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clack

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Everything posted by clack

  1. Emily and Richard had such hopes and plans -- and expectations-- for their intelligent, beautiful daughter, their only child. The finest schools, an appropriate marriage. And what they got was Lorelai pregnant at 15, a mother at 16, and a runaway at 17. She took infant Rory away from Rory's grandparents so that Lorelai could find work -- as a maid. Hard to imagine a more devastating rejection of themselves and of their values. Emily and Richard must have been traumatized. The upshot was that Emily never got over her hurt and her anger at Lorelai, and Richard just withdrew. Tempting to fall back on stereotypes of the snooty rich, but would any well-to-do parent -- would ASP, if she had a daughter -- welcome such a scenario?
  2. clack

    Nitpicking

    The Lorelai/Chris arc was set-up to be : Lorelai holds a torch for her 1st love, then sees through the romantic fantasy she has of him and discovers she's outgrown him. Chris is well-meaning and charming, but a bit weak and shallow. And in the end, we sort of get that disillusionment arc, but it's not sharply drawn. The show fumbles it's way through in a dramatically unsatisfying manner.
  3. clack

    Nitpicking

    The intended Lorelai/Christopher relationship arc, imo, was set up to be portraying Chris as an adolescent girl's romantic fantasy. Lorelai fell in love with when she was a teen, and part of her is still in love with him. Her maturation, then, would be coming to realize that Chris -- charming, irresponsibile, well-meaning but ultimately shallow -- isn't who she wants as a life partner. He's still an overgrown teenager, and she needs an adult. That arc doesn't quite work as the series played out, though. Lorelai would never had married the Chris who failed to show at important events in Rory's life -- graduations, birthdays, etc. Chris wasn't in Thailand, he was a few hours away, in Boston. The reason Chris wasn't at those events wasn't because ASP intended him to seen as a villain, but because of actor availability issues. These issues ruined the whole Lorelai/Chris arc.
  4. clack

    Nitpicking

    Real world considerations like budget and actor availability distorted Chris's portrayal. I think that he was originally conceived as a romantic figure -- a rebel without a cause ( like Jess) who rejected his parent's wealth and privilege ( like Lorelai) so that he could travel the country on a motorcycle. But he's now changed, and is ready to become a more responsible father, and a plausible endgame romantic partner for Lorelai. Does Lorelai choose her charming though flighty first love, or the irascible but responsible friend (Luke)? Style or substance? Not much of a choice as things turned out, but as I said, that's because of real world cast considerations. Lorelai was always going to ultimately reject Chris, but that rejection would have been much more powerful if Chris had been allowed to be a more sympathetic figure -- if actor availability had allowed him to become a steady presence in Rory's life.
  5. clack

    Nitpicking

    Some nitpicks have a "because it's a TV show" explanation. Like why does Lorelai, who has financial struggles and who manages an inn which serves breakfast, spend time and money eating at Luke's diner each morning? Because it's a TV show, and they need a way for Luke and Lorelai to interact at least once per episode. It doesn't make real life sense, but it does make storytelling sense. But the wide variations in Richard's and Emily's wealth from episode to episode not only don't make real life sense, there is no need for it in the storytelling. Why not make Richard the owner of the insurance firm? He can then have both his job and his millions. If ASP wants to keep the Digger drama, give Richard a partner. Richard can be co-owner.
  6. clack

    Nitpicking

    If we're talking average salary, an insurance company CEO makes 150 grand a year versus the dentist's 175,000. I don't remember the details of Richard's financial recompense -- whether or not he received stock options, or whatever -- but I seem to recall that Richard's boss was the company's actual owner, and that there were more than one VP.
  7. clack

    Nitpicking

    ASP is under the impression being an insurance company VP makes you part of the social and financial elite. You get to live in a mansion, have servants, dispense millions to charity. In reality, while it might still have some minor social cachet in Connecticut, financially it puts you about on the same level as a dentist. The problem of having a two-person, husband-and-wife showrunning team is that there is no one to call you on your ignorance.
  8. clack

    Nitpicking

    Richard did consider donating money to Yale for a new building in Rory's name ( this was after Rory had already been admitted). Which brings up a pet nitpick -- Richard can afford to give 10 or 15 million to Yale, but is thrown into crisis when he's threatened about losing his pension. He's a mere insurance company VP, for God's sake, a position which probably pays in the low six figures, yet he and Emily would struggle financially without this relatively small potatoes pension? Is he rich, or isn't he? I guess it depends on whatever the storyline du jour was.
  9. clack

    S03.E08: Now Am Found

    Isabella was crazy, I get that. But what was Hoyt's long-term plan for Julie? Was she to spend the rest of her life in the pink room? Age 30, age 40, still zonked on lithium, being tended to by sworn-to-secrecy caretakers? Was she to be eventually killed? So, so stupid.
  10. clack

    S03.E08: Now Am Found

    On twitter, Nic replied that some scenes had been cut for time. Those cut scenes revealed that Amelia died peacefully in 2013, and that there had not been some huge estrangement between Becca and Wayne. Rather, Amelia had always been the one to phone Becca and keep in weekly touch, and with Amelia dead and with Wayne and Becca both being emotionally reserved and shy about reaching out, they were no longer as much in contact as either would have wished.
  11. clack

    S03.E08: Now Am Found

    The plot made no sense. Was Julie kept secluded in the pink dungeon full-time for years until adolescence? Didn't go to school? Did Hoyt know? What did he think would happen to Julie when she reached adulthood?
  12. clack

    S03.E08: Now Am Found

    I don't know. The mystery's resolution was so anti-climatic. What information or theory did Eliza, the documentarian, have? So much was made of her and what she knew, but I guess in the end she was just a conspiracy nut? All those hints about Amelia's past, her role-playing : just red herrings? And didn't the final puzzle pieces fall into place with suspicious ease? Amelia's book falls, Wayne opens it up to a random page where he reads an important clue, then he hallucinates Amelia spelling out key explanations? Did he solve the case by finding Julie, or only imagine it?
  13. clack

    S03.E07: The Final Country

    I've watched Season 1 three times. I'll never re-watch this season. Not entertaining enough. Not fun, not exciting -- but damn, it is compelling in it's own slow-paced way.
  14. clack

    S03.E07: The Final Country

    Was it Tom's mother who doubted that Tom was the father of Will and Julie? Maybe Julie wasn't just a replacement for Isabelle's dead daughter, but an actual blood relation -- Isabelle's husband was Julie's father, or perhaps Mr Hoyt himself.
  15. What a teenager means by "love" in a romantic context is pretty basic. Racing heart, daydreaming about the loved one, wanting to be with them, stuff like that -- not that you're making a lifetime commitment. If Rory is truly not feeling any of that, Dean should have called off the relationship immediately. In fact, Rory should have called it off herself : it's misleading to date someone if all you feel for them is friendship.
  16. clack

    S03.E06: Hunters in the Dark

    6 episodes in and I still don't have a clear idea what the conspiracy is about. Was Hoyt tied in with Tuttle, from season 1? And what do they do with these young girls? Sexually exploit them? Involve them in ritual abuse? Kill them? Some things that are becoming clear: Lucy ( the mother) sold Julie to Hoyt, then kept asking for more until she was killed. The fat neighbor always by Lucy's side in the 1980 timeline (I think her name is Margaret) is the contact person with the Hoyt conspirators.
  17. clack

    The Thirteenth Doctor: Jodie Whittaker

    Chibnall sees science fiction as allegory, as social/political commentary, and to be fair to him, there is a long history of SF being used in that manner on TV, starting with the Twilight Zone, and including some of the silliest episodes of StarTrek. TV writers' SF ideas are mostly derivative hackwork, and their politics are off-the-rack left wing. Chibnall is original neither in his science fictional concepts or in his political ideas.
  18. clack

    S03.E05: If You Have Ghosts

    Ali is giving a great performance, but 1980 and 1990 Hays is just not as compelling a character as Rust Cohle. This season it feels like both main detectives are more like Marty -- competent, plodding, uninspired, with none of Rust's eccentric brilliance and craziness. Or more like 2 Dr Watson's, absent Rust's Sherlock Holmes, if you will. 2015 Hays, however, I do find to be intriguing. It's as if his loss of memory has also stripped away some of his barriers that made him such a closed-off, one-note character in the earlier time periods. He smiles, he cries, he shows fear. He's looking back at the past, and at himself, for the first time in a life that only looked forward, looking back before both the memory of his past and his very self disappear.
  19. clack

    S03.E05: If You Have Ghosts

    Ok, let's see if I got this right. The cop who disappears from the 1990 investigation is the same cop who finds the evidence linking Woodward to the children in 1980. And this same cop (I forget his name --Harris?) is the figure who shows up among the Viet Cong ghosts haunting Wayne. Apparently Wayne and Roland go vigilante and kill him in 1990. Do they also execute the cousin? Is this the same conspiracy of ritual children murderers from Season 1, the cabal of rich men like Tuttle? Is Hoyt a member of this cabal?
  20. clack

    S03.E04: The Hour and the Day

    Julie being alive eliminates some of the townfolk as suspects. The priest or the Trash Guy vet can't be hiding her -- she must have been spirited far out of town and is living under an assumed identity.
  21. clack

    S03.E04: The Hour and the Day

    Something is up with Amelia. She continually evades Hays's questions about her past. She also seems to be frequently acting, trying on various personas. Not that I think she's involved with what happened with the kids. Hays wouldn't still love her, as he seems to do even now.
  22. clack

    S03.E13: Pandemonium

    Friendship is a higher form of love than romantic love. Romance is just a magic trick that biology plays on you so as to further the propagation of the species. I find the love between Michael and Janet more affecting than the infatuation that Janet feels for Jason. And while I'm on board with Chidi and Eleanor loving each other, being "in love" for an eternity -- is that a good thing? Is it even possible? Stomach flutterings, racing hearts, aroused genitals, after several million years as a couple?
  23. clack

    The Thirteenth Doctor: Jodie Whittaker

    You know there will be pressure to make 14 a black man or woman. Does Gallifrey replicate the racial groups of Earth? Are there then ethnic Indian people of Gallifrey? Chinese ones? How would this make sense? And why are most of the Gallifrey people we meet white in the 1st place? Because it's a TV show, made in the U.K., with certain budget constraints. We as viewers are always aware just why, really, the Doctor regenerates. It's because an actor quits or is replaced. I don't care that the Doctor is now a woman. It's all artifice anyway. Just tell a compelling story.
  24. clack

    The Thirteenth Doctor: Jodie Whittaker

    I never invested in the premises and rules of the DWverse enough to care about the gender swap. So much of the show's world-building points to conditions outside of that fictional world, to the real life, practical considerations of making a 21st century BBC TV show. DW doesn't make sense internally. Why is the 13th Doctor a woman, after 12 previous incarnations and 1000 years as a man? Because it's a TV show. Why do incarnations 9 through 13 set up shop in early 21st century London, with all time and space at their disposal? Because it's a TV show. Why are almost all companions British, a people who comprise such a small part of the world's population? Because it's a TV show.
  25. Rory is the rom com's answer to Walter White. Her arc is one long Breaking Bad, starting in S5. She goes from being kind, thoughtful, conscientious, and independent to being selfish, spoiled, lazy, and dependent on her family and friends. Hard to put a finger on just what happened, it was all so gradual. Joining Logan's L&D Brigade seems a turning point, but is choosing fun and excitement in her college years, as opposed to evenings in her dorm watching movie marathons with the worthy, though not terribly exciting Marty, such a moral failing that it would gradually erode her character? Many people seek new experiences and go a little wild in college and then go on to lead responsible lives. Pehaps writing her memoir will force her to self-reflect in the hypothetical S9 that we will never get.
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