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My Generation: Period Set, Style, Slang, etc.


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Carried my books in high school (early 70's), but in college (fall of 1975), I used a backpack.  

We had bag lunch from home for most of high school.  AND we had to save them and reuse for a week!  Soooo embarrassing ...   Lunch was always sandwich, some kind of chips, homemade cookies, some kind of fruit.  Bought a carton of milk at school  Sometimes I traded my homemade cookies for "cool" storebought ones like Oreos.

Bobby Sherman -- and the guy who played his older brother in "Here Come the Brides" were my crushes.  Also the Quentin actor on "Dark Shadows."  Never liked Donny -- he looked too girly to me.

We rarely had pop (koolaid though) and when we did, it was the BrandX from the grocery store.  Not even Shasta!  One in particular was medicinally bad.  We'd save our money to buy brand-name pop and put our name on it so no one else could drink it.  :-D

I mentioned this is one of the threads -- Tang instead of OJ, anyone??

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Hahaha imagine trading homemade for storebought. Man, we were weird...When I was growing up all the kids went home for lunch in elementary school because moms didn't work, most of them. You had to get permission to stay and it was the cool thing to do so I did it sometimes. Of course, you had to have a bag lunch because there was no cafeteria, just long tables. There was a cafeteria in Jr. High and HS.

 

(now it's all middle school, but then it was jr. high!)

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My small town's elementary school were split into two buildings. Grades 1-3 in one, and 4-6 in another. 1-3 had to go a few blocks to the other building for lunch since they had a cafeteria. Good times.

No way can all those little kids run around unsupervised these days! 

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When I was in elementary school we got bused home for lunch at least from grade 3 on.  The school I went to until then had a cafeteria and children brought their lunch or you could buy lunch (for 25 cents!!!!) or at least buy milk.  When we moved to Quebec and started school there  I don't know if they even had a provision for kids whose mother wasn't home.  I would bet those few moms who worked had a friend or neighbour feed the kids but perhaps the school did have a lunchroom of some kind.  If so I sure never knew anyone who used it!  Looking back it must have cost the school board more to send every kid home for lunch and then pick them up again then it would have cost to have kids bring their lunch and eat in their classrooms.   Still I have such happy memories of being home at lunch and having grilled cheese and tomato soup (we could not possibly have had this every day but this is my memory and I'm sticking with it) and watching about 20 minutes of The Flintstones before we had to head out to the bus stop!

Edited by CherryAmes
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7 hours ago, CherryAmes said:

hen I was in elementary school we got bused home for lunch at least from grade 3 on.  The school I went to until then had a cafeteria and children brought their lunch or you could buy lunch (for 25 cents!!!!) or at least buy milk.  When we moved to Quebec and started school there  I don't know if they even had a provision for kids whose mother wasn't home.  I would bet those few moms who worked had a friend or neighbour feed the kids but perhaps the school did have a lunchroom of some kind.  If so I sure never knew anyone who used it!  Looking back it must have cost the school board more to send every kid home for lunch and then pick them up again then it would have cost to have kids bring their lunch and eat in their classrooms.   Still I have such happy memories of being home at lunch and having grilled cheese and tomato soup (we could not possibly have had this every day but this is my memory and I'm sticking with it) and watching about 20 minutes of The Flintstones before we had to head out to the bus stop!

Wow; so interesting that kids were bussed home for lunch!  I also wonder about families whose mom wasn't home.

Grilled cheese and tomato soup -- still one of my favorite comfort meals!

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I grew up in the Bronx in the '60s/'70s so of course everything was a little different from the rest of the world.  We always had school cafeterias, sometimes with pretty decent food, especially for back then.  You know, stuff that was actually cooked fresh.  That's where I first had PB and J sandwiches, macaroni and cheese and Sloppy Joes as I didn't get those at home growing up with an Italian American mom.  My favorite was Chili-Mac, kind of like Cincinnati Chili, complete with what we used to affectionately call "mystery meat".  We also got a variation of the military's favorite dish at the time, "Chipped Beef on Toast", affectionately called "shit on a shingle".

In elementary school I mostly brought my lunch because it was worth your life to go to the cafeteria.  Don't get me started on growing up in a rough neighborhood.  In my later years I became a class lunch monitor and was able to eat in the classroom.  My husband, who grew up in Northern Manhattan, attended a very rough school and was allowed to eat his lunch in the band practice room with other fearful band members.

For me, Jr. High was even rougher than elementary school, but the food was good there and thanks to a very militaristic shouty guy with a megaphone that I firmly believe the cafeteria guy in "Back to the Future" was based on, I was able to eat on the "well behaved" side of the cafeteria, where we were somewhat protected.  But don't go over that yellow line or you took your life in your hands, almost literally!  We were allowed to leave the building for lunch but we were on our own and had to be back before the bell rang or we'd literally be locked out of the building as we were always on some sort of perpetual lock-down.  I had a homeroom/biology teacher that was so much like Ben Stein it's uncanny, down to the voice and everything.  He even used to sing-song people's last names, including mine, just like in "Ferris Beuller's Day Off", with those half-reading glasses while looking at your "Delaney Card" (ugh, remember THOSE with the "demerits"?)  Only that was well before the movie even existed.

I literally had a "body guard" in Jr. High, a really nice girl that was very tall and big who also loved Donny Osmond so of course we were instant BFFs.  She had a relative that worked at Madison Square Garden and got us 6th row tickets to an Osmond Concert in 1972.  Being short and vulnerable, she told me that if anyone messed with me to let her know about it.  All I had to do was tell some tough thug that she was my BFF and they would leave me alone, LOL. 

Favorite expressions in 1972 included:

"Embarrasssing!"

"Sack it up!"

"Don't be such a spaz"

"Yo mama!"

"Gimme five"

"Duuuuuh"

By the time I went to high school, I was fortunate enough to make it into the Bronx HS of Science, the original "Big Bang Theory" high school, which meant that every cafeteria table was "the nerd table" and I did not fear for my life.  By that time I was mostly going out to delis for my lunch as there was a little Italian American neighborhood within walking distance with good pizza and heroes.

Rachael Ray jokes around that she was always made fun of for her school lunches, like sardine sandwiches and stinky cheeses.  Well I got that a lot too for the same reasons, growing up with an Italian American mom.  Except my mom made a concerted effort to sometimes give me more "American" food, like bologna sandwiches, deviled ham, tuna fish salad with mayo., etc.  always with a fruit and a "Baggie" filled with Fritos, pretzels or Lays.  Sometimes I got Heinz Gherkins or a Thermos filled with Campbell's soup or homemade "Pasta Fazool", LOL.

My allowance kept me in baseball card gum, candy necklaces, 3 Musketeers or Snickers bars, rod pretzels, egg creams and lime rickeys at the local candy store.  Later on it had to include Tiger Beat, 16 magazine, etc.  I used to walk the extra distance to the "good" magazine stand that got all the teen mags and got them early.  I still have a collection of them.  It was right next to an old fashioned bagel bakery, where you could watch the bagels boiling in big vats through the window.  And the smell......

Yeah, I had a colorful childhood!

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1 hour ago, hoodooznoodooz said:

Anyone remember “Wacky Paks”?

Larva soap, instead of Lava.

The lava soap actually worked in my memory. My husband 's family are farmers so if gloves are forgotten or misplaced a bit of grease finds its way onto their hands. Lava & a nail brush did the job.

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They were banned in the 70s, fairly early as I recall, we weren’t allowed to get one.

 

From wiki:

Clackers were taken off the market in the United States in the 1970s when reports came out of children becoming injured while playing with them. Fairly heavy and fast-moving, and made of hard acrylic plastic, the balls would occasionally shatter upon striking each other.[3] In the United States, they were classed in 1976 as a "mechanical hazard" in United States v. Article Consisting of 50,000 Cardboard Boxes More or Less, Each Containing One Pair of Clacker Balls.

 

I guess before taken off the market everyone knew.

there is one side that says 1995 but that site is wrong.

 

i loved going home for lunch to see mom and pet the cat. It was common to bring a friend or go to someone else’s house too. I’d often read a book. The chronicles of narnia have grease from Swanson’s frozen dinners on them.

Edited by lucindabelle
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6 hours ago, lucindabelle said:

They were banned in the 70s, fairly early as I recall, we weren’t allowed to get one.

 

From wiki:

Clackers were taken off the market in the United States in the 1970s when reports came out of children becoming injured while playing with them. Fairly heavy and fast-moving, and made of hard acrylic plastic, the balls would occasionally shatter upon striking each other.[3] In the United States, they were classed in 1976 as a "mechanical hazard" in United States v. Article Consisting of 50,000 Cardboard Boxes More or Less, Each Containing One Pair of Clacker Balls.

 

I guess before taken off the market everyone knew.

there is one side that says 1995 but that site is wrong.

Several sites I consulted said they were officially banned in 1985:

https://www.google.com/search?q=clackers banned in 1985&cad=h

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On 11/29/2018 at 11:26 AM, Thumper said:

Carried my books in high school (early 70's), but in college (fall of 1975), I used a backpack.  

We had bag lunch from home for most of high school.  AND we had to save them and reuse for a week!  Soooo embarrassing ...   Lunch was always sandwich, some kind of chips, homemade cookies, some kind of fruit.  Bought a carton of milk at school  Sometimes I traded my homemade cookies for "cool" storebought ones like Oreos.

Bobby Sherman -- and the guy who played his older brother in "Here Come the Brides" were my crushes.  Also the Quentin actor on "Dark Shadows."  Never liked Donny -- he looked too girly to me.

We rarely had pop (koolaid though) and when we did, it was the BrandX from the grocery store.  Not even Shasta!  One in particular was medicinally bad.  We'd save our money to buy brand-name pop and put our name on it so no one else could drink it.  :-D

I mentioned this is one of the threads -- Tang instead of OJ, anyone??

My grandma even made us save the sandwich baggies!  And we had lunch boxes until junior high because paper bags were a luxury.

No cafeteria in grade school so we ate on the front lawn, weather permitting, or in the gym.  Inside days were always popular with the older kids because they got to leave class early and go back late to set up and break down the lunch tables.  We had a cafeteria starting in junior high school, but I only remember having hot lunch once the entire time I was there.  Then we got to high school with pizza and milkshakes and soda machines and thought we were in heaven.

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In my Catholic elementary school, we ate lunch at our desks in the classroom.  A volunteer mom would supervise us while we ate, then we went out to the parking lot to 'play'.  In 8th grade, they decided to use the lunch room.  We still had to bring our lunch.  We paid 10 cents a week for a daily carton of milk.  I don't think that we were allowed to bring lunch boxes (which were made of metal)--they made too much noise.  Brown paper bags were the preferred method for carrying your lunch.   My mom made pb&j sandwiches  every day and included a few cookies ot the occasional Ring Ding or Yodel.  There was a full cafeteria in high school, and I used my babysitting money to buy lunch.

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4 hours ago, Sile said:

My grandma even made us save the sandwich baggies!  And we had lunch boxes until junior high because paper bags were a luxury.

No cafeteria in grade school so we ate on the front lawn, weather permitting, or in the gym.  Inside days were always popular with the older kids because they got to leave class early and go back late to set up and break down the lunch tables.  We had a cafeteria starting in junior high school, but I only remember having hot lunch once the entire time I was there.  Then we got to high school with pizza and milkshakes and soda machines and thought we were in heaven.

LOL -- we had to save our sandwich baggies, too!   High five, @Sile!  Miraculously, we survived.  😄😄😄

(I understand the baggie part now that I am older.  We were a family of 8 kids -- that's a lotta baggies!). But again, so NOT cool compared to the Hot Lunch kids.  😄

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22 hours ago, Phebemarie said:

We girls of Washington School were not allowed to wear pants to school until after '72.  

That was 2 years later than my school.  The girls in my Jr. High and I staged a revolt in the Fall of 1970 and started wearing pants to school against the rules, and the teachers gave in eventually.

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That was 2 years later than my school.  The girls in my Jr. High and I staged a revolt in the Fall of 1970 and started wearing pants to school against the rules, and the teachers gave in eventually.

By winter of 1968-69, we were in "slacks". By spring, we broke the slacks rule and started wearing blue jeans. The female teachers started wearing pants around a year later.

There was an exhausting dance called the "Klick-Klack" when the toy came out. And just like the toy, one attempt was enough for me. I don't know when the toy was deemed illegal, but some stores pulled them from the shelves not too long after they came out. Could be that the original maker stopped making them but copycats continued producing them. I seem to remember stories of shards of a broken klick-klack finding their way into people's eyes.

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Oh, my gosh. This is such a fun thread. I relate to so much of it. 

LIke CherryAmes (loved those books), I got bussed home for lunch, until, I think, third grade. Then we brought lunch and the school gave us cartons of milk (with paper straws). There was no cafeteria so we ate at our desks. I had metal lunchboxes, a new one each year, with a themos held in place by a curved bracket. I don't remember book bags until later, and backpacks came sometime in college. 

What I remember that lets me handwave any anachronisms is that back then parts of the country were behind others when it came to styles and trends, and even music and movies. We moved from Boston to South Florida when I was in fifth grade, but kept our summerhouse, so I spent summers in Boston. Every year, when I'd go back home, the songs I'd been listening to and movies I'd seen finally got to South Florida months later. 

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From around 1975/86 I remember "Slime".  Basically oozing, slick colored goo that you played with.  I think they still sell it but the stuff you could get when if first came out was pretty bad; especially as an adult looking back at it.  There was nothing you could do with it except run it through your fingers and swish it around (so why we thought it was fun I don't know anymore), it turned out to be completely impossible to get out of carpets, blankets or clothes so we were banished outside to play with it.  And, worst of all, it's the source of the most truly horrible toy memory I have - I dropped it and it slipped into a crack in the front sidewalk; I reached in to get it and I could feel it in there so I grabbed it and pulled out........a very, very large slug.  That was the end of Slime for me!

I did have click clacks but I was one of those uncoordinated kids who could barely work a yo-yo so I didn't have them long.    I do remember all us cousins got them for Christmas one year.  About 5 minutes after opening them Grandma banned them from her house and we had to put them away until we got home, pretty sure the fact that there were six of and we were probably too young for them so they kept getting away from us and flying across the room had something to with that.

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Public school in Wisconsin -- remember getting to wear "slacks" (as mentioned above), in Junior High, 1969-70-ish.  I had a cool pair of brown and gold psychedelic-print bell-bottoms!  Perhaps jeans by the end of high school?

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On 12/7/2018 at 12:00 PM, SongbirdHollow said:

I have this weird recollection that click clacks caused a fire when the sun shone through them. I remember hiding mine in a dark drawer after hearing this. But I believed some weird shit so it could have been my imagination.

No, I think it was that click-clacks could shatter -- they were hard plastic. They came out with a set that were a softer plastic, but were not as click-clacky satisfying.

I used to have to fold my brown paper lunch bags and bring them home so my mom could use them again; I still do that.

Edited by SmithW6079
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Catholic schools did not permit girls to wear slacks/pants when i attened in the 60s and very early 70s.  My high school did allow 'uniform' pants in the 80s or 90s I think, but they have since gone back to uniform skirts.  

I was so excited to be attending a public college.  I wore jeans the entire time I was there.  

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Koala bear clips

Slam books

Pet rocks

Mood rings

Gum wrapper chains 

Chinese jump rope 

Playing cards attached to bicycle spokes

Station wagons

Station wagons with doors that dropped down into the back of the car, near the back license plate

Holly Hobby

Pot holder loom kits

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4 hours ago, hoodooznoodooz said:

Koala bear clips

Slam books

Pet rocks

Mood rings

Gum wrapper chains 

Chinese jump rope 

Playing cards attached to bicycle spokes

Station wagons

Station wagons with doors that dropped down into the back of the car, near the back license plate

Holly Hobby

Pot holder loom kits

I'm around the age of the older half of the boys, and I would have said slam books were from an earlier time. And Holly Hobby, slightly later. But heck yes, potholder looms! When I cleaned out my mom's house after she died, I found more than a few of those!

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17 hours ago, SoMuchTV said:

I'm around the age of the older half of the boys, and I would have said slam books were from an earlier time. And Holly Hobby, slightly later. But heck yes, potholder looms! When I cleaned out my mom's house after she died, I found more than a few of those!

Potholder looms... I certainly went through a phase with those.  One Christmas I made my mom, both grandmothers and all my aunts pot holders on those.  Bless their hearts, they actually acted happy to receive them!

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19 hours ago, SoMuchTV said:

I'm around the age of the older half of the boys, and I would have said slam books were from an earlier time. And Holly Hobby, slightly later. But heck yes, potholder looms! When I cleaned out my mom's house after she died, I found more than a few of those!

I was born in 68 and I remember having a Holly Hobby birthday cake for my 7th birthday (1975).  It stands out because my cousin threw a massive fit because I got Holly's bouquet piece of cake & he didn't.  He then pouted for the rest of the party & claimed that his mom said he couldn't eat any sugar.  I got my first pair of rubber wheeled roller skates that birthday. 

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1 hour ago, Thumper said:

We had to save wrapping paper too (Peg in the Christmas 1972 episode).  We were not allowed to rip it.  Then we would carefully iron it to take out wrinkles and remove the scotch tape!

Okay, maybe I don't iron the paper, but it's not weird to save the gift bags, is it? I mean, sometimes they even still have the right tags for next year!

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Yep, I save gift bags. I use the tags that they come with first then use the stick-on tags in increasingly larger sizes! Peg would be proud. I bet I get 4 or 5 years from a bag. Plus they are from dollar tree.

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Oh, I save gift bags all the time!  (Don't most people?)  I also save ribbons if they are in good shape.  

We just always had a lot of fun teasing my mom about the wrapping paper.  She was a child of the Depression, with 8 kids of her own -- so needed to save money when possible!

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One of the kids got a "God's eye" in the Christmas episode. I loved making them. A teacher at my public school taught us. I didn't know it was a religious symbol back then despite the name.

 I remember a girl from another classroom wanted mine but I said no.

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On 11/29/2018 at 1:26 PM, Thumper said:

Bobby Sherman -- and the guy who played his older brother in "Here Come the Brides" were my crushes. 

My first name is Jeremy, and the name was relatively obscure until it had a sudden spike in popularity to a Top 20 baby name in the mid-1970's and maintained a top 50 Baby Name status through the 1990's. I read a theory online many years ago that the show "Here Comes the Bride" popularized the name, along with Jason (which got the biggest boost- it wasn't in the top 100 in the 1960's but it was a top 3 name in the 1970's) and Joshua, which also became a top 10 name out of almost nowhere in the 1970's. The girls who watched that show would have had their kids starting in the 1970's through the 1980's and into the early 90's, which is when those names were most popular. Joshua has remained pretty popular, although both Jeremy and Jason have fallen off a cliff, especially Jeremy. I have never met a Jeremy who was born before the 70's, and I rarely met kids with that name. It seems like a solid "child of a Baby Boomer or younger Silent Generationer" name.

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14 hours ago, methodwriter85 said:

My first name is Jeremy, and the name was relatively obscure until it had a sudden spike in popularity to a Top 20 baby name in the mid-1970's and maintained a top 50 Baby Name status through the 1990's. I read a theory online many years ago that the show "Here Comes the Bride" popularized the name, along with Jason (which got the biggest boost- it wasn't in the top 100 in the 1960's but it was a top 3 name in the 1970's) and Joshua, which also became a top 10 name out of almost nowhere in the 1970's. The girls who watched that show would have had their kids starting in the 1970's through the 1980's and into the early 90's, which is when those names were most popular. Joshua has remained pretty popular, although both Jeremy and Jason have fallen off a cliff, especially Jeremy. I have never met a Jeremy who was born before the 70's, and I rarely met kids with that name. It seems like a solid "child of a Baby Boomer or younger Silent Generationer" name.

That's interesting.  I was born in 1958 and went to school with a few Jeremy's and Joshua's, but then again I grew up in NYC in a very Jewish neighborhood and those are solidly biblical names which are popular among Jews.  Also, we can't forget the very period-apropos movie from 1973 entitled "Jeremy" starring Robbie Benson and Glynnis O'Connor.  A movie about tragic "puppy love" that really spoke to me at that time as the characters were around my age and in NYC and Robbie looked a lot like my Jewish boyfriend of that time too!

Edited by Yeah No
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Names are soo interesting. I was born in 1964 and growing up there were always lots of Cathy’s Michelle’s Karen’s Laura’s and at camp Nicky and Nicole. Lisa too. Of course Jennifer.

boys: David Adam Michael And Jeffrey. Philip.

 

Mom said sje she didn’t know any Jeffrey’s growing up. Popular names when she was growing up included Dottie and Marilyn and Linda and Sylvia. 

 

I know a Linda. Don’t know a single Sylvia.

 

paper straws! Given the state of the environment let’s give them a comeback! 

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I was born in 68 and I think Stephanie was one of the more popular names that year.  In 7th grade, in my social studies class, there were 7 Stephanie's.  The teacher numbered us & sat us in 2 rows.  I was #6.  He literally only called us by our number that year. 

Thank goodness my  mom didn't go with the other name she had picked out.    Summer Gay.  Yep, it was the 60's. 

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A few oldies from my childhood, including Mr. Potato Head before they came out with that punk-ass version with the plastic head. Back in my day, we had to use some elbow grease to attach the features to the potato! Colorforms....provided us with maybe 5 minutes of fun. Lie Detector was truly the best. And no batteries involved.

 

cootie.png

tickle_bee.png

lie_detector.png

mr_potato_head.png

colorforms.png

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I am old enough to remember when you needed a REAL potato for Mr. Potato Head.  Of course, my mom would peel and chop them for mashed potatoes after play time.  

I also loved Colorforms, particularly Miss Cookie's Kitchen.  What a great idea to let kids use them on the dishwasher!  I'm going to look for some to give to some little friends as Christmas gifts.

This may be a few years before TKAA, but does anyone remember the plastic 'screen' you would put on your tv screen and 'finish' the picture?  

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23 minutes ago, marypat57 said:

 

I also loved Colorforms, particularly Miss Cookie's Kitchen.  What a great idea to let kids use them on the dishwasher!  I'm going to look for some to give to some little friends as Christmas gifts.

 

MaryPat, the colorforms my kids had were scenes and shapes. They weren't dolls as pictured above. I had 3 kids so I could park a kid in front of his own appliance with his own colorform box. Ah good times. Good luck finding some. Old timey games and such?

fun topic!

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This may be a few years before TKAA, but does anyone remember the plastic 'screen' you would put on your tv screen and 'finish' the picture?  

I have a vague memory of this, and I don't think it's been implanted by nostalgic conversation.  I'm thinking maybe I saw it advertised on TV? Would've been circa 1960. Not much earlier. Otherwise, it's a false memory.

@rhys, maybe this is what you're talking about. This pre-dates my memory. My set was similar to the Raggedy Ann one above. A form in her underwear, I dressed her for the weather.

I think someone should resurrect Lie Detector. Made you think and eliminate and identify characteristics of suspects. 

 

colorforms_2.png

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1 hour ago, mojito said:

I have a vague memory of this, and I don't think it's been implanted by nostalgic conversation.  I'm thinking maybe I saw it advertised on TV? Would've been circa 1960. Not much earlier. Otherwise, it's a false memory.

@rhys, maybe this is what you're talking about. This pre-dates my memory. My set was similar to the Raggedy Ann one above. A form in her underwear, I dressed her for the weather.

I think someone should resurrect Lie Detector. Made you think and eliminate and identify characteristics of suspects. 

 

colorforms_2.png

Yes that's it but I don't recall the spiral bound method. I could have sworn it was a box.

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6 hours ago, rhys said:

Yes that's it but I don't recall the spiral bound method. I could have sworn it was a box.

I remember Colorforms - I would have completely forgotten this if not for this thread.  It was one of my favorite toys as a kid.  The set I had did not include a spiral bound book, but came in a box.  I just googled it and was pleasantly surprised to find out they still make it!

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