enjoyed seeing how lovingly Marilla looks at Anne, or some of the nice conversations between Anne and Gilbert, a television series is supposed to have more time to really savor the journey.  But they've already jumped to the conclusion on several key character turning points from the book, which were so effective because they were earned.

Edited by Camera One
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
9 minutes ago, Camera One said:

And at the end of they day, how did the thieves, pawning off Green Gables' treasures, Gilbert working at the docks, etc. develop Anne's character in any way?  

Offering to sell her gown is a rather notable character moment for Anne; the rest is about the character trying to take on family responsibilities.  Gilbert working at the docks is about developing his character, not Anne's, though it leads to their conversation, which is definitely developing Anne too.  The stuff with the thieves is more setup for next season, but even in this episode it develops Anne's relationship with Jerry.

Edited by SeanC
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/3/2017 at 10:38 AM, Camera One said:

I think the heavily off-book parts show how mediocre the writing is.  The strength of the series is in the impeccable cast, the beauty of the cinematography and the LM Montgomery source material.  I don't mind a more sombre look at the period, but you can't just throw in a suicide attempt out of nowhere.  Even the financial troubles plot was not alluded to at all.*  What was Marilla's relationship/reactions to Matthew's old girlfriend showing up?  That would have been interesting to explore, but we don't even get a full conversation between them. Why is this version of Avonlea, the community, so reticent to help?  What about all the other Avonlea farmers affected by the sinking?*  In another thread, we were discussing the lack of clarity about their invented Gilbert situation - how was their farm managed when they were away in Alberta?  

And at the end of they day, how did the thieves, pawning off Green Gables' treasures, Gilbert working at the docks, etc. develop Anne's character in any way?**  This episode felt more like plot machinations rather than character exploration.  Even in the last two episodes, the Diana/Anne separation was very temporary and they could have explored how that affected Anne. They're only halfway through the book***, but Anne's relationship with Gilbert and Marilla have both been fast-tracked to where they are by the end of the novel. 

 
 

*The second highlighted line with "*"  contradicts your first statement. The boat sinking in episode 6 was the first sign of financial problems, but that's still a hint. The fact that the guy that told Matthew about the boat was also making Matthew pay his outstanding credit that day also emphasised this. 

** @SeanC made some good points. But also season finale's aren't usually about major character development, they're about closing threads and opening new ones. Matthew went through character development, in terms of understanding his own value at Green Gables beyond working the farm. Marilla too grew, in learning when to put pride aside (which was also learned by Anne). 

***They're only half way through the book, but Anne's older than the book. Besides, in terms of the season, it wouldn't make sense for Anne to still be questioning her place at Green Gables after the first season. She had that scare that they might give her back due to their financial issues, she still has doubts and likely they will still flare up here and there due to the trauma of her past. But even her diving into being a Cuthbert and diving into representing them when in the city was development. She's part of a clan now, and she supports Marilla at the bank and by going to the city to sell items. By the way, Anne's realisation of what Gilbert's lost, due to her relating her fear of losing Matthew, was a huge character moment for her.

I understand feeling like certain things are brushed over, like the Diana/Anne separation, but that was explored in the Sullivan adaptation. I like that they're focusing on slightly different things here. I'm sure Anne and Gilbert will still butt heads despite their truce. I don't think the truce means anything beyond tentative friendship for now. 

Edited by Check Sanity · Reason: spelling/grammar
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
39 minutes ago, Check Sanity said:

*The second highlighted line with "*"  contradicts your first statement. The boat sinking in episode 6 was the first sign of financial problems, but that's still a hint. The fact that the guy that told Matthew about the boat was also making Matthew pay his outstanding credit that day also emphasised this. 

I assume you are saying that the fact that no one else seemed to be affected by the sinking was a hint that the Cuthberts had unique financial difficulties?  Yes, that is a good point.

If losing a single year's crop was enough for Matthew to mortgage the house, then there would have been pretty serious existing financial difficulties which could have shown itself before that "hint" in the episode right before the finale.  Farming is unpredictable, and it is not unheard of for a year's crop to be lost due to weather or disease, and farmers wouldn't normally react the way Matthew did.  What this says to me is the surprise factor drove the plot, not the characters.  It felt like a typical exaggerated cliffhanger scenario that took me out of the story.

There have been plenty of shows I've watched where the main character develops in the season finale, especially in the first season.   Matthew realizing he shouldn't kill himself may be character development, but it was not presented in a way that was believable to me.  I liked Marilla's development, but it was too quick.

Edited by Camera One

Share this post


Link to post
10 minutes ago, Camera One said:

I'm trying not to take offence at your condescending tone.  I assume you are saying that the fact that no one else seemed to be affected by the sinking was a hint that the Cuthberts had unique financial difficulties?

If losing a single year's crop was enough for Matthew to mortgage the house, then there would have been pretty serious existing financial difficulties which could have shown itself before that "hint" in the episode right before the finale.  Farming is unpredictable, and it is not unheard of for a year's crop to be lost due to weather or disease, and farmers wouldn't normally react the way Matthew did.  What this says to me is the surprise factor drove the plot, not the characters.  It felt like a typical exaggerated cliffhanger scenario that took me out of the story.

There have been plenty of shows I've watched where the main character develops in the season finale, especially in the first season.   Matthew realizing he shouldn't kill himself may be character development, but it was not presented in a way that was believable to me.  I liked Marilla's development, but it was too quick.

 

I'm tired and not filtering properly, sorry. I think you picked up on irritation to what's seemed like a weekly complaint about how the show isn't as expected (not all by the same person, I know, my apologies that it came out in a response to you). 

* My first point was a response to you saying: 

On 5/3/2017 at 10:38 AM, Camera One said:

 Even the financial troubles plot was not alluded to at all.

 

And then mentioning the boat incident, which was the first major hint at financial troubles, last episode. I understand better now that you were also considering Matthew needing to take a mortgage out on his farm after the loss of a years' crop as abnormal. Which I agree, is strange. However, I think it could be argued that the Cuthbert's search for an orphan boy to help out on the farm could count as a suggestion to their struggle. In the first episode, Marilla mentions that Matthew had decided on getting the extra help since the winter. Based on this episode, it seems Matthew was keeping their financial problems from Marilla for awhile, so any hints at that plot thread would all be from Matthew and subtle. Plus there were clues to his heart problems, and him recognizing them, and also keeping that a secret. On top of that, his buying a bunch of unnecessary things while gathering the courage to get Anne's dress due to his shyness would be an example of ill spending. It probably was not the first time he's done that either. Marilla, mention this episode to Anne that Matthew had visited the pawn shop a few times. Matthew sold his pocket watch to get to Anne and bring her back, and the never bought the watch back, another clue. 

I've stated before in another episode of the show's forum that I think the Netflix binging format is probably better suited for the show than a weekly series. It's a lot harder to get pulled out of a scene when things are fresh in one's mind. I binged episodes 1-5 on the CBC website. It pretty much felt like watching a long movie and made piecing the story together easier. Based on the format the show was intended to be watched in, I disagree with the statement that the writing is mediocre. 

A lot of the questions you asked about: Marilla's reaction to Matthew's old beau, why the community is so reticent to help, who else was affected financially from the sunken ship, the Blythe farm financials. 
I wonder about all these things too, though I don't think Gilbert is enough of a focus character to learn about his financials just yet. I hope season 2 will build on the community more. I feel like this show's depiction of the Avonlea community is a little closer to the show Road to Avonlea, which sugar coated things a bit less than the Anne of Green Gables movies. Though the level to which people don't seem to know one another, in a small town, in this version, is weird to me.

As for Matthew and Marilla's development this episode, I feel both were too quick. Someone mentioned it needing to take longer for Matthew to reach that point of despair and I agree. Marilla's, I could accept as just the limits of a 44 minute episode. Though thinking about it now, after Matthew's suicide scare, Marilla being more open to help makes a certain kind of sense. 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

I don't know how life insurance worked back then, but wouldn't death by suicide negate his insurance? It certainly would nowadays. 

I know it was typical at that time for the man of the property to make all of the financial decisions without consulting his womenfolk, but it still irks me. 

The anachronistic dialog pulls me out of this show constantly. "Come with? " I don't think so. And there are so many others. 

Now that they have introduced suicide, robbery and con men boarders, I guess I will start having to think about this show as "Anne of Green Gables" adjacent . There have been so many changes, it's barely the same story. I just read the entire series for the first time, within the past year or so, so the changes are particularly grating. 

I just love the actors playing each part so much that I will continue watching the series next season, but it is  NOT the Anne of Green Gables that I know and love. 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Jodithgrace said:

, but wouldn't death by suicide negate his insurance? It certainly would nowadays. 

That is not true most of the time, it's a bit of a trope shows over play. Most policies have a two year waiting period for new policies or if you increase the benefit but after that time period most policies pay out for suicide.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Well I just binge-watched the whole seasons and as a whole I enjoyed it except for the last episode.  I do NOT like the introduction of two muggers moving in with the family AND THEN THEY JUST END THE SEASON.  Not cool dudes, not cool.

But other than that I enjoyed the binge.  As others have said, the casting is excellent, the scenery spectacular, and that off-book escapade in episode 2 had my heart in my throat.  

I'll be back for the next go-round.

Edited by WatchrTina
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post

I'm withholding judgment for the time being since I thought they got more right than wrong in the first season, even with the changes, but yeah...

The mugging con men thing was more of a left turn than I thought the show needed. I'm supportive of most of the other alterations this version has made, since they've more or less served the canonical characters and helped flesh out their stories. But the con men feels like a completely different universe, so I'm hoping they don't linger on it for too long.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

The articles and reviews always talk about the flashbacks and Anne's horrible past, but it's strange that this element is pretty much gone after the first two or three episodes.  By the latter half of the season, we rarely saw the PTSD effects.  While Green Gables did have an impact on that, if they were trying to explore Anne's psyche, that should not have disappeared so quickly.  Looking at the first season as a whole, it felt like a very surface level treatment of the character.  I found that was very much the case with all the characters.  We got these newly invented details about Marilla's past, Matthew's past, a hint to Jerry's background, a bit about Gilbert's dad, but none of it felt very substantial.  The good part of that is there's a lot of potential to explore these in future seasons, but the downside is the season felt like a light, fluffy sampler, which is fine, but not really what they purport this series to be.  For all its darkness and "grittiness", it's no deeper than previous adaptations or the book to me.

Edited by Camera One
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I really liked it.  I didn't know if I would since I only had exposure to the Megan Fellows movies and the book.   

I honestly don't know where to start, I can understand why we got a dark look at the events of Anne's past.  The book had license to use whimsy but the tv medium has a stronger challenge in bringing that across.   Anne is a unique girl and in some ways she's strange or I should say she comes off that way.    She still has Anne's optimism, perseverance and ambition but she also seems more relatable in that you can see how the events of her past have helped form who she is.  Favorite moment was when the ingenuity shinned through and Anne went around offering her cleaning services for the holidays in order to raise money.

Matthew and Marilla were wonderfully cast IMO.  Despite her best efforts there was a definite warmth to Marilla and her relationship with Matthew.  The hard won rapport she eventually formed with Anne was also a slow build that was worth the wait.   

Matthew is always lovable, nobody will ever top the guy that played him in the Megan Fellows movies but this actor had a quiet charm that I very much appreciated.  I liked that the writers chose to expand more on Matthew and Marilla and their various past experiences.  They were well drawn characters in the novels but this series is definitely kicking it up a notch and I like it.

Rachel was likable and I look forward to spending more time with the character next episode.

Gilbert Blythe is VERY well cast.  He's got a maturity that counteracts suitable against Anne's impulsiveness and naivety.   They were sure to demonstrate he's sharp, strong and gave him a very believable sensitivity.  He and Anne played off of each other very well.  The charm he had made it perfectly believable that he would be the most popular boy at the school house and when we get insight into his home life, he becomes even more impressive.  I'm worried about him off on his own but I'm very interested in where they take his character, I hope he comes back to Town soon.  I miss him and his friendship with Anne.

Another stand out for me was Jerry.  I didn't know what to make of his character at first but he is awesome.  He's a wonderful supporting character to Anne and I really appreciated how the relationship between he and Anne evolved over the course of the season.  He was always friendly when possible but he didn't take any crap from Anne either.  He was charming, worldly and tough.  But he had a warmth to him as well.  When he told Anne that she could always go back to school during her boycott, you could tell he mourned that it wasn't an option for himself and he didn't want Anne to miss out on the possibility.  When Gibert and Anne were staring at each other after saying goodbye and Jeremy leans forward and says "Au Revoir" I had to giggle.  And before that I did "awe" when Jerry grabbed Gilbert and told him to get away from Anne when he thought she was being harassed.   And "awed" again when he asked if he could stay with Anne that night, then swallowed when he said he isn't use to having an actual bed to himself and not to worry, he never kicked his sisters when they slept.  sniff.

If the show continues on there is no way there is NOT a triangle between Gilbert/Anne/Jerry.  It's some time off but foreshadowing isn't a strong enough word for how obvious it is.   That said, I like what these writers have done thus far so I am definitely along for the ride.

Diana was a sweet girl and very likable in her friendship with Anne.  Although she admires Anne I like that Dianna always comes across as self-confident and very much not a side kick.

Josie Pye was as hissable and loathsome as ever.  But my word, Billy Andrews was a piece of work, and by that I mean he was as horrible as a Michael Myers halloween mask.  This was a surprise since in the novels the relationship between Billy and Anne was quite the opposite of what was presented on screen.  I didn't mind it, it was just noteworthy.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, tell me we are going to get a 2nd season.  Some of the reviews have been harsh on the show but I enjoyed it immensely.  I've given up trusting critics about Netflix programs since Sense8, I just hope whoever controls the show does as well.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
51 minutes ago, Advance35 said:

Diana was a sweet girl and very likable in her friendship with Anne.  Although she admires Anne I like that Dianna always comes across as self-confident and very much not a side kick.

Yes, I thought that brought something new to the character.  

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Camera One said:

 We got these newly invented details about Marilla's past, Matthew's past, a hint to Jerry's background, a bit about Gilbert's dad, but none of it felt very substantial. 

I loved the fleshing out of Marilla's relationship with John Blythe, especially since it made the ribbon she'd given Anne all the more valuable (oh how I'd love it if Gilbert wore that chapeau in Anne's presence without realizing its significance to Marilla/his dad)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
3 minutes ago, Keener said:

I loved the fleshing out of Marilla's relationship with John Blythe, especially since it made the ribbon she'd given Anne all the more valuable (oh how I'd love it if Gilbert wore that chapeau in Anne's presence without realizing its significance to Marilla/his dad)

I did like that.  It was "cute".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I finished the entire series in one weekend. I enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would.  I admit I've never read the books so my only influence is the Megan Fellows' movies and the Avonlea series and the 1934 movie and sequel.  I was struck by the sheer meannest of people towards an orphan, it was almost unbelievable.  I really enjoyed Rachel Lynde and I never thought anyone would surpass my love of Jonathan Crombie as Gilbert but I really just loved this new Gilbert. There were so many new dimensions added to characters that we know so well.  I was holding my breath hoping Matthew would make it until the end of the season.  

I was not expecting such an abrupt ending to the season and like others have mentioned I hope this plotline with the criminal boarders is wrapped up quickly in the next season.

I think my biggest complaint, and it's not serious, is the theme song, it seemed so out of place.  Overall, I really liked it and will be back for season 2.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

I binged this over the weekend and I have to admit I was a bit flummoxed by the experience. I think this has to be seen as a re-imagining of Anne of Green Gables rather than an adaptation. As I sit with it, it's growing on me. I grew up loving the books, but I was open to a new adaptation - I liked the Megan Follows version but don't consider it untouchable. I love the casting - this Anne looks just like Anne should look. And I like the fleshed-out backstories for many of the characters, the darker take on what it was to be an orphan at that time and the trauma Anne suffered and how it has affected her, the more forthright way class is dealt with in the show in the form of Jerry, the softening of Marilla and the more open friendship between her and Mrs. Lynde, and the gorgeous art direction and cinematography. The lighting in particular is magical and gives some of the transcendent beauty I would expect from an Anne adaptation. There are certain scenes that feel just right, like the girls starting their story club.

But it's the dramatic plot changes that bother me. I don't mind not sticking slavishly to the plot of the boook. But at least some of the charm of the books is that small incidents loom large for a quirky child in this quiet, close-knit community. And here we have Anne rushing into a burning house, running away, sinking ships and financial ruin, sleazy pawn shops, muggers, criminals moving into Green Gables, etc. Not only are some of these plot elements pretty over-the-top (I really gave a side-eye to Anne running into the burning Gillis house), but by focusing on them, we lose some of the introspection and simply slowness and smallness of life that I feel are central to the story. I mean, a dramatic incident in the book is when Anne accidentally uses salt rather than sugar in a cake. I almost think seeing a more realistic view of Anne's trauma in that context (of small mishaps) would be more effective than it is in the context of plots taken from a dime novel.

And as others have noted, I'm disappointed that nature and Anne's escape into natural beauty are somewhat absent. In my mind the beauty of the natural world is a huge, huge part of this story (and all of LM Montgomery's work). There are some beautiful shots, sure, but Anne's rhapsodic response to her surroundings is missing. This girl talks to flowers on the regular.

And I agree some of the anachronistic language takes me out of it: there is a scene in an earlier episode (I think...binging) between all the boys, when Gilbert and Billy get into a fight, that had me cringing with the overly modern language. I was actually physically shaking my head. 

But regardless, I will continue to watch. I agree they got more right than wrong, and I'm interested to see where they take the story from here.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post

I'm a slavish devotee to the books, which I can practically recite word for word, so I was apprehensive about the series. However I agree that there is far more to like than dislike. The cast are spot on and I love the relationships developing between the principals. 

I think the show falters in tone a bit too much, and that's probably the writing trying too hard to be suspenseful and dramatic and obsessing about pace. Writers seem to lose faith in their material and their audience's ability to sustain interest once it's not modern 5 second attention span stuff. Hence the rather silly modern language  - 'whatever' etc. 

But overall I love it a lot. It's got a lot of really sweet moments which make up for all the melodrama and deviations from the source. The little moment when Gilbert was at his father's grave and the snowflake melted into a tear in his hand was beautiful. You don't get that kind of sensitivity from tv much, so I'm inclined to give the rest of the show a big pass for the negative stuff. 

Edited by spottedreptile
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, spottedreptile said:

Writers seem to lose faith in their material and their audience's ability to sustain interest once it's not modern 5 second attention span stuff. Hence the rather silly modern language  - 'whatever' etc. 

It's true that the more current language sometimes jars me, but I'm pretty sure that the meaning of current words like "whatever" were felt by youth throughout the ages. They may not have used that term but eye rolling is universal and ageless. "Whatever" is just a verbalization of that (from my perspective). Further, boys and girls - when they were allowed to interact casually, generally like to have their own (frowned on) colloquial ways of speaking to each other.

Given that, if they don't stray into hurling epithets such as "fag!" as a put down, I can adjust to less archaic forms of speech. I wouldn't wonder that some common slurs from the 19th century have completely different, possibly positive,  meanings currently. Language is extremely fluid that way.

Edited by Anothermi
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Who knew Canada was such a small country? I have no idea what the point of adding villains into the show adds to the story, but I guess I will just see where its going. I haven't really been into all the changes the show has made (Matthew almost killing himself seems WAY too dramatic and dark for this story) but some of them, like the expansion of Jerry this season and the stuff with Gilberts' father have worked out really well, so who knows, maybe this will be alright.

I think my favorite part was Anne selling her dress. It was the biggest moment of her character growth for me, giving up something lovely and romantic for something practical for her family. A family is a two way street, and now that Marilla and Matthew have shown how much they care about her, its sweet to see how much she cares about them and their life together.

Enjoyed seeing Gilbert and Anne apologizing for their arguments before, as well as Anne warming up to Jerry more. Anne is a really sweet kid, but she can be rather harsh on people who make a bad first impression on her, but she's quite quick to move on. And I really liked her making up stories about all the stuff she was selling to Ye Olde Pawnshop Guy, and his amused reactions to her obvious make believe. It seemed like he actually admired her hustle!

I really enjoyed this season, flaws and all, and its REALLY made me want to take a trip to Canada. So pretty!

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
49 minutes ago, tennisgurl said:

Anne is a really sweet kid, but she can be rather harsh on people who make a bad first impression on her, but she's quite quick to move on.

I think the show allowing Anne some - for lack of a better word - meaner flaws really adds to the depth. As a character, she always had her foibles, but they were more charming that really damaging to others: overly flighty or romantic or dreamy or vain about her hair or whatever. I thought her cruelty to Jerry in the early going, which the show made clear arose from her fear that his being there made it less likely that the Cuthberts would keep her, both allowed her to be a more nuanced character and reinforced the show's view of the depth of the trauma of her early childhood and the resulting insecurity.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/1/2017 at 2:42 PM, Bec said:

Since show!Gilbert's father died from illness, it kind of already lays the groundwork for him becoming a doctor eventually. In the books he just seemed to randomly go to medical school for no particular reason, as far as I remember.

 

Not so much "random" as high-minded. And he was planning on it while he and Anne were still teaching before going to Redmond, so it wasn't sudden or anything. From Anne of Avonlea, chapter 7:

Quote

Gilbert had finally made up his mind that he was going to be a doctor. “It’s a splendid profession,” he said enthusiastically. “A fellow has to fight something all through life . . . didn’t somebody once define man as a fighting animal? . . . and I want to fight disease and pain and ignorance . . . which are all members one of another. I want to do my share of honest, real work in the world, Anne . . . add a little to the sum of human knowledge that all the good men have been accumulating since it began. The folks who lived before me have done so much for me that I want to show my gratitude by doing something for the folks who will live after me. It seems to me that is the only way a fellow can get square with his obligations to the race.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

  On 4/30/2017 at 10:31 PM, satrunrose said:

I'm oddly worried about how Gilbert will get from running away to sea to teaching to medicine. I don't want to miss out on Dr Blythe and his off page moments of medical genius.

Since show!Gilbert's father died from illness, it kind of already lays the groundwork for him becoming a doctor eventually. In the books he just seemed to randomly go to medical school for no particular reason, as far as I remember.

When those robbers were robbing Jerry, I thought Anne was going to show up and break a plank over each of their heads. I did wonder why casting hired a pretty good looking actor to play one of those robbers. Looks like it's going to play into the story somehow. Wonder what they're planning to do, rob Green Gables? Pull some kind of con? I'm gonna be annoyed if Green Gables get in financial trouble again just after getting out.

Can't wait to see more, though. I can't believe it's already the season finale!

I can't remember if Book Gilbert's father was a doctor, but his uncle was. (Gilbert inherits his practice eventually.) So it's definitely in the family.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Quote

Ironically, the only person who isn't the source of much story at the turn of the season is Anne herself: she's barely changed at all since she became a Cuthbert

From the article referred to above: I have to agree with the opinion here of the article writer. Anne doesn't really change much apart from growing up and becoming more quiet and mature, she never really loses her tendency to hold a grudge or lose her temper; she remains full of spirit and inclined to get into scrapes; what in fact does Anne Shirley learn about life that she doesn't already know? Apart from knowing what makes the roads red that is. 

It's often the way with leading characters - the others in the book change, but that is because they come to know the main character and her influence on them changes their outlook on life. This is true for Anne; she is the agent of change for others, but I don't know that she herself is anything less than fully formed, which can make her dull at times. Don't get me wrong I love the girl, but the series is more about how Anne affects others than the other way round.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
12 hours ago, spottedreptile said:

It's often the way with leading characters - the others in the book change, but that is because they come to know the main character and her influence on them changes their outlook on life. This is true for Anne; she is the agent of change for others, but I don't know that she herself is anything less than fully formed, which can make her dull at times. Don't get me wrong I love the girl, but the series is more about how Anne affects others than the other way round.

With this show, to me, this issue reaches beyond Anne.  Matthew and Marilla have pretty much reached their zenith of their change as well, and we're only at the end of the first season.  I don't feel that we saw the gradual change in Marilla which occurred over the course of the book.  I enjoyed the loving looks that Marilla was already giving Anne by mid-season, but I felt I lost the joy of the journey.  Did Anne help her to process the death of John Blythe?  It's unclear.  Would Matthew's desperate actions at the bank have differed if Anne wasn't in the picture?  Who knows.

Edited by Camera One
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/3/2017 at 2:57 AM, insubordination said:

This show hasn't captured my heart... I still hope it's renewed as I will watch anything 'Anne' related, but it is not the show of my dreams.

Exactly.

I finally put my finger on something I’ve been missing: Anne’s academic competitiveness, the emphasis on her intellect, her life of the mind. These things are touched on in Anne’s brightness—her reading, spelling, cleverness mentioned—but it ultimately felt cursory, the focus shifted to the emotional or social, without striving to balance the themes.

I kept wondering if the show did this to appeal to a modern girl audience. Which would be terribly unfortunate, because there’s so much research on how adolescent girls are subtly (and not subtly) taught to let go of intellectual curiosity or ambition and prioritize social interactions. To see the show prioritize the melodrama, as many here have said, seems to feed into this shift.

I did like the show in its understated moments. The subtle parallels and connections between Gilbert’s and Matthew and Marilla’s childhoods were an aspect I’d never thought about, for example—and they were made better by the show not over-explaining! By the end, I really resented every time Anne said “I’ll be the hero of my own story” or some other theme out loud…

I’m off to look up RH Thomson now—I don’t remember him from Avonlea, but I should!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

If I didn't know the books, I'd expect Anne to fall for and eventually marry Jerry. Curious choice to make him so prominent.

I think the first two Sullivan movies are pitch perfect and it's hard to shake my love to accept this verison. But the cast is quite good across the board, even if they don't always feel like the characters we knew. 

Trying to set aside nostalgia though, I can't say I like this grimdark version exactly. I just don't really care for the modernization aspect. I never really yearned for a conversation between Marilla and Anne about menstruation. And the Matthew from the books would likely fall down dead on the spot from embarrassment if he'd walked in on that given how he was too shy to even ask for a dress at the general store. 

Actually, the one change/wholesale new plot thread I did like was the dress shop owner once being Matthew's sweetheart. But I didn't follow what happened after the brother dying that made Marilla and Matthew both turn into spinsters? 

A lot of the other changes just feel superfluous or dramatic for drama's sake. It's interesting how much more unlikable or tiresome I sometimes find this Anne, too. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
10 minutes ago, taragel said:

But I didn't follow what happened after the brother dying that made Marilla and Matthew both turn into spinsters? 

Yes, introducing this here-to-fore unknown brother piqued my interest and then it went nowhere. Perhaps the show runners have plans to flesh that out sometime later. Hope so.

The best I can figure is that the dead brother was the eldest and was expected to marry and take over the farm. That would include caring for the aging parents. If he died before marrying that would mean both Matthew AND Marilla would have to cancel whatever they'd planned for their adulthood and take over those tasks. Matthew would have taken over running the farm (helping with the running first) and Marilla would become the "house wife". Did their brief conversation mention their mother? Either she died before her eldest son, or was so devastated by his death that she could not care for the home. Both scenarios would require Marilla to take over her duties, or her care AND her duties.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/15/2017 at 8:33 AM, stanleyk said:

financial ruin, sleazy pawn shops, muggers, criminals moving into Green Gables, etc.

All that's missing is Carm turning up at Green Gables with a ricotta pie. 

Quote

I almost think seeing a more realistic view of Anne's trauma in that context (of small mishaps) would be more effective than it is in the context of plots taken from a dime novel.

I agree. Anne's past would have been achingly hard to watch if it had been written with the same depth and delicacy as the book (instead of the melodramatic "no wire hangers!" theatrics Beckett used). 

Edited by film noire
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

I just watched on Netflix so...that was really the season finale or did more episodes air in Canada? It seemed very odd to have it end there.

I never read the books or saw any other adaptations so I was surprised to see the backlash but from what I've read, I get that this is a very dark interpretation.  This wouldn't normally be something on my radar but I was charmed by it and thought the young actress playing Anne was excellent.

Fun fact:  I did an IMDB search of the show and while looking through executive producer Moira Kelly-Beckett's profile I saw that in her acting days she played a character named Ann Shirley in an old TV show from 1990.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size