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Triskan

S03.E06: XXIV

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Well, the new episode is available and it was awesome ! 

 

Some random reactions (obvious spoilers) :

 

The meeting between Woodes Rogers and Rackham was, surprisingly (because there was so other awesome stuff not because I had low expectations) the highlight of the episode. Funny and clever, two men with a  lot in common but will probably never get along !

 

I really had no idea who'd win the duel between Teach and Flint ! I suspected Teach would bite the dust but feared a second Ned Lowe ! Thank you Charles for intervening ! 

 

Will have to rewatch the scene between Maddi and Scott because I didnt get it all but Silver and Maddi have great chemistry ! It's obvious where they're going, but the dialogue is selling it right and shaping their relationship in an interesting way.

 

So, thanks to Vane, Flint now knows about the gold ! Well... Anne is now the key of it all ! Looking forward to see how all that will shape up but I'm sure Anne can fend for herself... for now... but she cant remain on the run for long... I have no idea who'll find her first !

 

Max is by Roger's side it would seem. I think it's her best move for now, but things can quickly evolve... in any case, I fond the character very compelling this season (unlike the first and some part of the second).

 

I keep wondering if every new woman the show introduces is Mary Reed... I think we'll get her one of these days ! 

 

Anyway, looking forward to see other reactions ! 

Edited by Triskan
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Just watched the episode too.  (wanted to watch at 1am but I'm like, no I need sleep)

 

I have a question; how does Madi really feel about Silver; I know what is cannon in Treasure Island but did Madi offer to help Silver because she likes him or is it because she wants to make sure that her people don't get screwed, or some of both?  I think Mr. Scott told her to read up on Woods Rogers because he's the one they want to defeat.  

 

I think where Silver sees himself as an invalid, Madi sees differently.  I don't think Madi knew Silver only had a leg and a half until she saw it.  Then she realized what he's going through and going through it in pain.  When Madi held Silver's hand and looked at him, I thought that she was admiring him.  BTW, what were they doing to his leg, were they burning the flesh?

 

I don't think the Spanish are going to get their $$ and the British might have to join with the pirates or else Nassau will be lost.  

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Another great episode. Rackham is awesome. I just love that man. I'm all for anyone screwing over Rogers (and anyone who stands by his side, yes I'm looking at you Max & Eleanor. Sorry).

 

I kinda figured that Teach would win the duel with Flint just because it would make things easier on Flint if he had a fleet. And he can never do it the easy way. I did figure he would get Vane back on his side but I didn't think it'd happen so soon.

 

I think Madi does kinda like Silver a bit but she's also about seeing this partnership help her group. I'm more curious about what Scott said, about the day will come when their side would be enemies with the pirates.

 

And Billy? He's one I can't quite get a read on right now. He resents Flint, no doubt, but he also seems unable to break from him.

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Another good episode.  I turned off the lights and pulled up a chair for a theater experience.  This show really is beautifully shot.  

 

I agree this was Jack's episode -- I loved his dissing Rogers's book ("I"m very particular about my library") but I'm having trouble accepting Jack's motivation of being focused on building his legacy.  We've been told that that is what he's about on more than one occasion but I'm not sure I buy that.  I could understand that kind of thinking from a King or a President but it's seems an unlikely motivator for a pirate.  I'm mean we're talking straight up Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs -- people don't spend a lot of time thinking about self-actualization and esteem when their basic needs (including safety) are at risk.

 

So now Max is Team Rogers, aligned with Eleanor and in opposition to Jack & Anne.  My goodness. It is interesting the way alliances shift on this show. 

Edited by WatchrTina

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I love this show because they don't beat you over the head with stuff, but they let you know what time it is.

 

I get what Max is doing.  In an earlier episode, when Max and Anne were trading the gold for the gems, the men here were disrespecting Max, calling her "an intelligent Negress" and how remarkable that was.  That is how the rest of the world sees Max.  She feels or knows that the only place for her is Nassau; everywhere else, she's just a "Negress."  

 

Mr. Scott's talk with his daughter was interesting too.  Madi realized that Flint and Silver have a very unhealthy relationship.  Scott's like, "you have to make sure they don't kill each other because we need them."  Then she goes to read Woods Rogers book (I wonder what type of book that was, was it interesting, or was it like a memoir of some Z list celebrity of today like Snooki?), because she needs to know who the pirates want to fight.  

 

One thing that bugged me about last week's episode was when Flint went to talk to the Queen and gave her his plan.  I was like, "well what are the Queen's options other than Flint's plan?"  They were cut off from Nassau and its resources, if Flint hadn't told her his plan, what the hell was she going to do?  I mean she was basically fucked.

 

Question:  What were they putting on Silver's leg?  What the heck were they doing?  Were they burning the nerves or something?  

Edited by Neurochick

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I agree this was Jack's episode -- I loved his dissing Rogers's book ("I"m very particular about my library") but I'm having trouble accepting Jack's motivation of being focused on building his legacy.  We've been told that that is what he's about on more than one occasion but I'm not sure I buy that.  I could understand that kind of thinking from a King or a President but it's seems an unlikely motivator for a pirate.  I'm mean we're talking straight up Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs -- people don't spend a lot of time thinking about self-actualization and esteem when their basic needs (including safety) are at risk.

 

I suppose I buy it in the sense that if Rackham was so worried about his basic needs he would make that his priority, he's clever enough. I kinda just don't buy it because I don't remember him being so obsessed with legacy in the previous seasons? I just remember the bit about him wanting to make his pirate flag really memorable. Also, I'm not sure what makes him so sure anything is going to come up out of the ashes if Spain burns Nassau.

 

I wonder if that's it for Blackbeard? If so, the whole stint just felt like a really random visit from someone. Okay, thanks for stopping by, it was awkward.

 

"Tit curtain". Heh.

 

I thought this week was maybe the slowest episode of the season, but it looks like a set-up for next week.

 

Kinda dumb of Rogers to just send the one soldier to deliver a message to Anne.

 

And Billy? He's one I can't quite get a read on right now. He resents Flint, no doubt, but he also seems unable to break from him.

 

Yeah. I guess he just doesn't know where else to go, and he cares for the men as well. If I didn't know he were a book character I'd be rooting for him to go his own way.

 

Also I kinda wanna read Rogers' book.

Edited by ulkis
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A lot to digest in this episode.  I like how they tied all the different characters together with the running theme of who are you and what will your legacy be.  Unfortunately for Blackbeard, his designated legacy is always going to pick him second.  If that's the end of Blackbeard for the show, he was kind of underwhelming so I assume he'll be back at some critical point.  Either way, it was a really beautifully shot and choreographed fight.

 

Jack is better than I gave him credit for.  I've always thought he was much more serious about wanting to be taken seriously and wanting to be remembered even than he was saying and this cements it for me.  It's been building with Vane leaving and Blackbeard hanging around just long enough to remind him he's always been seen as hanger on for Vane, and his muddled attempts to manage the nuts and bolts of running Nassau and the Urca gold only added to it. His conversation with Woodes, who is already making a name for himself to be remembered, was just simply all the good things.

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Hmm, not the best episode, but I can understand its purpose: it was a transitional episode, setting up the board and rearranging the pieces for the second half of the season. (We're over halfway already!)

 

I think there can be little doubt at this stage that Madi is the future Mrs Silver. (Tumblr is predictably losing its mind). 

 

Scott's talk to his daughter about creating a villain for a story was interesting, namely because I think it was loaded with foreshadowing for what happens between Silver/Flint prior to the start of Treasure Island. That's goes ditto for Billy's words to Benjamin Gunn on the beach prior to the Teach/Flint duel. 

 

One thing bugged me: how amazingly eloquent these pirates are. I expect it from Flint, but this episode had Silver, Billy, Teach, Vane and Mr Scott all waxing lyrically about relationships, heartaches and the meaning of life. Hilariously not Anne though, who didn't get a single word of dialogue: just violence. I like how she's now the key to the unfolding situation - the show has been underutilizing her until now, so hopefully she'll have a more pivotal role in future episodes. 

Edited by Ravenya003
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I doubt we've seen the last of Blackbeard. He told the Irish prostitute he was laying with that he was on borrowed time thanks to a piece of Spanish shrapnel that was migrating towards his heart. I suspect that line was there to help explain whatever it is the writers (or history) have planned for him next. I can't imagine they'd have him reveal he doesn't have long to live, only to have a duel he survives be his final scene in the series. Maybe his paternal instincts will kick back in just when Vane needs help from him most.

 

As for eloquent pirates...

 

It actually makes a bit of sense for a few of the captains. Surprisingly some of them were well educated men historically, from affluent backgrounds. Blackbeard is perhaps a famous example of that. Recent research points to him possibly coming from minor gentry, with an Anglican minister (!) for a grandfather.

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I think there can be little doubt at this stage that Madi is the future Mrs Silver. (Tumblr is predictably losing its mind).

 

 

I think this is a bit of a generalization.  I'm on Tumblr and not everybody there is losing their mind.  

 

Yesterday I was messaging someone on Tumblr who likes Silver and doesn't think Flint is good for him.  She was saying that Flint/Silver has already happened.  Even though they haven't had sex, they are in a relationship, and its an abusive one and that this season Silver physically looks like a junkie, she thought he looked like someone on meth.

 

I too think that Flint/Silver is an abusive relationship.  In the first few episodes, Flint completely overrode Silver's authority.  Then after the storm, Flint blamed Silver for them getting into that mess because Silver wanted to investigate the abandoned ship.  To me that was classic abuser because any other time, Flint would have told Silver, "no, we're not checking out that ship, I'm the fucking captain."  In reality, I think Flint himself wanted to investigate that ship and put it in Silver.  

 

Interesting that in the first episode, Silver tells Billy that Flint's getting worse and Billy says, "He's fine."  Billy didn't change his tune until Flint executed those two men accused of stealing, on deck.  Then he told Silver, "you have to do something."  I was like, shit Billy, Silver's been saying that and you haven't listened.  

 

The only way Silver was able to get to Flint was to tell him that HE stole the Urca gold from him; meaning, "You think you're so smart, but I got one over on you."  Then, Flint started to respect him (getting the bucket of water for Silver on Maroon island), seeing him as an equal.  

 

I agree with the thought of Silver being a junkie.  It's like Silver is addicted to Flint and when he was on the island away from Flint, he was detoxing; that's why he was able to tell Madi how he felt about Flint.  He's scared that Fint's insanity will rub off on him and he'll end up as insane as Flint.  

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Also I kinda wanna read Rogers' book

 

It's real! Here's the link:http://www.amazon.com/Cruising-Voyage-Round-World-Adventures/dp/158976238X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1456668083&sr=1-1&keywords=woodes+rogers

 

Jack is better than I gave him credit for.  I've always thought he was much more serious about wanting to be taken seriously and wanting to be remembered even than he was saying and this cements it for me.  It's been building with Vane leaving and Blackbeard hanging around just long enough to remind him he's always been seen as hanger on for Vane, and his muddled attempts to manage the nuts and bolts of running Nassau and the Urca gold only added to it. His conversation with Woodes, who is already making a name for himself to be remembered, was just simply all the good things.

Thank you nodorothyparker.  This comment really helps me.  I said above that I was having trouble accepting all this "legacy" talk as being a legitimate reason for why Jack does what he does.  But you are right -- I had forgotten that well-written and well-acted scene when he meets Blackbeard and is basically told "you're not cool enough to hang with us."  Now I recall that the whole reason Anne & Jack parted company with Vane (which took Vane by surprise) is Jack's realization that Blackbeard would never take him seriously.  The reason he went back to Nassau for the pardon was so that he wouldn't have to change his name and lose the reputation (such as it is) that he has already built up.  His being particular about his pirate flag last season was (as ulkis noted) another character beat that was consistent with his concern about image.  And now I finally understand what was going on in this episode when he was talking to the two guys who were working on the fort.  When I watched the first time I couldn't quite figure out what was troubling Jack.  I couldn't understand why the rebuilding of a fort he had just blown up would bother him.  Now I recall that he couldn't get anyone to work on the fort -- he had to trick Vane into capturing a slave ship in order to find laborers.  Yet somehow Rogers could do it. That was KILLING him in that scene.  It makes more sense to me now that all of those blows, landing one on top the other, could provoke Jack into signaling Anne to take the money and run, knowing that it will create a crisis for Rogers, the English, and Nassau.

 

But shame on STARZ for putting Anne's stabbing of the Redcoat in last week's teaser trailer.  Way to spoil that plot point.

 

One thing bugged me: how amazingly eloquent these pirates are.

That doesn't bother me and maybe it's just willful suspension of disbelief by me but maybe I've been groomed to believe that people talked "fancy" in the old days.  One of my favorite shows ever was "Deadwood" and those denizens of a western frontier town in the 1870s were positively Shakespearean in their manner of speech (if Shakespeare had made liberal use of the word, "cocksucker.")  I just loved that show and I think I fan-wanked myself into believing that they emulated the speech patterns they saw in the few books they might have encountered in their lives.

 

I doubt we've seen the last of Blackbeard. He told the Irish prostitute he was laying with that he was on borrowed time thanks to a piece of Spanish shrapnel that was migrating towards his heart. I suspect that line was there to help explain whatever it is the writers (or history) have planned for him next. I can't imagine they'd have him reveal he doesn't have long to live, only to have a duel he survives be his final scene in the series.

Gosh I hope you are right because if that's all we get of Ray Stevenson's Blackbeard, that would be a major let-down.  So, am I the only one who, when they heard Blackbeard describe the ticking time bomb in his chest (the migrating shrapnel headed towards his heart), thought to themselves, "Hey, he's just like Tony Stark!"  Edward Teach -- the Ironman of the Republic of Pirates.

 

One more thing.  I am a bit confused about what went down on the beach between Flint & Teach.  Flint "lost" right?  He only survived because Vane intervened.  Blackbeard had him at his mercy and then Vane jumped in (breaking the rules).  Blackbeard ordered Flint off the beach and told him to take Vane with him, but no other ships left with him, right?  Flint did say "It would have been nice to have a pirate fleet" (or words to that effect) in the last scene between Vane & Flint as they sailed away from Ocracoke.  If so, THAT's a bit of a let-down.  Before the fight Flint suggests that if Vane sides with him the whole fleet will honor their vows and fall in line behind the leadership of Flint.  Vane refuses.  Blackbeard and Flint duel for control of the fleet.  Flint "loses" but Vane sides with him in the end.  Did all of Vane's influence just evaporate in that moment?  I predict that at least some of those ships that left Nassau with Blackbeard are going to sail off in the night and go looking for Flint & Vane -- including (maybe) a ship that will eventually end up with Vane as its captain.  Otherwise, what is Vane's future role?  He's a captain and he needs a ship.  I couldn't imagine him being content to be second-in-command on Teach's ship and Teach is something of a father figure to him.  No way is he going to be content to stay just a crewman on Flint's ship.  Vane needs a ship.  I asked this last week and I'll ask it again.  Where IS that Man 'O War?

 

Okay I'm re-watching the episode with headphones on (always a treat) and here is what Flint says to Billy at the very beginning, "Ocracoke Island.  Teach's lair.  In a few hours time I'm going to begin a discussion in which I'm going to ask him for something he can't possibly give. And the success or failure of this war will depend on the outcome."

 

So my question is -- did Flint succeed or fail?

Edited by WatchrTina
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One of my favorite shows ever was "Deadwood" and those denizens of a western frontier town in the 1870s were positively Shakespearean in their manner of speech (if Shakespeare had made liberal use of the word, "cocksucker.")

 

I mean, he kind of did.  Not cocksucker per se, but Shakespeare is nowhere near as highbrow as academia tries to make him.  If you're ever at a Shakespeare show and you don't know what's happening just assume someone is making a veiled dick joke and you'll be right more often than you're not.

 

This was a setup episode in a lot of ways, a needed beat to shift the chess pieces on the board.  Which isn't a criticism, I appreciate it when shows realize they need to set things up properly (and this is where I refrain from going on an off topic rant about the 100 and the storylines this season that could have been amazing if they'd set them up properly but are now just out of character messes NOT THAT I'M ANGRY AT ALL *ahem*).

 

Rackham's actions in this episode really solidify something I've been feeling all season, and have mentioned briefly in the past.  Both the English AND the pirates are dicks to the citizens of Nassau.  Like, I get that England is a massive bag of colonizing dicks, but the pirates are certainly not afraid of dicking over the little guy either.  Rackham's plan might secure his legacy, but how many people will Spain murder in the process?  Not just the English, not even just the pirates who actually had a hand in stealing their gold, but the (relatively) innocent denizens of the island who are just trying to live.  That's not a criticism against the writing by the way.  It's not even really a criticism of Rackham.  This has always been a show that asks you to identify and sympathize with morally dubious characters, that's certainly not changing any time soon.  It's more a neutral observation, I guess.  Or maybe a declaration that I'm Team Ordinary Nassau Citizen, rather than Team England or Team Pirates.

 

I kind of love how Max has now ended up having to chose between her personal plans/Nassau, and personal loyalty to other people.  Just like Eleanor.  A lot has been made this season, both in fandom and on the show itself, of Eleanor's history of betraying people.  And certainly she has, and she's handled it pretty horribly in some cases.  But I don't really see her as someone who manipulates and screws people over with malicious intent or because she enjoys playing with people.  Often it was a matter of having to choose between conflicting goals in a very high stakes world where the consequences of choosing a side meant having to screw someone over.  Max has been in her seat for only a few months and she's having to make the same kind of choices now.  I completely understand why Max has never forgiven Eleanor for season 1, but I'm always a fan of girls teaming up with other girls so I hope this leads to them working with each other more openly.  They could be a formidable political team.  Especially with Rogers backing them.

 

Speaking of Woodes Rogers, all I could think during that scene with him and Max and Eleanor at the end was "I see he's continuing habit of looking at smart, cunning women like their brains are the hottest thing about them".  Y'all can keep sweaty, batman voiced Vane, I would gladly climb Woodes Rogers like a tree.  

 

I do like Vane more this season than any other season.  Not that he'll ever be my favorite, but I think he pairs well with everyone besides Eleanor.  His relationship with Flint is fascinating.  Those two together are more than slightly terrifying in the amount of shit they can fuck up for everyone else.  

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Often it was a matter of having to choose betweenconflicting goals in a very high stakes world where the consequences of choosing a side meant having to screw someone over

The quote above is about Eleanor but it applies equally (we now learn) to Mrs. Hudson.  Assuming she is telling the truth (and I assume she is) she just became a much more interesting (albeit tragic) character.  I assumed last week that she was just pretending to be a newcomer to the spy business.  But now it seems she really is just a victim caught up in this world of pirates and spies.  Her newly revealed backstory makes more sense to me than her being some kind of 18th century Emma Peel.  Her being a widow with children to support -- children who were threatened to force her into the role of spy -- explains (for me) why a chambermaid speaks as well as she does.  She's probably a reasonably well-educated woman, perhaps of the merchant class, who has fallen on hard times and forced to work as a chambermaid for a class of people she despises.  Yes, she could definitely be an interesting addition to the mix.

 

 

Y'all can keep sweaty, batman voiced Vane, I would gladly climb Woodes Rogers like a tree.

Heh.  I'm afraid Eleanor is going to beat you to it.

Edited by WatchrTina
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I think Flint both failed and succeeded in the sense that he got to live despite being on the verge of defeat and he got Vane to choose him but he didn't get the fleet back from Blackbeard.  What they do with that going forward, I have no idea yet.

 

This show is so great on rewatch.  Continuing on the theme of identity, I love how this episode was full of character beats defining how these characters see themselves and how they see each other.  Jack has always known he was mostly a little dog running with the bigger dogs like Vane and Flint and legends like Hornigold but he had great hopes of joining the bigger dogs as he proved himself.  Vane has a fearsome reputation and ability for mayhem but he seems uncertain of who he wants to be and has what looks like daddy issues in needing the respect or approval of someone even bigger and more fearsome.  He made it clear in picking him that right now that someone is Flint.  Mr. Scott lists both Flint and Silver as the best at bending the world to their will and sees himself as a watcher that that will doesn't turn back on him or his people. Blackbeard despite his own infamy seems almost slightly envious of what Flint inspires and I think sums it up for us all when he says "Either you are unkillable, friend, or you're way overdue."

 

I particularly love Billy trying to explain the Flint phenomenon to Ben Gunn, who's clearly picked up on Billy's no great love for him, that he sticks it out with Flint because of his own need to see if Flint ever has to answer for the things he's done.  It's telling that Billy looked almost disappointed when it appeared Flint had shot Blackbeard, while Ben says that the other crew members had mostly good things to say as to why he should follow Flint.

Edited by nodorothyparker
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This show is so great on rewatch.

Yep.  Especially with headphones on.  I could hear the orders being given for the search for Anne for the first time (while Rogers is watching them out the window.)  And I totally agree about all the wonderful character-revealing moments in this episode.  Here are a few more things I noticed.

 

I love Billy being the lone voice in the wilderness pointing out the sheer madness of a war against England in a "A war meant to be won."  Later on Mr. Scott talks to Madi about Flint and Sliver and how they rose to their places because of their ability to talk men into anything - to bend them to their will.  Mr. Scott and Billy can see the manipulation and that's what sets them apart and makes them leaders (and makes it difficult for them to quietly follow).  Remember, Billy used to be the quartermaster. He gives Ben an interesting explanation for why he continues to follow Flint -- wanting to be there to have a ring-side seat when Flint is finally taken down -- but I think Billy also has no place to go.  Flint's crew is the closest he has to a family and, as former quartermaster, he's as enmeshed with them as Silver has become.  Someone said upthread that they can't figure Billy out and I think from this episode it's clear that even Billy can't figure Billy out.  He's a complicated character.  I like it.

 

I wonder if Billy is a surrogate for the viewer?  We're emotionally attached to this rogues gallery of thieves and murderers (or at least I am) and then occasionally one of them does something that is beyond the pale and we have to question just who it is we are rooting for. Billy struggles in the same way.

 

I was confused by Jack's line to Rogers, "What does that look like?  Return it all . . . it's the Resario Raid all over again?"  I thought at first he was referring to some historical ship, The Rosario, that was taken as a prize by a pirate who was then forced to return all the loot.  But after listening with headphones I think he said "Return it all OR it's the Resario Raid all over again."  I'm guessing the Rosario Raid is the 1703 raid on Nassau (prior to the events of the show, so not a spoiler) -- a joint Spanish-French attack on British Nassau which absolutely leveled it.  When the new Governor arrived a year later (not having heard anything about the raid) they found an island so desolate they had to turn around and sail back to England.  That may be the raid that has been mentioned on the show before -- the one everyone fears will reoccur.  I just don't recall anyone calling it "The Rosario Raid" before.

 

Ben Gunn's eyes are so startlingly blue they are absolutely mesmerizing.  And his lilting Irish accent is a welcome addition to the show.

 

Dear Captain Flint.  The next time you are in a duel to the death with notoriously unreliable 18th century flintlocks, aim for the fucking CHEST.  (Unless of course that is where you were aiming and you nicked his temple out of sheer luck.  if that is the case, all is forgiven.)

 

So here's a thought.  What if the scene we saw play out on the beach was this:  Edward Teach knows he is dying.  He wants to go out with a bang (literally) and secure HIS legacy (a la Jack's obsession.) Being killed in a duel with legendary, back-from-the-dead Captain Flint would not be a bad way to go -- especially as he has just reconciled with his prodigal "son" Vane.  In the duel, Flint turns to the side, giving Teach the smallest possible target.  Teach faces forward. He practically gives his chest as a target.  He deliberately misses Flint.  And then Flint fucking misses him -- only nicks him in the temple.  The combination of pain and frustration and anger are what fuels Teach's defeat of Flint.  And then that victory is tainted by Vane changing sides (again).  If that's what happened, poor Blackbeard!.  He loses his "son" again and he's still got a ticking time bomb in his chest.  Heaven only knows what he's going to get up to this season but I think it's safe to say that he will be a loose cannon when he turns up again (as he simply MUST.)

 

BTW, old expressions like "a loose cannon" take on a whole new meaning in the context of this show, don't they?  Sigh. RIP Mr. Muldoon.

 

Silver rejects pain-killers saying he doesn't wan to be seen "drooling in an opium haze saying God knows what." What do you suppose Silver is afraid he'll say?  He might be afraid he'll say something that reveals how scared he is of his new role and how conflicted he is about being a real member of the crew.  Or perhaps he's afraid he'll reveal to the crew what he revealed to Flint -- that it was he who stole the Urca gold from them in the first place.  Or maybe it simply is just that he doesn't want to appear weak and that ranting (about anything) in a opium haze would make him look vulnerable.  Whatever it is, I thought those scenes between Silver and Madi were terrific.  

 

Fun fact from the credits:  This show has a "Key Tall Ship Rigger" on staff.  I love that.

Edited by WatchrTina
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Silver doesn't want to look vulnerable in front of the crew.  Remember, most of that crew was actually in the room when the doctor cut off his leg and watched him scream his head off (remember that from last season).

 

It was interesting when Silver said, "I have to look the part."  Interesting because Silver looks so physically different this season than he did last season, facial hair and hair a lot longer than last season.  

 

I watch Afterbuzz TV on youtube, sometimes.  Last year right before season 2 started they had an interview with Zach McGowen, Jessica Parker Kennedy and Luke Arnold, they were filming season 3 at the time, and I remember how stunned I was because Luke Arnold looked SO different than how he looked in season 2.  He looked like a totally different person.  I remember him saying that he wasn't allowed to cut his hair short between seasons and that was fine with him, so he decided to grow it longer.  I didn't think anything of it at the time but now I'm like, yeah, Silver looks like a completely different person.  

 

I think it's Silver who represents the audience.  The show began with Silver on that merchant ship attacked by the Walrus; and we, the audience were introduced to Nassau through Silver's eyes.  I think as Silver gets deeper into the pirate lifestyle, so do we, the audience.

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Question:  What were they putting on Silver's leg?  What the heck were they doing?  Were they burning the nerves or something?  

 

Putting on a poultice, I believe. (which makes sense according to the definition I looked up: "a soft, moist mass of material, typically of plant material or flour, applied to the body to relieve soreness and inflammation and kept in place with a cloth.")

 

One thing bugged me: how amazingly eloquent these pirates are. I expect it from Flint, but this episode had Silver, Billy, Teach, Vane and Mr Scott all waxing lyrically about relationships, heartaches and the meaning of life. Hilariously not Anne though, who didn't get a single word of dialogue: just violence. I like how she's now the key to the unfolding situation - the show has been underutilizing her until now, so hopefully she'll have a more pivotal role in future episodes. 

 

Heh, I was thinking that too, they're all a bit too philosophical for a bunch of pirates. And it's not that I can't buy that a lot of them could very intelligent that way, I just don't know if I buy all of them being actually all that interested in constantly Pondering Their Circumstances.

 

 But shame on STARZ for putting Anne's stabbing of the Redcoat in last week's teaser trailer.  Way to spoil that plot point.

 

That reminds me, I'm also annoyed that they decided to now put the previews during the end credits, like they can't spare those 30 seconds outside of the credits.

Edited by ulkis

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And even if you avert your eyes from the previews at the end of the episode, they replay them RIGHT BEFORE the next episode airs.  What is the point of "teasing" an episode I've already tuned in to watch?  Very annoying.

Edited by WatchrTina
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I swear, I need a chart to keep up with all the changing alliances. People keep changing and switching allegiances, its really fascinating. 

 

I am really interested in where Maddi and Silver go from here. I do not know for sure if she is the future Mrs. Silver, but she seems like a pretty strong candidate as of now. So, if she does become Mrs. Silver, does she stick around the island and become queen when her mother dies? Does she decide to leave and sail the seas with Silver? Does something happen with the colony that makes the question pointless? What happens? If Maddi does become Mrs. Silver, and sticks around on the show, I would be ok with that. I really like her. 

 

Ben Gunn has such amazing eyes. This show is so kind to me, having already given us Billys arms, Silvers smile, Vanes chest, and Rogers cheek bones. Thank you show. You are doing good works here. 

Edited by tennisgurl
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Later on Mr. Scott talks to Madi about Flint and Sliver and how they rose to their places because of their ability to talk men into anything - to bend them to their will.  Mr. Scott and Billy can see the manipulation and that's what sets them apart and makes them leaders (and makes it difficult for them to quietly follow).  Remember, Billy used to be the quartermaster.

 

I couldn't watch this conversation without being reminded of a similar talk Mr. Scott had with Billy last year on their way to Charles Town.  He acknowledged then that Silver was the only man he'd ever seen come close to Flint in rising in prominence in their world so quickly and credited it to them both knowing the power of a good story and how to use it and "God help us all if (Silver) ever realizes what else he could use it for."  That was before it was revealed that Mr. Scott had an entire community riding on him.  Silver and Flint are his best bet now on keeping that community supplied and safe, but he's fully aware that he may have a tiger by a tail.  He doesn't know yet that Madi and Silver are sort of making eyes at each other, but it felt like a warning to her just the same.

 

Even with Billy's explanation for why he's stuck around, I still think there's a part of him that's very taken in by wanting to believe in Flint and I think he would hate ever admitting to it.  

 

I think it would bother me more if random crew number #43 or second tavern whore on the left was spouting some of Flint's or Teach's lines.  While I am a little fuzzy with what they've given us on where a couple of these characters might have become educated, we do know that several of them clearly are and can be in fact quite bookish.  I actually really enjoy listening to them talk because they do sound a lot like 18th century literature.  Beyond that, I'm just going with it and reveling in some of the language choices in some really lovely accents.

Edited by nodorothyparker
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I think it would bother me more if random crew number #43 or second tavern whore on the left was spouting some of Flint's or Teach's lines.  While I am a little fuzzy with what they've given us on where a couple of these characters might have become educated, we do know that several of them clearly are and can be in fact quite bookish.

 

true, although I do think either way, I think we need just a few more lines like Silver's last season, when Billy was talking about, yes, Vane only went to Charles Town to rescue Flint, but he only went to rescue Flint only to slit his throat once Flint was in the harbor and then he would come back and all their throats would be slit and Silver stared a beat and then replied, "well, that was dark." Rackham is also decent for cutting through all the philosophizing once in a while, but he does it more often this season than he cuts through it.

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Kinda dumb of Rogers to just send the one soldier to deliver a message to Anne.

 

Any more than that, I think, and Anne would have remained hidden and not met them at all. One soldier is more obviously not meant to be a threat.

 

I like Madi, but I've been calling her Princess Underwire due to the constant presentation of her assets. Not the actor's fault; I blame costuming, lighting, and blocking. And maybe the point is to give Silver something duh-obvious to admire, but it also could be that Michael Bay is an EP, and boobs are meant to be flaunted.

 

I disagree that this was a slow ep. Once again, I was astonished to see the credit cards so soon. Yo, there was a pirate duel! (When they were setting up the challenge, did anybody else murmur "Weehauken, dawn. Guns drawn."? [/hamilton dork] And then there  was a pirate swordfight! Sweet!

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Kinda dumb of Rogers to just send the one soldier to deliver a message to Anne.

There is a line where Rogers says that Jack insisted that only one soldier be sent, warning him (Rogers) that Anne would never let more than one get close enough to deliver a letter (or words to that effect.)  So Jack laid a trap with that letter and the soldier walked right into it, as did Rogers.

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I think this is a bit of a generalization.  I'm on Tumblr and not everybody there is losing their mind.  

 

 

I've been following a couple of Black Sails fans who went into meltdown mode, though it's easy to fall into the trap of assuming a platform like Tumblr is a hivemind. So far this fandom has been blessedly free of shipping wars (oy, you should see what's going down in The 100 fandom) and I had a kneejerk reaction to seeing it start up here as well.

 

Plus Madi/Silver are starting to interest me, especially after reading this review. To quote:

 

The previous scenes had Madi and Silver getting to know each other a little, and as Silver, away from Flint and the Walrus crew, is forced to admit just how badly the loss of his leg and resulting unhealed stump hurts and, more importantly, just how scary it is to insert yourself into Flint's mind, all of this is about Silver's character (showing the audience what his current state of mind and emotion is, setting up a new relationship for him), not so much about Madi's. So far, so standard regular male character and new female possible love interest.

 

And then we get that scene between Madi and her father, and wow. Because her reaction to all of this isn't "Dad, I think I could be into this guy", it's "I think we may have made a terrible mistake making that alliance with the pirates because this Flint-Silver combination it sort of rests on is volatile as hell"; who she's concerned about isn't Silver (though that may come in the future), it's her people (meaning her mother raising her with responsibility really paid off).

 

And then our Mr. Scott makes the scene even better by informing her that while the Flint-Silver tandem are necessary allies now (and preferably together, not apart), in the end the pirates will be the enemy, too. (Mr. Scott being entirely aware that in his world, white people will eventually screw you over, no matter what they promise: am so there for that. Remember his rather recent experience when Richard Guthrie handed him over to a slaver?) So best study them and their current opponent now to understand how to fight them. Which Madi takes to heart, and the episode doesn't end with her and Silver but with her starting to read Woode Rogers' book.

 

 

I've realized this is possibly the show's greatest strength: making sure that absolutely every single character, right down to the minor characters, have their own agendas and histories, as well as plans for the future based entirely on those agendas and histories. 

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I feel like Woody is either going to wind up pirate or he's gonna run afoul of a [temporary] Max/Eleanor alliance. There's no way Eleanor is just gonna let herself be daintily shipped off to a hanging if his plans go belly up, like nuh-uh bruh. And Max is only loyal to whatever her idea of stability entails, currently that means supporting Woody's reclamation efforts but if that should change...

 

I felt bad for Blackbeard. Poor Blackbeard.

 

I've always liked Rackham, he's like a fox in a den of wolves. He's never going to be particularly intimidating or match up to any of the other wolves but he's wily.

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I've realized this is possibly the show's greatest strength: making sure that absolutely every single character, right down to the minor characters, have their own agendas and histories, as well as plans for the future based entirely on those agendas and histories.

 

 

Thank you for that review.  I agree that one of the show's greatest strengths is that everybody has their own story.  I was explaining to someone that this Madi/Silver relationship is the diversity that people want to see.  Not to just see a black character, but that ALL characters have agency.  Too often in movies and TV, the black characters only exist for the development of the white characters.  Now, we see that Madi has her own agenda, she's not just some young girl crazy about a hot guy.  

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I felt bad for Blackbeard. Poor Blackbeard.

 

I tell you , I felt a little bit bad for him when we saw that all his chest hair is gray, contrasting with his inky beard. Who knew L'Oreal had an Okracoke outlet?

Edited by attica
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Oh my! This show just gets better and better.

 

I am fascinated by Woodes Rogers. So much so I had to look him up and read his bio. I love that he was a real live person that had an actual history. The actor playing the character is doing a mighty fine job I must say. I kind of hope the writers/ creators follow his actual history pretty closely. I mean --- in and of itself it is pretty amazing. (I don't mind some artistic license though.)

 

Loved the Jack and Rogers meeting. I played it back a couple times just to hear what all was said. The first season Jack annoyed me but the character has really grown on me so much he is now one of my favorites.

 

I think I understood what Blackbeard was saying about his wounds differently than other's here. To me he was saying that he got a wound first in the shoulder....then a little lower ... then another and each time they get closer to his heart. He is waiting for the final wound/blow that will indeed hit him in the heart and kill him. He sees himself as a ticking time bomb  (I had to look up his real history and yup-- that is kind of how it plays out)

 

And yes. I agree with whoever said that no way is Miss Eleanore going to just meekly let herself get put on a boat back to England. No way. She's back in Nausea now--her home turf -- and she may seem all docile and the puppet of Ole Woodsey at the moment --- but the Eleanore I have grown to love probably has a plan of sorts in mind. (In a way I kind of want her to be playing Rogers as well. But if push comes to shove she will stick a knife in his back and laugh while he's bleeding)

Yes. I am vicious that way.

 

 

 

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This episode is a transitional one and boy does it point out how conflicted some of the major characters are. 

Oh Jack. Seems more he tries to preserve his reputation, the worse he makes it for himself. I love his sideburns.  They just make me happy.  Jack should take Woods advice and write a book.  He appears to have some free time while waiting in jail….  And go Anne. She got the letter and rather than travel that half mile and get on the boat and leave Jack behind, she’s still on the island. 

I also say the foreshadowing is strong also.  Silver sharing with Madi, Madi letting him know she’s been preparing to lead since she was a child, advising Silver in a roundabout way that maybe he needs to work with someone who can pull him back out if venturing into Flints darkness.  I could see them being quite the formidable duo if they worked together.

 

Then Mr. Scott.  Loved the line, “The villain manages the story”.  And as long as the main players see the villain as England/civilization, then his people will be ok. But if (WHEN), Flint or Silver see each other as a villain worse, then his people are in danger.  Did you notice he totally ignored his daughters question when she asked how she was supposed to handle that if it occurred?

Lastly Billy.  I think he wants to be there when the world catches up to Flint but part of him also wants Flint to succeed. Notice his line that he feels one way and then “his (Flints) story starts to make sense again”.  We know from the STARZ site

that Billy sees a path later this season away from Flint. Maybe what we see now is the beginning of that move.  

His reputation is good. He’s known to be experienced, courageous and fair.  Not a drunk or lazy. I expect he’d have no shortage of options to join a crew with a Captain who’d truly appreciate him. But he’s stuck with Flint all these years with very little in return. I think Billy has his own dysfunctional relationship going on with Flint and I’ll be curious how that plays out the rest of this season and next. 

I wish we had more of Billy’s backstory. I know he was abducted at 12 and killed the Capt who kidnapped him but remember, that’s the story we heard Flint tell Miranda and Abigail. We did not hear it directly from Billy.  Billy doesn’t say anything about his past.   And of the major characters, the only one who has had absolutely no romance, not even implied.  Even Blackbeard got lucky this week.  SPOILER

And I think in next weeks show, Woods and Eleanor finally have sex. 

 Poor Billy. Maybe he's just horny. 
Can I get a yah for Ben Gunns Blue eyes and Flints ginger beard?

Edited by tricksi
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I tell you , I felt a little bit bad for him when we saw that all his chest hair is gray, contrasting with his inky beard. Who knew L'Oreal had an Okracoke outlet?

 

He probably got it done back in Nassau at the same beauty salon Hornigold visits to get his hair feathered so nicely.

 

Taanja -- Blackbeard pointed out where a piece of shrapnel went into his shoulder and, I thought, was clearly saying it was slowly moving towards his heart. Which begs the question of why not just find a doctor to remove it?

 

Poor Billy. He is like the only main character who hasn't gotten laid in three seasons? Which is ridiculous when you consider how that man looks. Yeah, get him some action. Ben Gunn is awful pretty . . .

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Blackbeard probably could not get the shrapnel removed because surgery back then was more like butchery so he's probably better off with it still inside him.

 

Then Mr. Scott.  Loved the line, “The villain manages the story”.  And as long as the main players see the villain as England/civilization, then his people will be ok. But if (WHEN), Flint or Silver see each other as a villain worse, then his people are in danger.  Did you notice he totally ignored his daughters question when she asked how she was supposed to handle that if it occurred?

 

 

I did notice that but dad probably has no idea how to manage that one.  I mean he's not going to say, "you better hook up with Silver, baby girl.  Yeah, he's got one leg but he's intelligent and easy on the eyes; just don't believe everything he tells you."

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Garnett77 I will have to go back an re-watch that scene. Oh pity! LOL

 

I have been doing a marathon re-watch of the first two seasons -- I am nor sure this is the place to post this? Anyway I miss the outfits/cloths Eleanore used to wear -- the leather coats and blouses and skirts and the groovy necklaces to match. I notice now that Woodes Rogers is in the picture-- they have her dressed like a proper young woman of the time.

 

Oh and she used to drink all the time with the men. If they had a drink --she did too. Something else I've noticed is when Rogers pours himself some port or whatever it is they are drinking --  he never offers it to Eleanore. (She is allowed to have tea) and she behaves all meek and mild but the Eleanore of the earlier seasons was never meek nor mild.

 

So my conclusion is she is "playing a part" I really think she is playing Rogers. (Perhaps she will get caught in her own trap?) I don't know but I am more interested now to find out.

 

And ... could Max (end up being)  Mary Read? Does anyone think that's a possibility? Kind of far-fetched huh?

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I have been doing a marathon re-watch of the first two seasons -- I am nor sure this is the place to post this? Anyway I miss the outfits/cloths Eleanore used to wear -- the leather coats and blouses and skirts and the groovy necklaces to match. I notice now that Woodes Rogers is in the picture-- they have her dressed like a proper young woman of the time.

 

 

I assume that all of the clothes Eleanor wore in Nassau are in Nassau.  What she's wearing now is probably what Woods Rogers or someone else purchased for her, in other words, not Eleanor's taste at all.

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Oh and she used to drink all the time with the men. If they had a drink --she did too. Something else I've noticed is when Rogers pours himself some port or whatever it is they are drinking --  he never offers it to Eleanore. (She is allowed to have tea) and she behaves all meek and mild but the Eleanore of the earlier seasons was never meek nor mild.

 

So my conclusion is she is "playing a part" I really think she is playing Rogers. (Perhaps she will get caught in her own trap?) I don't know but I am more interested now to find out.

 

I'm sure she was/is playing a part with both the pirates and Woodes Rogers. She probably drank with the men to show she was as tough as them and now she drinks tea cause that's what Woodes Rogers gives her. I think Eleanor will side with and/or play anyone who can bring her back her position in Nassau.

 

And ... could Max (end up being)  Mary Read? Does anyone think that's a possibility? Kind of far-fetched huh?

 

Could be, some people have brought up the possibility.

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Garnett77 I will have to go back an re-watch that scene. Oh pity! LOL

 

I have been doing a marathon re-watch of the first two seasons -- I am nor sure this is the place to post this? Anyway I miss the outfits/cloths Eleanore used to wear -- the leather coats and blouses and skirts and the groovy necklaces to match. I notice now that Woodes Rogers is in the picture-- they have her dressed like a proper young woman of the time.

 

Oh and she used to drink all the time with the men. If they had a drink --she did too. Something else I've noticed is when Rogers pours himself some port or whatever it is they are drinking --  he never offers it to Eleanore. (She is allowed to have tea) and she behaves all meek and mild but the Eleanore of the earlier seasons was never meek nor mild.

 

So my conclusion is she is "playing a part" I really think she is playing Rogers. (Perhaps she will get caught in her own trap?) I don't know but I am more interested now to find out.

 

And ... could Max (end up being)  Mary Read? Does anyone think that's a possibility? Kind of far-fetched huh?

 

I think with Eleanor it is probably one half cold calculation, and one half genuine interest. That would be in keeping at least with how she's been portrayed previously. She seduced Vane to oust Blackbeard from Nassau for example, but was also in love with him. Or at least, in lust.

 

I'd be surprised if Max transformed into Mary Read, because so far the showrunners have managed to give all the historical characters a fairly accurate backstory. They might bend the truth once we meet them, but the details we get of their life before they appear on screen, mostly matches the real people. Mary Read was a white Englishwoman who was raised as a boy, dressed in male clothing most of the time and had previously passed herself off as a man to fight in the British Army in Flanders during the War of the Spanish Succession. She couldn't be more different than Max.

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I think with Eleanor it is probably one half cold calculation, and one half genuine interest. That would be in keeping at least with how she's been portrayed previously. She seduced Vane to oust Blackbeard from Nassau for example, but was also in love with him. Or at least, in lust.

 

I'd be surprised if Max transformed into Mary Read, because so far the showrunners have managed to give all the historical characters a fairly accurate backstory. They might bend the truth once we meet them, but the details we get of their life before they appear on screen, mostly matches the real people. Mary Read was a white Englishwoman who was raised as a boy, dressed in male clothing most of the time and had previously passed herself off as a man to fight in the British Army in Flanders during the War of the Spanish Succession. She couldn't be more different than Max.

 

I have to agree with you about Max NOT being Mary Read. Like I said -- I have been doing a re-watch of previous seasons and no way is Max anyone than who she appears to be.

 

But I have noticed a bit of "artistic license" when it comes to Jack Rackham and Anne's Bonny's story. Anne and Jack met on Nausea yes but she was with her husband -- who basically becomes a "snitch" or whatever you want to call it for Woodes Rogers. It is only AFTER the arrival of Woodes Rogers that she takes up with Jack.

 

I know it's not a popular opinion here but Eleanore is one of my favorite characters from the show. She does what needs to be done to achieve her goals. Period. When a man does it he is called strong -- a woman is called cold and calculating and a bitch. I say give me a bitch any day!

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