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S01.E07: Broussard


saoirse

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OK, some more intriguing stuff here...and more questions. Some things that got my attention:

 

1. Snyder causally quips to Will that "the drones zapped my Congressman, but left [broussard] alive."

Does this mean the entire "Host" attack the day of the Arrival was entirely carried out by millions of drones which targeted elected officials for execution?

 

2. I always wondered what effect the Arrival would have on organized religion and their respective followers and now we got a look at what appears to be a devoted group of believers in "The Greatest Day," which appears to have recruited as its most zealous missionaries, the private tutors who serve the elite of the new political order. The stylized logo on banners in the sanctuary and on the cover of the book, "The Greatest Day" depicts a scene resembling the "launch" that periodically happens off the California coast and Lindsey, Gracie's tutor already is proselytizing her.

Could these "launches" involve the "Hosts" vacuuming up children and transporting them to an unknown, extraterrestrial location to, as the spiritual leader said, "become something greater"?

 

3. The spiritual leader then lauds "brother" Nolan Burgess "in the political ministry" for realizing "the importance of our work."

That statement invites investigation as to whether the term "political ministry" here has a double meaning, unlike the parliamentary term "ministry." It also invites questions as to whether those left alive by the "Hosts" — especially those in the new political elite, such as Burgess and Proxy Snyder — all are involved in drinking the proverbial Kool-Aid, in thinking the "Hosts" came to Earth to benefit humans, despite apparently wiping most out.

Is a sexually adventurous man who looks the other way as his wife rips off million dollar art pieces genuinely interested in advancing an evangelical cause, or is he involved purely for some political gain — perhaps angling for Proxy Snyder's position?

 

4. Speaking of "sexually adventurous," the bedroom arrangement of Burgess and his wife Charlotte to include a third party (only in her presence) is eerily reminiscent of a scenario in Maragaret Atwood's chilling sci-fi novel, "The Handmaid's Tale," in which an infertile woman was left with no choice but to allow her husband to attempt to procreate with a concubine-like "handmaid"strictly  for the purpose of procreation.

Knowing the "critical role"of children in "the Greatest Day" the spiritual leader spoke of, does being a voyeur float Charlotte's boat, or is there some kind of procreation mandate going on, among the devotees of this new (and I'm resisting calling it a "cult") spiritual philosophy?

 

5. In her subliminal proselytizing of Gracie, Lindsey shows her a paper cutout of a purple "man" she says was "very misunderstood" and came to Earth thousands of years ago to teach humans about themselves and the universe, before dying. 

Beyond the obvious references to messiahs and prophets, from Yahweh and Muhammad to Jesus and countless other figures, how did the "Greatest Day" messenger die and how do the devotees in the shows rationalize the "Arrival" as the man's resurrection?

 

6. Knowing he is the most wanted man in the Los Angeles Bloc, Eric Broussard still makes no effort to disguise his face in public and even returns to his mother's house to do home repairs. Katie literally turns her back on Broussard while walking back home, knowing full well he likely drove her to a place near the Griffith Park Observatory to execute her, reaffirms her loyalty to the resistance, yet willingly spills the details to Will on where he might be found.

Why would Katie so willingly give the information, only to warn him by phone that he was in danger?

 

7. Viewers learned this week that Broussard is an assassin extraordinaire who assumed multiple identities while doing shadowy contract hits for the U.S. government and afterwards, any high bidders. 

Why would a man so familiar with clandestine operations make absolutely no attempt — ever — to alter even in the slightest way, his physical appearance in public, against an enemy with unheard of — bordering on incomprehensible — surveillance abilities?

 

8. Beau and Will question two redhats who worked in the same team with Broussard, who they knew as "D." While the questioning goes on, viewers see a wall of photographs of the missing or dead — next to an undisturbed American flag.

With the Transitional Authority cracking down on every last remnant of the "old order," how would such a prominent symbol be allowed to be displayed?

 

9. Viewers had to be very attentively listening to hear an announcement in the background inside the resistance safe house to hear a voice in a public service announcement say that people who worked in the Green Zone would be eligible for "bonus rations."

What could these "bonus" items possibly include?

 

10. Viewers got more information about Snyder, who tells Will he has a daughter — somewhere. Then he gives Will a picture of his and Katie's son, Charlie, ostensibly alive, post-"Arrival" in the Santa Monica bloc. A skeptical Katie asks Will, "if [the Transitional Authority] was close enough to have taken a picture of Charlie, why isn't he home with us?"

Is Charlie really alive, or was this perhaps the last visible image of Charlie before he met his death?

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OK, some more intriguing stuff here...and more questions. Some things that got my attention:

 

1. Snyder causally quips to Will that "the drones zapped my Congressman, but left [broussard] alive."

Does this mean the entire "Host" attack the day of the Arrival was entirely carried out by millions of drones which targeted elected officials for execution?

 

2. I always wondered what effect the Arrival would have on organized religion and their respective followers and now we got a look at what appears to be a devoted group of believers in "The Greatest Day," which appears to have recruited as its most zealous missionaries, the private tutors who serve the elite of the new political order. The stylized logo on banners in the sanctuary and on the cover of the book, "The Greatest Day" depicts a scene resembling the "launch" that periodically happens off the California coast and Lindsey, Gracie's tutor already is proselytizing her.

Could these "launches" involve the "Hosts" vacuuming up children and transporting them to an unknown, extraterrestrial location to, as the spiritual leader said, "become something greater"?

 

3. The spiritual leader then lauds "brother" Nolan Burgess "in the political ministry" for realizing "the importance of our work."

That statement invites investigation as to whether the term "political ministry" here has a double meaning, unlike the parliamentary term "ministry." It also invites questions as to whether those left alive by the "Hosts" — especially those in the new political elite, such as Burgess and Proxy Snyder — all are involved in drinking the proverbial Kool-Aid, in thinking the "Hosts" came to Earth to benefit humans, despite apparently wiping most out.

Is a sexually adventurous man who looks the other way as his wife rips off million dollar art pieces genuinely interested in advancing an evangelical cause, or is he involved purely for some political gain — perhaps angling for Proxy Snyder's position?

 

4. Speaking of "sexually adventurous," the bedroom arrangement of Burgess and his wife Charlotte to include a third party (only in her presence) is eerily reminiscent of a scenario in Maragaret Atwood's chilling sci-fi novel, "The Handmaid's Tale," in which an infertile woman was left with no choice but to allow her husband to attempt to procreate with a concubine-like "handmaid"strictly  for the purpose of procreation.

Knowing the "critical role"of children in "the Greatest Day" the spiritual leader spoke of, does being a voyeur float Charlotte's boat, or is there some kind of procreation mandate going on, among the devotees of this new (and I'm resisting calling it a "cult") spiritual philosophy?

 

5. In her subliminal proselytizing of Gracie, Lindsey shows her a paper cutout of a purple "man" she says was "very misunderstood" and came to Earth thousands of years ago to teach humans about themselves and the universe, before dying. 

Beyond the obvious references to messiahs and prophets, from Yahweh and Muhammad to Jesus and countless other figures, how did the "Greatest Day" messenger die and how do the devotees in the shows rationalize the "Arrival" as the man's resurrection?

 

6. Knowing he is the most wanted man in the Los Angeles Bloc, Eric Broussard still makes no effort to disguise his face in public and even returns to his mother's house to do home repairs. Katie literally turns her back on Broussard while walking back home, knowing full well he likely drove her to a place near the Griffith Park Observatory to execute her, reaffirms her loyalty to the resistance, yet willingly spills the details to Will on where he might be found.

Why would Katie so willingly give the information, only to warn him by phone that he was in danger?

 

7. Viewers learned this week that Broussard is an assassin extraordinaire who assumed multiple identities while doing shadowy contract hits for the U.S. government and afterwards, any high bidders. 

Why would a man so familiar with clandestine operations make absolutely no attempt — ever — to alter even in the slightest way, his physical appearance in public, against an enemy with unheard of — bordering on incomprehensible — surveillance abilities?

 

8. Beau and Will question two redhats who worked in the same team with Broussard, who they knew as "D." While the questioning goes on, viewers see a wall of photographs of the missing or dead — next to an undisturbed American flag.

With the Transitional Authority cracking down on every last remnant of the "old order," how would such a prominent symbol be allowed to be displayed?

 

9. Viewers had to be very attentively listening to hear an announcement in the background inside the resistance safe house to hear a voice in a public service announcement say that people who worked in the Green Zone would be eligible for "bonus rations."

What could these "bonus" items possibly include?

 

10. Viewers got more information about Snyder, who tells Will he has a daughter — somewhere. Then he gives Will a picture of his and Katie's son, Charlie, ostensibly alive, post-"Arrival" in the Santa Monica bloc. A skeptical Katie asks Will, "if [the Transitional Authority] was close enough to have taken a picture of Charlie, why isn't he home with us?"

Is Charlie really alive, or was this perhaps the last visible image of Charlie before he met his death?

Excellent observations and questions!

 

[2] I hope this isn't the scenario - it is way too much like Childhood's End. It does seem likely, now that you mentioned it, but I just attributed to yet another Nazi type reference - the Hitler Youth.

 

[6] Right? He just walks around, no worries. The scenes with Katie led me to a theory of my own. In this episode, it seemed to me that they might have known each other well before the Arrival. From what she said, it seemed like he recruited her, there must have been some reason she trusted him. Given that she's a Navy brat, and he was a Marine - their paths could have connected in a number of ways - including the same way she met Will - at her bar in New Orleans (which IIRC was also the Yonk). Their code book is "Nostromo" is about a revolution (the obvious reference), but it's title is also Italian for shipmate, or boatswain. If just Katie and Broussard use this book, then that could indicate a connection. It could be the code book for all of the rebels - however, how many copies of that book are likely to be around. They would have to all be the same edition and format for the codes to work. Seems like it could be a book the two of them shared in an earlier time. I don't usually spend a lot of time working on theories - but this show brings it out in me.

 

[10] While I don't really trust that Snyder is telling the truth about his daughter - if he were, then perhaps like Will, he's working to get his daughter returned to him. Katie's statement seemed awfully naïve for someone who claims not to be naïve - why would the authority be interested in getting Charlie to them right away - he's proving to be an effective carrot (instead of a stick).

 

Are we supposed to like Katie's sister? While I am sympathetic about what she's doing in order to get meds for her son, her attitude about just about everything grates. Particularly when she apparently assumed the maid couldn't speak English.

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I was on the fence til this episode, but a decision has been made.  I hate Quayle and I'm sorry he didn't die tonight.  If he's the true leader of the resistance then no wonder they are so ineffective so far.  He shoots from the hip without thinking things through, such as what happens when Proxy Snyder is removed?  I believe Snyder when he says he's the lesser of the evils when it comes to those who could be in charge, even if he is a slimy little man.  If the resistance was smart, they would use Katie to gather as much intel as they can about the structure of organization.  She has access to more info than a mole redhat could ever get.  But instead they use her for a bunch of stupid shit, and then when it doesn't all go right, they put a hit on her.  I could even see Will being on board with the intel gathering from his high position for an effective fight down the road.  I feel like he wouldn't have chosen this, but has to do it or they're ALL off to the factory.  However he needs to slow down.  I don't have a side as far as collaborating or resisting just yet because we don't know what's really going on.  But I do really like and really dislike characters on both sides.  I just can't get behind an ineffective good cause that hurts more than it helps.  They need to back off and reevaluate their strategy.    

Edited by eskimo
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Katie has always made it perfectly clear, as she even brags, that her loyalties are divided, with the resistance second to family. Which is why it's perfectly sensible to question her loyalty. Her indignation that Quayle (is the name a reference to the ex-Veep's IQ?) would dare to ask a sensible question just shows us that Katie is a Privileged Character. This of course is why Broussard doesn't carry out the hit. Sadly, characters loved in the writers' room commonly don't get my love because of the disconnect between what they actually do and their alleged loveableness.  

 

Quayle's version of Roman history is as dubious as every decision he's made. Vercingetorix did indeed leave one town untouched, which Caesar did take. But that wasn't the end of the war. Vercingetorix won another victory, albeit a fairly Pyrrhic one. But his real downfall was when he was trapped in Alesia by siege walls. His plan to be relieved by Gallic allies was stymied by the Romans' ability to erect another set of walls to protect the Romans from the relieving force. What superior Roman engineering has to do with the ability to make hard choices is anybody's guess. However, this is a genuinely good reference for explaining why the Romans' superior technology had to be dealt with for a rebellion to win, not just Gallic collaborators with Caesar. Which is to say, the reference is an inadvertent critique of the resistance.

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1. Snyder causally quips to Will that "the drones zapped my Congressman, but left [broussard] alive."

Does this mean the entire "Host" attack the day of the Arrival was entirely carried out by millions of drones which targeted elected officials for execution?

Yeah it could be an explanation as to how they steamrolled the planet in 8 hours. Simultaneously assassinating every political and military leader in the world would have caused chaos.

 

 

 

7. Viewers learned this week that Broussard is an assassin extraordinaire who assumed multiple identities while doing shadowy contract hits for the U.S. government and afterwards, any high bidders.

Why would a man so familiar with clandestine operations make absolutely no attempt — ever — to alter even in the slightest way, his physical appearance in public, against an enemy with unheard of — bordering on incomprehensible — surveillance abilities?

Maybe since he knew of the Drones abilities, he also knew how pointless it would be. I don't know if you watch it, but the episode of "Elementary" that aired opposite of this show was about how useless disguises are in most cases.

 

 

 

8. Beau and Will question two redhats who worked in the same team with Broussard, who they knew as "D." While the questioning goes on, viewers see a wall of photographs of the missing or dead — next to an undisturbed American flag.

With the Transitional Authority cracking down on every last remnant of the "old order," how would such a prominent symbol be allowed to be displayed?

There were two workers in orange vests removing all of the pictures. So it's possible they just hadn't gotten to it yet. Also, the two Red Hats seemed like pretty big slackers so as long as it eventually got done they didn't care.

 

 

 

9. Viewers had to be very attentively listening to hear an announcement in the background inside the resistance safe house to hear a voice in a public service announcement say that people who worked in the Green Zone would be eligible for "bonus rations."

What could these "bonus" items possibly include?

I'm assuming it was just more of what they would normally get. I don't think it was anything special, just instead of getting 4 eggs they get 6 or something like that.

 

 

 

10. Viewers got more information about Snyder, who tells Will he has a daughter — somewhere. Then he gives Will a picture of his and Katie's son, Charlie, ostensibly alive, post-"Arrival" in the Santa Monica bloc. A skeptical Katie asks Will, "if [the Transitional Authority] was close enough to have taken a picture of Charlie, why isn't he home with us?"

Is Charlie really alive, or was this perhaps the last visible image of Charlie before he met his death?

Considering there was nothing in the picture to say when or where it was taken, I question if it was even a real photo of the kid. Considering what this episode established as the scope of the information the Authority has, it could have been any kid with Charlie's face shopped onto it.

Edited by ZoqFotPik
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I think Will and Katie can reliably recall whether they took the picture. And to be honest I wouldn't believe that this is a picture taken by a school friend, as if that would be so easy for Snyder's henchmen to find. 

 

Whether somebody has the tech to fake the thing entirely? I don't know. It's the little things like this that trip you up when writers try to tell themselves it's only scifi so you don't need to think about stuff like that. The picture looks like someone pulled the kid out of somewhere, stuck him against a bland backdrop to hide detail about where he was and snapped a pic without explaining anything to him To me the kid clearly looks baffled. Would someone faking the whole thing make it like that? I think not. But although I'm not a bit confident the picture is real, I think the show wouldn't be bold enough to have Will the hero fooling himself completely or to kill a hero's kid. But we'll see.

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The sister in-law's story seems like it takes place on another show and so far is complete waste of Adrian Pasdar.  I hope soon we get more of the politics out of his character and less of the soft core porn.

 

I actually though Broussard was setting up Quayle to get picked up by the red hats. I wish he had. Although I think that's coming something is going to happen there soon I hope.  

 

The picture might be real but Charlie could have died after it was taken. Although I actually like the idea that he's alive its actually more predictable if hes dead.

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I'm becoming tired of pretty much the same thing every week.  I have no prior experience with the actress who plays Katie but she is starting to bug me.  She has the same wide eyed expression week after week.  Even Sawyer is not doing it for me anymore.  He needs a role where he can be charming, not this dour expression he's forced to wear every week.   I think there are only a few episodes left and we know practically nothing.  And what we do know is kind of boring.  I'll watch to the end of the season, but if it comes back, I probably won't.

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SierraMist!  

 

Yes, this show is kicking in my LOST post-traumatic-stress-disorder.  It seems to pose more questions each episode than it answers.  I'm remaining cautiously optimistic that it will all come together by the season finale.  

 

I'm still not convinced that killing off Kathy Baker's character was worth it.  Maybe they'll prove me wrong.  At least they've filled in enough of Broussard's back story to make him interesting.  I think he's the only character I care about, at this point.  

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I have no prior experience with the actress who plays Katie but she is starting to bug me.  She has the same wide eyed expression week after week. 

 

That's Sarah Wayne Callies.  You just described every character she's ever played - bug-eyed and annoying.

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The sister in-law's story seems like it takes place on another show and so far is complete waste of Adrian Pasdar.  I hope soon we get more of the politics out of his character and less of the soft core porn.

 

This is so funny. In the earlier scene where the sister meets and hooks up with the black guy, I honestly checked the channel to see if I had switched to another show. It feels completely different, and not in a good way.

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