Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER

sistermagpie

Member
  • Content Count

    5.4k
  • Joined

Community Reputation

19.5k Excellent

1 Follower

  1. sistermagpie

    Party of One: Unpopular TV Opinions

    This is making me think of how annoying I found Ross, though. Seems like he had a crush on her in high school and never got over his sense of nerd resentment/entitlement that he was the smart one and she was the shallow cheerleader who overlooked him. Then when she started to have a career he was threatened and constantly interfered with it. It was bad enough when he humiliated her with a singing telegram on her first day, but that ep where she's having an all-night work crisis and he shows up demanding a picnic? Which points to yet another thing that made them a terrible couple, neither had any respect for the other one's career. Who would want to be with that?
  2. sistermagpie

    Season 4 Discussion

    This part I could believe, because Mrs. C. was so shocked I could very much believe that she wouldn't even speak about it. But even that was serious enough that he took himself out of the running and she accepted it. I expect there's more to come there and I won't be surprised if they ultimately do give everybody 2019 attitudes about it, but I bought Mrs. C not telling anyone what she saw in the moment.
  3. sistermagpie

    Season 4 Discussion

    I found this ending practically comedic. He'd barely given a thought to the life Violet would have been living until she showed up--five minutes before announcing he had to go to the US he'd suggested she just stay in Grantchester and "help people" with him and the storyline included Geordie proving his point about how police could be perfectly fair and just. Now he's going to show up Alabama during the Civil Rights movement, a white guy who barely functions as a respectable authority figure with a squad of people worrying about him. I don't buy Violet's any better at taking him in hand than anyone else. Sure it was great when she told him to stop feeling sorry for himself already, but Geordie said the same thing, he just wasn't besotted with him. It just made me feel sorry for Violet and her church who was going to have to look after him while he stumbled his way into one problem after another in the deep south. The only warning she gave him was that he might go to jail because he's with her as if it would all be even as orderly as that! Also, I can't speak on what a person of Violet's background would be like but I was surprised a minister's daughter from 1950s Alabama was so open about her very casual sex life, not just sleeping with the vicar right away but making jokes about it. And she apparently plans to be the same way back in Alabama. Just made me think there were so many reasons for him to leave that the supremely bad idea of using the US Civil Rights movement--as represented by a young black woman--as handy tool for personal growth. The show's on much firmer footing with homophobia and sexual harassment, I think.
  4. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    To point to obvious modern examples, The Real Housewives of New York reality show had two cast members with titles. One was a countess and often referred to herself as such. She'd married somebody who was a count. She lost her title when she got divorced but when people called/call her the countess it was mostly a way to refer her thinking she was important and thinking the title meant she was very classy and well-mannered, which she wasn't, particularly. The other one was a widow who'd also married into her title and she never used it. In her case it was more like a fun fact that was just sort of odd. People would say wait, so you're actually a princess? And it was true, but not a title she ever seriously used. It was more a quirk of her husband's genealogy, that she hadn't made a big part of her identity. With the group Don met it's quite possible if there was a guy who technically had an inherited title he might have used it whenever he thought it would be helpful to get him what he wanted. The type of person who'd buy it and be impressed by it in the moment probably wouldn't research it. They'd want to believe it, so they'd assume it was true. These might be people who needed to lean on things like that to live, so they'd drop it more into conversation.
  5. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Absolutely. I might not have been clear, but I did think they were absolutely right to see Don as fitting in with them. It made sense to me that Don ultimately *didn't* see them as right for him--at base there was a different. But the parts they saw in him that fit in with them were right too. If he had wanted to join them he would have done very well with them. He actually might have become one of the most powerful in their group, maybe in part because eventually he would have wanted to leave them too. I think he'd always remain elusive to them.
  6. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Yes, even Don in the end I think understood that his fear of being found out wasn't about him really being Dick Whitman, it was his thinking that he was a terrible person, as he believed. Right--but I think Pete's type of "good family" would see them as weirdo aristocrats. And they'd probably see the New York Dykmans as provincial and uncultured. It's a completely different ideal of what good breeding looks like (even if underneath they might be alike in many unflattering ways). I also remember having the vague impression that somebody had some connection to nobility--although of course that doesn't mean they're not also a conman or something of a bum. Plus there was the guy who was, iirc, a doctor. They clearly live in a wealthy world. They probably have truly cultured educations, speak many languages, are familiar with lots of places, know about art etc. Exactly--this totally nails the general impression I had of them. There's something false and empty at the center of them, but it's not connected to the class they're claiming to be from. They're not like Don--but it's no surprise that they would see Don as potentially one of them despite his having come from nothing and would never feel much familiarity with Pete who did grow up in a world of money and there might be a few places they might cross paths. Of course, Don's also so attractive and mysterious people want to see him as part of their type, but that's not all this is.
  7. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Yes, they seemed to have connections to people with houses etc., but I suspect none of them would be considered as being from "good families" like Pete was. There's nothing solid about them. But then, it doesn't seem like Don's falling for it either. He recognizes these people are like him and that life with them would be like being a hobo. The only thing that seems to kind of fascinate him is the financial level because unlike with the hobo, he can't really see how they're supporting themselves. Doesn't he even ask at some point exactly what they do and get met by an embarrassed silence? Or maybe he says something about them seeming to have a lot of money or something.
  8. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Yeah, not just boring but Pete's a totally different kind of rich person. He's Yankee WASP American, not European jet setter who has orgies or whatever. I always think of that group in my head as the Eurotrash. Pete's dad was a really a bounder, but even he ostensibly thought a man should work for a living etc. Also, Don was obviously a better physical fit. If they're looking for interesting sexual conquests Pete obviously isn't it, even S1.
  9. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    But really, regardless of what would have really happened to him, Don himself was terrified of anyone finding out. Even if the government didn't punish him at all it might have a very bad affect on his life. Don Draper's identity wasn't the thing that made him successful as a copywriter, but it could take it away. It's also interesting because what Don really wanted was to get out of Korea--desertion was the point, and by switching the ID he was back home however much earlier and avoided anything bad that might have happened to him in Korea. But psychologically it probably meant a lot to Dick Whitman that he could be somebody else for real.
  10. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Absolutely. I actually should have added too, that Joan's whole manner is intentionally flattering and flirtatious to men, so especially when she was a young secretary coming up that would have made her popular with all the execs. Doesn't mean she was sleeping with everyone, of course, but yes, her script was all about pleasing men that way. This is the woman who told Peggy her first day to go home, put a paper bag with eyeholes on her head and stand naked in front of the mirror to honestly assess her strengths and weaknesses.
  11. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    I'm sure she did start as one. She often still covered secretary desks--for instance, whenever Don had a space open. She and Peggy both worked for him in the pilot because she'd just started and she covered his desk again at some point--maybe after Miss Blankenship died? It was some time when Don had lost a secretary unexpectedly, I think. It's nice to think that when Joan promoted a secretary to a better position there was no executive favoritism involved. Sure one could say that Joan personally liked Dawn because Dawn seemed to have personal respect for her, but even that reflected her good attitude about the job.
  12. sistermagpie

    Deadwood

    Okay, I feel really dumb having finally watched the movie and totally not realizing that Al died, despite the similar handholding. I thought the meaning of the line was that Trixie was praying for him as if he was going to die and Al saying "And let him the fuck stay there" meant for God to stay away from him because he wasn't (fucking) dead yet. So he was cutting off Trixie's deathbed prayer and the whole deathbed scene. I really liked what they did with Alma and Seth. I didn't ship them but I could still feel sad at how they weren't meant to be in that moment. Seth was fine because the family that he took out of duty became a source of true happiness, but Alma had a personality that longed to love somebody passionately and grabbed at that chance with Bullock even though he was married, but it turned out she was fated to be alone. Seth was the only time in her life she got that.
  13. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Yes, Don clearly had the talent to do his job and do it better than most. One place where he's not a fraud at all is as a copy writer. Nobody would, I think, ever say that he's not earning his keep. But if he'd been a woman and just as good as what he does, he wouldn't have gotten the job the way he did. It's not a coincidence that all the executives we meet in 1960 are men--white men. If Joan were a man she'd absolutely have been in an executive position by the time we meet her, but as a woman she's limited to administrative work. Of course, Joan herself had embraced that path. She claimed she didn't want anything but a rich husband and wasn't trying to become the first woman executive or anything. She wasn't Peggy. But Joan was also taught to believe this was what she should want in ways Don wasn't. She seemed to be in some real denial about what she really wanted for a long time. That's why I always really like Don's conversation with Suzanne's brother. Don's telling him how he make his life into what he wants--it's advice that Don himself believes and he gives to other people a lot. He came from nothing and changed his life and these other people can too. But Suzanne's brother points out that he's always going to have a seizure disorder and his disability is always going to limit him in the eyes of others. There were doors that were open to Don that weren't open to others.
  14. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    Right, that's what I was thinking about. She for good reason was furious at Don being able to follow a whim at work and decide her life. Although of course Don's career would never exist as it does without him being a man.
  15. sistermagpie

    Mad Men

    That episode has become a favorite of mine to re-watch. From watching it I think the show knows that any time Joan and Don get near each other there's got to be some tension raised since they're basically the alpha male and female of the office, both essentially 1950s movie stars walked off the screen and onto Madison Avenue. They obviously also get that about each other too, so when they talk to each other in situations like this there's a big understanding there. You realize they don't really work as a couple so much as they're like two monarchs of allied countries. Yet in the office, as a man, Don gets more power and that's the thing that makes Joan actually angry.
×