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Books and documentaries about polygamy: Let's gather them here!


CouchTater
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Polygamy is fascinating!

I plan to do a polygamy deep dive over the holidays during my time off. 

I'm hoping we can start a collection of  suggestions for documentaries, books, web sites,articles about polygamy, 

  • I just started reading my first first-person account on polygamy, "Shattered Dreams" by Irene Spencer.
  • I just bought "Sound of Gravel" by Ruth Wariner, which is on my Thanksgiving reading list. 
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5 hours ago, CouchTater said:

Polygamy is fascinating!

I plan to do a polygamy deep dive over the holidays during my time off. 

I'm hoping we can start a collection of  suggestions for documentaries, books, web sites,articles about polygamy, 

  • I just started reading my first first-person account on polygamy, "Shattered Dreams" by Irene Spencer.
  • I just bought "Sound of Gravel" by Ruth Wariner, which is on my Thanksgiving reading list. 

I read Shattered Dreams.  It was very good.   She was married to Verlan LeBaron.  Wont divulge anything but it was very eye opening on how many of these families lived.

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Keep Sweet: Children Of Polygamy by Debbie Palmer, Paperback | December 10, 2004, gives a good perspective of the polygamists in Bountiful, British Columbia (near Creston).  Now that passports are required to cross the border, I wonder if human trafficking of teenage girls between the US & Canada is still as prevalent.  Or do they hide the girls in the trip to marry their cousins, uncles, great uncles, etc? 

Escape by Carolyn Jessop & Laura Palmer is good too

Edited by deirdra
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I’d suggest 

The Book of Mormon:

https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/scriptures/bofm/title-page?lang=eng

The Persistence of Polygamy: Joseph Smith and the Origins of Mormon Polygamy by Newell G. Bringhurst (Author), Craig L. Foster  (Author)

“...The first in a three-volume anthology in which top scholars examine the entire range and history of Mormon polygamy...”

https://www.amazon.com/Persistence-Polygamy-Joseph-Origins-Mormon/dp/193490113X

Emmeline Wells-An Intimate History

”...Emmeline B. Wells was the most noted Utah Mormon woman of her time. Lauded nationally for her energetic support of the women’s rights movement of the nineteenth century, she was a self-made woman who channeled her lifelong sense of destiny into ambitious altruism...”

https://uofupress.lib.utah.edu/emmeline-b-wells/

Edited by kicotan
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A number of years ago, a documentary was on cable.  It's on YouTube, called Personal Polygamy.  It talks about a fundamentalist Mormon community in Manti, Utah.  

I read a book titled, "It's Not About the Sex, My Ass" on my kindle a year or so ago.  The author references the Manti sect, that she, husband, and sister wife were a part of.  It's worth reading, to get a sense of what it's like when one's husband "gets a calling" to take other wives. 

Christine Brown's aunt Kristen wrote "50 Years in Polygamy."  I recommend it, too.

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Off-topic somewhat, I have a recommendation for a book about the Osho/Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh cult called The Promise of Paradise by Satya Bharti (nee Jill) Franklin. A beautifully written book by the woman who ghost-wrote (edited and made readable) most of the books based on Osho's lectures. She left 3 children with her ex-husband in the NY suburbs circa 1971 and went to live at the Ashram in Poona, India, later moving to Oregon to build "Rajneeshpuram." This is the group depicted in last year's documentary "Wild Wild Country." Although an early follower and member of the guru's inner circle, she is not mentioned in the documentary, which is a fascinating but extremely one-sided view based largely on interviews with the nefarious Ma Anand Sheela, who poisoned a whole town (among other crimes) after maneuvering to become the Bhagwan's right-hand woman. 

Apologies for thread hijack but if we are calling fundie Mormonism a cult, which it certainly resembles, I thought it would interest readers of these boards. 

Regarding Mormon history,  "Under the Banner of Heaven" by Jon Krakauer is on my reading list, although I haven't started it.

Last but not least: Sara Davidson's book of journalistic essays, Real Property, (pub circa 1975) has an essay about a polygamist family that she interviewed. She draws essentially the same conclusions about that group of women that most of us have about the Browns.

Edited by Teafortwo
added another book
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Thank you for receommending The Promise of Paradise.  I've seen Wild Wild Country, it was riveting!

As for books, I've mentioned The Polygamous Wives Writing Club in other threads.  I'm about halfway through but the parallels between these 19th century women and the women on Sister Wives is pretty striking, and proof that polygamy never worked for women and never will.

Also, Troublemaker by Leah Remini, about her life in Scientology, was fantastic.  I adore Leah and everything she's doing to blow the roof off of David Miscavige's cult.

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“...Under Susan McCloud's skillful hand the life story of Ellis Reynolds Shipp, the second woman doctor in Utah, becomes an engrossing drama of courage, determination, sacrifice, and fortitude. From meticulous research, with most of the dialogue having been taken verbatim from journals and family notes, the author unfolds a story that combines romantic love with life's realities...”

https://www.amazon.com/Not-Vain-inspiring-pioneer-doctor/dp/0884945294

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On 11/16/2019 at 8:31 AM, CouchTater said:

Polygamy is fascinating!

I plan to do a polygamy deep dive over the holidays during my time off. 

I'm hoping we can start a collection of  suggestions for documentaries, books, web sites,articles about polygamy, 

  • I just started reading my first first-person account on polygamy, "Shattered Dreams" by Irene Spencer.
  • I just bought "Sound of Gravel" by Ruth Wariner, which is on my Thanksgiving reading list. 

I went through a polygamy deep dive sometime back.

I recommend adding a few titles: Daughter of the Saints by Dorothy Allred Solomon, His Favorite Wife by Susan Ray Schmidt (another of Verlan LeBaron's wives), and Stolen Innocence by Elissa Wall

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Not sure about this one... I came across it while searching for something else.

It's a documentary from 2009 and it's called Sister Wife

Here's the synopsis:  DoriAnn was born and raised in Colorado City, Arizona, and comes from a long line of polygamists dating back to her ancestor, Parley P. Pratt, one of the original Mormon pioneers. DoriAnn and her immediate family left Colorado City over 25 years ago, eventually helping to establish a more progressive branch of Mormon fundamentalism in the nearby community of Centennial Park. After a turbulent childhood, DoriAnn ran away to live with relatives in a Mormon fundamentalist compound in Mexico. There she met and married her first husband at age 16, living with him throughout Mexico and Central America. DoriAnn and her first husband had eight children together in a monogamous marriage, although they ultimately divorced.

DoriAnn returned to her birthplace on the Utah/Arizona border in 1997, and two years later became the second wife to her younger sisters husband. In the nearly ten years DoriAnn has been a part of this plural marriage, she has borne another four children. Today DoriAnn has immediate family members practicing polygamy from western Canada, all the way to northern Mexico and beyond. Her life's joy is spending time with her husband, her children Kevin, William, Benjamin, Miriam, Brandon, Rebecca, Esther, Stephen, Curtis and Simeoné as well as her first grandson and other family members.

here's a little snippet on youtube

Edited by Joan of Argh
synopsis
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22 hours ago, deirdra said:

Where are all the books about the husband's daily struggles with polygamy?

Ask and you shall receive!!! Lol!😊

Joseph Smith’s Polygamy, Volume I: History

Author:  Brian C. Hale

“...Born in 1805 and silenced thirty-nine years later by assassins' bullets, he dictated more than one-hundred revelations, published books of new scripture, built a temple, organized several new cities, and became the proclaimed prophet to tens of thousands during his abbreviated life. Among his many novel teachings and practices, none is more controversial than plural marriage, a restoration of the Old Testament practice that he accepted as part of his divinely appointed mission...”

https://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Smiths-Polygamy-1-History/dp/1589586859/ref=asc_df_1589586859/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312154644197&hvpos=1o9&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16683213011058920617&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9031411&hvtargid=pla-571274578473&psc=1

ETA: Apparently there are 3 Volumes of information regarding Joseph Smith’s daily struggles ... the above link is merely the first one.

Edited by kicotan
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Here's the abridged version: mainly, his struggles with polygamy consisted of 

#1 hiding it from his first/legal wife, Emma, as long as possible. (When she found out, she was livid). 

#2 hiding it from the general membership as long as possible. (In the beginning, for many years, it was a dirty little secret only shared with and practiced by a very small circle of his friends. Which tends to lessen the validity of the eternal salvation angle - because why should that be available only to a select few?. The women they chose to marry were complicit in keeping it secret).

#3 hiding it from the husbands, brothers and fathers of the wives he and his minions were acquiring. (Many who objected were invited on excursions by his outriders, from which they never returned). 

#4 hiding it from authorities and neighbors. (While breaking into homes, stealing crops and rustling livestock because those who practiced the principle had too many mouths for one man to feed).

#5 hiding from the membership that the tithing books were being cooked. (See #4).

It truly is a shame that an angry mob stormed the jail where he and his brother Hyrum and some others were in custody. They were murdered; after so many years citizens were fed up with him/them skating time after time.

All told, including the times when he fled state jurisdictions and/or federal judges set aside state arrest warrants, history would have been better served if he had lived to face trials on charges of illegal banking, bank fraud, perjury, inciting to riot, treason and conspiracy to commit murder.  

None of that will be found in books written and approved by members/church historians. You will need other sources to get the big picture. 

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Joseph Smith was a horndog (my autocorrect wanted corndog) that couldn't be satisfied with one woman, and so made up a religion to cover his cheating (and apparently criminal?) ass.

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.  I liken it to L. Ron Hubbard making up Scientology to cover his greedy money-grubbing ass.  

I fail to see how either of these so-called "religions" have any redeeming qualities, especially for the women unfortunate enough to be roped into this life.  YMMV.

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In Polygamous Wives Writing Club, the "theory" was that there were all these unborn souls in heaven wanting to come to earth, so if a man married and impregnated all of his wives, these souls could be born.  Also, supposedly polygamy was meant as security for women - if a man took more than one wife, the unmarried women would then become part of a secure family and no longer be alone - except for the fact that those same women also had to frequently hide from marshals who were going around Utah/Arizona/Nevada looking to arrest the men, and if the men were caught living polygamy, the women had to testify against their husbands knowing that they'd be facing prison, and often the women were made to live alone and raise their children alone, sometimes far away from their "husband" who was busy living with whichever wife he preferred so he wouldn't get busted.

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I was under the possibly misguided perception that this thread was a gathering place of sorts for book/video/informative materials recommendations with regards to polygamy.

If the only suggestions folks want are specifically aimed at negative accounts of someone’s experience with polygamy or the “wrongness” of polygamy in general, I’ll stop posting my suggestions.

As far as opinions go, if we are indeed welcome in voicing those here as well, mine is that I believe most would be hard pressed to defend many of the illegal and immoral actions that have been committed in the name of many of the mainstream religions that are accepted as valid today.  The Roman Catholic Church is a major stand-out in regards to their history, misogyny and abuse of children by clergy.  I would not call for their religion to be deemed illegal, even though I would never be ok with being a part of it.  I am not a Mormon of any stripe, neither do I belong to any of the various religions out there.  

My fervent desire is merely that someday religious freedom in this country isn’t just allowed to the select few who believe in monogamy or are card carrying members of a government sanctioned religion.

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7 minutes ago, MargeGunderson said:

The books listed are ones that people who post here have read, not a bibliography of books on polygamy. Do you have one that you can add from a different perspective? If you would like to offer up books that support polygamy, go right ahead. 

Thanks, Marge.

I appreciate your support! 😊

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I think the problem is there aren't many pro-polygamy books out there. I know the main family in my former town did a lot of interviews (starting in the 70s) proclaiming their brand of polygamy was superior and amazing. Several wives still speak positively about their own experience but none of the children practice polygamy and most of the family keeps silent about it. Other articles written about the family have exposed the reality. Knowing them personally also exposed the affects of that lifestyle on them.

This site is pro-polygamy and has resources listed.

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All I know about polygamy I've learned from reality TV and books. Nothing I've seen or read shows polygamy in a good light. The wives turn into single family homes, many are impoverished, and their emotional needs are usually neglected. None of them are allowed to say out loud that it is difficult and painful to share your lover with another woman or watch him parent another family's children.

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Title: A House Full of Females: Plural Marriage and Women's Rights in Early Mormonism, 1835-1870 

Author: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

“...A stunning and sure-to-be controversial book that pieces together, through more than two dozen nineteenth-century diaries, letters, albums, minute-books, and quilts left by first-generation Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, the never-before-told story of the earliest days of the women of Mormon "plural marriage," whose right to vote in the state of Utah was given to them by a Mormon-dominated legislature as an outgrowth of polygamy in 1870, fifty years ahead of the vote nationally ratified by Congress, and who became political actors in spite of, or because of, their marital arrangements. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, writing of this small group of Mormon women who've previously been seen as mere names and dates, has brilliantly reconstructed these textured, complex lives to give us a fulsome portrait of who these women were and of their "sex radicalism"--the idea that a woman should choose when and with whom to bear children...”

https://www.amazon.com/House-Full-Females-Mormonism-1835-1870/dp/0307594904

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2 hours ago, kicotan said:

the idea that a woman should choose when and with whom to bear children.

Um.....kay.  While I haven't read the book things must have been way different back then.  I'm not sure being forced at 14 to marry an uncle decades older has anything to do with choice.

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2 hours ago, Nysha said:

All I know about polygamy I've learned from reality TV and books. Nothing I've seen or read shows polygamy in a good light. The wives turn into single family homes, many are impoverished, and their emotional needs are usually neglected. None of them are allowed to say out loud that it is difficult and painful to share your lover with another woman or watch him parent another family's children.

I first learned about it 20 years ago taking comparative religion as part of a Sociology degree course at college.  I found it just as fascinating as the belief and reverence for the 33 million gods that are a part of the Hindu faith.

Since then I’ve learned there are many sides to the story of religions~most recently Mr. kicotan and I watched the documentary “ God is Bigger than Elvis”, about a former actress turned nun who turned down an extremely lucrative Hollywood career to devote herself to being a cloistered nun.  She’s been at it for almost 50 years.

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6 minutes ago, Kohola3 said:

Um.....kay.  While I haven't read the book things must have been way different back then.  I'm not sure being forced at 14 to marry an uncle decades older has anything to do with choice.

In the beginning...lol...the time that the early pioneering women of Mormonism lived in, specifically referenced in the book as 1835-1870, general attitudes about age of marriage and to whom weren’t necessarily left up to the bride in mainstream USA.  Slave women had no choice.  Birth control pills didn’t exist and Catholic women wouldn’t have been allowed to take them anyway.

I think the thrust of the book is that in their time, Mormon women had different choices than a majority of women back then and because of that, they were able to have control over a certain amount of their lives that non-Mormon women didn’t enjoy.  In the present day, the obstinate insistence that The Brown Wives drone on about regarding how they were the ones that chose Kody, after being inspired, of course...and the repugnance they display regarding men “seeking” plural wives is most likely deep rooted in their fundamental Mormon upbringing.  Obviously, today’s standards are vastly different.  

I don’t agree that anyone should be forced to marry someone that isn’t their choice...regardless of age...but not ALL FLDS polygamous sects subscribe to the Warren Jeff’s version of what is appropriate today, so I hesitate to paint them all with the same brush.

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1 hour ago, kicotan said:

Since then I’ve learned there are many sides to the story of religions~most recently Mr. kicotan and I watched the documentary “ God is Bigger than Elvis”, about a former actress turned nun who turned down an extremely lucrative Hollywood career to devote herself to being a cloistered nun.  She’s been at it for almost 50 years.

Dolores Hart? The movies she made were in my coming-of-age era, the age when you're trying on role models for size and seeing how they fit. She was very attractive in an understated and ladylike way. I thought she had a very appealing presence onscreen and I've always been fascinated by and interested in her life path. 

In a way, technically, Catholic nuns are in a polygamous relationship. They are known as Brides of Christ and there are many of them and only one of him. Which I think is an interesting way to look at it. 

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Hey, kicotan, I need to let you know that my intention was not to throw shade at another poster (you) but to provide perspective. 

deirdra asked where are the stories about men struggling with polygamy (a very good question BTW) and I responded by listing Joseph Smith's struggles because he is the one who started the ball rolling. Sister Wives is his fault!

Most of the facts I posted about him are not known by people outside Utah or those who have little exposure to his philosophy. I ended my post by saying that church-approved books/documentaries will provide a biased perspective - but that doesn't change the fact that nothing in my post was inaccurate. Yes, it did reflect on your post which noted a 3-volume treatise by a church member but it I wanted to provide perspective about the books, not about your stance/opinion. I sincerely apologize if I came across to you that way and I recognize that I am responsible for how that came about.

I fervently agree with you that, across the board, organized religions have sad and sorry histories of abuse and intolerance - but this thread/this show pertains to one certain religion and therefore my comments did that also. If this was related to the Catholic church I would probably be pounding Simon Peter and Pope Gregory I. 

As a feminist, I would like to give the territorial legislature credit for allowing (allowing!) women to vote 50 years before the federal government did - if I didn't have the sneaking suspicion that it was done to provide one man with numerous votes. Because surely the women voted the same way their husbands did. I suspect that Kody Brown's wives do not vote for candidates or issues that don't have his approval and I will multiply that suspicion x1000 for the polygamous female pioneer voting bloc. 

I wonder if we will get more recommendations on books about polygamy in other religions, in other countries - we already have one. When I evaluate a situation my thing is always to ask Cui bono? Who benefits? It usually turns out for me that if the answer to that question is hinky then the situation is hinky. If there are established religions or systems where large numbers of polygamous wives and children are treated kindly and equitably I'm all for hearing about it. 

Edited by suomi
typo
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16 minutes ago, suomi said:

Hey, kicotan, I need to let you know that my intention was not to throw shade at another poster (you) but to provide perspective.

No worries, my intentions are the same.

17 minutes ago, suomi said:

As a feminist, I would like to give the territorial legislature credit for allowing (allowing!) women to vote 50 years before the federal government did - if I didn't have the sneaking suspicion that it was done to provide one man with numerous votes. Because surely the women voted the same way their husbands did. I suspect that Kody Brown's wives do not vote for candidates or issues that don't have his approval and I will multiply that suspicion x1000 for the polygamous female pioneer voting bloc.

If I wouldn’t have been made aware of Martha Cannon, I’d have tended to agree with you on that point, but apparently, November 3, 1896 Cannon became the first female State Senator elected in the United States, defeating her own husband, who was also on the ballot.

She was a Dr. and a founder and member of Utah's first State Board of Health.

As far as the Brown Wives and assumptions about their voting preferences...I’m fairly sure there are more than a few women in monogamous marriages that vote the way their husbands instruct them to.  I was recently asked by one of my husbands friends if I would be voting for Trump again and I replied, “ What makes you think I voted for him last time?”  He said” I just assumed it ran in the family”.  I’ve never expressed support for Trump in any way, yet, because my husband does, he just assumed I do too.

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38 minutes ago, suomi said:

I wonder if we will get more recommendations on books about polygamy in other religions, in other countries - we already have one. When I evaluate a situation my thing is always to ask Cui bono? Who benefits? It usually turns out for me that if the answer to that question is hinky then the situation is hinky. If there are established religions or systems where large numbers of polygamous wives and children are treated kindly and equitably I'm all for hearing about it.

I tried to link articles about this guy in Indonesia, heavy Muslim influence of polygamy but I felt that if they required a subscription  or too many pop ups to read them it would be more annoying than helpful.  Anyway, he’s got lots of money, an Islamic polygamist and owns a chain of restaurants that even have polygamy based menu items!

“...Puspo Wardoyo is a contented man. He has four wives, 10 children and 34 grilled chicken restaurants. Indonesians, he believes, should embrace his example.

Mr Puspo is campaigning to make polygamy respectable in Indonesia, where it was suppressed for decades under the former dictator, Suharto. Now it is enjoying a renaissance, thanks in part to Mr Puspo's energetic efforts to promote it as a desirable way of life...”

One could google him and get a general idea of where he’s at, sans Mormonism~just replace it with Fundie Islam.

Edited by kicotan
Grammar again
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Can I moderate , as the creator of this topic?  I say this with peace and love. 😊 

I was hoping to have a thread where it'd be easy to keep track of recommendations for books, videos, articles, etc. about polygamy.  I fear that if we go too far down the rabbit hole here, books, videos, articles, etc. will get lost in discussion.  Very good discussion, mind you, but not exactly on topic.

Thanks in advance, friends.

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1 minute ago, CouchTater said:

Can I moderate , as the creator of this topic?  I say this with peace and love. 😊 

I was hoping to have a thread where it'd be easy to keep track of recommendations for books, videos, articles, etc. about polygamy.  I fear that if we go too far down the rabbit hole here, books, videos, articles, etc. will get lost in discussion.  Very good discussion, mind you, but not exactly on topic.

Thanks in advance, friends.

My apologies for any derails.

I will keep my comments to recommendations only going forward.

😊

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I've read The Polygamist's Daughter by Christine's cousin (and doppelganger) Anna LeBaron. Her family bounced back and forth between the US and Mexico, which was interesting.

I've also read Becoming Sister Wives by those folx...oh what's their name?...It's on the tip of my tongue...

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I read Becoming Sister Wives when it was first issued, on my Kindle.  I'd say they minimized their problems with one another quite a bit.  🤨  It would have been more informative if they would have explained stuff like what Janelle's first marriage was like, and why it broke up.  I guess they didn't want to bother readers with the truth!

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The Punk Rock Polygamist’s Blog Profile

Nearly 10 years of blogging, including videos of presentations he’s given.  He states he is not FLDS...just a Mormon polygamist who started a blog about his experiences of his family being the subject of a tv documentary.

From his Bio:

”Moroni Jessop and his family have been featured on C4 in England and M6 in France. In the USA, they have appeared on programs on TLC and the History Channel. He has also been a guest on NPR.”

ETA:  just for fun I checked out some of the blogs he follows as well~this one was especially intriguing as I couldn’t quite understand why a poly family would need a designated hitter...lol

DH of a Normal Poly Family

Edited by kicotan
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45 minutes ago, kicotan said:

The Punk Rock Polygamist’s Blog Profile

Nearly 10 years of blogging, including videos of presentations he’s given.  He states he is not FLDS...just a Mormon polygamist who started a blog about his experiences of his family being the subject of a tv documentary.

From his Bio:

”Moroni Jessop and his family have been featured on C4 in England and M6 in France. In the USA, they have appeared on programs on TLC and the History Channel. He has also been a guest on NPR.”

ETA:  just for fun I checked out some of the blogs he follows as well~this one was especially intriguing as I couldn’t quite understand why a poly family would need a designated hitter...lol

DH of a Normal Poly Family

Moroni Jessop is not presently living as a polygamist.  He is divorced from one of his wives (I believe divorced from Temple, his 2nd wife) but says he and his present wife are open to taking another wife.

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Tom Green and his lifestyle were the subject of the British-made documentary One Man, Six Wives and Twenty-Nine Children in 2000 at the New York International Documentary Film Festival. I think I watched it on Prime. Scary sad.

Escaping polygamy is high drama, but gives some insight into the Kingston group.

Wife Number 19 by Anna Eliza Young. Her parents were early converts and friends of Smith. She was married to Brigham Young. First person account of the early days of the Mormon religion, in the flowery language of the time. Free on Kindle.

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Regarding the podcast "Surviving Sister Wives"  - to the hosts, Corey and Carly?  Come on, if you post or read here, introduce yourselves!  I've listened to two episodes and I've heard a few choice catch-phrases that make me think that they MUST hang out here on occasion!

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I just finished reading Shattered Dreams by Irene Spencer. She was married to Verlan Lebaron for 28 years and had 13 children. He had 10 wives and 58 kids. It is hard to understand how an intelligent woman could live with someone like Lebaron. His wives and children endured  abject poverty and unspeakable living conditions. She spends a considerable amount of her book bemoaning the lack of sexual intimacy and her need for this. She threatened to leave him over and over because he did not provide for her "needs" in this area. Funny thing is she didn't threaten to leave when he kept her living in filth and near starvation along with her children. I feel like I wasted 2 days reading this. She really never left him for good as he was killed in a car crash while she was still living with him. But  this took place in the 50's 60's and 70's so I have to wonder if this type of thing still goes on. Their situation really doesn't compare to the Brown family as Lebaron was marrying girls as young as 14.

 

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6 minutes ago, 65mickey said:

But  this took place in the 50's 60's and 70's so I have to wonder if this type of thing still goes on.

Watch a few episodes of Escaping Polygamy and you'll see that is does still go on.  One thing that always made me gag was hearing that the homes all smell like rotten food because the kids have to dumpster dive to feed the families.

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Not polygamy, but an extreme fundy Christian sect.  “Gloryvale”. Just watched it on amazon prime. Three shows. FYI, founder of the group spent time in prison for child abuse. The brain washing is amazing. Nice long shots of New Zealand.

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Following! I am *fascinated* by polygamy and cults in general (not that Mormonism by itself is  a cult, but plenty of fLDS phrasing and culture is cultlike). Under the Banner of Heaven is AMAZING. If I may, this is not entirely factual, but the historical fiction The 19th Wife is a great blend of creativity and history that gives you a taste of what happened with Joseph Smith's and Brigham Young's wives while also bringing in a bit of fictional murder mystery.

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On 2/21/2020 at 12:05 AM, lindalouwho said:

Not polygamy, but an extreme fundy Christian sect.  “Gloryvale”. Just watched it on amazon prime. Three shows. FYI, founder of the group spent time in prison for child abuse. The brain washing is amazing. Nice long shots of New Zealand.

Thanks for the recommendation.  I haven't watched the documentary yet, but I did watch a Ted Talk given by the granddaughter of the founder of that community.  It's very good:  http://www.tedxchristchurch.com/lilia-tarawa.

Edited by CouchTater
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