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Star Trek: Voyager

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Voyager has never been my particular jam (other than its theme song which is actually my favorite of all the Treks), but I just watched the episode “One Small Step” on BBCA the other morning (the S6 episode where the 2032 Mars mission astronaut was sucked into that space phenomenon like Voyager’s flier later was, and then Seven had to board the Mars capsule to get a piece of equipment to save their own ship), and I thought that the last 25 minutes or so were particularly well done.

I thought that the reactions of Seven and Tom were quite touching as they listened to John Kelly’s final mission records; I thought the direction was good in never showing John Kelly’s dead body but rather just giving glimpses of his arm or his suit or his hand, and I thought it was moving how Seven beamed him back for a proper funeral, which I thought was the most moving Star Trek funeral since Spock’s.  Basically, I just thought they did a good job of establishing the comradarie of explorers and deference to the fact that it was hazardous but necessary work.  I thought about the TNG episode “The Royale” where the cast was like, “Huh.  Dead old astronaut.  Whatever.”  I mean, I like that TNG episode a lot (although I know it’s polarizing), but they sure didn’t have many emotions about one of their explorer forefathers.

 

On 11/2/2017 at 11:15 PM, Mom x 3 said:

The series got much better when Jeri Ryan came on, and she is a fabulous actress.  

In its original run, I never saw any of the Seven episodes because I stopped watching  in S2, but I see why she was a popular addition.  She was really good here.  I liked her a lot on “Boston Public” too.

Edited by Peace 47
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3 hours ago, Peace 47 said:

Voyager has never been my particular jam (other than its theme song which is actually my favorite of all the Treks), but I just watched the episode “One Small Step” on BBCA the other morning (the S6 episode where the 2032 Mars mission astronaut was sucked into that space phenomenon like Voyager’s flier later was, and then Seven had to board the Mars capsule to get a piece of equipment to save their own ship), and I thought that the last 25 minutes or so were particularly well done.

I thought that the reactions of Seven and Tom were quite touching as they listened to John Kelly’s final mission records; I thought the direction was good in never showing John Kelly’s dead body but rather just giving glimpses of his arm or his suit or his hand, and I thought it was moving how Seven beamed him back for a proper funeral, which I thought was the most moving Star Trek funeral since Spock’s. Basically, I just thought they did a good job of establishing the comradarie of explorers and deference to the fact that it was hazardous but necessary work.  I thought about the TNG episode “The Royale” where the cast was like, “Huh.  Dead old astronaut.  Whatever.”  I mean, I like that TNG episode a lot (although I know it’s polarizing), but they sure didn’t have many emotions about one of their explorer forefathers.

In its original run, I never saw any of the Seven episodes because I stopped watching  in S2, but I see why she was a popular addition.  She was really good here.  I liked her a lot on “Boston Public” too.

Yes, I loved the eulogy she gave at the memorial service. As I recall, she said something to the effect that even though she never really knew John Kelly personally, she had nevertheless learned a lot from him about herself and about humanity from reviewing his logs.  I thought that was an especially touching tribute from her, since at this stage of her development, she was still somewhat contemptuous of humans in general and hadn't yet learned how to experience and process human emotions and relationships.

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Agreed that the eulogy was really beautifully done.  Janeway also said some nice things about space (nothingness) in reality being the concept that binds them all together as explorers.  And I just thought that it nicely stated one of the tenants of Trek.  In fact, there’s a really lovely 50th anniversary Trek YouTube video out there about the theme of good faith space exploration, and the eulogy comes up in it. 

I also liked how Seven finished her portion of the eulogy by saying softly, “The Yankees.  In 6 games.”  (She was telling the dead astronaut the World Series results because he had mentioned in his log that his one regret was not getting to see how it turned out.)

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Been 6 weeks or so. Now my question is, did the Borg ever try to assimilate non humanoid species? I know they almost lost to species 8472 and did not assimilate them, but what about species like the Aquatics of the Xindi? All Borg I've seen were generally, 2 legs, 2 arms, head, humanoidish. I'm not a big science fiction fan, but I've read an alternate universe series (not Star Trek related) where one of the species was more canine like, they did eventually evolve to 2 feet and 2 arms and became the Anubis of Ancient Egypt. And in the Star Wars Universe, there were non humanoid species, Jabba the Hut comes to mind quickly. But he probably could not be assimilated. 

I really need more to do with my time.

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 Star Trek has several species which didn't evolve from primates.  We see a felinoid species in the Council scenes in Star Trek IV.  The Federation President in the DS9 two-parter Homefront/Paradise Lost from a a bovinoid species (one that evolved from cows).  And the Xindi had the Aquatics, Insectoid, Reptilian and (unseen) Avian species.  I would assume the Borg could assimilate any of these, if they wanted.

 Then you have other species that are fundamentally different like the Horta and the Founders.  I think whether the Borg could assimilate them depends on which version you're talking about.  Pre-First Contact, I would think no.  After they were converted to space zombies in First Contact and given the magic nanoprobes I would suspect they could assimilate just about any species that has a tangible form.  Species 8472 wasn't impervious to assimilation because they weren't humanoid, it was because they had a unique immune system that could repel the magic nanoprobes.  

 Presumably the Borg have encountered species like the Xindi Aquatics and assimilated them for their knowledge but doesn't utilize them as drones, or they're used as drones on in circumstances when it would sense (i.e. if they were invading another aquatic world.

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45 minutes ago, Maverick said:

 Star Trek has several species which didn't evolve from primates.  We see a felinoid species in the Council scenes in Star Trek IV.  The Federation President in the DS9 two-parter Homefront/Paradise Lost from a a bovinoid species (one that evolved from cows).  And the Xindi had the Aquatics, Insectoid, Reptilian and (unseen) Avian species.  I would assume the Borg could assimilate any of these, if they wanted.

 Then you have other species that are fundamentally different like the Horta and the Founders.  I think whether the Borg could assimilate them depends on which version you're talking about.  Pre-First Contact, I would think no.  After they were converted to space zombies in First Contact and given the magic nanoprobes I would suspect they could assimilate just about any species that has a tangible form.  Species 8472 wasn't impervious to assimilation because they weren't humanoid, it was because they had a unique immune system that could repel the magic nanoprobes.  

 Presumably the Borg have encountered species like the Xindi Aquatics and assimilated them for their knowledge but doesn't utilize them as drones, or they're used as drones on in circumstances when it would sense (i.e. if they were invading another aquatic world.

And there are some species that the Borg have simply never bothered to assimilate, such as the Kazon (as Seven of Nine explained it, the Collective decided that there was nothing distinctive enough about the Kazon that made them worth assimilating).

Edited by legaleagle53
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And I don't think the Borg could ever assimilate the Q or the Prophets, since either race could simply poof them out of existence with just a snap of their fingers.

Edited by legaleagle53

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 The original version probably couldn't assimilate the Founders but the zombie version likely could.  Since they assimilate using the magic nanoprobes, they just have to inject a Founder and let them do their work.  The Founders still have an (ill-defined) cellular structure even in their gelatinous form which would be susceptible to the magic nanoprobes.   If Section 31 could infect them with a virus, then the Borg could most likely effect them as well.

 Aside from being omnipotent, I would assume Q and the Prophets would be immune since they're non-corporeal which means there are other species, such as the Calamarain, the Beta XII-A entity and Gorgon that would be as well. 

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I'd vote "No" on their ability to assimilate Changelings because they're just too different. Though the real answer is "It depends on the writer" and whether TPTB would allow it. I suspect it wouldn't be allowed, because if a Changeling was Borg-ified, they could potentially spread that throughout the Great Link, which would give the Borg control of most of the Gamma Quadrant at a stroke (depending at what point it was in the timeline, obviously).

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4 hours ago, John Potts said:

I'd vote "No" on their ability to assimilate Changelings because they're just too different. Though the real answer is "It depends on the writer" and whether TPTB would allow it. I suspect it wouldn't be allowed, because if a Changeling was Borg-ified, they could potentially spread that throughout the Great Link, which would give the Borg control of most of the Gamma Quadrant at a stroke (depending at what point it was in the timeline, obviously).

True, however, if a set group like Section 31 could figure out a way to create a virus that slowly killed off the Changlings before the cure was found. How hard would it be for the Borg to assimilate or learn of a new science that could alter cellular structure like Changlings at some point?

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Set Course For Home: In Defense Of STAR TREK: VOYAGER

Excerpt:
 

Quote

 

One of the most common complaints leveled against Voyager is that it never followed through on its central ideas - those of a lone Federation ship journeying across unfamiliar space with no help in sight, and of a Federation crew merging uncomfortably with Maquis rebels. As far as the rebels go, that’s a fair point: the two crews get along surprisingly smoothly for two populations bordering on civil war, although friction between them drives more episodes than viewers probably remember. The complaint about Voyager’s journey being too easy, though, derives most of its fuel from continuity nitpicking. Voyager crashes more shuttlecraft (including a ton of Delta Flyers) and fires more torpedoes than it’s technically got to lose, sure - but such complaints misinterpret what Voyager was really about.

Upon a revisit, it's clear Voyager was never meant to be the gritty survival show fans thought they wanted (largely retrospectively, it’s worth noting, thanks to the rebooted “anti-Trek” Battlestar Galactica premiering shortly after Voyager’s conclusion). Viewed with fresh eyes and an open mind, Voyager was always about making the best of a bad situation: a crew made up of sworn political enemies, coming together to seek out their shared home - and taking the opportunity to do some honest-to-Science space exploration along the way. In other words, it’s BSG’s search for Earth, but fueled by Star Trek’s sense of discovery and optimism. In a sense, it’s almost a direct refutation of the political greyness of Deep Space Nine, refocusing attention at how tiny and precious is our pale blue dot - and how petty are our disagreements over it.

 

Edited by VCRTracking
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On 6/17/2017 at 10:33 PM, MaKaM said:

Waking Moments: Aliens put everyone in a dream sleep to kill them (?). Motivation was unclear. Waking people were mean to them when they inserted themselves into nightmares? I don't know. It was weird. Chakotay got to carry on being a bit more mystical from the last one and it worked okay. The fact that everyone ended up afraid to go to sleep seemed very realistic.

I just saw this episode and was coming here to ask if anyone knows what the aliens were trying to do.  I actually like this episode a lot but the basic premise just doesn't make sense.  Or does it and I just missed the point somewhere?

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On 6/1/2018 at 4:03 PM, CherryAmes said:

I just saw this episode and was coming here to ask if anyone knows what the aliens were trying to do.  I actually like this episode a lot but the basic premise just doesn't make sense.  Or does it and I just missed the point somewhere?

This is one of those episodes (and all the Star Trek incarnations have them) where I like the story but the premise is weak!  

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I am such a cry baby. Tonight on H&I, Voyager arrived home. Tom & B'Lana's baby was born and like every time, I was sobbing. Tomorrow, the voyage begins anew. 

It didn't help that Deep Space Nine ran my favorite episode tonight, the one with Nog recuperating from his amputation by living with Vic in the holosuite. And then Enterprise just started the series over again last night think I'll go wash my hair so I can prepare for NYPD Blue, with my luck it'll be the episode where John Clark Sr commits suicide.

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They've circled around to the first season of Voyager and I'm surprised at how many of the episodes they've aired so far that I really like, and remember liking back in the day!  IF you had asked me I'd have said I didn't particularly like the first couple of years all that much - and it's true that I think it got stronger and better as the series progressed - but wow some of these early episodes were very, very good!  

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Tonight, the episode where Voyager time travels back to 1996. Tom & Tuvok  driving to the Observatory, I looked at the tv screen and immediately said, "M*A*S*H*." I am the least observant person about tv, I don't really watch, only listen, but I know that mountain/hill. I've seen the M*A*SH* opening thousands of times.

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Tonight on H&I the last episode aired. I had trouble concentrating in the first half because of some family drama, but it got resolved and I could watch. I have been wondering if Tom & B'Lanna's baby was born in the Delta or Alpha quadrant, but I think she was born in the wormhole. Did they ever announce the baby's name? And I was in tears at the end, but it might have been because my nephew let me know he was safe. He had been out of communication for 48 hours, we were on the verge of reporting him as a missing person. He is recovering from a broken femur, has no service on his phone, which is fine when he can access wifi, but he couldn't. He will get a couple of earfuls when he gets home.

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35 minutes ago, friendperidot said:

I have been wondering if Tom & B'Lanna's baby was born in the Delta or Alpha quadrant, but I think she was born in the wormhole. Did they ever announce the baby's name?

She was indeed born in the conduit.  And while they never officially announced the name, she was apparently named after B'Elanna's mother, Miral.  The name was noted in the script, and B'Elanna mentioned she and Tom were considering that name when she spoke to her father in "Author, Author".

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watching the episode where Tom and Neelix are fighting over Kes, then sent on an away mission to work out their differences. They find a reptilian egg in a cave and when it hatches, all I can think is "not the mama, not the mama!"

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