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AuntiePam

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  1. AuntiePam

    Live PD

    I noticed that too, and I didn't like it. Appearances can be deceiving but I'm pretty sure that officer is gay. Being so close and having her arms on the girl's shoulders was an invasion of personal space. The officer may have felt that she was establishing some kind of rapport with the girl, being sisterly, or motherly, but it wasn't appropriate. That officer doesn't usually show such poor judgment.
  2. AuntiePam

    Baskets

    Maybe it's similar to a movie with a G rating. If we don't see any kind of warning, we'll figure it's going to be too tame to be entertaining. Or maybe it means that children won't appreciate/understand it. ?? There is conflict. People use harsh words, and they argue. Could that be it?
  3. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Forgot to add (regarding Run of the Arrow), Steiger's mother is played by Olive Carey (Mrs. Jorgenson in The Searchers). The movie also has Ralph Meeker, Brian Keith, and Charles Bronson. The movie poster on the IMdB page is atrocious -- a Native American woman wearing a very short leather dress and holding up two arrows in a war-like stance. Steiger's Sioux wife was not at all like that. And the movie was directed by Samuel Fuller, who knows how to do a war movie.
  4. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    That's true, I hadn't thought of it that way. The difference is that with westerns, there are usually scenes where we see the characters overcoming the language barrier. Sometimes there'll be a scout who knows both languages, or something explaining why they can communicate. Here, it happened so quickly. I think if Steiger's first encounter had been with someone who looked remotely Native American, it wouldn't have been so discombobulating. Jay C. Flippen? If it's on again, it's worth watching. Steiger does a fine Scots-Irish accent, and the theme of "where do I belong?" is done thoughtfully.
  5. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Finishing up Rod Steiger's day with Running the Arrow. Steiger plays an un-Reconstructed Confederate soldier who heads west after the war. He falls in with a Sioux played by -- I kid you not -- Jay C. Flippen in a short black wig (think Moe from the Three Stooges). Flippen speaks English with no accent, and I'm confused as hell. He and Steiger communicate with no problem. All is revealed later on, when Steiger's Sioux wife compliments him on speaking her language -- with no accent, even though Steiger is speaking English. Apparently he and Flippen spent enough time together for Steiger to learn to speak the Sioux language -- without an accent. So the writers have decided that everyone will just speak English but we're supposed to believe the Sioux are speaking Sioux and Steiger is speaking Sioux when he's with the Sioux. At least I think that's what happened. The movie is entertaining, but the language thing is SO weird. And Jay C. Flippen as a Sioux? Terrible casting choice, but he's good in the role, and has some really funny lines. One scene I liked was at the beginning of the movie. Steiger's character is at Appomattox when Lee signs the surrender. He picks up a rifle and takes aim at Grant, but is stopped by a doctor. "If you shoot Grant, you'll have to shoot Lee too, else he'll die of the shame."
  6. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    That was so good. I think I've seen all the Leone movies, and a few spaghetti westerns that were done by someone else. My Name is Nobody is my favorite, but Fistful is a solid #2, especially for Steiger's performance. What a great character. Ben Mankiewicz (sp?) said at the end that Leone and Steiger disagreed about the tone of the movie -- Leone wanted a light comedy and Steiger wanted an epic western. The result was a nice mix, maybe tending more toward the comedy. Steiger's accent -- did Al Pacino see this movie? I could hear Scarface. Coburn's Irish lilt was sometimes quite good. I think my favorite thing about these movies is the long slow shots of people's faces, watching their expressions change, and marveling at how much can be conveyed with eyes. And the music that goes along with the more emotional moments. I'm glad I watched this, and glad that Rinaldo sort of made a dare out of it. Otherwise I might have skipped it.
  7. AuntiePam

    Baskets

    I thought she just didn't notice that the chair was on wheels. I loved her outfit. I can see someone marketing that, and making some money.
  8. AuntiePam

    Baskets

    What did Chip sign? I don't trust Amy. Happy that Christine will be going to Denver. That was a nice goodbye to California. I can attest to those guys from the bus company, snagging someone to be a mouthpiece. It's happened to me at public forums -- twice. The forum moderators/organizers will recognize the major players, but they won't know if an ordinary person is for real or not. Laughed at Chip going to State Capitol Coffee.
  9. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I'm so envious of New Yorkers. Any big-city-ers, actually. I've seen two Broadway productions -- Fiddler and Hair, and it was a major production to get to see those. It's weird that I can admire Bette Davis, who played more than her share of wicked, scheming women, and who in real life was reportedly not a charmer -- but Anne Baxter's one role soured me on her. Bastet, I'd still be giddy over that encounter.
  10. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Blue Gardenia, on Ann Sothern's day, with Anne Baxter and Richard Conte. Baxter gets drunk and ends up in lecherous Raymond Burr's apartment. In repelling his advances, she picks up a fireplace poker. We see a mirror break. Next thing we know, Baxter is rushing out of the apartment, without her shoes. In the morning, the newspaper reports that Burr has been murdered with a fireplace poker. She thinks she killed him. Well, we all know she didn't, because earlier in the movie, Burr gets a frantic phone call from a spurned lover, so we know that this other woman did it. We find out for sure when the police visit the music store where she works. They're not looking for her but she thinks they are, and she cuts her wrist in the employee restroom. So we're supposed to believe that Baxter was passed out in Burr's apartment while he was being murdered, and that she left the apartment without noticing his body? Or are we supposed to believe that she awoke and left and he was still alive? And she ran out without encountering him at all? Either way, it makes no sense, and it kinda ticked me off -- it's messy. Other than that, the movie was fine. Or okay. I can't warm to Anne Baxter. She'll always be Eve Harrington to me.
  11. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I'll take the bullet for you, on Fistful. Rod Steiger's character in Oklahoma gave me nightmares when I was a little girl. It looked like he was going to end up with Shirley Jones, and the concept of having to be with (marry, whatever) someone you didn't like was unnerving to a ten-year-old. I've come to appreciate him since then. In the Heat of the Night has stayed on the DVR. One thing bugs me though, the inconsistency of the actors' clothing. Was it hot? Cold? There's Lee Grant (I almost said Lee Remick) in a trench coat, while everyone around her was sweating. I still can't watch Oklahoma though.
  12. AuntiePam

    Season 4 Discussion

    True. I didn't recognize the songs, and since the 1950's is my era, that made me think they weren't "real" songs. But they may have been popular in the UK and not made it across to the States. Or it may have been a local band. I don't recall if the music at the dance was live or recorded.
  13. AuntiePam

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    The Whales of August, Bette Davis, Lillian Gish, Ann Sothern (it was her day), and Vincent Price. What struck me the most about this movie was that it seemed that it was barely written. The dialogue was so ordinary, every-day. And the characters -- it was like they were playing themselves. Demanding, bitter Bette, sweet accepting Lillian, aware and opportunistic Ann, and debonair Vincent Price. I wonder if that house is still there. I'd live there in a heartbeat.
  14. AuntiePam

    Lodge 49

    I think a key part of Dud's personality is that he doesn't pick up on social cues. He thinks everyone else is as open and honest as he is. He would have welcomed the help, so he thinks the new people should welcome it too. He's a babe in the woods, in a lot of ways.
  15. AuntiePam

    Lodge 49

    I usually delete episodes after viewing, but I'm saving this one. It's possible that Dud's hospital visions are hints about what's coming next, or maybe explanations of what we'll see. Like that little statuette at the end of this episode -- it was a miniature of the blue-headed guy who took that first parachute. So I think I'll be reviewing as the season progresses. I'm glad to see that Dud and Ernie will be buds again by the end of the season. Just glad to be back. Except for Connie's husband (and the new pool store people), everyone's heart is in the right place. And wouldn't Christine from Baskets fit right into this universe?
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