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MsChicklet

House Hunters Renovation

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29 minutes ago, Mittengirl said:

 (Is grout the right word?)

Mortar. 

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Just watched the Denver episode and I agree with all of the criticisms of the remodel mentioned up thread.  I want to add that in addition to the creaky, whiny voices that young women have decided to use, please stop using the word "amazing" to describe everything in a newly remodeled house.  Subway tile isn't amazing, and neither is a new bathtub, wood floors, etc.   Find another adjective to use. 

Yes, it was possibly one of the most boring redos we've seen on HHR, even though the buyer thinks she has "amazing" design skills.  I think she was joking with that comment.  Every time she walked into a house and wanted to knock out a wall, it seemed that the wall had plumbing on the other side.  You can't just knock out a wall that contains plumbing without incurring a large expense to relocate the plumbing, if possible.  She ran into that little hiccup with the furnace flue.  The other thing that irritates me about these owners is their constant whining that they don't know how to do any DIY projects and it would be a huge burden to take on.  That's why you HIRE people to do it for you.  I have a lot of experience with home projects, but there is no way I would tackle a bathroom and kitchen remodel on my own, or even act as a contractor for the project.  Just open your wallet and pay someone to do it for you.  If you can't afford to do that, then maybe a fixer isn't for you.  Obviously she had some painting skills, and could handle a screwdriver to assemble an umbrella.  She gets a participation trophy for that.

Would HH please find participants who want color and a designer who has more than 10,000 shades of white and gray in their color swatches? 

Oh, and about painted brick.  There was nothing wrong with the brick on the exterior of that house.  She didn't like the color, so of course, it had to be painted white.  Painting brick is more than slapping a coat of paint on it.  You have to determine the type of brick and paint it with the appropriate paint.  Brick needs to breathe, and painting it with the wrong paint can cause moisture problems down the road.  In my area, young buyers are snapping up houses built in the 50's (red brick), 60's & 70's (what we call old brick here) and immediately painting them all shades of white and cream.  Personally, I think that causes a loss of some of the character of the house.  IMVHO if the brick is in good shape, don't paint it and create more maintenance problems for yourself.  Work with what you have and save some money.  If unpainted brick ever comes back in style, get your sandblasters ready.    

Edited by laredhead
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Between the vocal fry coming from the buyer, roommate and the realtor and the over use of the word "amazing", I did a lot of fast forwarding. I know her budget was around $125k, did she stick to it? Was there a reason the dishwasher couldn't go on the other side of the sink instead of right next to the oven? Not only would it have looked better, but then the stove and hood wouldn't have been so off centered. And yes, that was totally noticeable and looked like an obvious mistake.  

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17 hours ago, Mittengirl said:

I hate the look of painted brick.  Does anyone have first-hand experience with it? I am thinking in areas with seasonal exteremes the paint doesn’t hold up well.

We rented a painted brick house when my husband was transferred with his job about 40 years ago. The house was built with the intention of paining it a soft yellow so it might have been a special type of brick that was meant to be painted. When we lived there the house was less than 10 years old. From recent photos on Google maps it still looks good, but I don't know if it's been repainted or not.

Where we live now the homes are mostly Federal and Georgian style two story brick and there isn't a single one that's been painted. They would look out of place if painted. 

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Juliet, she went $10,000 over budget.  As for the dishwasher placement, I thought the same thing as you, but I kept going back and looking at the kitchen layout (thank goodness for DVR's), and that was a very short run of cabinet with a door next to the cabinet.  There was no other place for the dishwasher.  I think a white paneled front on the dishwasher to match the cabinets would have made it look less off center.  It didn't bother me too much, because I didn't like the finished product as a whole.  Too bland for my taste.  

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On 5/12/2019 at 5:04 PM, ByaNose said:

I kinda liked the house. Granted it was white but it looked so clean and fresh. I’m sure eventually she’ll have to paint the outside but that wouldn’t be for a few years. I liked the outdoor space. It was just a regular patio area but she didn’t need to spend a lot of money on it. A huge umbrella, a sectional and call it a day. The bathrooms turned out nice. I remember the contractor Ben Henry from before. He was also on Survivor. The one thing I did learn from the show was their is a BFF App. Who knew? I guess it isn’t a horrible idea but it’s not my demographic. I think I’m too old at 55 to use it. LOL!!!!!

Agreed. I wouldn’t have chosen the finishes she did, but the final product was still modern and pretty. Except for the patterned tiles on the fume hood. I know the interior designer pushed for them, but I thought they were butt ugly.

I actually liked the home owner and her roommate and didn’t notice their vocal fries. She was nice and usually open to new ideas. 

Didn’t like the master shower, though. The white and gray tiles were so small that the final pattern looked messy. I wish she’d gone with larger tiles. And I wanted to see her new walk-in master closet. Did they show it?

On 2/11/2019 at 4:15 PM, ByaNose said:

I assume HH hires the designer, right? Maybe, I'm wrong. You are right though. You could go to Lowes or Home Depot and do all this yourself. Unless, you are a complete idiot like most of these people on HH Renovation who can't think for themselves. They would probably save some money, too.

Sadly, that would be me. I don’t have an eye for design, so I know I’d need lots of help. 

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My understanding is the designer only sees measurements, and photos of the kitchen, or whatever rooms they're designing, before the meeting with the homeowners.      The designer is paid for by the show, or else donates services for the publicity.      I'm sure there is some communications given to the designer about what the homeowners want to do about the kitchen or whatever room they want to totally redo.   

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BBH Renovation in NC: I liked how they used that 200 year old wood on the kitchen walls. Also liked that the countertops weren’t white. Didn’t the wife at first say that she wanted an all white kitchen? 

Why had the previous owners covered up those hardwood floors with carpet? 🙄

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It was a 'in' thing to put in wall to wall carpet to soften rooms, and it was as much a fashion as hardwoods are now.     

A friend was looking at a similar house that was older.    The homeowners had pulled a corner of the carpet up, and folded it back so you could see the hardwoods under it.      My friends was thrilled about the oak floors, but for other reasons went with another house.    Later, she found out the one corner, and a lot of the flooring was in nice shape (she actually heard from a man who worked on both houses).   However, many other parts had the dark staining that was impossible to get out, and the floor wasn't the best quality, so the carpet was to hide that.   I don't know if the sellers knew about the stains or not.    My parents put wall-to-wall over their original wood floors, because the floor dried out over the years, and wasn't firmly against the neighboring planks.     

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LA: No white kitchen! Yay! I don’t think I could have gone for the walls being painted that dark, too, but I liked that they went for something different. Seemed like a nice couple. I missed the first few minutes, so what was their profession? I know it was in the music industry, but what? 

The hardwood floors they found were amazing. The Japanese soaking tub didn’t seem practical though.

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I hated the round soaking tub, and I hope they never try to sell because I don't think anyone is going to want that.    Terrazo belongs on the floor, not the counters, and would have looked better on the floor.        I can't believe it was legal for the homeowners to do their own lead abatement.     The kitchen was way too dark for my taste, and the rooms with dark floors were a bad choice.  

The 'secret' door opened right into the doorway of the kitchen, and they didn't even paint the section of the house behind it.    Paint would have at least freshened it up.    I hated the fireplace tile in green.    The paneling removal helped the rooms a lot though.   

At the end when they put booties on the dog to keep everything from scratching was bizarre, or maybe it was to prevent slipping, I'm not sure.    The super dark floors are a nightmare, from water mineral splashes, to showing every speck of dust or dirt that lands on it.   

I would have either taken the second house, or the third.    The third with the atrium roof closed up would have given them a ton of entertaining room.  

I don't even know how the budget turned out.  

Edited by CrazyInAlabama

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1 hour ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

I hated the Japanese soaking tub, and terrazo belongs on the floor, not the counters.     I can't believe it was legal for the homeowners to do their own lead abatement.    The 'secret' door opened right into the doorway of the kitchen, and they didn't even paint the section of the house behind it.    Paint would have at least freshened it up.    I hated the fireplace tile in green.    The paneling removal helped he rooms a lot though.   

I would have either taken the second house, or the third.    The third with the atrium roof closed up would have given them a ton of entertaining room.  

I don't even know how the budget turned out.  

On Property Bros--didn't remember if it was in CA or the US, said  if the lead was limited to so many sq ft, the HO could do lead removal themselves.

On a recent This Old House, I I seem to recall  if the lead is removed, the local trash scavenger will take it.... but the bags must be well sealed.

ETA: DIY lead removal in MA

Edited by sheetmoss

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I know people complain about the all white kitchens but the blue kitchen was too dark me. Maybe, I’m just in paint shock & so used to the white shakers shown before. The countertops were ugly, too. I didn’t like the green tile on the fireplace either. Overall, this renovation was a total miss for me. BTW! The husband looked like Ricky Schroeder before the wife beating charges, of course. 

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