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The K-1 Visa Process: How Does It Work?

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Something I find unclear in the process - could Devar (or anyone else on a K1) go to school before his gets his work visa? I was curious because if Devar wants to continue in some sort of medical field like EMS, he would likely need additional training to obtain licensure in his state. If I was in Devar's shoes, I'd be working my ass off so I could get that licensure ASAP.

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Something I find unclear in the process - could Devar (or anyone else on a K1) go to school before his gets his work visa? I was curious because if Devar wants to continue in some sort of medical field like EMS, he would likely need additional training to obtain licensure in his state. If I was in Devar's shoes, I'd be working my ass off so I could get that licensure ASAP.

The hold up for most will be the social security number as it serves as a default national ID. Most wait until after the marriage, and for most a name change before applying for the social security card. But you can apply from day 1 to day 76 while you are on a K-1. However many local social security workers don't know the rules and try to make you wait until you get an work authorization. You can apply for your work authorization before you marry, but it usually takes at least 45 days and most are married before its approved so most wait so as to not have yet another government fee to pay

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My understanding, from knowing immigrants, international students, and this show, is you can't do anything but be here and planning a wedding on a K-1. After the wedding, you wait for the visa status to change to green card and then you can go to school, work, etc. To try and change the visa would create lots of headaches and red tape and could get someone deported as a worst case scenario. As unpleasant as it can be to sit idly as time passes and bills pile up, it's the best thing to do.

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My understanding, from knowing immigrants, international students, and this show, is you can't do anything but be here and planning a wedding on a K-1. After the wedding, you wait for the visa status to change to green card and then you can go to school, work, etc. To try and change the visa would create lots of headaches and red tape and could get someone deported as a worst case scenario. As unpleasant as it can be to sit idly as time passes and bills pile up, it's the best thing to do.

The prejudice of the show is that people are spending 90 days getting to know each other and then deciding whether it is a go or no go., Even if in many cases they got to know each other first on vacation and not because of foreign work or study for extended periods. When in fact the 90 days are for getting the wedding plans, venues, invitations, dresses...etc and perhaps counseling if you are going through a church that requires it. Most are getting married  sooner to day one than to day ninety

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When you apply for the K-1 visa, you have to be sure you are going to marry that person.

You can marry the next day after arriving. You don't have to wait the whole 90 days to get married, nor is it meant as a dating/getting to know each other and see if we want to get married visa (that's what tourist visa are for). Thank you TLC for misleading all these people.

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That's why it's 90 days and not 6 months or a year. It's not meant to be used the way TLC seems to be showing it, as a "getting to know you/making sure this is right" probationary period. It's for moving the immigrant over, finishing the wedding details, and doing the deed.

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But it's so much more draaaaaaaamatic the way TLC does it. Jason and Cassia, last season, their entire story was fake. Ron had flown down there beforehand to meet her, it was not their first meeting in the house.

The way this show protrays it, I'd be deterred from ever wanting to marry someone from another country.

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I too wondered how they could get Loren's guy got a paid job.

 

 

 

How would Alexi be able to model? Isn't that considered work? Maybe she just wanted to show him off like a piece of meat. It just seemed so demeaning considering he didn't want to be doing it and just as bad as if a guy was pressuring his girl to "take pictures". I guess Loren got all the looks in her family but she is annoying af.

I'm confused by the Florida condo they are living in. It looks pretty dumpy and I figured they had more money as they must have been subsidizing some of Loren's expenses in New York.

I missed that point was he paid or like many perspective models Loren/TLC doing the paying at this point? It was the same with Kiryam she was taking pictures. I do wonder if there is some sort of P or O visa rider to the entire immigrant cast to be part of the show prior to their work authorization

Edited by Raja

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I missed that point was he paid or like many perspective models Loren/TLC doing the paying at this point? It was the same with Kiryam she was taking pictures. I do wonder if there is some sort of P or O visa rider to the entire immigrant cast to be part of the show prior to their work authorization

 

We do not see him being paid on camera. We hear Loren say "We need money".

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I don't know if there's an actual limit, but my friend's dad has had 3 Filipino mail-order brides. (Sequentially, not simultaneously)

Under IMBRA, the International Marriage Broker Act of 2006 there is a limit of two K-1 petitions and the second has to be at least two years after the first. Immigration attorneys are able to arrange waivers for the clients. Especially for a man like Mark whose first petition was more than 20 years ago before the law was passed. Or the American can marry in the alien's country and still get approved on a CR-1 visa

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I was wondering how Alessandra's parents were able to get to the states. I remember the girl in the first season was from Russia and her parents weren't able to and she missed them so much. Is it just a matter of money? Aleksandra's mom is pretty hot and stylish. Josh's mom looks so matronly. She definitely seemed really uncomfortable around her parents.

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In some parts of the world, where it is harder to obtain a visitor B-2 visa, money talks. Having money, business or political ties at home gives the US a greater level of confidence that someone will leave when their visa expires and not remain in an illegal status.

Edited by Raja
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Under IMBRA, the International Marriage Broker Act of 2006 there is a limit of two K-1 petitions and the second has to be at least two years after the first. Immigration attorneys are able to arrange waivers for the clients. Especially for a man like Mark whose first petition was more than 20 years ago before the law was passed. Or the American can marry in the alien's country and still get approved on a CR-1 visa

 

I am The King Of The K1 Visa.  I have applied for 3 K1 Visas (1999, 2002, 2009).  I did all three by myself without an attorney.  All 3 were approved.  I married all 3 women (not at the same time).  I am still with the third one.  When I filed for the 3rd K1 Visa I had to request a waiver of that limit.  I explained my situation in writing.  I submitted the waiver request with the other forms and they approved the visa.  When I arrived in Miami immigration with my fiance the agents interviewed us separately and they accused her of paying me to bring her to the US.  When they asked me I laughed and said "I wish she had money to pay me.  I've lost over $30,000 by living with her for 6 months in Colombia."  The crusty old agent said "This is your last time." and I shook my head and agreed.  I will never do another K1 visa because it's too much risk and cost.  If I were single again I would just retire to Latin America now at my age and be a sugar daddy to some desperate woman.

Edited by Steve
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I am The King Of The K1 Visa.  I have applied for 3 K1 Visas (1999, 2002, 2009).  I did all three by myself without an attorney.  All 3 were approved.  I married all 3 women (not at the same time).  I am still with the third one.  When I filed for the 3rd K1 Visa I had to request a waiver of that limit.  I explained my situation in writing.  I submitted the waiver request with the other forms and they approved the visa.  When I arrived in Miami immigration with my fiance the agents interviewed us separately and they accused her of paying me to bring her to the US.  When they asked me I laughed and said "I wish she had money to pay me.  I've lost over $30,000 by living with her for 6 months in Colombia."  The crusty old agent said "This is your last time." and I shook my head and agreed.  I will never do another K1 visa because it's too much risk and cost.  If I were single again I would just retire to Latin America now at my age and be a sugar daddy to some desperate woman.

LOL -- at least you admit to it!

 

I didn't know they gave you some legal limit, although American women need sugar daddies too!  Not me, but there are girls out there!

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I didn't see the whole thing. Is this something they showed or do we just know this from another source? I'm assuming it means that she gets something if they divorce?

No it means should Mark just kick Nikki out on the street and she show up to claim public assistance the Feds and state government will seize the amount from Mark. The promise is that it will be a bit more invasive than the state seizing money to make good child support settlements since the tax payers in total and not just one single family unit has been cheated.

Edited by Raja

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I don't mean this as any kind of political commentary, but there is an article in The Washington Post today about K-1 Visas, since one of the San Bernardino killers was brought over on one:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/12/04/the-fiance-visa-process-that-brought-one-of-the-san-bernardino-attackers-to-the-u-s-explained/?hpid=hp_rhp-top-table-main_fix-fiancevisa-1pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

Edited by WhoAmIReally

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^ I saw a different article on this topic in the NYT, but this article you posted has some fascinating data. No one who is a regular viewer of this show will be surprised to learn that about 90% of K1 applications appear to get approved, but I did raise an eyebrow at the jump in applications in 2014 over previous years. What's going on there?

 

Incidentally, this article alludes to agents asking all kinds of nosy relationship questions in interviews, but the current K1 form allows applicants to request a waiver of some of the requirements (like a prior personal meeting) if you have a religious exemption or arranged marriage, etc. I don't know what the situation of this couple in California was, but that sounds like the kind of loophole that might provoke discussion.

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It makes me wonder if they're going to start cracking down on these visas (making them harder or longer to get) from countries the US perceives to be a threat.  Was the NYT article just a general one or was it about the California couple?

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I guess the fear is that when ISIS gets a 16 year old girl willing to join their cause some will travel to Syria to become wives of infantrymen while others will be told to wait until they are 18 to bring over a special terrorist husband on a spousal visa?

^ I saw a different article on this topic in the NYT, but this article you posted has some fascinating data. No one who is a regular viewer of this show will be surprised to learn that about 90% of K1 applications appear to get approved, but I did raise an eyebrow at the jump in applications in 2014 over previous years. What's going on there?

 

Incidentally, this article alludes to agents asking all kinds of nosy relationship questions in interviews, but the current K1 form allows applicants to request a waiver of some of the requirements (like a prior personal meeting) if you have a religious exemption or arranged marriage, etc. I don't know what the situation of this couple in California was, but that sounds like the kind of loophole that might provoke discussion.

Generally speaking the invasive interview is not done for the K visa. The pre I94 entry visa interview is done by a foriegn service worker deputized for the USCIS from the State Department who would know things like a Saudi spouse is not going to have any evidence of a romantic relationship, if there was the local police would have lashed or stoned her. The questions come when it is time to adjust their status to a permanent resident and then it it is usually not like the 1991 movie Green Card, starring Gérard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell. The what is his favorite position or color of her toothbrush questions tend to go to non K visa interviewees unless the paper chase trail is lacking or inconsistent. Those who married when a student, tourist or work visa was expiring demanding their own stop the INS clock marriage certificate

Edited by Raja

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I guess the fear is that when ISIS gets a 16 year old girl willing to join their cause some will travel to Syria to become wives of infantrymen while others will be told to wait until they are 18 to bring over a special terrorist husband on a spousal visa?

 

I think in this case (California), the wife was brought to the US from Pakistan. 

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I think in this case (California), the wife was brought to the US from Pakistan. 

I terms of the general fear of the spousal visa being used to circumvent Homeland Security it doesn't matter much where ISIS or other group finds the spouse/terrorist infiltrator. In this specific case I thought she was a Pakistani national but living in Saudi Arabia if true a Department of State employee in the Riyadh Embassy or maybe the Jeddah or Dhahran Consulate would have done the interview

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The NYT article was about the California couple-- and I think you're right, Raja, that she was Pakistani but living in Saudi Arabia.

 

In this specific case, I think she would have gotten over either way because there was nothing until recently to indicate that she was in contact with radical elements. But I somewhat disagree with the argument that a longer/more involved process wouldn't do anything. There are people--terrorists or otherwise--who look at this as a fast-track to a green card. You can't tell me that wasn't on Mohammed's mind. Likewise, even though I believe Devar and Melanie are a real couple, I'm sure the notion that he could get a K1 in under a year vs. 10 years of waiting to be sponsored by his mom crossed his mind.

 

The number of times we've heard statements on this show like "we've got 90 days so we'll see what happens" suggests the visa process is being misused. It should be restricted to someone you want to marry, not someone you want to date for a while.

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Our general rule here is we don't discuss politics or news events. Let's stay away from current news events and stick to how the K-1 process works in general, as it pertains to our couples. Thank you.

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The number of times we've heard statements on this show like "we've got 90 days so we'll see what happens" suggests the visa process is being misused. It should be restricted to someone you want to marry, not someone you want to date for a while.

 

We hear that on the show because it IS a show. That's the only reason it is said and played out. If you see a couple on your screen taking part in this show you can know that they got married and planned on it all along.

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There was a story on K1 visas on NPR this morning, and they said the process of obtaining this type of visa will now likely undergo heavy scrutiny.  Apparently, some immigration organizations have already been unhappy about these visas and how easily granted they are.  I hope that doesn't make our show get cancelled, because for some reason I really enjoy it.

 

I didn't mean to post something too current-event related, but it may affect our viewing pleasure in future, so please forgive.

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There was a story on K1 visas on NPR this morning, and they said the process of obtaining this type of visa will now likely undergo heavy scrutiny.  Apparently, some immigration organizations have already been unhappy about these visas and how easily granted they are.  I hope that doesn't make our show get cancelled, because for some reason I really enjoy it.

 

I didn't mean to post something too current-event related, but it may affect our viewing pleasure in future, so please forgive.

I'd really like to be able to discuss this here with other viewers of this particular show, because it's directly related and VERY interesting - if necessary, can we take it to the Small Talk (or whatever it's called) thread?

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I have been hearing for 10 years now predictions of the K-1 going away. Especially with the K-3 waiting times being almost the same, instead of the previous months longer waits. It would mean getting married and then waiting to see if either government will let you live as a family. And then the same homeland security concerns with a fiancee being a terrorist infiltrator remain with a spouse

We hear that on the show because it IS a show. That's the only reason it is said and played out. If you see a couple on your screen taking part in this show you can know that they got married and planned on it all along.

Yes they are in competition with Married At First Sight and tease some similar themes.

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I hope that doesn't make our show get cancelled, because for some reason I really enjoy it.

I like it too, and I'm all for seeing the couples who are genuinely in love make it work. But, let's face it, we know who is and who isn't. Just because they all get married doesn't mean they all love each other and it certainly doesn't mean they're all going to be married 3-5 years from now.

 

I really wish the show would do a story line on arranged marriages, though. An Indian-American or Arab-American person seeking a spouse abroad would make an interesting story. I want to hear why people make that choice, whether it is fulfilling to both of them, etc. A story like that would really help viewers understand why we have this K1 process (and built-in exceptions for spouses who haven't met) and for me at least it would help me decide what side of the debate I fall on.

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I would like to see the K-1 Visa get canceled.   If the couples are truly in love, let them work something else out -- like the American fiance relocating instead of vice versa.    Love will find a way, as the song says.

 

The process seems patently unfair to me because it allows certain people to get an express pass through the immigration process, and in that respect acts as a carrot to many unscrupulous or desperate individuals who see nothing wrong with exploiting some lonely person to get to the US.   By the same token, it provides a relatively easy conduit for Americans with questionable motives to import a human plaything, sex slave, servant, etc.

 

There is something very unseemly about the whole idea.  It's one of those aspects of American life that everyone knows about but looks the other way because it's icky.    K-1 may have originally been a good idea for veterans to bring foreign fiances back from distant lands where they served, but beyond that it just seems to cater to the "personals ads" crowd and adds nothing of true value to American life.   The K-1 was already something most people would rather sweep under the rug.   Now there's a risk factor attached.   I can't see any good argument for keeping it.   

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So you think that Americans who would want to marry someone who isn't a U.S. citizen don't deserve to raise their families and live their lives in the United States? You want to marry someone from England or Japan--don't let the door hit you on the a** on the way out?

Also it's not easy to immigrate anywhere--but all of the countries I'm familiar with have some sort of protocol for allowing families to remain intact. If I married my Russian boyfriend, I could apply for permanent residency and then be eligible for citizenship, and I would be able to skip the quota that others are subject to. The UK has visas for partners and you don't even have to be married to eligible. Pretty much every single country has a way for families to be together.

I do kind of side-eye the mail-order bride kind of marriages... But they do work out sometimes, even some of ones with big age differences, so eh.

And the difference between the U.S. and many other countries is that it can be very difficult for people to get a visitor's visa to the U.S. The K1 visa is indeed a way around that. The process that exists in many countries of coming to the country on a different kind of visa and then applying for permanent residency through your spouse isn't something that would be possible for a large number of American+International couples--look at all the parents whose visas were denied on the show and they couldn't come to the wedding. So the U.S. has K1 and spousal visas to make up for it.

Edited by deltaburkefan
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So you think that Americans who would want to marry someone who isn't a U.S. citizen don't deserve to raise their families and live their lives in the United States? You want to marry someone from England or Japan--don't let the door hit you on the a** on the way out?

 

It has nothing to do with deserving.   But why is the default choice always to come to the United States?  Melanie loves a Jamaican man so much, let her move to Jamaica and be his wife there.   See ya, Mel.   Have fun in the Philippines, Mark.   Enjoy Colombia, Fernando.   Works for me.  Keeps opportunistic immigrants out and rids us of dimwits at the same time.   But my guess is, the people who import these fiances don't love them enough to leave, which says something about the quality of their affection and the validity of these relationships.

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It has nothing to do with deserving.   But why is the default choice always to come to the United States?  Melanie loves a Jamaican man so much, let her move to Jamaica and be his wife there.   See ya, Mel.   Have fun in the Philippines, Mark.   Enjoy Colombia, Fernando.   Works for me.  Keeps opportunistic immigrants out and rids us of dimwits at the same time.   But my guess is, the people who import these fiances don't love them enough to leave, which says something about the quality of their affection and the validity of these relationships.

It isn't always the choice. These days expatriate message boards as a rule are more busy then spousal immigration ones. It looks like it is always a third worlder t from the Western side, a spouse from Israel is about as close as we got to an American equivalent on this show, because the American or European is normally the one with the greatest earning potential at home. Meanwhile retirees more and more staying in the improving Third World and dealing with those countries immigration systems and laws.

Edited by Raja

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It's not just being selfish and not wanting to live where your foreign spouse resides. You also have to think about things like health care, overall quality of life, education for your potential future children, etc. Many European countries would beat the United States in this regard, but not a country like the Philippines. Or you have aging family members, an established career in the U.S., etc. I live and work overseas now, but I don't want to raise my (potential) kids here.

It's not always the default choice--I actually do know many people who went the opposite route. But they often have the money to send their kids to international schools and have started their own businesses here, etc., and live a lifestyle that is far above what an average person experiences. I just have a normal job :) If you have the choice to live a life and give your children a life that will be more comfortable, why wouldn't you make that choice?

Edited by deltaburkefan
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Hey, folks-

 

Most of the discussion is okay, but sometimes it verges on being rant-y.

 

Rant-y is not okay.

 

If you think you're edging into rant territory, please edit yourself or hold the thought.

 

We will be watching the thread as usual and will remove rants without further notice.

 

Thanks!

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It has nothing to do with deserving.   But why is the default choice always to come to the United States?  Melanie loves a Jamaican man so much, let her move to Jamaica and be his wife there.   See ya, Mel.   Have fun in the Philippines, Mark.   Enjoy Colombia, Fernando.   Works for me.  Keeps opportunistic immigrants out and rids us of dimwits at the same time.   But my guess is, the people who import these fiances don't love them enough to leave, which says something about the quality of their affection and the validity of these relationships.

Many people choose not to live in the US.  Even American citizens occasionally choose to move to foreign countries for their spouses even though you may not hear about it in the media. Most countries, whether third world or not, have a process for foreign spouses to live there similar to the K-1 visa. 

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On 12/6/2015 at 3:09 PM, millennium said:

I would like to see the K-1 Visa get canceled.   If the couples are truly in love, let them work something else out -- like the American fiance relocating instead of vice versa.    Love will find a way, as the song says.

 

The process seems patently unfair to me because it allows certain people to get an express pass through the immigration process, and in that respect acts as a carrot to many unscrupulous or desperate individuals who see nothing wrong with exploiting some lonely person to get to the US.   By the same token, it provides a relatively easy conduit for Americans with questionable motives to import a human plaything, sex slave, servant, etc.

 

There is something very unseemly about the whole idea.  It's one of those aspects of American life that everyone knows about but looks the other way because it's icky.    K-1 may have originally been a good idea for veterans to bring foreign fiances back from distant lands where they served, but beyond that it just seems to cater to the "personals ads" crowd and adds nothing of true value to American life.   The K-1 was already something most people would rather sweep under the rug.   Now there's a risk factor attached.   I can't see any good argument for keeping it.   

That is how Canada does it. You either had to marry live together for a year first and then petition for a Canadian visa. It does leave everybody in the situation where people can be married and both home countries can refuse to allow the spouse to immigrate and unite the marital union.

In the end marrying and then depending upon immigration officials, done by many under  CR-1 as an immigrant or K-3 as a spouse needing to go back to USCIS to get the permanent residency.

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On 12/6/2015 at 6:09 PM, millennium said:

I would like to see the K-1 Visa get canceled.   If the couples are truly in love, let them work something else out -- like the American fiance relocating instead of vice versa.    Love will find a way, as the song says.

 

The process seems patently unfair to me because it allows certain people to get an express pass through the immigration process, and in that respect acts as a carrot to many unscrupulous or desperate individuals who see nothing wrong with exploiting some lonely person to get to the US.   By the same token, it provides a relatively easy conduit for Americans with questionable motives to import a human plaything, sex slave, servant, etc.

 

 The K-1 was already something most people would rather sweep under the rug.   Now there's a risk factor attached.   I can't see any good argument for keeping it.   

My husband and I married through the K-1 visa, but we definitely went about it differently from what the show is projecting. 

We met in graduate school in the UK and dated for two years before deciding to marry. We lived together for a year and a half. We also had a child. At first, we thought we'd live in England since we were already there. However, with a son on the way I wanted to be closer to my mom back in the US. My student visa was also expiring. I have a progressive and rare medical condition and there aren't any specialists for it in the UK; they are all in the US. In the end, we weighed the pros and cons and it was simply cheaper for us to live back in my part of the world than in his. And my mom was there, of course. 

We applied for the visa during the pregnancy. We could NOT apply for the work permit at the time. My husband still officially lived in England at that time but came to the US to be with me for the rest of the pregnancy. (I flew back at 7 months.) He was here on the visa waiver program, which meant he couldn't work or anything. I worked from home anyway so we were always together. He got the house ready, did repairs, and took care of the meals. The visa came through 2 weeks after our son was born. At that time he had 3 days to fly back to London, get the medical exam, and do the interview. Once those  were processed, he turned back around and returned to me and our son in the US. It was then that we had the 90 days to get married. 

I don't understand why you would think it was "an express pass through the immigration process". From start to finish, it took nearly 3 years and cost around $5,000 to go through the process and finalize everything. Once we were married we then had to apply for his permanent residency. He still wasn't able to work. He couldn't apply for the work permit until we'd applied for permanent residency. The work permit took another year to come through. Then, a year later, we had to go back through all the interviews (which we had to do in another state) and do another formality. 

And he does not have his citizenship. He is just a permanent resident. Citizenship is a whole other bag of worms. 

I assure you, there was nothing express, or even inexpensive, about it. Not to mention stressful. The multiple interviews, doctors' exams, and paperwork gave me anxiety attacks. He had to find a sponsor here in the US and that person had to provide criminal checks, background checks, and 7 years' worth of bank and tax statements. It's very hard to ask someone to do that. 

"If the couples are truly in love, let them work something else out -- like the American fiance relocating instead of vice versa". I didn't WANT to live in England forever. For one thing, the way their immigration process works, moving my mother to the UK couldn't happen. And she was our only form of help with the child. (His parents are gone.) I am an only child and my father is deceased. I didn't want to remain an ocean away from her. Me emigrating to England as a spouse (I was there on a student visa) cost twice as much as him emigrating here. My visa expired, so I had to return. If we'd married there and he'd come over on a spousal visa, the wait time was 3 years. During those years, he wouldn't have been able to come to the US, not even as a tourist. So that means he would have missed the birth of his child and our son's first 3 years. 

Sorry, but I get a little heated about this.  We met and fell in love in college, just like thousands of others do. It just so happens that I was the visiting foreigner, and not him. He didn't move here for a better way of life or to get a green card-my husband left a good job, stable economy, and technologically advanced country to be with his wife and child because he loved us both. It was hard and scary and expensive, although I joke about him being the most expensive souvenir I've ever picked up on my travels, we've made it work for more than a decade. We've survived the loss of our infant, multiple miscarriages, parental loss, chronic illnesses, job losses, and natural disasters and we're still going strong. The only difference between us and other American couples is that the beginning of our marriage had a lot more paperwork. 

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37 minutes ago, mamadrama said:

 

I don't understand why you would think it was "an express pass through the immigration process".

Obviously because I am ill-informed and allowed my impressions to be shaped by this moronic yet addictive television show.

Thank you for taking the time to write a very thoughtful post and for sharing your story.   I wish you and your husband many years of happiness ahead.

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1 minute ago, millennium said:

Obviously because I am ill-informed and allowed my impressions to be shaped by this moronic yet addictive television show.

Thank you for taking the time to write a very thoughtful post and for sharing your story.   I wish you and your husband many years of happiness ahead.

Aw, no problem. Hell. I KNOW how the process works and this show even confuses ME and makes me question crap. :-) 

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A childhood friend of my husband's got married in the Phillippines and then applied for his wife and her son to come to the US. It still took 2 1/2 years. Lots of paperwork, medical exams, etc. as well as interviews. She could not come here on a tourist visa so he had to go there to visit-- expensive plane tickets added to the total cost. He did not do the K-1 visa because he thought it was better to be married before having her come to the US--He may have had other reasons, but I don't know what they might be.

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On 11/21/2016 at 8:43 AM, Adiba said:

A childhood friend of my husband's got married in the Philippines and then applied for his wife and her son to come to the US. It still took 2 1/2 years. Lots of paperwork, medical exams, etc. as well as interviews. She could not come here on a tourist visa so he had to go there to visit-- expensive plane tickets added to the total cost. He did not do the K-1 visa because he thought it was better to be married before having her come to the US--He may have had other reasons, but I don't know what they might be.

2 years is a long time for a CR-1 I would think that since she was a single mother that somewhere along the line when the father was added to the birth certificate one form was marked married and thus it hit the computer that she was married. It was common for those in the 80s and 90s after their family law changed so unmarried fathers were listed on the birth certificate only to find out that the Philippines now considered them married after a records update to computerized systems and  a check. In effect the Nun at the hospital checked married so the child's birth certificate would not bear the illegitimate stamp. But there is no common law marriage and women need parental permission and notifications up to 25 years of age. So most of the 2 years would be spent getting an annulment. Either by either trying to prove the paperwork error or the easier method of  just going through the testi-lie system and paying a forensic psychologist to lie and say that the mother and baby father's "marriage" broke up because of a prexisitng mental defect.

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On November 24, 2016 at 9:08 AM, Raja said:

2 years is a long time for a CR-1 I would think that since she was a single mother that somewhere along the line when the father was added to the birth certificate one form was marked married and thus it hit the computer that she was married. It was common for those in the 80s and 90s after their family law changed so unmarried fathers were listed on the birth certificate only to find out that the Philippines now considered them married after a records update to computerized systems and  a check. In effect the Nun at the hospital checked married so the child's birth certificate would not bear the illegitimate stamp. But there is no common law marriage and women need parental permission and notifications up to 25 years of age. So most of the 2 years would be spent getting an annulment. Either by either trying to prove the paperwork error or the easier method of  just going through the testi-lie system and paying a forensic psychologist to lie and say that the mother and baby father's "marriage" broke up because of a prexisitng mental defect.

I see. I don't know exactly what the story was about her son's father; I thought it would be rude to ask-- but I assumed the length of time had something to do with it.  I do remember hearing that paperwork had an error or had gotten lost and had to be resubmitted at one point.

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On 11/7/2017 at 4:23 AM, Major Bigtime said:

Who knows but most sham marriages probably come from other sources, the border jumping illegal immigrant or visa overstay person in order to stay, with or without an anchoring American citizen baby.,  It is a pain going through the spousal K-1 visa to get into the nation in the first place. It never made much sense to me that you would pay off a spouse, presumably without conjugal benefits and sponsor a qualifying meeting trip. If you had that money why are you trying to get here so bad in the first place?

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On 11/12/2017 at 3:38 PM, Raja said:

Who knows but most sham marriages probably come from other sources, the border jumping illegal immigrant or visa overstay person in order to stay, with or without an anchoring American citizen baby.,  It is a pain going through the spousal K-1 visa to get into the nation in the first place. It never made much sense to me that you would pay off a spouse, presumably without conjugal benefits and sponsor a qualifying meeting trip. If you had that money why are you trying to get here so bad in the first place?

It seems the K-1 visa process/scam has a lot of advantages over illegal border jumping. First, it is a potentially legal way to stay and work in the U.S., if the scan is successful.  You won't have to hide from immigration and risk deportation.  Second, many border jumpers hire coyotes. Coyotes are expensive, thousands of dollars, although probably not as much as the cost of K-1 visa scam.  However, coyotes are very shady, dangerous folks.  it is not uncommon to hear of truck loads of people drying while in the custody of their coyotes. Third, trying to jump the border without the assistance of a coyote is extremely dangerous. The southern Arizona desert is littered with the bodies of people who did not survive the scorching desert. 

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