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Bastet

Season Three: The Cannes Pact and Other Obstacles

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While I really enjoy most of this season's episodes, this is where the show started getting in its own way coming up with one reason or another to stymie Steele and Laura's attempts at romance.

 

The end of the season finale, with Laura sitting on his bed staring at the empty closet, was brutal.  Him disappearing without a word was always her big fear - and no wonder, given not just his history but hers ... she comes home from school one day and her dad is gone, she comes home from work one day and Wilson has packed up and left ... girlfriend comes by her issues honestly - and now here she is living it.

Edited by Bastet
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While I get what you're saying, @Bastet, in the case of Laura at Steele's empty place, wasn't that just after Laura got off the plane telling Westfield (?) she wasn't going with him? It does suck that Steele left abruptly, but I think as far as he knew then, Laura had chosen the other guy, and Laura was the only reason Steele had ever stuck around, IMO. (Then again, S4 had his reason going so as to give Laura his real identity, so who knows? LOL! It was all a mess.)

 

So I sort of understood him taking off as he did. But I do get why Laura was insecure, too.

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She wasn't taking off to marry the guy or something; she was going away with him for a weekend.  Emptying out one's apartment and not so much as leaving a note seems a rather extreme reaction.  She didn't pull that shit when he was deciding whether he wanted to be with Anna again.

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Oh absolutely, @Bastet .  I have a love/hate relationship with this season.  Wasn't it also in this season that we had the episode where Steele was set up, and the agency was sold? How Laura was doing her best to find out what happened, and sent Mildred to bail him out of jail? And then when he pulled her over, she admitted, it could be the ultimate con? And how he promised he wouldn't leave her or something like that?

 

Anyhoo, going back to something I like..well, actually, LOVED. "Steele Your Heart Away" was on this past weekend, and there is something so endearing and charming about an amnesiac Remington Steele. And were they really in Ireland? It looked like it.  And how Steele was trying to convince Laura, that if she let him kiss her, maybe that would jog his memory.

 

The ending did confuse me though. Was the wake for the same guy that was murdered in the beginning of the episode?

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"Steele Your Heart Away" was filmed in Ireland, yeah. Of note, the music on the DVD is NOT the same as in the episode in terms of the watch's music. Originally, the tune was, appropriately enough, "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling". But I guess the tune was caught in music rights hell hence the change to a more nondescript tune on the DVD.

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Wasn't it also in this season that we had the episode where Steele was set up, and the agency was sold? How Laura was doing her best to find out what happened, and sent Mildred to bail him out of jail? And then when he pulled her over, she admitted, it could be the ultimate con? And how he promised he wouldn't leave her or something like that?

 

Thankfully that came in season four.  Good golly do I adore that episode and that scene. 

 

wasn't that just after Laura got off the plane telling Westfield (?) she wasn't going with him? It does suck that Steele left abruptly, but I think as far as he knew then, Laura had chosen the other guy, and Laura was the only reason Steele had ever stuck around, IMO.

 

I don't recall that she ever told him that she was going to go off on a trip with the other guy to Mexico.  I thought they had left it that their partnership was broken. 

 

Still it was absolutely brutal.  Couldn't he have left some clothes behind at least?  A trinket?  A picture?    Sigh.  I suppose he cleared out everything so that he didn't have to come back to his things thrown out?   The man was a clothes horse so he had to have his stuff in storage somewhere - or he donated it all to Goodwill, you know, last years fashions.  lol. 

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Yeah, I'm not sure he even knew about the trip.  They'd really been pulled apart, and had to decide whether the agency was the only thing keeping them together.  She has the opportunity to explore a potential relationship with a nice, honest man, but decides it wouldn't be fair to any of them -- Steele, Westfield or herself -- and stays home to talk things out with Mr. Steele.  He takes off without a word, and leaves behind an empty apartment.  In his mind, he's going to find his identity and present it to her as proof of his resolution to be more open with her, but in her mind he has answered the question of "is the agency the only thing keeping us together" with a resounding, "Yep, and so now that it's gone so am I."  And whatever head space he was in, he had to know that.  It wasn't deliberately cruel, but it was thoughtless, and Stephanie sold the hell out of Laura sitting in that empty room.

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Today is St. Paddy's Day! In its honor, if you have the DVDs, I say watch "Steele Away With Me" from S3! (Even if "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" was replaced as the watch melody. Sigh.) Still, Laura, Steele, and Mildred were in Ireland! And amnesiac Steele trying to seduce Laura in that hayloft was a plus.

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It doesn't look like a hospital

 

It's an Irish hospital. 

 

 

Ah, I loved that episode.  Stumbling awake, tripping over a dead man.  Mildred running around trying to brain him.  Steele thinking he knows kung fu.  Making out in a hayloft.  A horse that is a little too fresh. And it all leads back to the dead man from the flea pit. 

Edited by BkWurm1
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I am partial to, "Mr. Steele, you're not Mr. Steele."  I just love the little twist on the usual amnesia storyline built into this particular show -- even once he recovers his memories, he still won't fully know who he is.

 

Between amnesia and two people running handcuffed together - with the hijinks that inevitably follow - this episode has two things that are usually too much for me to take.  But it all works so well here.

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The ending [of Steele Your Heart Away] did confuse me though. Was the wake for the same guy that was murdered in the beginning of the episode?

 

I just realized this was never answered.  Yes, that was that same man -- the one who'd sent him the watch with the note saying "Your father wanted you to have this" (thus he never got to talk to him and thus the "dead end" line to Laura when he comes back out of the house).

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I just realized this was never answered.  Yes, that was that same man -- the one who'd sent him the watch with the note saying "Your father wanted you to have this" (thus he never got to talk to him and thus the "dead end" line to Laura when he comes back out of the house).

This characteristic that Steele had, of down playing rather pivotal or big bits of information was one of the more fascinating parts of his character.  This reminds me of three Santa episode (forgive me, I forget the name specifically  Donner, Dancer, Prancer, and Steele?) where he shares with Mildred that the gun had no bullets but leaves it to Laura to think the worst of him if she so chooses (which she didn't)  It seems at odds with his personality to not explain things that would then put him in a better light (like why he hit Keys in the shortened season five or that he had to walk pretty much the whole way to the good hotel too) but it became one of my favorite traits of his.  The silent nobility. 

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God, as soon as Steele at It starts, I get angry thinking about the Cannes pact to come.  Don't get me wrong, the episode itself is great.  Laura has every right to be angry; yes, she would have initially refused had he come to her with his plan to steal the dagger, but she also would have changed her mind once he explained why he needed to do it to help a friend, that it would be given back, etc.  She's done that for him every.single.time such a scenario has come up, so when she gets blindsided by the fact he's manipulated her yet again and asks, "Why didn't you trust me?" my heart kind of breaks for her.  And, even though I know it won't happen, and don't want it to, I cheer for her later when, after finally dragging the truth out of him, she coldly declares that she'll help, but when this case is finished, so is their partnership.  Because in that moment?  Nothing less than an "I'm done with this" attitude is appropriate.

 

As a side note, her anger is a lot of fun to watch in this episode: "They'll have to take a number" when Steele tells her the Palermo Brothers are trying to kill him, "Flattery will get you nowhere" when he complains that she's the most obstinate woman he's ever met, tackling him on the beach, etc.

 

So, at the end, when she acknowledges she can't tell him to go jump in the Riviera because Remington Steele is by now not just a nationally-known detective but an international hero and thus can't just disappear and also freely admits they make a great investigative team, it makes sense for her to say there are too many problems when they try to combine romance with that partnership and she's thus decided not to see him outside of work anymore.  Even she knows it won't last, but it's not a ridiculous thing to say in the moment.

 

The way the writers simultaneously drag it out but ignore it (and forget it exists at points along the way) all the way up to Have I Got a Steele For You, which is thirteen episodes later, is maddening, though.  And knowing that's to come makes me pre-emptively angry.  Don't get me wrong, I enjoy those thirteen episodes (especially Stronger Than Steele, Steele Your Heart Away, Lofty Steele, and Cast in Steele).  And it's realistic that not once in those thirteen episodes were they actually strictly business, because after all this time they can't be -- they can agree not to act on the attraction, but they can't stop being friends.  But the writers aren't acknowledging and exploring that through those thirteen episodes, they're just having their cake and eating it too -- they're still doling out kisses and intimate moments but trying to justify the fact they're not going to lead anywhere. 

 

With Have I Got a Steele For You, they finally - via Laura - acknowledge the characters can't go back, so if they don't go forward, they're just stuck in limbo.  And it's a nice journey from that to Steele Trying, when he finally manipulates in a way that's romantic rather than hurtful, and the only reason they don't have sex is because of circumstances.  (I'm at Springtime for Steele in my re-watch, so I'm looking forward to this second half of the season.) And then, of course, the events of Steele of Approval put the kibosh on that, with his disappearing act setting them back for the fourth season.  (Which is when it finally hits "Okay, even for TV this is no longer believable" levels of ridiculous that they've still not consummated the relationship, but that's for another thread.)

Edited by Bastet
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I finally got back into my re-watch, and finished season three last night.  That finale is still brutal all these years later, with Laura sitting there in Steele's empty bedroom.  And William Westfield is a non-entity as far as Steele's actions; I couldn't remember if he knew she was going away with him, and not only does he not know that, he doesn't even know there's a spark between them (not that knowing all of that would have justified his leaving without a word).

 

They lose their license, and she says as awful as it is, maybe the time it takes them to get it reinstated will be good for them, forcing them to really think about whether they want to be together now that they're not required to do so by work.  And he panics, rushing off to scare the licensing guy (who took the bribe to pull their license) into immediate reinstatement of the license.  Like, "No, I can't confront this now, so I'm going to make sure we're still forced to be part of each other's daily lives."  But then he obviously decides, "Alright, coward, I do need to figure out what I want, and to do that I need to confront my past."

 

It's all good up through that point.  But then he brings her biggest fear to fruition, by disappearing.  A simple note, if he couldn't bear to tell her in person, that he needs to fill in some blanks, understand some things about himself, etc. and when he has that, he'll be back?  Nope.  Packing a few weeks worth of clothing, indicating an intention to return?  Nope.  He empties his apartment and vanishes. 

 

So she's telling Westfield she can't start anything with someone until she knows for sure she and Steele can't make it work, and goes to see Steele (still carrying her bags, which he'll ask about, so presumably she's going to tell him she had the opportunity and interest in exploring a relationship with a nice guy to whom she's well suited, but stayed home instead) and discovers his answer to the question of whether the agency is the only thing holding them together looks to be, "Yep, see ya; now that there's no point in playing Remington Steele, I'm moving on."

 

Ugh.  Leave a note, ol' chap!

Edited by Bastet
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Him not leaving a note though is perfectly in character because he does not try to justify his behavior in the big things. He'll spin all sorts of excuses and pretty promises if he's scheming, but he is maddeningly tight lipped on giving explanations on stuff that would put him in a different light if only he explained.

He has in the past refused to make promises he can't know if he can keep. He left to set off to find answers about who he was so he could give it to Laura as proof of his commitment but he was setting off on a mission he couldn't promise he'd be able to fulfill. I think until he could give Laura promises, he was in his own particularly stupid noble way, taking himself out of Laura's life.

The way he left was devastatingly brutal. I still remember the awful empty scared feeling I got from that scene the first time I saw it. I couldn't have been much older than nine. I didn't yet know what a cliff hanger was. I was really worried that the show was ending like that. It quietly freaked me out and I didn't talk to anyone about it, just stewed over it during the summer every time I watched the show. (Since back then reruns were still on the to do list) I babbled like a brook about the whole mess once it was resolved come fall. Probably my first fan rant. My mother was a very patient listener since she could have cared less, lol.

In the past I always focused on what it said about Steele that he left but with the intention to come back right this time. Now it occurs to me how much Laura cared that she went looking for him when she never chased after anyone else in her life that left her. Maybe she was hiding behind the agency but I don't think so, at least not entirely since she was the one that wanted them to figure out if it was only the agency keeping them together and she still choose to keep up appearances and bring him home. After he'd just fullfilled her worst fears, it takes a huge amount of faith, strength and love to not write him off forever. She'd fight for him.

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He's like Friends' Ross -- Rachel says they need a break, and he goes out and fucks someone else that same night.  Laura says they need some time apart to think, and he goes home, empties his apartment and disappears to another continent.  Really, guys?

 

As difficult as it is for either one of them to be vulnerable, she's been honest with him about how it felt being left by her father and by Wilson, and also that she fears he'll do the same.  That's why his actions bother me so much; his intentions in leaving are good, but he knows what leaving by means of clearing out and disappearing is going to do to her. 

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Oh, he was an idiot, on that we agree, but it remains in character, lol.

He's like Friends' Ross -- Rachel says they need a break, and he goes out and fucks someone else that same night. Laura says they need some time apart to think, and he goes home, empties his apartment and disappears to another continent. Really, guys?

To be fair to both of them, the request for a break pretty much sounded like a fancy way of saying I am dumping you and had Laura not changed her mind at the last minute, then Steele would have been absolutely right in his interpretation.

Still should have left a note though.

Edited because Laura and Laurel are from two different shows. My fandoms are showing.

Edited by BkWurm1

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Yeah, we definitely see it differently.  To me, "We need a break/some time to think" and “we’re through” are two completely different concepts, which is why both Rachel and Laura said the former rather than the latter.  (Thus, my feeling both actions were grossly disproportionate to the situations at hand.)

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I said this back in the thread before, but yeah: I have to go with BkWurm1's interpretation, too. It did suck how Steele up and left with nary a word, but until Laura changed her mind with Westfield on the plane at the last possible moment...it looked to me like she was basically couching dumping Steele in nice (ambiguous) wording.

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I can see that.  I obviously don’t agree, as I find “we should take time to think about what we want” inherently non-decisive, even setting aside the rest of the conversation, but I can see that.

 

Since my problem is not with him leaving, but with him emptying his apartment and not leaving any communication, ultimately it doesn’t matter to me.  If instead of what she did say, she’d told him, “We’ve tried for three years to combine pleasure with business, and always been tripped up.  Clearly, the romantic is not meant to be.  I’ve met someone, and we’re going away for the weekend to see what may come of it.  Let’s just get the license back and decide what we want to do professionally,” and proceeded to spend four days getting it on with William Westfield, it still would have been a low blow to send her the agency’s license and disappear with all his stuff, indicating he no longer wanted to be Remington Steele when that was not the case.

 

At any rate, even though I know it's going to frustrate me, I'm glad to be onto season four -- this episode was brutal.

Edited by Bastet
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Ugh. What an awful way to start the new season. With Steele lying to Laura about why he really wanted to go to Cannes, his macking on Henri's daughter, while still presumably, he and Laura were continuing to move to the next level.

 

As Bastet knows, I railed on Steele in this episode "Steele in Action" over on TWoP, and I won't repeat myself, but only to say I'm TOTALLY TEAM LAURA in this episode. His excuses for not telling Laura didn't ring true. Considering the episode in the previous season where they both "stole" the Pitkens and she was getting such a high on thievery. Something he had to calm her down from; or even "Hounded Steele" and any number of times where they had to dress up as burglars.  I know come the end of next season, I'll be venting my spleen over why Steele couldn't be honest with Laura about Keys finding out about his fake passports, considering she'd gotten him one that had his current identity of Remington Steele.

 

My heart is just not that into this season. The Back and Forth, and just realizing that they'd filmed all the European episodes at the same time, but aired them out of order. The tell is the length of Laura's/Stephanie's hair; and Pierce's.

 

And though Gleason or one of the writers praised Pierce for "Pocket Full of Steele" because it was a bit more gritty, blah, blah, it's one of my least favorites and the dialogue so cliched I can't stop rolling my eyes. And the kid who plays Jackie, Meno or as I like to think of him, Soleil Moon Frye's brother, plays the same character in every show I've seen him. Here, it was tough talk by Steele whereas it was a maternal/friend talk with Amanda on Scarecrow & Mrs. King.

 

But I do so adore "Steele Your Heart Away."

 

And now I'm watching "Cast in Steele" and trying to figure out when they decided to go back to mixing business with pleasure!

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And the kid who plays Jackie, Meno or as I like to think of him, Soleil Moon Frye's brother, plays the same character in every show I've seen him.

 

Meeno Peluce actually did pretty well on the one-and-done season of that NBC show, Voyagers, with the late Jon-Erik Hexum. But I do understand since it did seem like the same riff on other shows.

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Well, I'm glad that Gleason confirmed my thought that "It's Steele in the Chips" was filmed early in the season, but aired near the end of the season because of the stupid Network.  The fact that Laura and Steele were still not dating contradicted the previous two or three episodes that aired before, where it was clear they had dropped that "agreement" to keep things professional.  Not to mention that Pierce's hair was short, as if he'd gotten a hair cut, that he sported very early in the season.

 

Sorry, I tend to notice small stuff like that. 

 

Apparently the network thought the episode was "too silly" and they delayed airing it, even though it had been written right after the second season ended during summer hiatus. AAAAND it's written by Stephanie and Robin Bernham, who happens to be a good friend of Stephanie.

 

As funny and silly as this episode is, I can't really enjoy it because it's such a disconnect for me watching Laura and Steele play one upmanship with Bill(?) and Miss Dalrymple, after having watched the episodes that precede it.

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Well, I'm glad that Gleason confirmed my thought that "It's Steele in the Chips" was filmed early in the season, but aired near the end of the season because of the stupid Network.  The fact that Laura and Steele were still not dating contradicted the previous two or three episodes that aired before, where it was clear they had dropped that "agreement" to keep things professional.  Not to mention that Pierce's hair was short, as if he'd gotten a hair cut, that he sported very early in the season.

 

Sorry, I tend to notice small stuff like that. 

 

Apparently the network thought the episode was "too silly" and they delayed airing it, even though it had been written right after the second season ended during summer hiatus. AAAAND it's written by Stephanie and Robin Bernham, who happens to be a good friend of Stephanie.

 

As funny and silly as this episode is, I can't really enjoy it because it's such a disconnect for me watching Laura and Steele play one upmanship with Bill(?) and Miss Dalrymple, after having watched the episodes that precede it.

I am glad to hear it confirmed that it was out of order.  That's what I always told myself since it was a great big huh?  otherwise.  It's really not that silly of an episode.  To anyone that has a chocolate chip cookie addiction, it was a fantasy and a tragedy at the same time.  It also generated one of my favorite lines ever, the exchange between Miss Dalrimple and Laura about how she runs in high heels and the answer being training.  Of course knowing that all that running in heels pretty much ruined SZ's feet has taken the edge off my amusement.   

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I am glad to hear it confirmed that it was out of order.  That's what I always told myself since it was a great big huh?  otherwise.  It's really not that silly of an episode.  To anyone that has a chocolate chip cookie addiction, it was a fantasy and a tragedy at the same time.  It also generated one of my favorite lines ever, the exchange between Miss Dalrimple and Laura about how she runs in high heels and the answer being training.  Of course knowing that all that running in heels pretty much ruined SZ's feet has taken the edge off my amusement.   

 

Oh thank goodness! That I'm not the only one who notices stuff like this. Usually when it happens and I tell others about it, they just roll their eyes. In a manner that is condescending with a it's JUST a tv show/book smirk. But I know I am among friends here who are invested in not just the relationship, but Laura and Remington, separately and together.

 

I called it silly with Steele's running gag of Miss Dalrymple! Oh Miss Dalrymple! as he runs across the field, the office, to soothe her when it looks like she was caught in the cross-fire of the competing folks after the cookies.

 

I do love the meta moments spoken by the characters in this show. Laura saying "training" for how she runs in heels; Steele's remark in Season Two's premiere of how Murphy's new firm is near the coroner's office--being handy since he had a "flair" for reading autopsy reports, etc.  I'm sure that the few times we saw Laura resting her feet, it was a relief to her. We saw it in "Red Holt Steele" and "Steele Threads" with Steele giving her a foot massage in the latter.

 

Like I said, the enjoyment in this episode is lessened for me because of the airing it out of order.

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Network execs were so rigid in their hour = drama/half hour = comedy distinction back then, they pitched a fit whenever an hour-long show submitted a comedic episode.  (Moonlighting made ABC execs' heads spin.)  NBC flipped out about Steele's Gold, and then this one, with its Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World caper style.  Obviously, both ultimately made air, and I think both are enjoyable episodes (especially Steele's Gold).

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Network execs were so rigid in their hour = drama/half hour = comedy distinction back then, they pitched a fit whenever an hour-long show submitted a comedic episode.  (Moonlighting made ABC execs' heads spin.)  NBC flipped out about Steele's Gold, and then this one, with its Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World caper style.  Obviously, both ultimately made air, and I think both are enjoyable episodes (especially Steele's Gold).

 

Yes, Gleason, Bernham and the director, I think said how NBC didn't even want it to air. The original premise was for them to have a food fight when trying to get to the cookies, and the network said it was "too silly" so they changed it to the school band in the gym.  And a week after "Steele in the Chips" aired, Moonlighting aired an episode that did feature a food fight.  Gleason laughed over that and I think he said he was glad they had Stephanie and Robin change the script.  So am I, frankly. I don't think I could have dealed with a stupid food fight.

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Okay, I have to make a clarification from one of my posts upthread when talking about "Steele in the Chips."  It wasn't Gleason who said that the network thought the original idea of having a food fight in the gym was "too silly." It was Robin Bernheim.  And what she actually said was they felt vindicated for their original idea, since Moonlighting had a pie throwing episode the following week.

 

I guess she meant that apparently it wasn't "too silly" since ABC had done it with their hit show?

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Here is something that I found hilarious in the season finale. I don't think it was meant to be funny, but I laughed at the way the guy said it.

 

His name is escaping me, but the former DA who hired Laura to do a background check on Westfield? When Laura came back and told him there was a gap, he retorts:

 

"Gaaap? What gaaaap?" It was the way he elongated the sound of "gap" that I found hilarious and the look on his face. It just struck me as funny.

 

Okay, I haven't had breakfast and coffee yet, and I was bored.

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Hee!  You are not even doing a rewatch anymore.  You are just putting the show on like listening to a albulm. I like it!

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I never did get back to my re-watch after Thanksgiving, so I still need to finish season four, but I've recently watched some season three episodes instead.  I love Steele Trying (when they go to San Francisco) so much (even more with Tony Bennett ... alas).  This manipulation is so different from his usual MO -- which is why she responds accordingly.  It's adorable.  And, of course, it blows up in his face. 

I love his reaction when it turns into a real case -- the way he plops down on the ground and just looks like, "How the hell did this get away from me?" is perfect.  And then all his shenanigans trying to contact Mildred, and Bertha.  Serves him right, and it's so much fun to watch.

Laura's method of drawing the cops' attention in the strip club so those goons can't take them off makes me roar with laughter every single time.  Her fabulous rant about punishing the women doing sex work while ignoring the "filthy, oppressive, exploitative men who drove us into this by denying our rightful place in society."  His insistence to the cops that she's right, and he's as guilty as she is.  Then cut to the next morning after they've been released, when she wants to know why his bail was $250 and hers was $500.  "Well, you were the professional in the group."

One minor thing having nothing to do with Steele or Laura that I really like is Seymour's reaction when Mr. Steele cites Bertha's six curtain calls for Streetcar to prove he knows her -- instead of writing him as rolling his eyes, like, yeah, my washed-up actor of a sister just will not shut up about some stupid community theatre performance a hundred years ago, they have him beam with pride about "her greatest triumph."

But the one thing that has always bothered me about this episode is Laura knowingly allows Rita up to be killed.  Yes, Rita tried to lure them to their deaths, so she's hardly an innocent, but Laura would normally set her up to be caught, not killed! 

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But the one thing that has always bothered me about this episode is Laura knowingly allows Rita up to be killed.  Yes, Rita tried to lure them to their deaths, so she's hardly an innocent, but Laura would normally set her up to be caught, not killed! 

Hunger makes us all extra cranky?

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Ha!  Well, the universe knows I might kill someone if hungry enough, but Steele was the one with the growling stomach, not Laura, and he wasn't there when she put two and two together to implicate Rita and set her up for termination.

Speaking of Steele's quest for food, we must fan-wank that hunger seriously warps his brain between the time he takes everyone's chili dog order (with each one just wanting one thing left off, despite the fact their orders sound convoluted; he breaks it down to "no onions, no mustard, no whatever" before heading out) and the time he can't come up with anything other than four orders with everything on them.  But also when the killer cop shows up at their hotel room trying to lure them out with the fruit basket; he's ready to go chow down on anything edible until Laura reminds him they didn't order room service, but why didn't he order food as they sat there rattling off street names to figure out where Seymour had laid the trap everyone was after?

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Ha!  Well, the universe knows I might kill someone if hungry enough, but Steele was the one with the growling stomach, not Laura, and he wasn't there when she put two and two together to implicate Rita and set her up for termination.

Laura I think would take it as a point of pride not to be distracted by hunger when there was a client with a case to be solved even when she was hungry.  And we know she starts to lose it when she's hungry from Beg, Borrow, and Steele where she loses it at the Soup Kitchen after they've been waiting so long in line only for the place to run out of food.   So her grudgingly ordering a hot dog to me doesn't necessarily negate the excuse.  Lol. 

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So, I am expecting Season 3 from the German Amazon site, and I am most curious to see whether the music will actually be intact for the watch scene in "Steele Away With Me" (which originally played "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling") and the Tony Bennett stuff in "Steele Trying". The German sets so far all have had the original music, so I hope that continues.

It confounds me that the US laws won't allow the original soundtracks on certain shows, but the foreign markets can do it.

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