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All Episodes Talk: What's Up Doc?

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33 minutes ago, MVFrostsMyPie said:

Wonder what episodes that will consist of, since he's like in two-thirds of them. 

They’ll probably just narrow it down to the ones where he has an epiphany about medicine/his career/his life. 

That should narrow it down to 1 or 2 seasons worth. 

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The Comcast guide has them listed.  The one episode that’s not listed and surprises me is Exodus.  That is probably my favorite Carter episode. It’s also one of the best Carter episodes period.

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9 hours ago, ch1 said:

The Comcast guide has them listed.  The one episode that’s not listed and surprises me is Exodus.  That is probably my favorite Carter episode. It’s also one of the best Carter episodes period.

Yeah, Cox doesn't have it listed, either.  I'd rather see that than Kisangani which is the final episode.  The marathon will rerun immediately after the first round, starting at 8PM tonight.  The eppies are chronologic starting with the Pilot '24 Hours'.  'Be Still My Heart' and 'All in the Family', AKA, the stabbing episodes, will run in the 5-7PM slots.

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I caught the last half of All in the Family during the Carter marathon and had to stop to watch the rest of it. So much emotion from so many different directions. You have Benton trying to save Carter, Elizabeth and Romano losing Lucy, the staff processing everything. Sobricki going on about feeding his dog while his poor wife realizes he has totally gone off the rails. So sad on so many levels. Such compelling drama.

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15 minutes ago, desertflower said:

while his poor wife realizes he has totally gone off the rails.

Her performance really struck me when I watched the episode a couple of years ago; I had remembered so much about the main cast's great scenes, but didn't have any memory of her at all.  Yet that quiet moment at his bedside, when she realizes he really is schizophrenic and really did stab two people, is right up there with the others.

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6 hours ago, Bastet said:

Her performance really struck me when I watched the episode a couple of years ago; I had remembered so much about the main cast's great scenes, but didn't have any memory of her at all.  Yet that quiet moment at his bedside, when she realizes he really is schizophrenic and really did stab two people, is right up there with the others.

Yeah, two bad it was: "Well, he is on medicine now and his friends got him a good lawyer to get out and we have a 3 year old to deal with, so we're good, now I'm off to be on Gilmore Girls." I didn't like that aftermath two years later, because basically he got off without any problems. Kind of reminded me years later with the father who didn't want his daughter at the hospital because a doctor killed his father. Even going as far as saying it was death there, even though NONE of those doctors were around anymore or putting down: "Don't take my daughter to this hospital." Follow through and aftermath were either hit or miss on ER.

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Watching early season 10 and I'm pleased by the lighter tone the show takes after the Jack Orman era ends. Seasons 7-9 felt so dark and dreary that by the time 10 came around it was like a breath of fresh air.

Romano's last episodes are sad for me to watch since his character is one of my favorites and he was just so broken by that point. I would have loved to see him stick around, even in a recurring role. Seeing Sam, Neela and Morris in their early days was a shock as well after binging the later seasons and seeing how their characters developed.

Also, I really didn't miss Carter at all during his absences at this point in the show which is surprising for such an important and long-lasting character.

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Eriq LaSalle and Julianna Marguiles:

Re: "All in the Family" it's an amazing episode. One of the things I loved about ER was how the surgical team acted like surgeons. They are as a rule a rather cool, tough bunch (at least professionally). It was hard to see them lose their cool like that -- Benton screaming his lungs out, Romano throwing the surgical tray across the room, Corday flooded with tears. 

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I know these are actors and there is a difference between "liking each other in real life" versus "good actors portraying characters" but I still love how all indications point to the actors liking each other in real life. Somehow it would bother me if Eriq and Noah Wylie disliked each other in real life--even though that really doesn't impact the Benton/Carter bond and relationship that I so loved on the show.

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Hi everyone. I think I carried on watching the show for a good while but i really started checking out at the beginning of Season 8. I thought the Malucci storyline was very badly handled - in previous seasons the relationship between Malucci and Weaver was one with a fair amount of affection and respect, you could tell from the way he called her 'chief' and from Weaver's occasional amusement.  (There was one scene where she raced to help him during the riot at the start of Season 7; also when she complements him on his triage work in Mars Attacks). At the start of Season 8 it took this sharp turn into outright mutual hatred and some of the insults they traded at eachother just felt wrong to me, like they were just driven by the need to get the character off the show. As abrasive as his character was I also didn't buy that he'd be strutting around the hospital acting like an obnoxious twit only a few days after the Marfans incident - it felt really over-the-top and it was completely at odds with his demeanour in the heart-to-heart scene with Chen. It wasn't just that obviously - it was quickly followed by very daft plotlines (Corday the angel of death, Lewis' completely pointless return etc). There were steady drops in quality throughout the series but I think Season 7 into Season 8 was a chasmic plunge.

Anyway, I was revisiting Season 15 recently and I was really struck by how affecting some of the episodes were, especially the one with Morgenstern and the guy who more or less created emergency medicine; as well as Carol and Doug's episode of course (Susan Sarandon was incredible in this episode). Really deserve a lot of credit for the understated way the show rallied towards the end. 

Edited by outsmartabullet
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On 1/6/2018 at 2:09 AM, casey65 said:

I totally didn’t expect to see Pratt alive in the episode today. This was a really well done, touching episode.  I was surprised to find myself crying; I didn’t think I cared that much about the character but MP was great in his scenes, and of course the gurney down the hall and Frank touching his shoulder were heartbreaking.

The episode with Gant’s pager going off was one of the best/ most shocking moments on TV. I still wait for it to happen every time that ep comes up; Benton and Carter’s reactions were so well done.  I remember being SO angry when Greys Anatomy ripped it off with the “George is the bus crash victim” episode.

It's a quieter line among the chaos but you can hear Benton saying 'come on, Gant' when working on him which really got to me. 

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On 1/8/2018 at 10:35 PM, MVFrostsMyPie said:

I will try to slow down. And valid question - TBH there's just something about his personality that rubs me the wrong way. I liked him okay in season 1 and he's not annoying alll the time, but I think season 3 has really reminded me that he gets on my nerves. If I can figure out what it specifically is that ticks me off, I'll let you know 🙂

Also, any time he has sex scenes or making out scenes, they're beyond unsexy. Like, cringe-worthy

Hope people don't mind me bumping old posts but just reading through the thread -

Have to say I find Greeene harder and harder to take on rewatches, and I was never a big fan.

Firstly I don't get why he's regarded as some kind of saintly figure - his bigoted behaviour with Jeanie was appalling and was just kind of forgotten about after the one episode and never really mentioned again. He had that habit of acting like a passive-aggressive demon for months after a major setback (understandable I guess after the assault, less understandable after Lewis leaves). This is more of an opinion thing but he just has this sort of flat, monosyllabic manner that grates. And the stuff that I think is supposed to be cute about him is just sort of cringeworthy, like his hangdog pining after Lewis, who clearly isn't into him in that way. You want to shake him sometimes.

The stuff where he's clearly not in a fit state to be working in the ER (post-tumour) but yells at anyone who tries to tell him this? Absolutely tedious. And then his last episode in the ER where he keeps making these enigmatic, vague comments to people instead of saying 'hey guys, I'm quitting - Kerry, I won't be in next week. It was lovely working with you all', etc...ugghhhh. It didn't make sense that women would be throwing themselves at him either, even if they were not-all-there mentally like Cynthia. 

There's probably more but that will do.

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On 5/29/2019 at 3:30 PM, RedbirdNelly said:

I know these are actors and there is a difference between "liking each other in real life" versus "good actors portraying characters" but I still love how all indications point to the actors liking each other in real life. Somehow it would bother me if Eriq and Noah Wylie disliked each other in real life--even though that really doesn't impact the Benton/Carter bond and relationship that I so loved on the show.

That's always a real thing for me. I want the characters I love to also be close in real life. I don't know, I think it adds more to the work. They aren't pretending to care about each other. There is a real bond there. It broke my heart when I heard about how separated Sarah Michelle Gellar was with a lot of the cast. She just believed in separation of work and home. I understand that but I like to think that Scoobie gang were tight knit in real like. Especially  Allyson and Sarah.

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On 6/3/2019 at 4:54 PM, outsmartabullet said:

Have to say I find Greeene harder and harder to take on rewatches, and I was never a big fan.

I had the opposite reaction.  I mean, he was absolutely insufferable for points of it, no argument, but I was completely shocked by how much more I liked the cancer storyline when I was binging it over a few days instead of watching it consume the show for two years.

On 6/3/2019 at 1:55 PM, outsmartabullet said:

Anyway, I was revisiting Season 15 recently and I was really struck by how affecting some of the episodes were, especially the one with Morgenstern and the guy who more or less created emergency medicine; as well as Carol and Doug's episode of course (Susan Sarandon was incredible in this episode). Really deserve a lot of credit for the understated way the show rallied towards the end. 

The only other show that I can remember having a rally like that in its final season was the original Law & Order.  They pretty much nailed it.

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Speaking of the characters still being tight, Eriq La Salle recently celebrated Noah Wyle's birthday with Wyle's family. I really love this and I agree that the fact that the actors were close in real life added to the authenticity of the show. 

It's sort of like Game of Thrones, which also had a very close cast. 

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Re: Greene on rewatch, I kind of liked the fact that he was less likable than I remembered him. I think in the early years ER really tried to make everyone a well-rounded character. Everyone had moments when they were lovely, and everyone also had moments when they were real shits. That's par for course when you work at an intense, high stress job. 

One storyline I didn't remember that was a joy to watch again was Mark's relationship with his dad. Idk why I didn't remember much about that storyline. But John Cullum's acting was so nuanced, and I loved how we gradually saw that Mark's dad wasn't this cold, unloving person. That he was a lot of fun and had a great sense of humor. I cried when I rewatched the final episodes where his dad is dying of cancer. 

The well-written, subtle storyline of Mark's dad was such a contrast with the Saga of Abby's Family that dominated later-ER.

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Mark’s storyline where he took care of his father was an absolutely beautiful story.  It was so well done.   The use of Simon and Garfunkel, the scene on the lake, cleaning his father after he wet himself - beautiful.

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51 minutes ago, Growsonwalls said:

One storyline I didn't remember that was a joy to watch again was Mark's relationship with his dad.

The first thing that struck me about Mark’s storyline with his dad is that he’d have never had that transformative time with him if his mom hadn’t died first.  It’s a pretty compressed time frame in which to lose both your parents, so that’s horrible in one way, but if his mom was still alive, his dad’s illness would have played out in San Diego, with his mom taking care of him.  Mark would have made sure he was getting proper medical care, checked in with his mom regularly and probably even visited a couple of times (during which he and his dad continued to just talk about projects around the house), but his dad would have died with their relationship still distant and strained.

Despite the many wonderful scenes between Mark and his dad in Chicago, including their final ones, my favorite part of the arc comes after his dad’s death, when Mark himself is dying and trying to connect with Rachel before he does – he recognizes the teenage version of himself in Rachel, and recognizes his dad in the current version of himself.  Like Rachel, he grew up resentful of his father’s career-induced distance (both physical and emotional).  But now he knows that wasn’t a black-and-white situation; his dad made mistakes that caused lasting damage, but he wasn’t malicious and suffered his own wounds.  Fundamentally, he was loved. 

I get choked up when he tells Rachel he’d take back every negative thought about/interaction with his dad if he could, but it’s okay that he can’t.  It’s a wonderful gift to leave her with; when she gets older and starts to properly process their relationship, she’s going to feel guilty for her part of it, but she’ll have that conversation to look back on, and know he understood it from both sides.  He knows full well she won’t get what he’s saying now, she can’t -- she has to grow up to gain that perspective, just like he did.  And he won’t be around for her adult self to hash it out with the way he was able to with his dad.  But he’ll have left her with the knowledge he died understanding all those “if only” regrets she’s having now, and accepting as his due the negative thoughts she had then.

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6 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Speaking of the characters still being tight, Eriq La Salle recently celebrated Noah Wyle's birthday with Wyle's family. I really love this and I agree that the fact that the actors were close in real life added to the authenticity of the show. 

It's sort of like Game of Thrones, which also had a very close cast. 

Aw man they were in my neck of the woods and I didn't even know it! 

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9 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Re: Greene on rewatch, I kind of liked the fact that he was less likable than I remembered him. I think in the early years ER really tried to make everyone a well-rounded character. Everyone had moments when they were lovely, and everyone also had moments when they were real shits. That's par for course when you work at an intense, high stress job. 

One storyline I didn't remember that was a joy to watch again was Mark's relationship with his dad. Idk why I didn't remember much about that storyline. But John Cullum's acting was so nuanced, and I loved how we gradually saw that Mark's dad wasn't this cold, unloving person. That he was a lot of fun and had a great sense of humor. I cried when I rewatched the final episodes where his dad is dying of cancer. 

The well-written, subtle storyline of Mark's dad was such a contrast with the Saga of Abby's Family that dominated later-ER.

Yes, thanks for reminding me of that. The part where he surprises him by bringing him out on the boat is probably my favourite Greene scene.

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16 hours ago, Bastet said:

The first thing that struck me about Mark’s storyline with his dad is that he’d have never had that transformative time with him if his mom hadn’t died first.  It’s a pretty compressed time frame in which to lose both your parents, so that’s horrible in one way, but if his mom was still alive, his dad’s illness would have played out in San Diego, with his mom taking care of him.  Mark would have made sure he was getting proper medical care, checked in with his mom regularly and probably even visited a couple of times (during which he and his dad continued to just talk about projects around the house), but his dad would have died with their relationship still distant and strained.

Despite the many wonderful scenes between Mark and his dad in Chicago, including their final ones, my favorite part of the arc comes after his dad’s death, when Mark himself is dying and trying to connect with Rachel before he does – he recognizes the teenage version of himself in Rachel, and recognizes his dad in the current version of himself.  Like Rachel, he grew up resentful of his father’s career-induced distance (both physical and emotional).  But now he knows that wasn’t a black-and-white situation; his dad made mistakes that caused lasting damage, but he wasn’t malicious and suffered his own wounds.  Fundamentally, he was loved. 

I get choked up when he tells Rachel he’d take back every negative thought about/interaction with his dad if he could, but it’s okay that he can’t.  It’s a wonderful gift to leave her with; when she gets older and starts to properly process their relationship, she’s going to feel guilty for her part of it, but she’ll have that conversation to look back on, and know he understood it from both sides.  He knows full well she won’t get what he’s saying now, she can’t -- she has to grow up to gain that perspective, just like he did.  And he won’t be around for her adult self to hash it out with the way he was able to with his dad.  But he’ll have left her with the knowledge he died understanding all those “if only” regrets she’s having now, and accepting as his due the negative thoughts she had then.

This is a great post. And one thing ER did do its final season was wrap up the fates of beloved characters. I teared up seeing Rachel, now a mature med school student, running into the ER exactly the way Mark would have. She obviously remembered her conversation with her father and honors his memory.

I also like how Doug and Mark had that heated conversation where Doug pointed out to Mark that his dad really didn't sound that bad. Of course Doug had the world's shittiest dad, but it was nice to see a different perspective. 

But my favorite scene with Mark's dad was when he went to the store to get Rachel maxipads. He was so befuddled he ended up buying every kind of pad. That was when one realized that Mark's dad wasn't a bad guy at all. Maybe a bit flinty like many military men are, but not a bad guy.

It also made me think that all those years his dad must have wondered what happened. He did all the right things as a parent and husband, and yet his son was still cold and distant from him. He turned down a promotion so Mark wouldn't have to move constantly the way Navy brats do. He was faithful to Mark's mom and provided for his family. 

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Apropos of nothing but I remember watching the party scene at James Franco's house in This Is The End and it slowly dawning on me that that weirdly familiar guy hanging out with his crew was Paul Sobricki - was the first time I'd seen the actor in anything else.

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Re: Mark and the Jeannie storyline, I liked it because it was realistic. In the 1990's there was still a lot of fear and ignorance about HIV and AIDS. I think "good guy" Mark having a rather bigoted, ignorant response to Jeannie showed that even nice, compassionate people in the medical profession were not immune to these prejudices and fears. 

It was kind of like Carter being insensitive to the trans woman. Not a good look on Carter, but realistic that a super-privileged med student from an Old Money family wouldn't know how to react to a somewhat down-and-out trans woman.

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19 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Re: Mark and the Jeannie storyline, I liked it because it was realistic. In the 1990's there was still a lot of fear and ignorance about HIV and AIDS. I think "good guy" Mark having a rather bigoted, ignorant response to Jeannie showed that even nice, compassionate people in the medical profession were not immune to these prejudices and fears.

I had the opposite thought.  I can understand Mark being ignorant and having some fear, but his behavior was enough that in reality he could have been fired and lost his medical license.  I mean, I think it's one of the most basic ethical rules for doctors, i.e. that medical records are confidential, and a doctor has no right to go through a random person's records to satisfy their curiosity.  More to the point, imagine if when Mark had a tumor, but had not revealed it publicly, Kerry went through his medical records without authorization to determine what was going on.  He would have been apoplectic.   

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1 hour ago, txhorns79 said:

I had the opposite thought.  I can understand Mark being ignorant and having some fear, but his behavior was enough that in reality he could have been fired and lost his medical license.  I mean, I think it's one of the most basic ethical rules for doctors, i.e. that medical records are confidential, and a doctor has no right to go through a random person's records to satisfy their curiosity.  More to the point, imagine if when Mark had a tumor, but had not revealed it publicly, Kerry went through his medical records without authorization to determine what was going on.  He would have been apoplectic.   

I agree with the part about Mark looking in medical files. It was far-fetched. But i thought the general sentiment of the story (that people who considered themselves educated, compassionate doctors were not immune to really unacceptably bigoted reactions re: the HIV/AIDS virus) really well-done. 

Besides Mark was always a crappy person when it came to office politics. For instance when Carter was addicted and confronted and didn't react well Mark just shrugged and said "Is that it?" He didn't seem all that concerned or sad that a colleague of many years had endured a horrible trauma and was struggling. It was equally ironic since Mark had so many anger issues after being attacked. But his compassion that Carter was self-medicating was almost nil. 

It was Benton and even Kerry who expressed more genuine concern. 

Mark wasn't exactly supportive of "best friend" Doug getting the pediatric attending position either.

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Mark pulling Jeannie's record was awful (but consistent with the ways in which Mark was sometimes awful despite the show propping him up as The Good Guy), but it led to the fabulous scene when Jeanie finds out what he did and tells him fine, now he's learned something about her, and she's learned something about him.  It was one of the only times someone had his number.

Jeanie bugs the shit out of me with her treatment of Kerry, and she's a bit of dip when it comes to men, but I love her in that moment.

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10 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Mark wasn't exactly supportive of "best friend" Doug getting the pediatric attending position either.

That storyline was when I began to absolutely loathe him. Even Kerry later called him out on his two-faced behavior, although that was in regards to the fact that he did the same thing to her--promising her that he had her back when he didn't.

Why the hell couldn't he have just had the balls/guts/spine to tell both of them that he couldn't/wouldn't back either of them until he had all the facts?

I absolutely hated that about him, and it's a trait that he displayed right until the end.

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11 hours ago, txhorns79 said:

More to the point, imagine if when Mark had a tumor, but had not revealed it publicly, Kerry went through his medical records without authorization to determine what was going on.  He would have been apoplectic.   

Which brings me to the other thing I hated about Mark--his hypocrisy. He read Kerry the riot act about her denial about her mentor's dementia and her reluctance to report him, but went ballistic when she reported HIM. Apparently it's okay for HIM to be wandering around the ER mixing up words, but not anybody else.

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20 hours ago, Camille said:

That storyline was when I began to absolutely loathe him. Even Kerry later called him out on his two-faced behavior, although that was in regards to the fact that he did the same thing to her--promising her that he had her back when he didn't.

Why the hell couldn't he have just had the balls/guts/spine to tell both of them that he couldn't/wouldn't back either of them until he had all the facts?

I absolutely hated that about him, and it's a trait that he displayed right until the end.

Well in my experience generic "nice guys" like Mark are often more fair-weather than pricklier characters like Benton. The Marks of the world are people-pleasers and they don't want to take a stand that could be controversial. Doug Ross was a polarizing figure in the ER -- patients and most of his colleagues liked him, the higher-ups not so much. Kerry was the same -- some people liked her, many hated her. So it's not surprising that Mark was wishy washy about them. 

You got the feeling that Benton didn't have many friends outside work, and probably never had many friends period. So it made sense that when he found someone he cared about (Carter) he would go above and beyond. Like flying with Carter to rehab.

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15 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Well in my experience generic "nice guys" like Mark are often more fair-weather than pricklier characters like Benton. The Marks of the world are people-pleasers and they don't want to take a stand that could be controversial. Doug Ross was a polarizing figure in the ER -- patients and most of his colleagues liked him, the higher-ups not so much. Kerry was the same -- some people liked her, many hated her. So it's not surprising that Mark was wishy washy about them. 

You got the feeling that Benton didn't have many friends outside work, and probably never had many friends period. So it made sense that when he found someone he cared about (Carter) he would go above and beyond. Like flying with Carter to rehab.

On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 2:17 PM, Growsonwalls said:

Besides Mark was always a crappy person when it came to office politics. For instance when Carter was addicted and confronted and didn't react well Mark just shrugged and said "Is that it?" He didn't seem all that concerned or sad that a colleague of many years had endured a horrible trauma and was struggling. It was equally ironic since Mark had so many anger issues after being attacked. But his compassion that Carter was self-medicating was almost nil. 

I agree with so many posts on here and thank you all for reminding me of the great Mark/his dad storylines. My favorite scene with his dad was the Thanksgiving one where he has to go get the pads for Rachel.

also the above (is that it) set up my favorite scene of Benton responded (I paraphrase) not if I can help it, going after him and saying fine, you want to fight? ok but your ass is getting in that van. I loved Benton refusing to give up. So loved it.

I really like how the show wrote Mark. He was so real. Not perfect but real. There are a lot of nice people who suck at saying to someone's face what they really think. Not because they are evil but because they are bad at confrontation/don't want to hurt feelings and then find themselves backtracking, etc. You don't often see that on TV--it's normally so and so lies and is evil. Mark just weak spined his way into bad situations.

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“Your ass is getting in that van” is one of my favorite Carter/Benton moments. Then Carter starts bawling and Benton hugs him, and my heart grew 3 sizes that day. 

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13 minutes ago, Claire85 said:

“Your ass is getting in that van” is one of my favorite Carter/Benton moments. Then Carter starts bawling and Benton hugs him, and my heart grew 3 sizes that day. 

me too. It's so perfect.

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For the Carter/Benton lovers, this is also a total gem. After the Carter's Shittiest Day Benton drags Carter to the Benton Thanksgiving dinner. My heart watching this. 

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Carter was on a very short list of people that Benton showed any kind of tenderness to - the rest were his family - his mom, sister and son.  How can you not love these two?

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13 minutes ago, ch1 said:

Carter was on a very short list of people that Benton showed any kind of tenderness to - the rest were his family - his mom, sister and son.  How can you not love these two?

Well he and Lizzie broke up but remained friends and in the series finale had a really 'shippy moment where he walks her to her car. Since the series ends after that a part of me likes to believe that he left Cleo-bot and rekindled his romance with Corday. Especially since his relationship with Cleo-bot had all the spark of drained battery.

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8 minutes ago, Growsonwalls said:

Well he and Lizzie broke up but remained friends and in the series finale had a really 'shippy moment where he walks her to her car. Since the series ends after that a part of me likes to believe that he left Cleo-bot and rekindled his romance with Corday. Especially since his relationship with Cleo-bot had all the spark of drained battery.

I so agree. I loved those scenes and they always seemed like a great couple.

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36 minutes ago, RedbirdNelly said:

I so agree. I loved those scenes and they always seemed like a great couple.

I like that after they broke up as a romantic couple they remained friends through ups and downs (the surgical residency was a down). Not everyone is like Julianna Marguiles and Archie Panjabi or Sarah Jessica Parker and Kim Cattrall. People can have their differences but remain friendly and collegial.

Here's a good deleted scene between Peter and Corday at Mark's funeral. 

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Seeing the entire "Nurse Float" story arc. Seeing it now and even then. I get they were trying to show that hospitals or medical places were trying to entrap people so they would get fired so they wouldn't have to pay out a pension or stuff. I think the story would have worked better if they had a nurse who was use to private practice and then had to go work in an ER, which as she said: "I haven't covered since I was out of school." Ok, the mixed up lunch schedule or where certain medical items are, makes sense. But really? She puts potassium in her fanny pack and then mixes it up. Plus, she can't tell the damn difference between putting a football and a severed foot in a bag of ice? Plus, no one doubled checked before the guy went up to surgery. How about when then Holay was about to be floated to a department she had no idea how to work, especially given her age at the time. No, hospital would be that stupid to put itself in the line for that many lawsuits. Plus, I like how Carol just argued one day and magically the nurse floating was taken away after several years. The show didn't really know how hospitals were ran. 

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46 minutes ago, readster said:

Seeing the entire "Nurse Float" story arc. Seeing it now and even then. I get they were trying to show that hospitals or medical places were trying to entrap people so they would get fired so they wouldn't have to pay out a pension or stuff. I think the story would have worked better if they had a nurse who was use to private practice and then had to go work in an ER, which as she said: "I haven't covered since I was out of school." Ok, the mixed up lunch schedule or where certain medical items are, makes sense. But really? She puts potassium in her fanny pack and then mixes it up. Plus, she can't tell the damn difference between putting a football and a severed foot in a bag of ice? Plus, no one doubled checked before the guy went up to surgery. How about when then Holay was about to be floated to a department she had no idea how to work, especially given her age at the time. No, hospital would be that stupid to put itself in the line for that many lawsuits. Plus, I like how Carol just argued one day and magically the nurse floating was taken away after several years. The show didn't really know how hospitals were ran. 

The show always seemed to want to tell us that people who worked in the ER were somehow superior to every other hospital employee.   The doctors, the nurses, the unit secretaries all worked harder, smarter, better in the ER while everyone else was lazy.  This is, of course, baloney.

The show pretended that a med-surg float would not understand the concept of not getting a break due to patient volume.  Believe me, they often have to skip their lunches, too.  At least as often as it happens in the ER, maybe more.  Med-surg nurses also know better than to mix up their own special blend enemas for patients without an order.  They also know about potassium, it's risks and side effects and use it in IV's regularly.  ER nursing and med-surg nursing are two totally different specialties and an ER nurse would have just as tough a time adjusting to the work load on med-surg as the med-surg nurse did in the ER.

Carol was a nurse manager for the ED.  Every department has a nurse manager and they all meet regularly to discuss various issues.  Can you imagine the amount of flak she would've gotten from her nurse manager colleagues if she insisted that the staffing problems were not her issue and refused to let her nurses float?  How would that be fair?  And, as noted above, floating nurses is not just a strategy to force senior nurses to retire; hospitals are operating on thin margins, patient volumes can be unpredictable and there has to be flexibility.  I presume if the ER wasn't busy, Carol would've also objected to nurses being sent home without pay or sent home to be on call for a couple of bucks an hour rather than full pay.

Edited by doodlebug
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41 minutes ago, doodlebug said:

The show always seemed to want to tell us that people who worked in the ER were somehow superior to every other hospital employee.   The doctors, the nurses, the unit secretaries all worked harder, smarter, better in the ER while everyone else was lazy.  This is, of course, baloney.

The show pretended that a med-surg float would not understand the concept of not getting a break due to patient volume.  Believe me, they often have to skip their lunches, too.  At least as often as it happens in the ER, maybe more.  Med-surg nurses also know better than to mix up their own special blend enemas for patients without an order.  They also know about potassium, it's risks and side effects and use it in IV's regularly.  ER nursing and med-surg nursing are two totally different specialties and an ER nurse would have just as tough a time adjusting to the work load on med-surg as the med-surg nurse did in the ER.

It was also where reality just didn't work on ER. How about the medical student Carter had before Lucy who was ALLERGIC to latex. He was in his final year of medical school and had to complete his ER rotation. First of all,  by then how many procedures would he have been on where he was wearing latex gloves regularly? If he wanted to be more of a personal doctor (which we found he did and was better as a talking doctor). Did his constant: "I can't breathe and don't feel right?" not make him question: "Shouldn't I look into why I'm feeling and acting like this?" Oh no, took a huge influx of patience and wearing latex TOO LONG where everyone figured out he wasn't a hypercritical but was allergic to latex. Plus, I get he had to meet a credit for graduation, but if he was focused on being a "people doctor" his professors would have steered him there or his course instructor would have. Kind of like how Carter lost his RA job because of the out of control dorm party. Because that would have really happened at a medical college or the fact that student doctors "shouldn't do drugs". In fact pre-med or medical students are constantly tested because of access to drugs or do it to escape stress. 

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4 hours ago, doodlebug said:

The show always seemed to want to tell us that people who worked in the ER were somehow superior to every other hospital employee.   The doctors, the nurses, the unit secretaries all worked harder, smarter, better in the ER while everyone else was lazy.  This is, of course, baloney.

I really didn't like that. I can believe that Rhonda (the float nurse) would have been out of her element, but there's no way she would have been so incompetent and moronic, especially "after 22 years" as she stated. It would have made far more sense for her to be a rookie than someone with 22 years of experience under her belt.

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1 hour ago, Camille said:

I really didn't like that. I can believe that Rhonda (the float nurse) would have been out of her element, but there's no way she would have been so incompetent and moronic, especially "after 22 years" as she stated. It would have made far more sense for her to be a rookie than someone with 22 years of experience under her belt.

non medical person here, but I remember that seeming over the top.

And I'm pretty sure there is some other episode where they are slammed and pull some old nurse from the geriatric ward? and she is dressed like a 1950s nurse? It was thrown out there for humor but it was so out there, I found it annoying.

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21 minutes ago, RedbirdNelly said:

non medical person here, but I remember that seeming over the top.

And I'm pretty sure there is some other episode where they are slammed and pull some old nurse from the geriatric ward? and she is dressed like a 1950s nurse? It was thrown out there for humor but it was so out there, I found it annoying.

Then in Abby's first episode as a medical student, Carol assumes she's been sent down to help with the overflow of flu patients and Weaver later gets her assigned to the ER without even discussing it with Abby herself as if her feelings on the matter are irrelevant. 

Huh? After that whole "float" storyline where it was depicted as irritating at best and disastrous at worse to be shifting nurses from one department to another, now that's just all been forgotten about?

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2 hours ago, RedbirdNelly said:

non medical person here, but I remember that seeming over the top.

And I'm pretty sure there is some other episode where they are slammed and pull some old nurse from the geriatric ward? and she is dressed like a 1950s nurse? It was thrown out there for humor but it was so out there, I found it annoying.

Yep, first of all, hospital nursing is a young person's job.  Very few nurses stay working the floor until retirement, it is hard work and it isn't for the older practitioner.  If he/she is going to stay working in the hospital, they're going to shift into administrative roles.  Secondly, no nurse, not even an old one, has worn the starched white dress with white hose and nurses' cap since the 80's if not earlier.

2 hours ago, Camille said:

Then in Abby's first episode as a medical student, Carol assumes she's been sent down to help with the overflow of flu patients and Weaver later gets her assigned to the ER without even discussing it with Abby herself as if her feelings on the matter are irrelevant. 

Huh? After that whole "float" storyline where it was depicted as irritating at best and disastrous at worse to be shifting nurses from one department to another, now that's just all been forgotten about?

Well that's because Abby was just the bestest ever at everything.  Even though she hadn't done any ER nursing, she stepped right up and became the best ER nurse in the place by the time Carol left.  Everyone looked to Abby for guidance and advice on everything.  Another unrealistic scenario.

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4 hours ago, Camille said:

I really didn't like that. I can believe that Rhonda (the float nurse) would have been out of her element, but there's no way she would have been so incompetent and moronic, especially "after 22 years" as she stated. It would have made far more sense for her to be a rookie than someone with 22 years of experience under her belt.

Exactly! It was too much and the fact that even in Chicago, after "22 years" a nurse would have left for a private practice or clinic by them. I'm also sure the said nurse had kids in college too I believe she mentioned. So, at that point, she be happy to just do her checks, make a shift and then go home and kick back and enjoy the quiet. Like I said, when they had her mix up the syrigins on the potassium and then mixing up a football with a severed foot was when the story lost all credibility. 

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