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maraleia

S01.E10: Bora Bora Bora

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Pennsatucky discovers a new skill; the inmates try to scare delinquent teenagers straight; Pornstache's side business suffers a tragic setback.

 

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Sad ending for Trisha, but I do hope that Mendez gets found out.

 

I can't wait to see the end of Alex's long con with Tiffany.  Or was it finally getting Tif into the psych eval.

 

Piper's talk to the girl in the wheelchair was chilling.

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I think that's the episode Taylor Schilling should submit for the Emmy now that she has the nomination [as I understand it, that's how it works--you now submit one for consideration for Best Actress.]  The brilliant thing about that scene in the lockerroom with Dina, to me, is that it encapsulates the show's tone perfectly; it begins in comedy with the broad generalizations about Piper and her sexuality and the ridiculous show the guards and prisoners put on for the "scared straight" kids, and then it delves into some of Taylor's best dramatic acting with the kid, and then comes back around to comedy with her code-switching, "Bitches gots to learn."  I suspect she and her people are leaning towards the pilot or Fucksgiving, but I hope they go with this one.  /just my two cents. 

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Just finished this episode, I'm new to the show and binge-watching S1.  I'm trying to understand what is going on re: Mendez and Red, so I hope it's the right board to ask:

 

Has Mendez been bringing in heroin and distributing it in return for sexual favors?  And has Red been using her connections at Neptune to supply him with pills?  Are the pills for him or to distribute, and if he has the connections to get heroin why can't he also get the pills, whatever they are.  Maybe I missed some key dialogue somewhere but to me this whole plot thread has been somewhat confusing.

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Mendez was bringing in pills and other drugs to sell to the girls. He accepted sexual favors but he was mostly selling them. But they amped up security for the guards and now he can't just bring the drugs in as he normally would.

 

Red is adament against bringing drugs into the prison because she'd get in serious trouble if that was found out. As is they let her smuggling slide. She also doesn't want drugs around her girls.

 

Now Mendez wants to use her connections to bring in his drugs since he can't just bring them in off the street like he used to.

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I'm new to the show, and I thought this was the strongest episode yet. I loved everything about it (from Trisha's tragic story to everything about the wheelchair scared straight girl). But what intrigued me most was Crazy Eyes' use of Shakespeare. The plays she quoted in this episode were Coriolanus and Measure for Measure--not run-of-the-mill high school reading list Shakespeare. And her use of the quotes was completely appropriate; she wasn't just spouting language.

 

The first was a speech by Caius Martius (Coriolanus) when he responds in anger and disgust to a crowd of plebeians who have rejected him:

You common cry of curs! whose breath I hate
As reek o' the rotten fens, whose loves I prize
As the dead carcasses of unburied men
That do corrupt my air, I banish you;
And here remain with your uncertainty!

If the writer of the episode had wanted "generic crazy Shakespeare," Lady Macbeth or Ophelia in their mad scenes would have been fine, but the Coriolanus quote works really well as a quote that insults and intimidates a crowd of young girls into never coming back to prison.

 

Her next quote was even more fitting and even more surprising. It's a response to Piper's indignation that everyone is calling her a lesbian, so the obvious and easy quote would have been Gertrude's "the lady doth protest too much" from Hamlet. A common and familiar saying from a well-known play that lots of high school students read. But Isabella's "little honor to be much believed" from Measure for Measure works even better. Gertrude's line reveals her own guilt and hypocrisy, and Crazy Eyes wants to call attention to Piper's. Isabella's line is directed to Angelo to call attention to his hypocrisy, so it works better to insult Piper, and it fits better with how Crazy Eyes thinks Piper treated her.

 

So far I haven't seen anything from Crazy Eyes that would indicate that she understood literature (or anything) well enough to use relatively obscure Shakespeare quotes that precisely. So I'm left wondering if this was a writer who was willing to sacrifice accurate characterization in order to demonstrate how well they know Shakespeare or if this was a well-written indication that Crazy Eyes has an intellect/education that will be addressed later. I hope it's the latter.

Edited by stardanced
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I'm new to the show, and I thought this was the strongest episode yet. I loved everything about it (from Trisha's tragic story to everything about the wheelchair scared straight girl). But what intrigued me most was Crazy Eyes' use of Shakespeare. The plays she quoted in this episode were Coriolanus and Measure for Measure--not run-of-the-mill high school reading list Shakespeare. And her use of the quotes was completely appropriate; she wasn't just spouting language.

 

The first was a speech by Caius Martius (Coriolanus) when he responds in anger and disgust to a crowd of plebeians who have rejected him:

You common cry of curs! whose breath I hate

As reek o' the rotten fens, whose loves I prize

As the dead carcasses of unburied men

That do corrupt my air, I banish you;

And here remain with your uncertainty!

If the writer of the episode had wanted "generic crazy Shakespeare," Lady Macbeth or Ophelia in their mad scenes would have been fine, but the Coriolanus quote works really well as a quote that insults and intimidates a crowd of young girls into never coming back to prison.

 

Her next quote was even more fitting and even more surprising. It's a response to Piper's indignation that everyone is calling her a lesbian, so the obvious and easy quote would have been Gertrude's "the lady doth protest too much" from Hamlet. A common and familiar saying from a well-known play that lots of high school students read. But Isabella's "little honor to be much believed" from Measure for Measure works even better. Gertrude's line reveals her own guilt and hypocrisy, and Crazy Eyes wants to call attention to Piper's. Isabella's line is directed to Angelo to call attention to his hypocrisy, so it works better to insult Piper, and it fits better with how Crazy Eyes thinks Piper treated her.

 

So far I haven't seen anything from Crazy Eyes that would indicate that she understood literature (or anything) well enough to use relatively obscure Shakespeare quotes that precisely. So I'm left wondering if this was a writer who was willing to sacrifice accurate characterization in order to demonstrate how well they know Shakespeare or if this was a well-written indication that Crazy Eyes has an intellect/education that will be addressed later. I hope it's the latter.

I just got the DVDs for season 1, so I'm also new to this show and binge watching. I am also interested in Crazy Eyes background more than most of the other characters, except Red (but that's my ongoing Kate Mulgrew love). In, I think, the Fucksgiving episode, Crazy Eyes was visied by her parents who...let's say...I would not have pegged as her parents. I think their appearance and demeanor about her cursing, are some clues to her background. It would not surprise me at all to find out that she has quite a good, strong educational background.

 

I need to finish out the last couple of episodes of season 1 tonight, and then on to season 2!

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