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Life After Downton: How to Get Our Period Fix

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It's really hitting me that okay. Downton is gone. And Now What. I love period dramas and the whole upstairs/downstairs aspect (Though, ironically, I'm not sure if I'd like "Upstairs/Downstairs" go figure. 

I was doing a google of what to watch After Downtown and there was a lot of suggestions and I bet a lot of you guys would have some too. I am throwing this little diddy into the ring:

"Gran Hotel" (Grand Hotel). It's a Spanish Telanovella - it's on NetFlix with English Subtitles, I'm only on episode 3 but I am hooked. This is seriously amazing, the costumes are amazing, and I can follow along without any issues. 

 

Here's a list of other shows (this is how i found out about Grand Hotel), we can discuss and figure out how to fill the Downton Sized hole in our hearts

 

http://www.silverpetticoatreview.com/2015/01/21/top-25-tv-shows-satisfy-downton-abbey-addiction/

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Grand Hotel is a hoot! It's like Downton on drugs, I really loved it!

 

Unfortunately there's still one series missing on netflix as far as I know. The ending 

where the hotel blows up through a bomb

is not the real ending! There's loads after that still.

 

My newest favourite right now is "Outlander". I love the setting, the landscape, the costumes and the two lead actors are incredible together. 

Edited by Andorra
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Grand Hotel is a hoot! It's like Downton on drugs, I really loved it!

 

Unfortunately there's still one series missing on netflix as far as I know. The ending 

where the hotel blows up through a bomb

is not the real ending! There's loads after that still.

 

My newest favourite right now is "Outlander". I love the setting, the landscape, the costumes and the two lead actors are incredible together. 

 

 

I ADORE OUTLANDER :) I'll see you there def. :)

 

 

that's a boo re: Grand Hotel not being complete on netflix. I am trying to eat this slowly - but it is soo easy to binge on it. 

there's also "Velvet" (netflix only has 2 seasons and there is 4). 

 

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That's a great list - my favorites are 'Call the Midwife' (never, ever try to watch without box of Kleenex at hand) and 'Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries' (the one character whose wardrobe outshines all the ladies of Downton Abbey). I also adored 'The House of Elliot' (fantastic gowns) but a word of warning: the show was canceled without warning after three seasons and  *shakes fist at BBC* so the writers could not give some sort of conclusion to various plots.

Not quite in the same period as these (but since 'Outlander' already popped up here): 'The Musketeers' - great swashbuckling fun.

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That's a great list - my favorites are 'Call the Midwife' (never, ever try to watch without box of Kleenex at hand) and 'Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries' (the one character whose wardrobe outshines all the ladies of Downton Abbey). I also adored 'The House of Elliot' (fantastic gowns) but a word of warning: the show was canceled without warning after three seasons and  *shakes fist at BBC* so the writers could not give some sort of conclusion to various plots.

Not quite in the same period as these (but since 'Outlander' already popped up here): 'The Musketeers' - great swashbuckling fun.

 

 

i hate! Hate! when that happens. (the same thing happened to Lillies - the same woman who writes Call the Midwife wrote that). and here here for Musketeers too!

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My sentimental favorite is still the original Upstairs Downstairs. It was ancient when I first watched it as a child. IMO Downton can't hold a candle to it.  I got so attached to these characters and some of them broke my heart.  Hazel, omg. 

 

Also very watchable is an old series called "The Duchess Of Duke Street". It's about a beautiful working class woman and gifted cook who rises from humble beginnings to owning and running a high class hotel.  I loved the heroine.  Catching the eye of royality.  Working hard. A spine of steel.  And a love story that will make you tear up at the end.

 

A warning to people who have started to watch OUTLANDER - this show contains horrific sexual violence. The last two episodes of the first season are quite pornographic and rapetastic. That show may sell itself at first like a historical romance with time travel elements but beware - it isn't anything like Downton or most BBC historical dramas.

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Thanks for the warning ... I was quite prepared to watch Happy Valley when it devolved into stomach churning violence against women ... It's bad enough even when they don't SHOW you everything, but ... seriously, I don't need to see it too. 

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Outlander - It's like pouring manure in your mind.

 

Gran Hotel - loved it....................at first.I felt stupid by the second series. It has like 100 episodes in each season and became truly, truly ludicrous.

 

Velvet -  ah traid....lawd knows ah traid..........but quite dull and the lead guy didn't convince me AT ALL.

 

The Last Kingdom -  quite good and very watchable medieval drama about England's birth.

 

 Anzac girls --  just ok. It's a war drama about 5 or so nurses. The writing is not that great in my view but the gritty war aspects was very well done.

 

A Place called home  - I started watching this but I don't know if I will continue. Try it. You might like it.

 

The Hours  - very nice period newsroom drama with Ben Whishaw and Romola Garai, although I might argue questionable in parts and cancelled at the WORST POSSIBLE time. Urgh!

 

Little Dorrit - also recommended.

 

Also wanted to add Scarlett Pimpernel - although good luck finding it. (maybe on youtube?). I recommend the Simon Bricker and Cora version because it's a series and keeps you more engrossed than the other versions. Bricker (Richard E. Grant) was superb in my view in this role.

 

That's all I have for now. I believe I've seen all the good period dramas. They don't come along often.

Edited by skyways
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netflix has a lot of Merchant & Ivory ... some of which are -- imho -- better than originally received (because of the M&I cachet and then backlash, it was easy to dismiss them as "lesser")  ... most are disk only I think. 

I caught a beautifully done movie -- Best Offer -- that I enjoyed thoroughly even thinking that it had an underdeveloped ending and a somewhat quess-able twist. ... some people loved it and some felt let down ... I think forewarned helps. 

I also loved "Night Train to Lisbon" which will either intrigue you or you'll turn it off early on ... again about 50/50. Apparently the book (which I haven't read) was an "international best seller" but may have flopped here in the USA ... something of a meandering mid-life meditation ... with Jeremy Irons. 

Oh, and I enjoyed "Bicycling with Moliere" ... french with subtitles. ... see also Daniel Auteuil's directorial efforts in WellDigger's daugher, Fanny and Marais (the third of the Pagnonl trilogy to be released I think next year) -- not "earthshattering" ... just good low-key stories -- all in French with subtitles. 

I don't demand happy endings, but I don't mind them either. 

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A suggestion: Monarch of the Glen, there are 7 seasons to binge watch.

Published February 14, 2013 by Meghan Miller

Netflix Fix: Monarch of the Glen

Crack open a bottle of scotch for this week's Netflix Fix.

Netflix Fix: Monarch of the Glen

Usually, a Netflix Fix is a movie, but sometimes you need something a little bit more involved to get you through a long, rainy weekend or several weeks (or months) of crappy TV choices. So this week, I'm breaking with tradition to bring you the BBC television series, Monarch of the Glen. After all, once Downton Abbey's over, you'll need a new failing manor struggling to become solvent in changing modern times (and this one has kilts. And whisky).

Title: Monarch of the Glen

Year: 2000-2005

Fix: When You Want a Daily 4 p.m. Date With Your TV and a Cup of Tea, or if You're Pining for Scotland

Netflix Summary:

Summoned back to his childhood home in the Scottish Highlands, London restaurateur Archie (Alastair Mackenzie) assumes his role as the Laird of Glenbogle and sets out to restore the financially troubled estate back to prominence with help from his family and loyal staff. The final two series of this British drama shift the focus onto Archie's half-brother Paul (Lloyd Owen) and his struggles to modernize the 40,000-acre property.

FYA Summary:

Pain-in-the-arse modern man Archie has to quit his fancy life and fancy restaurant in London to go back to Scotland to dig his family manor out of debt and ruin, with the help of a crazy-ass father, tolerant mother, and some loyal (wise and otherwise) staff.

Familiar Faces:

Unless you're a die-hard BBC viewer, you probably won't recognize most of the faces here, except Richard Briers, who always makes me tear up with his performance as Leonato in Much Ado about Nothing and who's been in a zillion things. He plays Archie's magnificently nutty father, Hector, the aging laird of Glenbogle.

You also might know Alexander Morton, who plays the all-knowing Golly the Ghillie with sardonic reticence.

And then you might not recognize his face, but surely you'll recognize the name -- Julian Fellowes frequently appears as the interfering, poncy neighboring laird, Kilwillie.

Couch-Sharing Capability: Small, Committed Group (or Solo)

You probably want to limit the audience here because nothing's more annoying than having to explain an entire series worth of backstory to someone who decides to pop in and join you for one episode of season 3, and spends the whole time asking, "Wait, who's that? What's going on? Why did she say that to him? Are they dating?" Maybe you and your roommate/spouse/one in particular/BFF can make a regular viewing date, or maybe you just want to binge on the whole show over the course of a weekend, but four seasons (well, the last two kind of suck compared to the first two) is quite a commitment.

Recommended Level of Inebriation None Necessary, Though Whisky Wouldn't Be Unappreciated

Especially by Archie's father and Kilwillie. Just make sure it's scotch. You might also want to have a cup of tea handy (spiked or otherwise).

Use of Your Netflix Subscription: Strong

As a tv series rather than a movie, this will keep you busy for at least a couple of days, so you already win the time-to-cost game. There's also a lot of whisky, since the MacDonalds and Kilwillie distill their own, and you can never go wrong with whisky, especially when it's being consumed by two crazy old men in a boat on a chilly loch. It's cozy and funny and just perfect for a rainy afternoon or three.

http://foreveryoungadult.com/2013/02/14/netflix-fix-monarch-of-the-glen/

Edited by talula
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Thanks for the warning ... I was quite prepared to watch Happy Valley when it devolved into stomach churning violence against women ... It's bad enough even when they don't SHOW you everything, but ... seriously, I don't need to see it too. 

Yes, Outlander does show everything, full frontal nudity during its going on forever torture and rape scenes. Happy Valley is actually much less violent than Outlander, for one it is not pornographic and as hard to watch the violent content is one doesn't get the sick feeling on Happy Valley that they are getting off on what they are putting on screen. 

 

There is an adaptation of Dickens "Our Mutual Friend" with a very young Keely Hawes that is quite romantic and well worth watching. Also, "North And South", which has Downton's Bates quite terrific in a supporting role, and a swoon-worthy romance at the center.

 

I am going to put Monarch of the Glen into my netflix queue.

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A Place to Call Home is the most like Downton I've seen, but I've also watched Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (Miriam Margoyles is why I first tried it, but I love the entire cast now I've seen it), various Charles Dickens novel mini-series adaptations (like Bleak House with Gillian Anderson and Little Dorrit with Judy Parfitt/Tom Courtenay), and I've just started Call the Midwife--which is very similar to Downton, as far as having a lighthearted tone.

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Yes, Outlander does show everything, full frontal nudity during its going on forever torture and rape scenes. Happy Valley is actually much less violent than Outlander, for one it is not pornographic and as hard to watch the violent content is one doesn't get the sick feeling on Happy Valley that they are getting off on what they are putting on screen.

 

You should clarify, that this is your personal opinion. I actually thought the last two episodes of Outlander were incredibly brave, moving and impressive. It's content is disturbing, of course and it left the viewer uncomfortable and feeling sick, but that's what the situation in the book required.

The fact that it is male rape and that the big, strong hero of the book is the person who is assaulted is even more unusual and shocking. Also the fact that there is a point where he can't control his body's reactions and the guilt and shame he feels about it afterwards IMO was very realistic and so disturbing because of it.

 For me it was not at all gratuitous as it is on so many shows. Anna's rape in Downton IMO was handled horribly and only put in there for shock's value, while in Outlander the story is built on a book and what happens in the last two episodes of series 1 will influence the "hero" for the rest of his life. It isn't at all the usual "get raped and completely forget all about it after a few episodes" kind of story. 

 

Of course a warning is required, I don't deny that. The show doesn't have it's rating for nothing. But to say it is "pornographic" and to say that the makers of Outlander "get off" on the content is highly unfair IMO. It is in the contrary so disturbingly real, that only sick perverts would get off on watching it. 

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I watched the movie Testament of Youth last night, it's good but I preferred the BBC series from the 70s as that was more about Vera's whole war/post war experience whereas the movie felt more like a romance story about Vera and Roland Leighton.

 

This week I'm planning on watching 2 new period series. War and Peace from the BBC and Rebellion from RTE/Sundance. War and Peace is a 6 part adaption of the Tolstoy novel (or a 4 part series in the US) about the French invasion of Russia in 1812 and it's aftermath. And Lily James (Lady Rose) is one of the 3 leads.  Rebellion is a 5 part drama about the 1916 Rising in Ireland. I tend to be wary of RTE produced drama, as I rarely enjoy it, but the trailers for this are promising.

Edited by AllyB
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The Hours  - very nice period newsroom drama with Ben Whishaw and Romola Garai, although I might argue questionable in parts and cancelled at the WORST POSSIBLE time. Urgh!

Another cancellation crime at the hands of the BBC, grr! Peter Capaldi and Anna Chancellor were spectacular.

 

As for the Outlander debate: book

I've read the first three volumes of the series and then gave up due to Gabaldon's continuous use of rape as a plot device. What had a lot of impact in the first book became more and more a sign of lazy writing IMO.

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A lot of people have praised Poldark. I only know the show from screencaps of Aidan Turner's shirtless scything, but I guess I should check it out. I've never seen an enjoyable adaptation of War & Peace, so I hope the new miniseries will manage to be good in its own right and not just the greatest hits of the book.

 

My favorite classics are the 1970s Upstairs Downstairs (far more gritty and realistic than Downton while still being well-acted and entertaining) and The Onedin Line (about a shipping family, which I didn't think I would find interesting but I ended up loving the business scheming/women's stories back home and even the weekly ship plots abroad).

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I tried Poldark. It is very well made. Unfortunately I don't like the story from the books though and there're some storylines in it, that I really don't want to watch.

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Ahh Poldark!! It's best to just checkout the thread in the Previously Forums to get a better sense. Is the War and Peace Version with Lily James out? I must warn those planning to see the more modern adaptations with Italians/British collaboration. It's ATROCIOUS! I haven't read the book so I was open-minded. The lines and dialogue sounded like what I would write when lacking confidence. The scenery, plot and presentation was great but the writing/acting was a mess. At times I thought it was like a satire? or something I don't know the word. (where people are saying something to look and sound serious yet the scene comes across the opposite?)

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Ahh Poldark!! It's best to just checkout the thread in the Previously Forums to get a better sense. Is the War and Peace Version with Lily James out?

First episode of War and Peace begins tomorrow.

 

Poldark is good, both the 1970s and 2015 version, but neither really does justice to the books.

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Netflix announced a Series called "The Crown" 
(it's from the same screen writer as "The Queen" that movie that talked about the aftermath of Princess Diana's death. nothing really but I am assuming it's going to go from Queen Elizabeth's coronation just by going by the picture. (and a lot of people have been doing Queen Victoria recently so)

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That's a great list - my favorites are 'Call the Midwife' (never, ever try to watch without box of Kleenex at hand) and 'Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries' (the one character whose wardrobe outshines all the ladies of Downton Abbey). I also adored 'The House of Elliot' (fantastic gowns) but a word of warning: the show was canceled without warning after three seasons and *shakes fist at BBC* so the writers could not give some sort of conclusion to various plots.

Not quite in the same period as these (but since 'Outlander' already popped up here): 'The Musketeers' - great swashbuckling fun.

Love Detective Fisher and also Eliot

A suggestion: Monarch of the Glen, there are 7 seasons to binge watch.

Published February 14, 2013 by Meghan Miller

Netflix Fix: Monarch of the Glen

Crack open a bottle of scotch for this week's Netflix Fix.

Netflix Fix: Monarch of the Glen

Usually, a Netflix Fix is a movie, but sometimes you need something a little bit more involved to get you through a long, rainy weekend or several weeks (or months) of crappy TV choices. So this week, I'm breaking with tradition to bring you the BBC television series, Monarch of the Glen. After all, once Downton Abbey's over, you'll need a new failing manor struggling to become solvent in changing modern times (and this one has kilts. And whisky).

Title: Monarch of the Glen

Year: 2000-2005

Fix: When You Want a Daily 4 p.m. Date With Your TV and a Cup of Tea, or if You're Pining for Scotland

Netflix Summary:

Summoned back to his childhood home in the Scottish Highlands, London restaurateur Archie (Alastair Mackenzie) assumes his role as the Laird of Glenbogle and sets out to restore the financially troubled estate back to prominence with help from his family and loyal staff. The final two series of this British drama shift the focus onto Archie's half-brother Paul (Lloyd Owen) and his struggles to modernize the 40,000-acre property.

FYA Summary:

Pain-in-the-arse modern man Archie has to quit his fancy life and fancy restaurant in London to go back to Scotland to dig his family manor out of debt and ruin, with the help of a crazy-ass father, tolerant mother, and some loyal (wise and otherwise) staff.

Familiar Faces:

Unless you're a die-hard BBC viewer, you probably won't recognize most of the faces here, except Richard Briers, who always makes me tear up with his performance as Leonato in Much Ado about Nothing and who's been in a zillion things. He plays Archie's magnificently nutty father, Hector, the aging laird of Glenbogle.

You also might know Alexander Morton, who plays the all-knowing Golly the Ghillie with sardonic reticence.

And then you might not recognize his face, but surely you'll recognize the name -- Julian Fellowes frequently appears as the interfering, poncy neighboring laird, Kilwillie.

Couch-Sharing Capability: Small, Committed Group (or Solo)

You probably want to limit the audience here because nothing's more annoying than having to explain an entire series worth of backstory to someone who decides to pop in and join you for one episode of season 3, and spends the whole time asking, "Wait, who's that? What's going on? Why did she say that to him? Are they dating?" Maybe you and your roommate/spouse/one in particular/BFF can make a regular viewing date, or maybe you just want to binge on the whole show over the course of a weekend, but four seasons (well, the last two kind of suck compared to the first two) is quite a commitment.

Recommended Level of Inebriation None Necessary, Though Whisky Wouldn't Be Unappreciated

Especially by Archie's father and Kilwillie. Just make sure it's scotch. You might also want to have a cup of tea handy (spiked or otherwise).

Use of Your Netflix Subscription: Strong

As a tv series rather than a movie, this will keep you busy for at least a couple of days, so you already win the time-to-cost game. There's also a lot of whisky, since the MacDonalds and Kilwillie distill their own, and you can never go wrong with whisky, especially when it's being consumed by two crazy old men in a boat on a chilly loch. It's cozy and funny and just perfect for a rainy afternoon or three.

http://foreveryoungadult.com/2013/02/14/netflix-fix-monarch-of-the-glen/

Monarch is great! Though I didn't see it all. AllCreatures great and Small. Similar.

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I'll be digging out my "Lark Rise to Candleford" and Downton Abbey DVDs.  Because:  Brendan Coyle.

Always been curious about Lark Rise to Candleford.

Think I'll finally watch Brideshead Revisited, with Jeremy Irons.

And the remake with Matthew Goode, Haley Atwell and Emma Thompson.

I own both on bluray.

Like you fine folks, I'm a sucker for period dramas.

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You should clarify, that this is your personal opinion. I actually thought the last two episodes of Outlander were incredibly brave, moving and impressive. It's content is disturbing, of course and it left the viewer uncomfortable and feeling sick, but that's what the situation in the book required.

The fact that it is male rape and that the big, strong hero of the book is the person who is assaulted is even more unusual and shocking. Also the fact that there is a point where he can't control his body's reactions and the guilt and shame he feels about it afterwards IMO was very realistic and so disturbing because of it.

 For me it was not at all gratuitous as it is on so many shows. Anna's rape in Downton IMO was handled horribly and only put in there for shock's value, while in Outlander the story is built on a book and what happens in the last two episodes of series 1 will influence the "hero" for the rest of his life. It isn't at all the usual "get raped and completely forget all about it after a few episodes" kind of story. 

 

Of course a warning is required, I don't deny that. The show doesn't have it's rating for nothing. But to say it is "pornographic" and to say that the makers of Outlander "get off" on the content is highly unfair IMO. It is in the contrary so disturbingly real, that only sick perverts would get off on watching it. 

 

How is it highly unfair to have a negative  opinion of Outlander and post about it? I found Outlander to be both pornographic and having way too much rape and torture.  I formed this opinion watching the entire first season and in particular the final two episodes and being aware of the author's rape fetish.  You don't agree with my thoughts on the show and you won't convince me to change my mind about the show.  That's okay, it would be boring if we all had the same thoughts and opinions about things.  Here's where the old saying lets agree to disagree comes in - enjoy your show.

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Over Christmas I indulged in a series that's my tv equivalent of a security blanket. The 1986 mini-series adaptation of A Little Princess with Amelia Shankley and Maureen Lipman. I love that series so much.

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For a short fix, Gosford Park is excellent and I think Fellowes was involved in the writing or producing as well.

 

But if you really want to sink your teeth into something wonderful, I have to echo everyone who suggests the original Upstairs/Downstairs.  In fact, were this not such a mannered and genteel show and forum, I would demand that all of you stop what you are doing and start watching it now! :)  It is far superior to Downton in nearly every way (except, of course, cinamatography and scenery) and, IMO, is the bar that every show like it should be measured against.  Even Fellowes must have thought so, given how many times he ripped it off.  I watched it not long before Downton premiered and I was shocked at how many storylines were either taken directly from or "inspired" by U/D.

 

Having said all of that, it can take a bit of getting used to, as it is filmed on a stage set and can be very theatrical.  Unfortunately, no long and loving shots of the Yorkshire countryside, but the acting, the drama and the storylines are so good that you will barely miss it.  I didn't catch it when it originally aired, but once I started it, I pretty much did nothing else until I had seen the entire thing.   If there were any anachronisms, I don't remember them, and there really wasn't any softening of attitudes to reflect the current culture (which was the seventies, but still).  And some of the storylines were pretty racy given that it was a British period piece from nearly a half-century ago (clearly, I hadn't yet discovered I, Claudius - yikes!)   All of Bates and Anna's misery won't be in vain if U/D benefits from a renaissance!

Edited by Deanie87
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here is the sizzle reel for The Crown
Eleven (aka Matt Smith is playing Philip)

I was right - this is focusing on Queen Elizabeth (the only info didn't mention the time period)

 

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Upstairs/Downstairs makes you realize how much can be done with so much less than Fellowes/Downton had at their disposal ... I re-watched part of it after Downton had started, rather entranced by a amount of character development was accomplished both by careful writing and emotive acting. My theory has been that -- aside from Fellowes' difficulty in writing emotional scenes/dialog -- the actors were encouraged to don a "stiff upper lip" unemotionality to speed filming (all those multiple takes that become that much more difficult when trying to match expression/tone when dealing with "emotional" content).  Not to "trash" Fellowes, but US/DS really shows how character development can and should be done ... without endless exposition. 

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The Crown looks nice.  So this is about the young Elizabeth?

 

Yeah.

there were some of younger George, his brother and him signing away his right to reign (and then them being older) so i am wondering if they are going to intertwine everything (or flashbacks or what)

 

this is a must watch for me. 

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Oooh, I love Period Dramas and I have hundreds of recommendations!

 

I second the recommendation for Poldark - not in the least because Aidan Turner with his shirt off is glorious thing to behold. Speaking of Turner, I really loved Desperate Romantics from 2009 as well - it's about the Pre-Raphalite Brotherhood (artists) in the 18th century, and it got a magnificent cast (Tom Hollander, Amy Manson, Rafe Spall, Zoë Tapper and the aforementioned Turner).

 

Mr Selfridge (and its lesser cousin The Paradise) which is about love, life and the changing ways of commerce in the early 1900, as seen through the eyes of both owner and employees, is just starting it's final season, and is a good fix for anyone who loves pretty clothes and pretty people. It's written by Andrew Davies who wrote the screenplay for the original BBC Pride&Prejudice and is the writer for the new War and Peace, which I like so far. Natasha (Lily James) is close enough to my image from the books and both Pierre (Paul Dano) and Andrei (James Norton) is spot on.

 

If you like (cosy-ish) crime, there's Granchester (set in the 1950s) with James Norton as a crime-solving priest with a romantic past and The Blechtley Circle (post-war) about four different women who worked for the code-breaking center during the 2.WW, who starts solving crimes in the years after. The always wonderful Anna Maxwell Martin stars as the main character. For more Maxwell Martin (and David Morissey), South Riding is a beautiful and bittersweet love story.

 

Cranford is an old favourite as well; Judi Dench is wonderful as the character who holds everything together and the rest of the cast (loads of well known British names if you enjoy Period Dramas as much as I). I love, love, love Wives and Daughters and the newest version of Nothanger Abbey (with Felicity Jones and Carey Mulligan) and really enjoyed Daniel Deronda, He Knew He Was Right, The Way We Live Now, Berkely Square, The Forsyte Saga (Damien Lewis!), Middlemarch  and Under the Greenwood Tree.

 

Wow. I watch a lot of tv :)

 

Edit: Uggh. Spelling is not my friend today.

Edited by feverfew
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Oooh, I love Period Dramas and I have hundreds of recommendatons!

 

I second the recommendation for Poldark - not in the least because Aidan Turner with his shirt off is glorious thing to behold. Speaking of Turner, I really loved Desperate Romantics from 2009 as well - it's about the Pre-Raphalite Brotherhood (artists) in the 18th century, and it got a magnificent cast (Tom Hollander, Amy Manson, Rafe Spall, Zoë Tapper and the aforemented Turner).

 

Mr Selfridge (and its lesser cousin The Paradise) which is about love, life and the changing ways of commerce in the early 1900, as seen through the eyes of both owner and employees, is just starting it's final season, and is a good fix for anyone who loves pretty clothes and pretty people. It's written by Andrew Davies who wrote the screenplay for the original BBC Pride&Prejudice and is the writer for the new War and Peace, which I like so far. Natasha (Lily James) is close enough to my image from the books and both Pierre (Paul Dano) and Andrei (James Norton) is spot on.

 

If you like (cosy-ish) crime, there's Granchester (set in the 1950s) with James Norton as a crime-solving priest with a romantic past and The Blechtley Circle (post-war) about four different women who worked for the code-breaking center during the 2.WW, who starts solving crimes in the years after. The always wonderful Anna Maxwell Martin stars as the main character. For more Maxwell Martin (and David Morissey), South Riding is a beautiful and bittersweet love story.

 

Cranford is an old favourite as well; Judi Dench is wonderful as the character who holds everything together and the rest of the cast (loads of well known British names if you enjoy Period Dramas as much as I). I love, love, love Wives and Daughters and the newest version of Nothanger Abbey (with Felicity Jones and Carey Mulligan) and really enjoyed Daniel Deronda, He Knew He Was Right, The Way We Live Now, Berkely Square, The Forsyte Saga (Damien Lewis!), Middlemarch  and Under the Greenwood Tree.

 

Wow. I watch a lot of tv :)

Thanks feverfew and everyone for your great recommendation.

thank-you-bear.gif

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Cranford is an old favourite as well; Judi Dench is wonderful as the character who holds everything together and the rest of the cast (loads of well known British names if you enjoy Period Dramas as much as I). I love, love, love Wives and Daughters

There's also North and South - another Elizabeth Gaskell adaptation.

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It's been what - 16 or 17 years now? - and I'm still pissed that Berkeley Square didn't get a second season.  That was soap at its finest and soapiest.

It really was; and I was so disappointed as well. Speaking of soap - I think we talked about The Buccaneers in one of the other threads some time ago. That's a show for anybody who wanted a story on how Cora and Grantham might have met: Four young women from wealthy (read: New Moneyed) families in America is sent to England to make a bid for title. Drama! Love triangles galore!

 

There's also North and South - another Elizabeth Gaskell adaptation.

 

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That. That scene slayed me. Everybody who hasn't watched BBC's North and South - go. Do it right now!

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299_900.jpg

 

That. That scene slayed me. Everybody who hasn't watched BBC's North and South - go. Do it right now!

There was also an adaptation of North and South made way back in 1975, featuring Patrick Stewart with hair!* Now out on DVD, also well worth watching.

 

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*Possibly a wig even then - he went bald very young.

Edited by Llywela
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Over Christmas I indulged in a series that's my tv equivalent of a security blanket. The 1986 mini-series adaptation of A Little Princess with Amelia Shankley and Maureen Lipman. I love that series so much.

I love it too.  It's always been one of my favorite childhood books, and I've always hated that we never see the real ending.  For Downton Abbey fans, the actor who played the guy who was courting Lady Rosamund in the Season 2 Christmas special is in it. 

 

As for shows to watch, ITA about the original "Upstairs Downstairs."  I'm not one who thinks it's better than DA or any more realistic, but I don't think DA could have been possible without an USDS.  

 

Quite possibly my favorite period show is BBC's "The Village" which ran for 2 series a year or so ago.  It's about life in an English village from just before the start of WWI to the mid 20's through the eyes of one of its residents who is the oldest man in the UK. It was originally supposed to run for several more series and end up in the present day, but so far they haven't done any more filming.  The actor who played the old man/narrator died either late 2014 or early last year too.

 

Anyway, the show goes into pretty much the same territory as DA, but through the perspective of tenant farmers rather than the aristocracy although there is a rich family involved.  Incidentally, the second series features what might possibly be one of the greatest FU! scenes of all time.

Over Christmas I indulged in a series that's my tv equivalent of a security blanket. The 1986 mini-series adaptation of A Little Princess with Amelia Shankley and Maureen Lipman. I love that series so much.

I love it too.  It's always been one of my favorite childhood books, and I've always hated that we never see the real ending.  For Downton Abbey fans, the actor who played the guy who was courting Lady Rosamund in the Season 2 Christmas special is in it. 

 

As for shows to watch, ITA about the original "Upstairs Downstairs."  I'm not one who thinks it's better than 

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Grantchester. Love it.

Poldark.

Anyone going to watch Mercy Street when it airs?

I watched one of the Grand Hotel series once (there's quite a few out there; 4ish?). An english one that had a younger Stephen Moyer (from True Blood fame) in it. It was quite soapy and dramatic, and I was enjoying the evil brother (I guess he reminds me of Thomas in a way), but I

stopped a few episodes into it after I read online that it was an incomplete series (it was cancelled if I recall correctly) and some of the actors got recasted in season 2. Recasting is something that gets under my skin (unless it's due to an actual death, etc.).

Older-made classics are good too, either for revisiting or for first-time watching:

North and South (both versions), wives & daughters, any of the Jane Austen stuff, etc.

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ITV just this week began a new costume drama called Jericho, set in Yorkshire in the 1870s - following the lives of a respectable but impoverished family living among the 'navvies' building a viaduct. The first episode was on Thursday - worth checking out.

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Thanks for the heads up to 'Jericho'. Just checked out the first episode and was pleasantly surprised. Nice to see Jessica Raine again, I lost track of her when she left 'Call the Midwife'.

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Always been curious about Lark Rise to Candleford.

Think I'll finally watch Brideshead Revisited, with Jeremy Irons.

And the remake with Matthew Goode, Haley Atwell and Emma Thompson.

I own both on bluray.

Like you fine folks, I'm a sucker for period dramas.

I remember living and breathing Brideshead Revisited. I think it's time to revisit it myself. Must find it somewhere...

I'll wait till it's really cold, snuggle in bed with big socks and watch The Thornbirds (again).

FYI - The actress who played Lady Rose's mother was the original Cordelia Flyte in Brideshead.

Edited by TessHarding2
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Has anybody seen 'The time in between'? I think it's set in 1930's Spain? I'm not sure.  Also I second 'Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries'

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A show I really loved, which sadly only ran one season was "The Crimson Field". Kevin Doyle is in it and he is a very endearing character. It's about some young auxiliary nurses in WW1.

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Jeremy Swift, the actor who plays Mr. Spratt, was also in it.  Yeah, that was a great show.  Another similar show is "Anzac Girls" which is about Australian and New Zealand nurses in WWI.  

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Hello all...another period drama fan here.  I want to thank Daisy for starting this thread with that fantastic list, and the other posters for sharing period drama info, as well.  I'm now watching The Paradise on PBS, but can't wait until Mr. Selfridge returns. But now I have so many more to choose from that I am just giddy with excitement to check them all out.

 

Last night I decided to start watching Lark Rise to Candleford (because...Brendan Coyle, of course!) and it is truly a delight.  Yay!  Getting my 'fix' on!  :-D   :-D   

And, I was thinking about subscribing to Acorn TV to catch all of the BBC shows.

 

Thank you, again!  I am SO in my 'happy place' right now.  :-D  

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I'm subscribed to Acorn but I won't be surprised if I see myself dropping it after a few months. They don't have the choice British dramas you think especially the period ones. In my view Netflix has a wider range of good British dramas period or otherwise - even Amazon.

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I LOVE costume dramas and happy endings so I weed out more than many of you might.  

I will check out what I can of these lists...so much to watch!

I had never heard of Outlander and was intrigued enough to watch the first episode. I loved the way they handled the material so I kept watching.  I started reading some of the fan pages that are out there after each episode (I wanted to understand about the ghost in the first episode). The rape and sadness in the series just got to me and it was spoiled by a poster what was to come.  I just couldn't keep watching.  I found it too disturbing.

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries were just okay. I liked her clothes and she's a hoot but the writing was thin.

I've watched two episodes of War & Peace and again, I just am not loving. Sigh.

The Crown looks amazing.  Thanks for posting.  I will definitely be watching!

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