Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
SilverStormm

Restored

Recommended Posts

I've been catching reruns lately, and just really love this show!  I do feel sad sometimes when the homeowners don't want to restore something that is original to the house, though.  I saw an episode where Brett pulled up old tiles and linoleum in the kitchen floor and found the original hardwood which was in great shape, but they homeowners decided to put linoleum over it anyway because of their dogs.  Sigh.  I didn't really understand that since they had hardwood on other floors in the house.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Watched a Restored marathon last night and couldn't help but wonder whether any of those houses were lost in the California wildfires because I think that area was definitely affected.

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, chediavolo said:

I hope their are new houses this season and not just this rehashing. I saw it the first time!

It was fun to revisit those houses, but I'm with you. I want honest-to-goodness new episodes, not rehashed shows being presented as "new" simply because they've been re-edited.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I went on Brett Waterman's Twitter to just see what he was saying and it sounds like they started filming back in November.  I don't know how long it takes to film a season but I would imagine they got quite a few houses done in the four months or so before they had to shut down.

There's also an announcement that they're "casting" for a season set to start filming this summer so it looks like there will be a Season 5.  That makes me happy. I was worried because isn't this the network that Chip and Joanna Gaines is taking over? 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
6 hours ago, chediavolo said:

I hope their are new houses this season and not just this rehashing. I saw it the first time!

 

Especially for me because I basically watch the beginning, ffwd the middle unless my boyfriend is watching, and then watch the reveal!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Well it looks like all repeats damn it but I'm watching most anyway. The last one, with the Victorian cottages...the father and young daughter, I don't know if I caught it first time around. Her minuscule make shift bedroom was behind his master bedroom. She has to walk thru daddy's room every time she wants to go in and out of her room for any reason. How is this reasonable for a grown man and a young daughter? It may work for the next couple of years but after that is feels really ICKY! Should have taken some of that reno money and configured a way to make 2 separATED bedrooms. And speaking of money. If I could get Brett to redo my home the way he does for anywhere from $50 to $100,000, I'd go to the bank Right....this....minute...I am fixing up my fixer upper and there is NO WAY it costs so little to do all that work. I can bull shit on the producers.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, chediavolo said:

Well it looks like all repeats damn it but I'm watching most anyway. The last one, with the Victorian cottages...the father and young daughter, I don't know if I caught it first time around. Her minuscule make shift bedroom was behind his master bedroom. She has to walk thru daddy's room every time she wants to go in and out of her room for any reason. How is this reasonable for a grown man and a young daughter? It may work for the next couple of years but after that is feels really ICKY!

He probably has shared custody of the daughter and she might only be spending a couple nights a week at his house.

Share this post


Link to post
4 minutes ago, CruiseDiva said:

He probably has shared custody of the daughter and she might only be spending a couple nights a week at his house.

I certainly hope so, still going to be awkward to say the least, real fast.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, chediavolo said:

I certainly hope so, still going to be awkward to say the least, real fast.

And be bad for resale. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 8/7/2020 at 8:00 PM, biakbiak said:

And be bad for resale. 

The house works for a single or a  couple or even a couple with an infant. That's the market - essentially a small dollhouse instead of a condo so I don't think it impacts resale. The little space can be an office or a den or whatever.

What doesn't work for me is having access to the bathroom through my bedroom. Maybe some people are less private about any guests traipsing through the bedroom but it would be a no for me.

I would assume the daughter lives with the mother most of the time so I don't think it's an issue even when she gets older. Families share hotel rooms or trailers or live in shared quarters.  Families share hotel rooms or trailers or live in shared quarters. My experience with fathers who have kids for limited time is that the child is more of a special guest than a child you live with who you don't spend every moment interacting with. So not having the separate spaces is less of an issue because the father and daughter will be doing stuff together most of the time he has her and there isn't the same need for private space. He is not going to be having female (or male) overnight visits so the issue of having separate complete private bedrooms isn't an issue - I'm not sure what the issue really is - if she needs to use the bathroom when he is sleeping or in bed, what's the big deal? Most kids interact with their parents while the parents are in bed.

And like any of these renovation shows, the costs bear no relation to reality as anyone who has ever done any sort of remodeling knows. I don't know how they arrive at what amount the homeowner kicks in and how they make that fit in the budget. Brett is the designer and GC so he is not charging anything for these expensive services. The  skilled craftsmen who are featured are charging minimal amounts and any of the places where he finds the tiles or has custom stuff made would be providing stuff cheaply or for free because of promotional value. At least with this show, I do get the sense that the work is being doing well versus other renovation shows I have read about where the work is done as cheaply as possible.

Edited by amarante
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, amarante said:

The house works for a single or a  couple or even a couple with an infant. That's the market - essentially a small dollhouse instead of a condo so I don't think it impacts resale. The little space can be an office or a den or whatever.

It still limits resale because most couples I know, myself and partner included, wouldn’t look at a house that wasn’t a true two bedroom. Hell even as a single person I wouldn’t look at a house that wasn’t a two bedroom. It means fewer people are even going to look at it because it will be eliminated from their searches which limits the pool which impacts its resale value.

Edited by biakbiak

Share this post


Link to post

5 hours ago, biakbiak said:

It still limits resale because most couples I know, myself and partner included, wouldn’t look at a house that wasn’t a true two bedroom. Hell even as a single person I wouldn’t look at a house that wasn’t a two bedroom. It means fewer people are even going to look at it because it will be eliminated from their searches which limits the pool which impacts its resale value.

But the house was always a one bedroom. The new design made the design much more functional in my opinion for the target market. I am not sure how converting that awful space on the front porch into a nook off the bedroom decreased value.

It is not as if Brett took away a bedroom and made a larger one bedroom or stole space so that there would be a master bath or whatever. At a certain point you can't enlarge what is there. How would you suggest a second bedroom be added that wouldn't detract from the aesthetics and functionality of the house. 

Such a small house is obviously not for everyone but it would appeal to single people or even a couple who preferred a single family home to a condo. 

The renovation didn't negatively impact resale value - the actual size of the home meant that it was always going to appeal to a smaller segment of the market. But within that market, a beautifully restored Victorian cottage would be more appealing than the equivalent square footage for a condo.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, amarante said:

The renovation didn't negatively impact resale value

I would absolutely love to find a non-condo one bedroom (or potentially two--if the second is small that most people won't want it).

My only worry would be how much they put into the renovation.  (I don't remember the specifics of the episode).  There is such a thing as over-renovating a house for the market.  The more spent, the longer it likely will be before the house's appraisal matches initial house price plus the renovations.

Edited by Irlandesa

Share this post


Link to post

I just discovered this show, thanks to Primetimer posters. I love it because he's more into restoration than other shows. And he works with some stunning old properties.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

Did not like what he did with the playroom. So many doors that it would be hard to place furniture and a card table that sat four and and only comfy chair isn’t a great set up for four kids! I realize that the furniture probably doesn’t stay but it still didn’t seem that functional of a space. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 9/25/2020 at 6:44 PM, biakbiak said:

Did not like what he did with the playroom. So many doors that it would be hard to place furniture and a card table that sat four and and only comfy chair isn’t a great set up for four kids! I realize that the furniture probably doesn’t stay but it still didn’t seem that functional of a space. 

I agree that the furniture used make the room looked pretty weird (I actually thought at first it had become the dining room) but as a whole I think the house has a much better flow now.
I didn't like the outside paint job, my first reaction when I saw it whole was "haunted house", but it seemed to suit the owners.
I love how excited Brett gets over period tile and fireplace surround. It's really special to have real period pieces in a house, I'm always happy to see these parts being given a new life.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Sarnia said:

I agree that the furniture used make the room looked pretty weird (I actually thought at first it had become the dining room) but as a whole I think the house has a much better flow now.
I didn't like the outside paint job, my first reaction when I saw it whole was "haunted house", but it seemed to suit the owners.
I love how excited Brett gets over period tile and fireplace surround. It's really special to have real period pieces in a house, I'm always happy to see these parts being given a new life.

She claims to be an artist but she can't appreciate " a painted lady" which is what she has! What the hell. House needed more colors. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
On 9/27/2020 at 12:27 PM, chediavolo said:

She claims to be an artist but she can't appreciate " a painted lady" which is what she has! What the hell. House needed more colors. 

To be fair, she didn't like the extreme colors that are sometimes used in the painted ladies which is a fair aesthetic judgment. I agree that they aren't to everyone's taste and a Victorian can look beautiful painted in a more subdued fashion.

But once again I wonder why all remodeling shows show unrealistically low budgets. In this episode, Brett said that moving the A/C to the basement would be $10,000 or $15,000 - perhaps that's fair but it certainly wouldn't include the cost of installing a bathroom which would be an additional $15,000 or so if a real homeowner was having a bathroom installed. Bathrooms are expensive to do even if one has all the plumbing already there.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Where I live, a gut and re-do of a 5 X 7 hallway bath is a minimum of $25K, without luxury finishes. It's insane. Essentially contractors refuse to take the work for less, and it's become a price-fixing scenario. Skilled immigrants from other countries are getting their licenses and breaking in to this bubble. I ended up finding someone from "the country" who was willing to drive 90 minutes each way, and I purchased all of the (inexpensive) materials myself, but it still cost me $20K.

Why do the shows hide the true costs, not to mention the ugly expensive battles with asbestos, lead, cracked sewer lines, etc., that is  part of the restoration of old properties?  Very misleading not to spend two minutes on these issues in at least one episode.

Edited by pasdetrois
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

Renovation costs must vary greatly across the country. Our home was brand new in 1987 when we bought it so it was time for some updates. We live in the deep south and when we did a gut reno of the master bath two years ago and the final cost was about $19K. We saved vanities in the dressing area and the toilet. Everything else was replaced, including drywall. We got rid of a garden tub and in its place is a very large shower with bench. There's a closet where the original smaller shower was with room to hang bathrobes and shelves for linens. I chose all the plumbing fixtures, lights, 1 'x 2' ceramic tile for floor and shower, quartz vanity counter top, two sinks, glass shower doors, etc.

Our hall bath was supposed to get done early this year, but quarantine struck. It will also be taken to the studs--the only way to get rid of wallpaper that is stuck to walls like super glue. We expect it to cost about $15K. I don't pick the trendiest or most expensive products, but try to get good quality and styles we like.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

On 9/30/2020 at 10:07 PM, amarante said:

To be fair, she didn't like the extreme colors that are sometimes used in the painted ladies which is a fair aesthetic judgment. I agree that they aren't to everyone's taste and a Victorian can look beautiful painted in a more subdued fashion.

But once again I wonder why all remodeling shows show unrealistically low budgets. In this episode, Brett said that moving the A/C to the basement would be $10,000 or $15,000 - perhaps that's fair but it certainly wouldn't include the cost of installing a bathroom which would be an additional $15,000 or so if a real homeowner was having a bathroom installed. Bathrooms are expensive to do even if one has all the plumbing already there.

The house needed more color. It didn't have to be as extensive as your classic Victorian but this house was bland looking.

Agree about the costs, I gripe about that all the time. Are they not factoring in labor costs or what because if I could have a completely down to the studs new kitchen, laundry or pantry, and bath, all the paint taken off my original wood features, house painted , outdoor plantings, using vintage ($$$) materials, I would go to the bank for a loan today.. What kind of fools are they taking us for??? We did our renovations ourselves, some with box store materials, some vintage and it nears the cost of these luxurious and fantastic reno's by professional master raisins. I call BS!!!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

The Tudor restoration on last night's episode was beautiful.  Again, though, there is no way an ordinary owner could have done all of that on a $195,000 budget.  No matter, the final result was beautiful.  I do wonder if the furniture is staged from a company, or if it belongs to the owners.  I guess if it is staged, the owner can always opt to buy it.  The ceiling stenciling in the entry hall and inglenook was gorgeous.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I think some of the furniture they have there looked the same as what they had at the end so I think it was theirs.  If it were staged, I actually would have expected more furniture.

I was surprised at the 195,000 budget because much smaller houses usually have a budget on that show about half that size.  So even though that's a huge budget, it's also somewhat small.

But it was a beautiful house. I loved the master.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
27 minutes ago, Irlandesa said:

But it was a beautiful house. I loved the master.

That master bedroom turned out beautiful and so functional for the way the family lives. Brett really is a genius at picking up the hidden 'secrets' of the original house designs. I really liked the ladies' dressing room, but I was a little disappointed with the master bath.

The front lawn turned out gorgeous and the subtle paint scheme on the house made it look fresh and inviting. Such a great idea to put in plantings to "hide" the roof of the house across the way without losing that wonderful mountain view.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 10/2/2020 at 7:01 AM, pasdetrois said:

Where I live, a gut and re-do of a 5 X 7 hallway bath is a minimum of $25K, without luxury finishes. It's insane. Essentially contractors refuse to take the work for less, and it's become a price-fixing scenario. Skilled immigrants from other countries are getting their licenses and breaking in to this bubble. I ended up finding someone from "the country" who was willing to drive 90 minutes each way, and I purchased all of the (inexpensive) materials myself, but it still cost me $20K.

Why do the shows hide the true costs, not to mention the ugly expensive battles with asbestos, lead, cracked sewer lines, etc., that is  part of the restoration of old properties?  Very misleading not to spend two minutes on these issues in at least one episode.

I think some of the under-statement of costs is because shows are essentially just ways to get people to watch advertising. And advertisers want people to under-estimate the true costs of what home renovation is.

It seems to be completely universal in terms of home renovation shows. I have read that some shows really do a crap job but I think that Brett does do high quality work. 

My estimate of $15,000 AT LEAST for the new bath was that it was very small and didn't use particularly high end stuff. As I recall it used one of those pre-fab corner showers. But Brett presented it as though moving the A/C AND building a new bath would be $15,000 total versus at least $30,000 for a very basic bathroom.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 10/2/2020 at 9:31 AM, CruiseDiva said:

Renovation costs must vary greatly across the country. Our home was brand new in 1987 when we bought it so it was time for some updates. We live in the deep south and when we did a gut reno of the master bath two years ago and the final cost was about $19K. We saved vanities in the dressing area and the toilet. Everything else was replaced, including drywall. We got rid of a garden tub and in its place is a very large shower with bench. There's a closet where the original smaller shower was with room to hang bathrobes and shelves for linens. I chose all the plumbing fixtures, lights, 1 'x 2' ceramic tile for floor and shower, quartz vanity counter top, two sinks, glass shower doors, etc.

Our hall bath was supposed to get done early this year, but quarantine struck. It will also be taken to the studs--the only way to get rid of wallpaper that is stuck to walls like super glue. We expect it to cost about $15K. I don't pick the trendiest or most expensive products, but try to get good quality and styles we like.

Costs vary in different regions. The South seems to have the lowest costs - at least based on what I read when spending a lot of time on houszz.com when I was doing a gut remodel including a master and guest bath. 

Labor drives costs significantly as well as jurisdictions having more stringent permits. My bathrooms had to be inspected three times including the 24 hour flood test for the shower.

Bathrooms are probably the most expensive room on a square foot basis in a home. Building a tile shower is incredibly expensive because it requires skilled labor to make it waterproof and a skilled tile layer so it doesn't look like a POS. So many threads on houzz.com of people who got disastrous tile jobs which then had to be redone completely. Also licensed plumbers and electricians are not cheap and bathrooms obviously need that form of skilled labor. When I remodeled, the actual labor costs were high and although I did choose higher end fixtures, that wasn't as much of a significant factor as the actual labor costs for skilled labor. Of course, there are certain choices that are cheaper because they require less labor and not such skilled labor such as installing a prefab acrylic tub shower type of thing. When I watch House Hunters (another guilty pleasure) one can judge the cut corners of many of the new or remodeled homes by whether the tubs and showers are the most inexpensive type of acrylic rather than being tiled.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

It's more realistic, I suppose, but I'm always surprised at how long these renos take -- several months in many cases. I mean, I assume Brett has reliable contractors and subs he regularly works with, not like me scrambling through review sites and getting estimates, then workers not showing up, making mistakes, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
34 minutes ago, 2727 said:

It's more realistic, I suppose, but I'm always surprised at how long these renos take -- several months in many cases. I mean, I assume Brett has reliable contractors and subs he regularly works with, not like me scrambling through review sites and getting estimates, then workers not showing up, making mistakes, etc.

This is the thing, compared to other quick turn reno shows, that makes me think he must be doing really good work.  Or at least "real" work.

Share this post


Link to post

Actually Brett's time frame for the scope of renovations is quite short and realistic only because he has a crew that he works with all the time and every single element of the remodel has been planned in advance and all materials have been sourced so that they are ready to be installed.

If anything the process is understated and the time frame and doesn't take into account having plans drawn up and submitted to the jurisdiction for permits and approvals. 

Most home renovation shows - even using their own crews - completely understate how long a project might take. There are aspects of construction that just require time - installation like waterproofing behind tile work has to cure. Even the best run construction crew has to work in stages in terms of remodeling a bathroom or kitchen.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, amarante said:

Actually Brett's time frame for the scope of renovations is quite short and realistic only because he has a crew that he works with all the time and every single element of the remodel has been planned in advance and all materials have been sourced so that they are ready to be installed.

If anything the process is understated and the time frame and doesn't take into account having plans drawn up and submitted to the jurisdiction for permits and approvals. 

Most home renovation shows - even using their own crews - completely understate how long a project might take. There are aspects of construction that just require time - installation like waterproofing behind tile work has to cure. Even the best run construction crew has to work in stages in terms of remodeling a bathroom or kitchen.

 

^^ Well said. I was watching a repeat of an episode of Bargain Mansions from a few years ago. It was unintentionally funny to me. Tamara buys these old and often run-down big houses and does a major renovation job on them. In many cases she does a major gut job - changing location of rooms around, etc. I enjoy the show overall and unlike that witch from Chicago whose show I refuse to watch, I believe Tamara gets permits and I respect the work she does. I remember one project where the City required them to do a major sewer line re-route or install, I forget which, to bring an old house up to code. 

Anyway, in the episode the other day, there were at least two scenes of faux drama that cracked me up. First, Tamara and her dad, supposedly after the project was well underway, were standing in an upstairs room talking about her plans. Her dad looks around and says, Tamara, I don't see any HVAC vents in these upstairs rooms. And she replies as if this is a new discovery, oh my gosh I'll have to get my HVAC guy onto this. 

And I'm thinking: Oh, sure, honey, like you hadn't factored in the obvious need to install a new HVAC system in that almost 100 year old house when you first crunched the numbers for the project. **eyerolls**

And then later in the episode they doubled down! They were in one of the upstairs rooms where the drywall had been installed when her dad pointed out that the HVAC vents had been covered over by drywall. Gasp! And scenes of the HVAC guys cutting holes in the ceilings to expose vents. **more eyerolls**

I don't recall seeing any such obvious shenanigans on Brett's shows, thank goodness. I get tired of his cowboy hat sometimes but I do respect his work.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Last night I watched an episode where they showed a little of the unglamorous side of restoring old houses. It was the episode with the fireman's Arts and Crafts bungalow. They showed a cracked drain line that would require tearing up the kitchen floor. They also showed old electric lines and Brett exclaimed "another electric fire," which indicated they were encountering dangerous wires. They also showed layers of old linoleum, including a pattern that I've seen before, and I noticed Brett and others were not wearing any protective gear as they tore up that floor. Perhaps the materials had been tested already for asbestos.

I am captivated by the salvage and restoration stores that Brett visits. There is a wealth of stunning period-appropriate materials he can choose. We have a couple of huge salvage places in the DC area, but the stuff isn't as attractive or period-appropriate. I hope they survive the pandemic.

The labor-intensive paint scraping is one reason why I question the costs quoted on the show. There is a lot of old Douglas fir trim in my house, painted white many years ago, and the work involved in removing the paint is mind-boggling. There is no easy or fast way to do it, even using chemicals.

The costs cited for the fireman's restoration seemed very unrealistic; maybe I misunderstood what they said.

Agree about Brett's hat. Guess it's part of his brand.

Edited by pasdetrois
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I had a hard time caring about those poor Pasadena Tudor folks with their 7K square feet not having the best flow? That house was amazing!

Okay, I will give them the weird entrance into the kitchen.

Brett is seemingly falling into a rut giving every house a flush fridge with big hinges and tiled walls. It's nice for sure.

  • Like 1
  • Laugh 3

Share this post


Link to post

Megan, I'm just glad not to see barn doors, gray walls, and giant clocks in his finished houses - lol.  Yes, that was a very weird entrance into the kitchen.  Notice that the family didn't ask for "open concept" either. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

The Tudor restoration was  beautiful, although I feel that the living room was a little bit "cold" (maybe because of the antique furniture, I love period pieces but I couldn't see myself living in a house entirely furnished with them). The inglenook was really cozy.

It was indeed a weird entrance to the kitchen but it made some sense when you looked at the floor plan, as both aisles of the house are at a weird angle with the main part. I think Brett did the best of that awkward layout.

Second episode in a row where I love the interior restoration and don't understand the outside paint. Brett said he had chose the color to make the exterior "pop" but I felt it look flat and dull.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, Sarnia said:

The Tudor restoration was  beautiful, although I feel that the living room was a little bit "cold" (maybe because of the antique furniture, I love period pieces but I couldn't see myself living in a house entirely furnished with them). The inglenook was really cozy.

It was indeed a weird entrance to the kitchen but it made some sense when you looked at the floor plan, as both aisles of the house are at a weird angle with the main part. I think Brett did the best of that awkward layout.

Second episode in a row where I love the interior restoration and don't understand the outside paint. Brett said he had chose the color to make the exterior "pop" but I felt it look flat and dull.

It was the owner who wanted the house painted like that. It looked terrible. It was 100% better before. He should shake hands with the artist who muted down the paint job on her Victorian. I have a bit of a hard time watching these shows with their gorgeous houses, high restoration budgets (and still, irl it would cost at least double, don't know why they are trying to shit us) and skilled artisan work. Working class here, do most on our own and just a wee bit jealous!. Anyway, this type of episode where Brett is doing work on an, I assume, multimillionaires mansion, is one I never want to see again. I wish I were 1/4 financially blessed. 

Share this post


Link to post
13 hours ago, Sarnia said:

The Tudor restoration was  beautiful, although I feel that the living room was a little bit "cold" (maybe because of the antique furniture, I love period pieces but I couldn't see myself living in a house entirely furnished with them). The inglenook was really cozy.

That huge room ended up looking cold and formal with that furniture, especially the way it was scattered all around.  I thought I heard the homeowners say they wanted it to be a family room where everyone is comfortable hanging out.  It ended up being the exact opposite.  The coziness of the inglenook (now I finally know what that is!) was an odd contrast to the room it was attached to. 

I don't know what kind of seating arrangements and furniture would make it more cozy while still fitting in with the airy room, but there has to be a style that would work and be more comfortable for a family with kids.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

This is one reno show I wish they wouldn’t stage. I absolutely abhore 99% of the furniture decisions from style to layout/flow that it actually distracts from the beautiful work he does on the actual restoration. 

I realize they didn’t want to go over budget but I would immediately need to do something on the front exterior wall with the huge blank space between those two windows. The children who’s weddings they were paying for should chip in and buy them a tree or something.

Edited by biakbiak

Share this post


Link to post

The transitional Victorian on last night's episode was lovely.  I hope the owners bought the staging furniture in the living room, because it looked beautiful.  Loved the fireplace and freize treatment.  I also liked that the owners were happy with the existing bathroom size, and didn't want double sinks, a soaking tub, and more square footage like so many people on other home improvement shows want.  From the blueprint, that bathroom was also shared with another first floor bedroom, but not a peep from the owners about how that was unacceptable.  Guess I'm a bit tired of those comments from other shows.  The redone kitchen was very pretty.  My only negative comment is about the stacked washer/dryer.  I'm short, and stacking those full size units means that the controls and access to clothes in the dryer is difficult.  Also, the washer sits directly on the floor, and bending over to remove clothes from it isn't great for those of us with back problems - voice of experience here.  I have mine side by side on pedestals.  The owners said they wanted the bathtub removed because they were thinking about issues with getting older, so they might want to consider modifications to the laundry area in the future if possible.  That was the only thing that I found to criticize, and it's a personal preference with me.  I would love to see the yard after a couple of years and the plantings have established themselves.            

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

17 minutes ago, laredhead said:

My only negative comment is about the stacked washer/dryer.

In addition to your reasons for hating them, I find them so difficult to replace.  You need to find the perfect size depending on how big the closet is.  And when I replaced mine last year, I found that the sizes had changed so I had to go smaller than what I used to have because everything else was too big and they didn't have my previous size.

That kitchen was very white.  Pretty but white.  However, their reaction was lovely and I'm glad they chose the wall details they chose as opposed to a more floral design.  I know it's silly to say that the floral feels "dated" given they're restoring a 100 year old house but....it feels dated.

Edited by Irlandesa
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Irlandesa, I agree about the kitchen being very white, but I would think the owners would be consulted about some colors prior to painting, or maybe not?  I think the kitchen wainscotting would have been pretty painted a very, very pale yellow, but I like yellow and many people don't.  Of course, they could add color by painting that, and adding colorful accessories.  Odd that the refrigerator door treatment was not commented on in the reveal, because it's very period appropriate.  And, you are correct about replacing those laundry machines, or working on them.  They are a beast to move out of a tight space if repairs are needed.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
49 minutes ago, laredhead said:

Irlandesa, I agree about the kitchen being very white, but I would think the owners would be consulted about some colors prior to painting, or maybe not? 

Oh I'm sure they were consulted.  I just thought it was very white. I like white but that's a lot of white for a place where stains happen.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I love MCM design so last night's episode featuring a post and beam MCM house was right up my alley.  Restoring the wood paneling, and making the concrete hearth into a seating area again were two great changes.  I am also a fan of the yellow sofas.  The kitchen reconfiguration was an improvement, but I wondered where backpacks and other things that used to be "dumped" in the utility room by the users when they entered the house would go now.  The old utility room housed an extra refrigerator, as well as a side by side washer and dryer among other things.  I guess the owners decided they could eliminate the extra refrigerator, or else it was moved to the garage (if there was one), or to another location in the house.  The only thing I did not like about the redo was the installation of a stacked washer and dryer in a closet just around the corner from the kitchen.  There was no room in that closet for detergent, or anything other than the laundry appliances squeezed into that closet.  Also, that movable wood wall has to be closed for several feet to access the laundry closet if my observation of how it works is correct.  When Brett moved it to open the kitchen, the wall slid closed over the laundry closet.  There is no way I would want to have to move that every time I accessed the washer/dryer and I live alone.  I can only imagine how many loads of laundry they will do for a family of 4.  Did anyone else think this is the way that wall worked?  

The new landscaping was very appropriate for the style and era of the house, and that was a killer view.  What lucky homeowners to be able to afford to live in such a wonderful house. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

There have been some great houses this season.   I love MCM, although I don't know if I'd love living on concrete, and I thought the restoration was beautiful. I also appreciated learning about the different kind of MCM home. I hadn't realized there was a difference before.

I knew the yellow couches would probably work once they completed the decoration with pictures and pillows/throws.

2 hours ago, laredhead said:

I wondered where backpacks and other things that used to be "dumped" in the utility room by the users when they entered the house would go now. 

The backpacks will probably get thrown in the same place except now on top of the cushions.  Such is life.

I also didn't like where they put the laundry.  That house looked so big--that's the only place they could put it?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I thought the laundry area was a huge design fail.  I would think they would want those panels open most of the time and then the washer and dryer aren't accessible.  Even the carport would have been a better choice for them.  Other than that I had no complaints--and I liked the yellow couches.  I'm not too worried about the lost second refrigerator--the new fridge looked huge.  It was a stunning house!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Just seen the "Storybook cottage" episode (I had no idea about storybook cottages!). For once I didn't like the house, before or after, it looked so Disney but I guess that's what appealed to the owner so she definitely got what she wanted.
Were the panels on the living-room ceiling only paint? If so, that's a breathtaking job.

I also didn't understand the massive curved curtain rod in the living room. How do you get the curtains over the middle window, as there seem to be rod holders on either side of that window that would surely prevent the curtains from sliding? But if that works, this did look a hundred times better than the previous grandmother drapes.

Share this post


Link to post

Sarnia, I had the same problem visualizing how the drapes on the curved rod would look when closed.  Seems to me they would be hiked up in the middle and look weird from the inside.  The end result did look much better than the before solution.  I thought the ceiling was paint effect, and yes, the man who painted it is a genius painter.

Overall, I liked the the end result, but again, there is no way those changes would cost only $55,000 for a person not signed up for the show, and getting discounts from vendors.  I reran the kitchen reveal several times, but could not locate a dishwasher.  The vintage range was gorgeous, but I would want a little counter space adjacent to it to put down spoons, a small bowl, etc. while cooking.  I guess she's used to using it that way after 30 years of living with that kitchen.  The other thing I would change is the vintage ironing board.  Really?  You can find a modern one that is sturdier than that wooden vintage one, but it can be concealed in that cabinet.  I was afraid that wooden one was going to fall apart as he was demonstrating it.

   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size