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2 hours ago, Notwisconsin said:

I don't remember Calamity Jane ever being referred to as "Calamity Jane" during the series. Just a comment.

I vaguely recall Wild Bill making some sort of reference to a calamity and her presence.  But not out and out calling her "Calamity Jane."   

I was always a big Deadwood fan, and this movie did not disappoint at all.  I absolutely loved it.  I've watched it twice already. The BEST moments:

  • I cried like a fucking baby when Seth broke down at Samuel Fields deathbed.   
  • Seth kissing Martha: "I'm home."   
  • Trixie looking at Sol and her baby just prior to Al's passing.
  • Jane killing Harry.   
  • Al's last words.

Good bye all you wonderful cocksuckers.   You'll always hold a place in my heart.

Thank you, David Milch for this final heartfelt love letter to Deadwood fans.  I truly wish you the best.  

Edited by jnymph
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I am so amazed that this actually happened, and that it actually was a satisfactory finale. You can tell this was made with love for the fans and for these amazing characters, and it was basically everything I wanted it to be. It was sad and funny and sweet and beautiful, and I didnt realize how much I missed these characters and their world and lyrical profanities until I heard it again. It was just what I wanted this to be. 

Poor Charlie, and fuck Hearst and his black heart. You killed the two best men in Deadwood you piece of shit! Can I get a few kicks in, angry mob?!? I did enjoy seeing that smug smirk finally getting wiped off his face, and I especially loved everyone teaming up to get Charlies land away from his scummy ass self. I just loved getting to spend time with everyone again, and while everyone is clearly older, and Deadwood itself is changing (telephones and everything!) it still feels like coming home to the most beautiful and nasty place in the west. Sol and Trixie get married and have a son, Joanie and Jane (who gets a big damn heroes moment Charlie and Bill would be proud of), Alma and Seth get some closure but go Seth goes back to Martha and his kids and Alma is happy as a businesswoman and mom to no longer baby Sophia, the town comes together to tell Hearst what a garbage person he is and celebrating Sol and Trixies wedding, both for the best, and Al dies at some sort of peace, telling God to screw himself one more time. So good, and so fulfilling. I both happy and sad cried, I am just so happy we got this finale, the one that I think we, the cast, and these characters deserved. 

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Would it be impertinent or impolitic of me to question the basic premise of the plot? (Hear that in E.B.'s whiny voice.)

Why would Hearst want that land for telephone lines?  Didn't the telephone lines go on the same poles as the telegraph lines?  AT&T -- American Telephone & Telegraph.   

Hearst had a logical reason to return to Deadwood -- the statehood celebration - but he needed a better reason to want Charlie's land.  Discovery of more gold, silver, etc. would be seen by some as repetitive, but it would make more sense.

Or he could have killed someone else, trying to get to Trixie. 

Sorry to nitpick.  I loved the movie too.  It's at 98% on Rotten Tomatoes.  There was just one negative review, from some hooplehead who just didn't get it.

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I really wish EB and Al would have shared a scene.  Those two were always a lot of fun together.

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4 hours ago, benteen said:

Using the same argument, what was the point of the new character, Caroline?  To give Johnny Burns a happy ending while chewing up more time with flashbacks?  I kept expecting her to be revealed to be one of the characters long-lost daughter.

You’re not the only one. I kept thinking is she Trixie’s, is she Al’s, is she Al and Trixie’s daughter, what?

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On 6/1/2019 at 12:50 PM, bijoux said:

There's one thing I'm unclear on. Relatively speaking, the new whore got a lot of attention, so what was her purpose? We got to see hew arrival, meeting Sofia, talking with Al and Johnny, being given baby Joshua to hold... Maybe there was more. But in comparison, Joanie only got to interact with Jane. So, was the new girl just a reminder of Jen? I didn't see it, really, and kept waiting for something more. 

I think so.  I think she represented a lot of things to different people.  So her importance was what she represented rather than who she was.

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1 hour ago, benteen said:

I really wish EB and Al would have shared a scene.  Those two were always a lot of fun together.

Didn't we see EB whisper in Al's ear, at the wedding, to tell him about what he saw through the hotel walls? 

But yeah, not enough EB in the movie.

Rewatching, and noticing that (at least through S1), the only person who was cruel to EB was Alma's father, with his comment about EB trying to get the attention of his betters.  Lots of people in Deadwood ignored EG or poked fun at him, but Mr. Russell was the only one who really cut him (figuratively). 

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6 minutes ago, bijoux said:

You’re not the only one. I kept thinking is she Trixie’s, is she Al’s, is she Al and Trixie’s daughter, what?

I agree that this particular storyline was weak.  Caroline Woolgarden, was that her name? "Anyways..."

I'm gonna go with the assumption that her character simply signified time moving on and progression of thoughts.  Remember Trixie basically gave her the smackdown on how she does not have to become a whore, simply because some asshole mistreated her. (not quoted as eloquently as Trixie, but that was the main drift.)    She was there to help Johnny get over the death of Jen as well.    I guess.  I dunno.  Heh. 

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8 hours ago, millennium said:

On the bright side, nobody went mad and incinerated the town and citizens with a dragon.

I was expecting a fire. A fire took out most of the town in 1879. That's when Bullock's Hardware burnt down, and Bullock decided to open a hotel. 

But I gratefully accept the happy ending. 

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Deadwood burning down would have been Season 4, right?

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1 hour ago, Macbeth said:

I was expecting a fire. A fire took out most of the town in 1879. That's when Bullock's Hardware burnt down, and Bullock decided to open a hotel. 

But I gratefully accept the happy ending. 

The Gem burned down too in '79.   It was rebuilt.

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10 hours ago, Notwisconsin said:

I don't remember Calamity Jane ever being referred to as "Calamity Jane" during the series. Just a comment.

The guy who Jane cured his smallpox, what's his name - Andy Cramed? Said something to the effect when he was feeling better: "Henceforth, if ever I fall into calamity, I'll be sure to seek out Jane."

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I am so grateful that this movie actually happened. It is a testament to the quality of the production and the effect it had on those involved with it that when schedules were finally compatible enough, everyone who could return did return.

What to say that hasn't already been said? Nothing. I really enjoyed it and appreciated that it finally gives us some closure.

Did I wish characters had more to do? Absolutely. But considering the time constraints, everyone was very much in character for older versions of themselves.

Loved that, while getting progressively more ill, Al was able to admit that he had feelings...but at the very end, he was very much himself.

I feel everyone knocked it out of the park (considering the time they were given).

I am pleased. 

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I felt trepidation after the credits rolled in regards to the fates of Alma and Trixie. No way does that cocksucker Hearst forget about these slights to his ego. Evil bastard. I also question why the new whore got so much attention and agree with the users upthread about her taking up too much time. I perhaps would have asked for more Al/Dan or some Al/EB interaction, which was always gold.

Otherwise? Huzzah! Sorry to see some of my favorites pass on, but unlike the many, many deaths of a certain show that will go unnamed, these deaths made sense and were written in an organic way that added to the story. 

The Garret Dillahunt cameo delighted me! 

This will always stand out as the best fucking TV show ever made, and I'm amazed that this movie happened. I always thought the rumors would never amount to anything. Two fucking thumbs up to all involved! 

giphy.gif

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16 hours ago, benteen said:

Using the same argument, what was the point of the new character, Caroline?  To give Johnny Burns a happy ending while chewing up more time with flashbacks?  I kept expecting her to be revealed to be one of the characters long-lost daughter.

Here's what Alan Sepinwall wrote about Caroline in the long article I posted upthread. I like this explanation.

Quote

The movie spends a fair amount of time on Caroline Wooldgarden, freshly-arrived in town and eager to become Al’s new favorite. (And naive enough to not understand that any favor she curries with him won’t last long enough to help her.) It’s hard to work a new character into a story this brief, in the middle of a crowd of old favorites who don’t all get much to do themselves. But her presence is less about Caroline herself than about what she represents to others. To Johnny, she’s a chance to redeem himself for his failure to protect Jen; ironically, she instead winds up protecting him, stitching up the bullet wound one of Hearst’s guards gives him. To Al, she’s a reminder of what he once had with Trixie, before his abusive behavior (and the fundamental awfulness of being a prostitute in the Old West) drove her from the Gem forever. And she’s a reminder of the path Trixie was able to take herself off of. After Caroline is done holding the baby during the wedding planning, Trixie asks if she believes she was born to be a whore. Caroline sheepishly suggests it’s the only thing she’s fit for, to which Trixie replies, “How hard do you suppose the bastard turned you out had to work to make you think that?” It’s a bit of wisdom Trixie might have understood during the events of the series, but not something she would ever want or be able to articulate to someone else until now. That she does it demonstrates a level of maturity and kindness that will serve her well in her new role as owner of the Gem, even if she opts to make it into a dance hall. So the passing of the torch ultimately isn’t from Trixie to Caroline, but from Al to Trixie, who even wears Al’s trademark pinstripe coat as she stands on the balcony and looks down the thoroughfare at her husband and child. The specter of Hearst may continue to loom, but for the moment she’s gotten the happy ending she is only just starting to accept that she might deserve.

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I thought they were supposed to reference what happened to Cy.

They didn't explain how he died, but it was implied that he was dead and left the Bella Union to Joanie Stubbs.

They also didn't explain how the Doc was miraculously cured of his tuberculosis.

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1 hour ago, plurie said:

They also didn't explain how the Doc was miraculously cured of his tuberculosis.

Yeah, I did wonder about that, but I was so pleased to see Doc Cochran that I really didn't care.

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When Charlie told Bullock about Hearst making an offer, Bullock promised to visit Hearst before any further negotiations...but that never happened...did it? Maybe I got confused because both of them were talking in long-winded sentences like Boyd Crowder...

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Sorry/not sorry to rain on this parade.

No way in HELL Jane survives end stage liver disease, for a decade, much less as a functioning drunk.

Don't even get me started on Doc, the end stage lunger ... or Trixie's miraculous geriatric baby.

I did not love this movie.

Not the closure I had hoped for,

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2 hours ago, walnutqueen said:

Sorry/not sorry to rain on this parade.

No way in HELL Jane survives end stage liver disease, for a decade, much less as a functioning drunk.

Don't even get me started on Doc, the end stage lunger ... or Trixie's miraculous geriatric baby.

I did not love this movie.

Not the closure I had hoped for,

I'm so glad I didn't rewatch Season 3 prior to the movie, because I didn't recall Jane nor Doc being sick !!  Oherwise that would have made me saying "WTF"  as well !!!    I raised an eyebrow at Trixie's geriatric baby too, but I was willing to give it a pass because I thought she made a vague reference of having a baby of her "legacy" .......... I'm not sure if that meant her age, but I decided to take it that way. 

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I was afraid I had forgotten too much to follow this movie, and didn't really have the time to re-watch the entire series. So I was relieved to discover I was able to follow it pretty well and remembered enough of it to not be thoroughly confused. 

To the people complaining about the flashbacks - they were included for fans like me. Those who loved the original series, but have not re-watched it over and over again and have forgotten a lot of details. For instance . . . I remember Trixie shooting Hearst, but for the life of me, I can't remember what made her do it. He'd either killed someone or had someone killed, right? Who was it? 

Overall I enjoyed it, but it was clearly set up to give fans closure on basically two plot points that have confounded the fan base for the past 13 years: Trixie and Sol, and Hearst getting his comeuppance. Both were resolved in grand fashion by the end.

I didn't really ever understand what Alma was even doing there. Charlie asked if she was there because of her banking interest in the town and her response sounded like she was just using that as an excuse. Was she there simply to see Seth again? 

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2 hours ago, jnymph said:

 I thought she made a vague reference of having a baby of her "legacy" .......... I'm not sure if that meant her age, but I decided to take it that way. 

She acknowledged that "A former whore of my vintage" having a baby was a WTF miracle...

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17 minutes ago, paigow said:

She acknowledged that "A former whore of my vintage" having a baby was a WTF miracle...

Since she previously alluded to 6 or 7 abortions when counselling a pregnant Alma, I kinda assumed her womb was barren long ago.  So I'll sidewink her miracle baby after 10 years of Sol schtupping.

For me, the Love Story of all times was Trixie and Al.  A fitting end for that magnificent man, with his dearly beloved holding his hand.

I am still fucking teary, consoled only by my fucking cat.

AND - it was PEARS and peaches, the first few mentions!!!

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On 5/29/2019 at 7:26 AM, Bannon said:

Halfway through season one; my fourth viewing of this show.  My opinion is unchanged: it is the best written dialogue of any television show ever, and 2nd place is so far behind that it can only barely be seen.

Oh yes, fucking yes! Deadwood always tops my list of "best TV shows ever"--it hasn't budged since I first saw it. And I never typically liked "westerns"! I can remember on my original watch times when my mouth would drop open in amazement at some exchange of dialogue or a soliloquy (usually Al's!), and I'd rewind and watch--listen--over and over in pure wonderment at the deftness and intricacies of the language. And of course, the amazing and delightful use of obscenities in the most glorious abundance I've ever encountered. I support the characterization of David Milch as a contemporary Shakespeare entirely.

The Good Place recently made the #2 spot on my list for its incredible inventiveness and quality; before that, anything after Deadwood, even shows I liked a great deal, were only grudgingly given a number place, because nothing really rose to the quality. It is still the only show about which I contend that there was not a single bad episode--yes, there were eps that were exceptional even by its own standards, but none were stinkers, or even mediocre. Truly remarkable.

And my heart went pitter-pat throughout the movie, which I need to watch again before I evaluate further. I choked up, I laughed, I grumbled. I think it was a touch fan-directed but I'm not mad about that.

Edited by cuppasun
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3 hours ago, iMonrey said:

For instance . . . I remember Trixie shooting Hearst, but for the life of me, I can't remember what made her do it. He'd either killed someone or had someone killed, right? Who was it? 
 

It was Ellsworth who was killed.  In an interview after that season, Jim Beaver said he was sad but not terribly upset about his character being killed off.  He also said that  he asked "What about the dog?"  Or maybe it was "Does the dog survive?"  (Something like that.)  Remember that scruffy dog that hung around after its owner was killed?  I don't recall who the original owner was -- there were so many deaths in those first few episodes.

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Note to bad guy: When you are 6 feet tall, a 10 year old boy is an inadequate human shield.

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I loved the nods to the original series we got in the movie - things like Bullock taking Hearst by the ear, and Trixie calling the marshal 'fuckin' Bullock'. I know there were others, but those two in particular delighted me.

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11 hours ago, paigow said:

She acknowledged that "A former whore of my vintage" having a baby was a WTF miracle...

If Lady Grantham, the mother of three adult daughters, on Downton Abbey could get pregnant, why not Trixie?

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10 hours ago, LittleIggy said:

If Lady Grantham, the mother of three adult daughters, on Downton Abbey could get pregnant, why not Trixie?

Likely not just due to number of years (although she may have been mid/late twenties in the original show, so +10 makes her mid/late thirties, not so unusual) but due to number of abortions, diseases, and all around bad treatment she'd had over those years.

I liked the movie. Coming off a convenient marathon of season 3 (good planning HBO) I wished they wouldn't have wasted precious time on flashbacks (a 10 minute "previously on" would have sufficed) and thought sneaky suspicious new whore Caroline was going to assassinate someone.

Loved when Mrs. Ellsworth won the auction, but not sure why Hearst gave up. Surely $7000 was still couch cushion money for him. Unless perhaps he realized she ultimately was richer than he? How?

Not sure why N* general was still vagabond, I'd assumed he'd be running the livery?

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15 minutes ago, andipandi said:

Loved when Mrs. Ellsworth won the auction, but not sure why Hearst gave up. Surely $7000 was still couch cushion money for him. Unless perhaps he realized she ultimately was richer than he? How?

I took it as a realization on Hearst's part that the town would pool all possible resources to get Charlie's land before letting him get it.

I did enjoy the finale.  I knew with the return of Hearst that someone was getting offed in act one.  I knew once the land was mentioned that it would be Charlie 😥😥 he was always my favorite.  I understand for plot purposes why it was him, one of the only people in town who was universally loved and respected and would unite the town against Hearst once and for all; even number one toadie Farnum played a part in thwarting him.  Alma gets revenge for Whitney, Al gets one last fight in him, Seth gets long overdue justice.  It wasn't neatly done, Samuel dies as well.  Two more decent people lost because of fucking Hearst.

Not sure how Doc is still living but I don't mind, he carried an extra salty disposition this time and I was all for it.

I've never been sold on the great star crossed love of Seth and Alma so I loved that he remained loyal to Martha and that they created a happy stable life.

It was hard to enjoy the wedding scene because  I thought Hearst and his minions would come in guns blazing.  I figured Sol would be the victim since it be a joint message against Seth and Trixie so I'm glad everything went well with them.  Of course he showed up at the end to set up the trap for Seth to killed by Harry which was wonderfully averted by Jane.  I guess I'm saying I enjoyed how everyone played their part. And a bonus Garret Dillahunt appearance!

No mention of what happened to Cy but I would bet that he gave the Bella Union to Joanie upon his death the same way Al gave Trixie the Gem.

Al went out pretty perfectly, bestowing his possessions on those he cared for most without sacrificing who he was.  I'm glad we got an Al/Wu scene.  

Overall I'm good.

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3 hours ago, kittykat said:

No mention of what happened to Cy but I would bet that he gave the Bella Union to Joanie upon his death the same way Al gave Trixie the Gem.

Seeing Joanie running the Bella Union made me sad. She tried so hard to escape that miserable lifestyle. 

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On 6/4/2019 at 11:05 AM, iMonrey said:

I was afraid I had forgotten too much to follow this movie, and didn't really have the time to re-watch the entire series. So I was relieved to discover I was able to follow it pretty well and remembered enough of it to not be thoroughly confused. 

To the people complaining about the flashbacks - they were included for fans like me. Those who loved the original series, but have not re-watched it over and over again and have forgotten a lot of details. For instance . . . I remember Trixie shooting Hearst, but for the life of me, I can't remember what made her do it. He'd either killed someone or had someone killed, right? Who was it? 

Overall I enjoyed it, but it was clearly set up to give fans closure on basically two plot points that have confounded the fan base for the past 13 years: Trixie and Sol, and Hearst getting his comeuppance. Both were resolved in grand fashion by the end.

I didn't really ever understand what Alma was even doing there. Charlie asked if she was there because of her banking interest in the town and her response sounded like she was just using that as an excuse. Was she there simply to see Seth again? 

A statehood celebration really is a big fuckin' deal, and one of the principal owners of the local fuckin' bank would see, as would the hoopleheads,  travellin' to the celebration as normal fuckin' civic responsibility.

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Well, look, the original story outline obviously had Doc dying of tuberculosis, and when those seasons disappeared, to be replaced by a two hour movie depicting a 13 year interval from the beginning of the story, the writers had to make a choice; do we bring back a terrific, and known, character like Doc, or do we spend some of the 120 minutes developing new characters? I think the reasonable choice was made to only have one new character, and do some hand waving about a misdiagnosis of Doc's condition, or miraculous recovery.

With regard to Jane, as much as I loved the actor, character, and show, I always felt they didn't quite nail how her alcoholism affected her; just a little too over the top. If I had a conversation with a healthy David Milch, I'd ask him about his backstory about Jane. In the 1st episode, Wild Bill references her ability to mete out violence to those that displease her, but then we later get scenes where she is frozen in terror by the mere sight of Al or Cy. Now, obviously this is psychologically explainable, especially today, with our insights about how past trauma can produce contradictory behavior. This is such a rich, hugely complex world that Milch created, that it's hard to fully explore everything. I appreciated Jane showing what Hickock referred to in the first five minutes of the show, 15 years ago.

Milch, and whomever assisted him, faced a tremendously difficult writing task here; how do we pull this very complex world back together, showing an interval of 10-plus years, and get a resolution in 120 minutes? Would I have liked it if they had 3 times as many minutes? Yes, but I think the end result was really good, given the task.

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In particular, if there had been time, I would have enjoyed hearing more conversation between Seth and Martha. In the show, I really enjoyed how it was depicted that two imperfect, but fundamentally decent people overcame tremendous obstacles in building a very loving and beautiful relationship.

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Avoiding reading recent posts until I watch the movie tonight, but I had to drop in with an Ian McShane alert:

Streaming now on Pluto TV's Mystery Science Theater 3000 channel--Code Name: Diamondhead, starring the man himself as a master of disguise and espionage! I think this episode dates back to when Lovejoy was still a thing, because that's the riff he gets pretty much immediately. The real "star" of this cheesy made-for-TV joint is Ray Thinnes, if you can believe that. I've watched this episode multiple times because (a) funny and (b) IM = young and gorgeous (when he's not got latex prosthetics stuck to his face).

ETA: IM in this movie bears a startling resemblance to Rufus Sewell at around the same age. This is not a bad thing.

Edited by spaceghostess · Reason: Sewell/McShane hotness; I'll just be in my bunk . . .
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I want to emphasize again what a daunting task it was to produce a really good resolution to this hugely complex story in 120 minutes, after a 13 year break. If those hoopleheaded Emmy voters don't find a way to recognize Milch in his twilight, and this cast, well, they suck cock by choice!

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On 6/1/2019 at 10:16 AM, catrox14 said:

And I loved that Seth Bullock was now the Marshall an my Justified loving heart hoped it was a little meta reference for Timothy Olyphant.

He was pretty damn Raylan Givens accurate with that Colt, too.  That turd on the balcony never had a chance.  I was kind of wondering while watching if they were going to throw in a cameo from Teddy Roosevelt, who Bullock had become good friends with by this time.  Of course, it wasn't necessary, but it might have been cool.

With all the dancing, lyrical, dialogue throughout the movie, what's going to stick with me is "I heard you singing the other day.  I thought you stabbed a frog."  Don't ever change, Al.  Of course, I guess you won't, now.

Let's hope Alma has the good sense to manage that property well.  Build a railroad station, like Bullock did in real life.  If you haven't read the Wikipedia article on him, he lived a real life.

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On 6/6/2019 at 9:51 AM, Bannon said:

In particular, if there had been time, I would have enjoyed hearing more conversation between Seth and Martha. In the show, I really enjoyed how it was depicted that two imperfect, but fundamentally decent people overcame tremendous obstacles in building a very loving and beautiful relationship.

Because she started a car wash business on her own.....huh...wrong show....

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On 6/3/2019 at 9:19 AM, attica said:

He was the minister at Trixie and Sol's wedding! Yes, he was!

Nah, that wasn't The Titlicker, it was Con Stapleton.

I think The Original Shit Stirrer (TM Al Lowe) made a fleeting appearance, though, didn't he? A line or two at Tom Nuttall's, yes?

I'll have to collect my thoughts and maybe watch again before commenting further, but what in the actual fuck, Harry? We left in him in season 3 gazing awestruck at the fire engine (wagon?) Nuttall had ordered for them to start their rental business. Guess it didn't work out, but a couple of lines indicating how he became embittered/corruptible enough to murder Bullock in cold blood wouldn't have gone amiss. I mean, he was never the sharpest tool in the shed, but I didn't peg him for something like this. Which was the point, I suppose, but it still felt a bit too much out of left field for me.

Edited by spaceghostess · Reason: cocksuckin' typo

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6 hours ago, Bannon said:

I want to emphasize again what a daunting task it was to produce a really good resolution to this hugely complex story in 120 minutes, after a 13 year break. If those hoopleheaded Emmy voters don't find a way to recognize Milch in his twilight, and this cast, well, they suck cock by choice!

You have no idea how many times that line gets used in my day-to-day speech. Between Deadwood and Spartacus, my vocabulary is astonishingly foul. 

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On 6/7/2019 at 8:02 PM, paigow said:

Because she started a car wash business on her own.....huh...wrong show....

Different Sol, as well...

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On 6/9/2019 at 10:40 AM, Bannon said:

Different Sol, as well...

Well done.  

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The Primetimer Awards are now open for voting. Please vote for Deadwood. 

Category- Get Your Goat- Favorite Show of All Time 

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On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 8:31 PM, Dowel Jones said:

He was pretty damn Raylan Givens accurate with that Colt, too.  That turd on the balcony never had a chance.  I was kind of wondering while watching if they were going to throw in a cameo from Teddy Roosevelt, who Bullock had become good friends with by this time.  Of course, it wasn't necessary, but it might have been cool.

With all the dancing, lyrical, dialogue throughout the movie, what's going to stick with me is "I heard you singing the other day.  I thought you stabbed a frog."  Don't ever change, Al.  Of course, I guess you won't, now.

Let's hope Alma has the good sense to manage that property well.  Build a railroad station, like Bullock did in real life.  If you haven't read the Wikipedia article on him, he lived a real life.

A Teddy Roosevelt cameo would have been cool but Teddy was back on the East Coast around this time, serving as a Civil Service Commissioner.  If Deadwood had gone a few more seasons and expanded from South Dakota, we definitely could have gotten something.

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It was great seeing everyone again. I felt a little like Alma, almost giddy with anticipation of seeing an old flame.  Her paying double the price for Utter's land  was worth seeing Bullock's awkward PDA. 

Births and wedding tropes aside, I also dug the closing immortal words of Michael Hurley


And the hog of the forsaken got no reason to cry
He got to chew the angels fallen from on high
He ain't waitin' for no answer baking woeful pie
Pie of eyesight, pie blue-black
Whoa, that pie. The pie of by-n-by.

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On 6/4/2019 at 7:50 AM, purist said:

Yeah, I did wonder about that, but I was so pleased to see Doc Cochran that I really didn't care.

I am rewatching the series, and am partway through S3.  It is so sad to see Doc Cochran who was gifted with such lovely verbal acuity being silenced by his illness.

One of my favorite quotes is when Doc finds Calamity Jane entangled in her horse's saddle and says - "You are an entangled inebriate are you not?"

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I finally watched the movie last night and while I loved seeing all the characters again and I am extremely grateful to everyone who made this happen, my overwhelming reaction is a sense of nostalgic sadness.

Deadwood was extraordinary.  The language was positively Shakespearean and the cast was fantastic. It was tragic when it ended.  And this last taste, alas, has merely awakened the sadness I felt at it's demise.

I  was also frustrated by the decision to have Trixie call herself to the attention of Hearst. That was poor recompense to Al after he went to the trouble of murdering a look-alike whore to save her from Hearst's quest for vengeance, not to mention an appalling lack of maternal instinct for a woman on the verge of giving birth.  But mostly I was just frustrated that they decided to re-hash that story line. And of course nothing was really settled.  Hearst may be in jail now and he have taken a beating due to his having had Charlie and Samuel murdered but does anyone REALLY think he's going to face justice?  No, he'll get off scot free because he's rich and he'll go after Trixie again because he can and because he's just that kind of vengeance-obsessed cocksucker.  Alma may be rich but he's rich and politically connected so eventually so she'll be forced to sell that land and let the telephone lines go through.  So really, what was accomplished by her purchase of the land?  A delay that he will find annoying. That's all.  Yeah, I woke up depressed about the whole thing.  I tried beginning a re-watch of the series but after one episode I had to stop.  I just can't put myself through it. It would be a great ride but I'd just feel all sad at the end again.

Still, I'm wildly grateful that so many people came together to give us this last two-hour movie.  I shows a huge amount of love for the show.

That being said, I was a huge fan of both Farscape and Firefly.  Both were amazing shows that were cancelled unexpectedly leaving us with unfinished story lines.  In both cases we finally got wrap-up movies.  In both cases those movies did a better job of brining those sagas to a satisfying conclusion than this movie did.

Edited by WatchrTina
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On 6/4/2019 at 9:17 AM, walnutqueen said:

Sorry/not sorry to rain on this parade.

No way in HELL Jane survives end stage liver disease, for a decade, much less as a functioning drunk.

Don't even get me started on Doc, the end stage lunger ... or Trixie's miraculous geriatric baby.

I did not love this movie.

Not the closure I had hoped for,

We may be the only ones! And my husband. First of all, Al did not die that way irl, Hearst was that much of a cocksucker is not stated in history, although he was portrayed this way in the movie also.  And why did many of the characters start speaking like fuckin' Yoda?!!  Did no one else watching this notice? Everyone appeared to have aged 20+ years , not 10. It felt off, it felt like it was filmed differently. Peoples voices were different, it did not hold a candle to the series. Never should have cancelled it. This was a big disappointment?

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What the hell did Al mean after Trixie was praying "our father who art in heaven" and he said, "let him the**** stay there"? He wasn't coming down. Don't get it. 

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