Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
Billina

Book Recommendations

Recommended Posts

I second Lord of the Rings and Narnia. I haven't read them in a long time, but when I was in high school, I really liked The Dragonriders of Pern series.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

4 hours ago, OtterMommy said:

One note about the LotR trilogy.  I think she would *love* them but her father is insisting on reading them *to* her and her little brother and, well, let's just say reading aloud in an entertaining manner is not his strong point.  So, I need to work to convince him to let her read them on her own!

Can you maybe convince him to download the audiobook so you can listen together if he's insisting on a communal reading? Maybe she can follow along with an actual book or read ahead so she can compare how an accomplished actor interprets the words vs. what she hears in her head?

Share this post


Link to post
8 minutes ago, Irlandesa said:

Can you maybe convince him to download the audiobook so you can listen together if he's insisting on a communal reading? Maybe she can follow along with an actual book or read ahead so she can compare how an accomplished actor interprets the words vs. what she hears in her head?

That's actually a good idea.  I may do that for our next road trip!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

From my nephew, who was a big fantasy reader when he was younger: the Inkspell trilogy by Cornelia Funke, the Eragon books by Christopher Paolini (a quartet, maybe? though he's not as enamored of them now as he was then), Fly by Night by Florence Hardinge, Five Children and It and sequels by E. Nesbit.

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, auntlada said:

when I was in high school, I really liked The Dragonriders of Pern series.

I will second the Dragonriders of Pern.  I still re-read those periodically.  I would start her with the trilogy of Dragonsinger, Dragonsong, and Dragondrums.  And stay far far away from the ones not written by Anne McCaffrey.  

ETA: the original Xanth books were good -- very punny -- but it got terribly out of hand after the first three or so.

I liked The Phantom Tollbooth, too.

Edited by Browncoat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

1 hour ago, OtterMommy said:

That's actually a good idea.  I may do that for our next road trip!

There's actually a really good audio drama of LOTR done by the BBC in 1982. The highest-profile actors nowdays are Ian Holm and Bill Nighy as Frodo and Sam. It leaves out Tom Bombadil, but I suppose that's for the best.

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, OtterMommy said:

Hey all...I'm looking for some book recommendations for my daughter.  She's in 5th grade (11 in a few weeks) but she reads at an upper high school level (or as high as her testing will indicate).  One of her goals is to read more "challenging" books but we're having trouble finding ones that are challenging and appropriate.  She's not at all into romance and doesn't want anything "girly"...and she's only 11 so YA romances are out.  She does enjoy fantasy novels and mysteries and has read all of Rick Riordan's books already and, of course, the entire HP series (multiple times).  At her age I had completely different interests and I'm still not a huge fan of fantasy, so I'm not much help here.  Hence, I'm turning to all of you...any suggestions?

Has anyone suggested Diana Wynne Jones books? She's the perfect age to start reading them. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Other good fantasy writers,

Frank Herbert (Dune-well the first 3 books, though some by his son, Brian are ok); 

Raymond Fiest (start with Magician and include the Daughter of the Empire trilogy with Jamie Wurst)

Mercedes Lackey (start with Arrows of the Queen)

David Eddings (start with Pawn of Prophecy-kind of LOTR light, but still pretty good)

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Oh, also The Dark Is Rising series by Susan Cooper. Some of them are a little spooky,  I find, but if she regularly reads famtasy, she will probably be OK. Stay far away from the movie.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Brandon Sanderson is a Mormon. He decided to write epic fantasy with less sex, violence, swearing, etc. He's done a bunch of stuff divided between YA and A, SF and F.

  • Like 1
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

What about the Sally Lockhart books by Phillip Pullman? They're mystery but good! He also wrote the Golden Compass trilogy, if she hasn't read that which is more fantasy. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

14 hours ago, auntlada said:

I second Lord of the Rings and Narnia. I haven't read them in a long time, but when I was in high school, I really liked The Dragonriders of Pern series.

I was going to suggest McCaffrey's Harper Hall series since the protagonist is a 15yo girl and there is no adult content as far as I can remember.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, auntlada said:

Oh, also The Dark Is Rising series by Susan Cooper.

Excellent series, and yes, avoid the movie like the coronovirus.

11 hours ago, Jenniferbug said:

What about the Sally Lockhart books by Phillip Pullman? They're mystery but good!

I think a there are one or two fairly explicit sex scenes (Pullman took a lot of heat for those), so know your kid.

  • Like 1
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, dubbel zout said:

I think a there are one or two fairly explicit sex scenes (Pullman took a lot of heat for those), so know your kid.

Oh, I think you're right that there's one in the second book and then maybe one in the 4th. I guess I don't remember them being that explicit, but I haven't read the books since I was 12 or 13. So yes, preview them first if you have concerns! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Oh! I just had a thought for ottermommy! Has your daughter read Watership Down by Richard Adams? She sounds like the kind of thoughtful kid that would really love this book.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Ottermommy, I'd recommend anything by Richard Peck!  He's wrote wonderful books for teens.  Probably best known for the Blossom Culp books (the first of which had a movie based on it by Disney).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

5 hours ago, Silver Raven said:

My favorite writer, Guy Gavriel Kay, reading the introduction to my favorite book of his, Tigana.  This book makes me cry

I've been meaning to read some things by him. I loved the Fionavar Tapestry.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Constant Viewer said:

I've been meaning to read some things by him. I loved the Fionavar Tapestry.

The most recent book of his that I read was "Lord of Emperors", set in a pseudo-Byzantine empire (the second of two books in that series).  There is a LONG passage about a chariot race, and at the end of it, I was bawling.  Who else can write about a chariot race and bring you to tears?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Anybody who wants to read something weighty and educational, give The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan a look:

61AEPrA1LPL.jpg

He abandons the Euro-centric history of the world that most of us are taught and focuses on the areas of Asia traditionally thought of as being the old silk road routes linking the 'civilised' worlds of China and Europe.

Learning about Persian history, the rise of Christianity in the Middle East and its clashes with Zoroastrianism then Islam, the empires and nations that rose in areas we usually ignore unless things explode there, is really satisfying.

Edited by Danny Franks
  • Like 2
  • Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post

I read that!  It's fascinating.  I liked how he divided the book into "the road to [a particular concept or factor] and explored how that influenced the history of Asia (and the world) rather than just reciting a list of events.  The flow of knowledge, wealth, disease, religion, etc from east to west and back again... really interesting stuff.

I didn't think the last part of the book dealing with 20th c colonialism and petro-politics would interest me so I left it for many months.  Then when I had nothing else to read I picked it up again and realized my mistake.  It was an insightful take on more recent history.

Edited by Haleth
  • Like 2
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size