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I imagine the neighbors are "thrilled" to have this thing blocking every bit of sunlight they used to have from the formerly empty "back yard."

Well, they don't have to worry about offending the neighbors in the back. 

good_bones.jpg.0c5b059df5d879142714574d6eec5774.jpg

I couldn't see spending $312 with a junky industrial area, parking lot, and apartment building so close by.  And no back yard.

The back part of the house reminded me of pictures of seen of the old Pullman Sleeper Car (trains).

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I was reading these comments while on my desktop computer and it occurred to me that I hadn't seen this episode. Thus, I captured two of the things most talked about it while I watched the show.

I wonder how many people looking for a home that size would care anything about the structure's biker origins? A Harley Davidson medallion embedded in a closet wall would be more than enough for me. I also don't get the time and effort spent on non real property craft projects. Or the special shopping trips for things like the fugly bar and stools. 

 

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2 hours ago, mojito said:

 I also don't get the time and effort spent on non real property craft projects. Or the special shopping trips for things like the fugly bar and stools. 

I think it is supposed to add "personality" to the show.  And I suspect the shopping trips result in comped items, because the shop owner is featured on a tv show.

 All of  the HGTV shows have similar gimmicks.  On Home Town, you have Ben's road trips with his "wacky friends" Josh and Jim.  On Fixer Upper  there were Chip's "crazy antics".  I suspect  HGTV has put some thought into this strategy, they probably have had focus groups and have found that people respond to this kind of thing; it makes them feel like they are visiting with friends every week.  

Obviously, not everyone feels that way- just read the posts here.  But I suspect more people enjoy it than not.

YMMV, but that's my take.

 

Edited by 3 is enough
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4 hours ago, mojito said:

Well, they don't have to worry about offending the neighbors in the back. 

good_bones.jpg.0c5b059df5d879142714574d6eec5774.jpg

I couldn't see spending $312 with a junky industrial area, parking lot, and apartment building so close by.  And no back yard.

The back part of the house reminded me of pictures of seen of the old Pullman Sleeper Car (trains).

good_bones_2.jpg.dc5a00b85776c04d4904e63062832489.jpg

I was reading these comments while on my desktop computer and it occurred to me that I hadn't seen this episode. Thus, I captured two of the things most talked about it while I watched the show.

I wonder how many people looking for a home that size would care anything about the structure's biker origins? A Harley Davidson medallion embedded in a closet wall would be more than enough for me. I also don't get the time and effort spent on non real property craft projects. Or the special shopping trips for things like the fugly bar and stools. 

 

That addition is so horrific. I think this is an instance where they should have spent the money to hire an architect to design the addition.

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If I could even afford this house, I wouldn't touch it.    Next to two huge houses on either side, two doors down a bunch of apartments, and I'm guessing at least half of the parking lot traffic goes right through the alley behind the house.   I wouldn't like to back out of the garage.  

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On 7/25/2020 at 2:29 PM, absolutelyido said:

That addition is so horrific. I think this is an instance where they should have spent the money to hire an architect to design the addition.

Seriously. Was there no better way to tie the two structures together than that tiny hallway? Why even bother saving the front part if there is no way to nicely integrate the addition?

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Tonight's episode is an illustration of every bad practice in safety, and remodeling in renovation.    They have a bunch of people on top of the house, while cutting the roof, no safety equipment, then the house collapses in the middle of the night.   Fortunately it missed the neighboring houses.     That scaffolding is swaying while they do the needless decorative beams, so it's obviously not put together correctly.    If they want to save money, then don't do decorative beams, don't do some floating tree bed, and get other finishes that are still durable, and beautiful, but don't waste money.      Use nice marble look porcelain tiles in the baths, and showers or tub surrounds, do 42" stock cabinets in the kitchen uppers, and don't do overpriced options.   

Edited by CrazyInAlabama
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1 hour ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

Tonight's episode is an illustration of every bad practice in safety, and remodeling in renovation.    They have a bunch of people on top of the house, while cutting the roof, no safety equipment, then the house collapses in the middle of the night.   Fortunately it missed the neighboring houses.     

I logged on to post this same thought. They were intentionally trying to get the roof to collapse and none of them were wearing hard hats except Cody briefly when he was standing in the yard watching hatless Tad inside the house knocking down posts that supported the roof. Honestly, I would think that has to be some kind of OSHA violation.

I wasn't clear on how much time had passed between them knocking down the roof and the whole house collapsing, but even if it was only overnight it was incredibly dangerous to leave the house like that with no fencing around it. They are lucky some curious kids didn't decide to explore the site and get hurt.

As for the final house, I actually liked it more than I usually do. The Scandinavian-inspired design was more cohesive and less busy than they normally do. I liked the swing bed but think it would be more practical on a large porch than a bedroom. No one wants to sleep on a bed that swings every time they move in their sleep.

Edited by absolutelyido
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I was surprised they put those pavers directly on the sod. Why place sod there if you plan on killing it with pavers? I didn’t like the placement of the pavers either. Didn’t make sense to me. I did like the house. The swinging bed could go, but I would keep the “tree.”

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I'm watching the rerun now and cringing. Karen on the scaffolding was giving me palpatations. Mina got discouraging news from the ferility doctor but I thought I had read that she was pregnant. I wonder if IVF worked this time.

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5 minutes ago, ECM1231 said:

I'm watching the rerun now and cringing. Karen on the scaffolding was giving me palpatations. Mina got discouraging news from the ferility doctor but I thought I had read that she was pregnant. I wonder if IVF worked this time.

 

Spoiler

She is pregnant.  She is due in September.  They went to get a second opinion and tried intrauterine insemination as a last resort and it worked.

 

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As for the final house, I actually liked it more than I usually do. The Scandinavian-inspired design was more cohesive and less busy than they normally do. I liked the swing bed but think it would be more practical on a large porch than a bedroom. No one wants to sleep on a bed that swings every time they move in their sleep.

Also, just how long would that drywall last with a child swinging on the bed? 

I liked this house. It was a return to the old Good Bones episodes with a smaller, un-enlarged home and an affordable price tag.  Wonder about the neighborhood, though.  Maybe these two will sweep into the neighborhood and fix up other homes as they did this one.

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1 hour ago, mojito said:

Also, just how long would that drywall last with a child swinging on the bed? 

I liked this house. It was a return to the old Good Bones episodes with a smaller, un-enlarged home and an affordable price tag.  Wonder about the neighborhood, though.  Maybe these two will sweep into the neighborhood and fix up other homes as they did this one.

Sounds like a neighborhood I would like to live in - walking distance to shops and restaurants and less than 30 minutes to downtown.

My problem with the swinging bed is that if someone wanted to remove it they would have to then patch the ceiling to remove the large hooks (or whatever) they used to hang the bed rom (otherwise if I had a small child I would probably think it was pretty cool).  Otherwise I think this was one of my favorite houses they have done recently because it made sense and it wasn't over-designed.  I liked how they used leftover tile for a nice backsplash.

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Aside from the roof shenanigans this was a good episode.  They can do budget finishes if they want to- I noticed that the tub/shower combo was a one piece acrylic unit - no fancy tile.  But it was new and clean and looked nice with the more upscale vanity.  There was a stacked laundry too.  

That was a great house for someone with a smaller budget. It was essentially a new build.

Edited by 3 is enough
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On 7/29/2020 at 2:38 PM, 3 is enough said:

Aside from the roof shenanigans this was a good episode.  They can do budget finishes if they want to- I noticed that the tub/shower combo was a one piece acrylic unit - no fancy tile.  But it was new and clean and looked nice with the more upscale vanity.  There was a stacked laundry too.  

That was a great house for someone with a smaller budget. It was essentially a new build.

Although if they re going to go cheap on something I would prefer it not to be one of the dreaded acrylic one piece bath/shower units - I despise mine and if I stay in this house my bathroom will one day get upgraded to tile.

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1 hour ago, RoxiP said:

Although if they re going to go cheap on something I would prefer it not to be one of the dreaded acrylic one piece bath/shower units - I despise mine and if I stay in this house my bathroom will one day get upgraded to tile.

Can I ask why you dislike it so much?  I have had those units in the past and I really liked them in terms of ease of cleaning and no caulk to replace.  I will admit I was only in the houses for 3-5 years so I can't speak to how they hold up in the long term.

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19 minutes ago, 3 is enough said:

Can I ask why you dislike it so much?  I have had those units in the past and I really liked them in terms of ease of cleaning and no caulk to replace. 

Ditto.  I have had both and vastly prefer a good quality one-piece unit.  SO much easier to clean. no group to scrub.  I have walk in ones with benches in both bathrooms, everyone who visits loves them.  

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wouldn't porcelain pavers be very slippery with a sheen of ice on them? Sidewalks in my cold climate are always rough texture. 

IMHO the swinging bed was ridiculous.

Edited by dleighg
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16 hours ago, 3 is enough said:

Can I ask why you dislike it so much?  I have had those units in the past and I really liked them in terms of ease of cleaning and no caulk to replace.  I will admit I was only in the houses for 3-5 years so I can't speak to how they hold up in the long term.

I just don't care for the look of them (and mine are two piece with a lip that accumulates mold). If mine looked like tile perhaps I would like them better.

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On 7/28/2020 at 9:40 PM, CrazyInAlabama said:

Tonight's episode is an illustration of every bad practice in safety, and remodeling in renovation.    They have a bunch of people on top of the house, while cutting the roof, no safety equipment, then the house collapses in the middle of the night.   Fortunately it missed the neighboring houses.     That scaffolding is swaying while they do the needless decorative beams, so it's obviously not put together correctly.    If they want to save money, then don't do decorative beams, don't do some floating tree bed, and get other finishes that are still durable, and beautiful, but don't waste money.      Use nice marble look porcelain tiles in the baths, and showers or tub surrounds, do 42" stock cabinets in the kitchen uppers, and don't do overpriced options.   

Tad was not wearing gloves while ripping off siding and pulling out framing posts. That's just basic safety. EVERYONE else wears gloves.

I've lived in a ton of inexpensive apartments and almost all of them have had "builder-grade" tile in the bathroom. It doesn't have to be marble tile to look decent. People don't expect high-end finishes in a $100,000 house. If they had enough "remnant" tile in their warehouse to do the kitchen, why couldn't they find enough tile to do the bathtub? The tile doesn't have to go to the ceiling, MINA. They could've skipped those "pavers" (used stone/concrete instead) and done tile in the bathtub.

I did like this house overall. It was well managed price-wise for the neighborhood, and not crazily overbuilt. I was bummed that the mother and daughter that toured the house didn't buy it, but that's every episode now.

It was ludicrous that they didn't just bulldoze the house from the beginning and start from the foundation. They had spent only $1000 at that point. They would've saved money on demo labor, at the very least.

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6 minutes ago, bilgistic said:

Tad was not wearing gloves while ripping off siding and pulling out framing posts. That's just basic safety. EVERYONE else wears gloves.

Also no hardhats and eye protection while they're yanking down siding and ceilings. I also wondered what was the point of trying to save ANYTHING. 

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My guess is they do everything to save at least the outside walls, because if they tear down and replace everything, then it's considered a new build, and needs an entirely different permitting process.     Different permitting means another long process from the city.   

Lots of the reno shows didn't do proper safety equipment, and I've noticed most of them do now.    The lack of safety glasses, and respirators, and gloves means one of these days something will happen, but by then it will be too late.    

Edited by CrazyInAlabama
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At the very least, protect those eyes. They're not as durable and capable of being healed as your bones. 

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5 hours ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

Lots of the reno shows didn't do proper safety equipment, and I've noticed most of them do now.    The lack of safety glasses, and respirators, and gloves means one of these days something will happen, but by then it will be too late.    

Something already did happen. I watched a repeat recently in which Austin was recklessly demolishing a wall, and ended cutting his arm so badly he had to go to the hospital by ambulance. I guess they didn't learn anything.

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The placement of the pavers looked ridiculous.

The hanging bed was impractical.

One of these days, someone on that demolition crew is going to be seriously injured.  Too much playing to the cameras.

Hated the two vertical pieces of treated lumber holding up the porch roof.
  
The living room floor turned out nicely.

My DVR cut off early.  I heard they didn’t sell the house to the woman and her little girl, but did they sell it at all?  If so, for how much?  

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The house was $105,000 (with the original transfer price of $1,000), priced at $115,000 and sold to another buyer for $115,000.  They called it a profit of $10,000, but there are still closing costs if they did it without realtors, so I unless it was all cash, it still was several thousand for closing costs.   Here's the article about the home, and the sale:

https://www.realtor.com/advice/home-improvement/good-bones-mina-and-karen-show-off-their-best-scandinavian-style/

I'm wondering if Mina sold it herself, to avoid a commission to the buyer's agent, and waived her commission (if she's working for an agency, she still has to pay the broker I think).   

Edited by CrazyInAlabama
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My guess is they do everything to save at least the outside walls, because if they tear down and replace everything, then it's considered a new build, and needs an entirely different permitting process.

So true. And in my neighborhood of narrow lots, they often leave the front facade and sometimes the side walls that don't meet modern set-back codes but that can be kept and grandfathered in.

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On 7/18/2020 at 6:51 AM, dleighg said:

Those two big posts under the counter projection in the kitchen were absolutely necessary-- that countertop was rather thin. Some idiot is bound to try to sit on it at some point and WHAM. I still think that's a danger, even with the supports.

I liked the repurposed fireplace surround, but the empty spot underneath still looked "empty." Not sure what a good solution is. 

And I really disliked the "dining room" being right inside the front door.

Agree, the first room I want to want to walk into is a sitting (living) room, not a dining room or kitchen.

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16 hours ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

The house was $105,000 (with the original transfer price of $1,000), priced at $115,000 and sold to another buyer for $115,000.  They called it a profit of $10,000, but there are still closing costs if they did it without realtors, so I unless it was all cash, it still was several thousand for closing costs.   Here's the article about the home, and the sale:

https://www.realtor.com/advice/home-improvement/good-bones-mina-and-karen-show-off-their-best-scandinavian-style/

Buyer pays closing. Seller is responsible for realtor fees. Since Mina is the realtor, she gets her cut back, and can set the buyer agent’s cut. 

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17 hours ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

The house was $105,000 (with the original transfer price of $1,000), priced at $115,000 and sold to another buyer for $115,000.  They called it a profit of $10,000, but there are still closing costs if they did it without realtors, so I unless it was all cash, it still was several thousand for closing costs.   Here's the article about the home, and the sale:

https://www.realtor.com/advice/home-improvement/good-bones-mina-and-karen-show-off-their-best-scandinavian-style/

The outside of their houses are too plain, IMO.  I like the look of shutters added  instead of one plain color.

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On 7/25/2020 at 2:29 PM, absolutelyido said:

That addition is so horrific. I think this is an instance where they should have spent the money to hire an architect to design the addition.

I just saw the episode and horrific doesn't begin to describe that addition.  I can't figure out what they were thinking.  You know sometimes there is a very good reason while builders never did that before.  Buyers will think it is awful is for starters.

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On 7/31/2020 at 6:59 PM, tinderbox said:

Hated the two vertical pieces of treated lumber holding up the porch roof.

Unless they were going for the raw-wood/country look, chances are the treated lumber was just too fresh to paint. Now, I had my pressure treated porch posts vinyl wrapped but that would probably be too nice for the price point. Lots of their porches are the raw pressure treated lumber because building and selling happen so closely together on the show. ETA: now, they did look undersized for the mass of the porch jut out. The mcmansionhell girl would be all mad at those spindly posts with that huge porch roof-thing. Definitely should have found it in the budget to double them up at the very least.

I don't mind walking into a dining space. :shrug: maybe I am weird but I'd rather walk into a dining room if it meant getting a larger living room.

Edited by MaKaM

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I watched the rerun of the Motorcycle Beverage place (if I hear Biker Bar one more time I'll scream), and they said that the 'potential buyers' passed, and it was still on the market.   

 I hated the neighborhood overhead shot, showing the giant apartment house, a couple of doors down.      I noticed about 80% of their 'potential buyers' don't really buy, and I suspect the other 20% actually already are buying it, and have a contract, or else they're going to rent it out, and wait for the comps to improve.      I hated that house, with virtually no lot, and the garage leading out to the alley that was the secondary way out of that huge apartment complex.  

That's what they did with Mina's rental house that Tad had been renting, they redid, and the comps just weren't there.  So they rented it out for a much higher price, and were going to sell in 3 to 5 years. 

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I suspect that as they’ve gotten more popular, they’re using more “stand ins” than actual buyers. It’s pretty easy to figure out the addresses of these houses, so I can see a buyer not wanting everyone to know where they live. They should just go the Flip or Flop route and have an “Open House.”

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1 hour ago, irisheyes said:

I suspect that as they’ve gotten more popular, they’re using more “stand ins” than actual buyers. It’s pretty easy to figure out the addresses of these houses, so I can see a buyer not wanting everyone to know where they live. They should just go the Flip or Flop route and have an “Open House.”

They've had a couple of episodes where they have realtors tour the house and give their opinion on the price which I think would make sense too. However the realtors don't tend to 'ohh-and-aah' over everything like the potential buyers do, which they seem to prefer for the show.

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They just had a behind the scenes on "Big Money in Fountain Square".    They listed it with advice from other realtors for $495,000, and no offers.  Then they kept lowering the price, and finally sold at $346,000.   (That is not a typo).     If I had the money, I wouldn't have touched it.  The house was a big two story, between two others.  However, this house wasn't in line with the ones on either side, but set back.    

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I think for all seasons nearly everyone they have "revealed" the house to has not been a buyer. At first, my assumption was that they wanted the reveals to be different from the Chip-and-Johanna ones that were for a specific couple or the Flip-or-Flop ones that were open houses where everyone gushed over the gray and white. Maybe the producers required a different ending so it wasn't too much like all the other shows on the network. Eventually I bet they ran out of family and friends and are now doing friends of friends who pretend they are maybe interested in buying a house and can do the gush.

 

I'll give Good Bones some props: I always remember to watch it on Tuesdays (I did not set my DVR as the commercials urge me to) while I've forgotten 2 weeks in a row (at least) to watch Renovation Island.

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1 hour ago, CrazyInAlabama said:

They just had a behind the scenes on "Big Money in Fountain Square".    They listed it with advice from other realtors for $495,000, and no offers.  Then they kept lowering the price, and finally sold at $346,000.   (That is not a typo).     If I had the money, I wouldn't have touched it.  The house was a big two story, between two others.  However, this house wasn't in line with the ones on either side, but set back.    

I just caught the end of this, but it seemed to be an example of Mina going overboard in what seems to be her belief that more bedrooms equals a higher sales price. They made it 5 bedrooms, which left too little public space. Small open living room and kitchen. No dining room, no kitchen island. They staged it with a kitchen table, but you'd have to turn sideways to get between the chairs and the sink. Not at all practical for a family. They should have left the house 4 bedroom with the whole main floor public space. 

Loved, loved, loved MJ's house on tonight's episode. The fireplace in the kitchen was gorgeous and seemed to have a good sight line to the living room. Beautiful sun room. I know that MJ helps out with design for Two Chicks, but, based on that house, I think he should make all design decisions going forward.

Jack continues to be beyond adorable, especially hugging the kitty. 

 

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I bet they've run out of "potential buyers", and we've seen every friend of the family, everyone who works for Mina and Karen, and anyone that is willing to make approving sounds, and follow the script.    My suspicion is the actual buyers were already contracted for the house, or they knew they were selling to a specific relative or friend, and the design was geared towards them.      Sometimes it's amusing to see someone who obviously won't be buying trying to fake that they want the house.    

I didn't realize until I started watching the DVR of last night's episode, that MJ and his husband are the two that passed on the $500k house because they needed to pay for their wedding in Italy.   I'm glad they bought in a nicer neighborhood, and at a lower price point, the "transitioning neighborhood" on the houses Mina and Karen rehab scare me in a lot of cases.  

Jack and MJ's cat Moose (?) was so adorable.   I think the cat enjoyed it too. 

How disgusting, a squirrel nest behind the fireplace cover.   I hope they blocked where the squirrels were getting in, they can cause so much damage. 

I love MJ's design ideas.   I'm glad Mina could find some used items that made the redo complete.   I like the affordable, and much easier to install electric insert in the sunroom fireplace.  

The flooring in the sunroom is EVP (engineered Vinyl Plank), which is more durable than LVP, and it looked wonderful. 

I don't like that they painted the house exterior brick.    I hated the lime wash.   If you're going to paint something, then make it permanent.   I loved the arched built-ins.  The light floors in the house looked spectacular. 

I love the bedroom end tables, for $40 each at a thrift store.   Just moving the bed location made such a great difference.    I loved the sunroom!    It's wonderful.   

Edited by CrazyInAlabama
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I know that shows have/need to change but most of the changes in Good Bones are not my favorites. There is too much "goofing" off now...things added that are truly not needed(Karen screaming to them to put the wall back...like they could!) I'm not sure what the music is for...actually seems out of place to me. This show used to be a must see, now it is I'll watch when I have time. I miss the original Good Bones. They were mostly the same but well done. Am I the only one?

I really liked the changes they made in MJ's house. The arches, floors and the standing fireplace. Not sure about the white wash but even that looked good last night. I was a bit worried when Austin tried to do the splits but that even turned out OK.

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I know this is a bit off topic, but I recall a sort-of similar show from some years ago-- a female "flipper" who tried to keep lots of original detail, and wasn't out to make tons of money. I enjoyed that show (can't remember the name). 

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Are you thinking of Rehab Addict?

I didn't like the built-ins (which actually are they built-ins because technically they were "brought ins" - not built into the wall)  I thought they were too white but apparently that's the style he wanted them in and it's not my house!  I also did not care for the white-wash on the brick exterior - it looked messy to me.  But again - not my house!

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8 minutes ago, RoxiP said:

Are you thinking of Rehab Addict?

yes, thank you! I didn't realize it was still on.

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I didn't get the consternation about the sunroom flooring when they ended up making the "malm" electric. Why did the floor need to be tile instead of the engineered wood it already was? People have had wood-burning stoves/fireplaces on/next to wood floors forever. It seemed like they were looking for a wood-burning stove/fireplace, so they changed the floor, then decided to change the type of stove after the fact, and just never said anything about the money paid to change the floor. I could be totally wrong here.

I didn't dislike anything they did except for that stove. Well, the bench looked a little chintzy. They could've boxed in the supports and made it storage seating.

As for them "running out of buyers", I don't think that's the case. I think we're just seeing staged "buyers" doing walkthroughs. Mina mentioned in passing a few episodes ago about them having "a dozen" projects going at once. The business is thriving, and they just opened a home-furnishings store a couple months ago, in the middle of the pandemic. I question the responsibility of that, but then, I am questioning a lot of people's responsibility these days.

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I don't think they're running out of actual buyers, just fake buyers that they trot out to show the house at the end of the episode.   I think many times they already have a buyer in place, or the house will be a rental.    The few times we've heard the real sale price, it's not much of a profit.  

The floor issue is that MJ and husband were told that the sunroom wood floor was concrete underneath, but it was engineered wood, with wood subfloor.   To have a real fire burning fireplace, they have to have non-burning material under it. like concrete or tile.      So they found the used fireplace, and put the electric insert in it, so it looked like a fire, but wasn't a fire hazard.       The EVP sound really nice.   I have LVP, glued down, and it can be scratched if you aren't careful.    The original wood floor was a wonky thickness, and so they pulled the sunroom floor up, and used it mixed in with the new wood in the living room, dining room, etc.     Then they put the thicker EVP in the sunroom.   (I hope I put that all right).  

The one part of the house remodel I didn't like was the lime wash on the outside.   I want something that's fairly permanent, and I wouldn't like the lime washing off of the house over the years.   I think the house would have looked nice with new shutter colors, door colors, and the upper siding, and porch being painted, but leave the brick alone. 

Edited by CrazyInAlabama

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