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Warning to those that like to avoid spoilers, that New Yorker article has a huge show one

Spoiler

Luke's a freedom fighter in Canada, the fuck?

, and also plenty from the book.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/yvonne-strahovski-handmaids-tale_us_591b4a1fe4b07d5f6ba6d1b1

Nice interview with "Serena Joy."

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/serena-joy-complex-and-complicit-takes-center-stag-255479

The episode worked for me in spite of the heavy handed clunkers this article points out, definitely worth a read.

Edited by Umbelina

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19 hours ago, ElectricBoogaloo said:

A well written review of S1.E6 by Vulture (this is just a snippet, but the whole thing is worth reading):

Thanks for that. I just read an article (I think in was in the Guardian) about Stockholm syndrome that got me thinking the same dynamic works for any abusive relationship, including here. Which explains some of the Handmaiden's behaviour. (Like the one with a gouged eye.) 

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I don't know if this is where to put this, but one of my favorite nerdy book sites has a new Handmaid's Tale shirt available:

https://www.outofprintclothing.com/collections/the-handmaids-tale/products/nolite-te-bastardes-carborundorum-womens-book-t-shirt

(If you're not familiar with Out of Print, part of each purchase goes to fund literacy programs and book donations, and their shirts are very well-made--I own several.)

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http://www.vulture.com/2017/05/the-handmaids-tale-recap-season-1-episode-7.html

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Luke’s flashbacks aren’t quite as effective as the ones for June and Serena Joy, if only because they lack the stark contrast between the women’s vibrant lives before the rise of Gilead, and the rigid, dehumanized existence they find on the other side. His story sit at the fulcrum, fumbling around the messy, terrifying limbo of a world in the midst of turning into something terrible, a monster that has not fully completed its transformation.

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He makes his way to a house in an abandoned town, its windows pierced with bullets and painted with charming Gilead slogans like “FAGS DIE.” It’s interesting how the ultimate truth of the creator of the universe so often gets conflated with the precise ways that a small group of people want to be terrible to others. The version of Christianity that the new regime has embraced is as self-serving as it is violent, a cherry-picked interpretation that allows them to roll back the advances in social equality that threaten their supremacy and place themselves back atop the throne as unquestioned kings.

It is a vision of America ruled by terrorists and religious extremists — not the foreign ones that serve as convenient bogeymen for bigots grasping at power, but rather the angry, militant white men who pose an even greater threat. The “traditional values” and “faith” at the heart of Gilead do not strengthen but shatter individuals, families, and communities. Its leaders have no interest in either representing or serving the people of America, but rather crushing them into rubble in order to rebuild a country where a very thin slice of privileged people — them — get to sit at the top.

 

http://deadline.com/2017/05/the-handmaids-tale-elisabeth-moss-interview-emmys-contender-video-1202100007/

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‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Creative Team Talks Going Beyond The Book

 

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https://www.wmagazine.com/story/the-handmaids-tale-hulu-season-1-episode-7-recap

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This episode, which tells the story of how he got there, is fast-paced and action-packed, which means it more or less feels like an entirely different television show than the one we’re used to. Not in a bad way! It’s kind of a nice break from the bleak stillness of Offred’s world. And the contrast in tone and pacing is apparent from the first moment of the episode. This, after all, is Luke’s story: One of hardship and narrow misses, sure, but ultimately one of escape.

http://www.refinery29.com/2017/05/154882/the-handmaids-tale-recap-season-1-episode-7

This review is making me realize we saw quite a bit in this episode, as Gilead formed and took over.

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After some more walking, Luke wanders into a seemingly abandoned town. This isn't the first time we've seen the immediate aftermath of the Gilead takeover, but it's definitely the creepiest. "Gender traitor," is scrawled on a wall in red graffiti, which brings to mind old pictures of Nazi Germany with "Jude" painted in yellow on Jewish-owned shop windows. Shit has gone down here.

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The eclectic group — which includes "an Army brat, two strays, a gay, and a nun" — is heading to Canada, something Luke is not pleased to hear. He wants to go back and find June. Real talk, Luke: Your guts are literally spilling out of your belly, your glasses are broken, and there are patrols everywhere. Stay in the damn bus.

One of the women is clearly still traumatized from her experience — she hasn't said a word since they picked her up. Later, we learn that she was found in what sounds like a version of the Red Center, which suggests she was a handmaid in training. Rumors are starting to circulate about fertile women getting rounded up, but nobody quite knows why yet.

 

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Luke and June are driving through Boston, with Hannah sedated in the backseat. Under the guise of a casual breakfast outing, they are attempting to escape. This is early days, yet. The streets are lined with Guardians holding machine guns, but people still seem to be doing their thing, walking around in civilian clothing. There are no pairs of Handmaids, no tell-tale white wings in sight.

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In a typical man move, Luke pigheadedly refuses to give up his photo album, but forgets the extra Benadryl in case Hannah wakes up.

Edited by Umbelina
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That's an interesting article.  But tying it back to the novel and the show, I always assumed that one of the problems was that what we knew-- or thought we knew-- about fertility hadn't been successful in solving the problem.  Hence the rise of this kind religious zealoutry around fertility...everything else had failed.  Hence their argument that it was a punishment from god, hence their belief that Gilead was the answer, and by forcing a group of women into reproductive slavery it would eventually lead to a time where the turmoil and stresses that might contribute to fertility issues are taken away for them, leaving their bodies to heal and do what they are supposed to do.  Hence Aunt Lydia's "it will become normal" talk, which I believe is abbreviated from the book where she actually says "it will be harder for you, the next generations will be easier because this will be their world," an extension of her "Freedom to and freedom from" philosophy.   

Am I supposed to respond to articles and the show here?  Or does that type of discussion happen elsewhere?  

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http://www.vulture.com/2017/05/handmaids-tale-music-song-choices.html

How they pick the songs for the show.

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To counter the silence and reveal what life was like before Offred lived in a totalitarian society, music supervisor Michael Perlmutter (Queer As Folk), showrunner Bruce Miller, director Reed Morano, Moss, and other Handmaid’s Tale producers and editors collaborated to punctuate Adam Taylor’s otherwise chilling score with familiar songs that pop viewers out of the darkness. From Simple Minds’ “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” and Peaches’ “Fuck the Pain Away” in earlier installments to James Taylor’s “Sweet Baby James” in this week’s episode, the songs are meant to shake viewers out of Offred’s reality and into her past. “When you’re in Gilead, you totally forget there was a past, so we slam into the flashbacks with music that’s loud so it jars you out of Gilead to this feeling of, ‘Holy shit, there was another life before this,’” Perlmutter said.

http://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/tv/a9914528/handmaids-tale-book-show-differences/

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10 Major Differences Between The Handmaid’s Tale Book vs. Show So Far

I completely agree with the following review.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/24/arts/television/the-handmaids-tale-the-other-side-recap.html?_r=0


 

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“The Handmaid’s Tale” is very good at imbuing simple and quiet moments — a trip to the gynecologist, Serena Joy pruning her rose garden, a game of Scrabble — with high suspense. Scenes often include emotional turns and narrative twists that resonate long after the characters stop speaking. Its suspense often leaves me in a state of anxiety. This series may have its blindspots (which I’ve written about several times before), but I have always been riveted by its story and curious about its characters. Until now.

This episode stands apart from the rest of the season because of how half-formed the plot feels. It continues the trend of using the perspectives of other characters to further flesh out Gilead’s society — here using Luke as a way of illuminating the outskirts of America beyond’s Gilead’s strongholds. Unfortunately, Luke is nowhere near strong enough a character to anchor an entire episode on his own.

 

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This all could have worked better if Luke had proved to be an engaging character. After all, even if the events are unexceptional in portraying a different side of Gilead, they should at least deepen Luke’s character. Instead I know just as much about him at the end of the episode as I did at the beginning: He’s generally affable, he loves his family, and he wants to be reunited with them. But O.T. Fagbenle (who plays Luke) has neither the nuance nor the charisma necessary to elevate this paper-thin characterization, and the people Luke comes into contact with also feel like shallow archetypes. There are occasional details that draw interest — Offred’s mother was a doctor and Offred insisted they should have tried to leave when Moira did — but the episode is most fascinating for what it says about Offred and Luke’s remarkable marriage.

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But Offred and Luke’s marriage seems like a fairy tale in a series that is typically more honest about the ways people relate to each other.

When Luke remembers the days leading up to his family’s being split apart, he sees Offred and Hannah bathed in pale sunlight making chocolate-chip pancakes. But this feels empty. I still don’t understand why Luke and Offred are drawn to each other or even what they have in common. When three years go by and Luke finds himself in Canada with news about Offred being alive, it should be a moment that swells with longing. Tears form in his eyes when he sees the note she passed along through Mr. Flores. But I was left cold. The decision to expand its narrative beyond Atwood’s text is vital. But with Luke I couldn’t help but wonder, what was the point of spending an hour with a character that remains nothing more than a cipher?

Edited by Umbelina

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http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2017/05/handmaids-tale-episode-8-jezebels-max-minghella
 

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Handmaid’s Tale: The One Moment That Reveals Nick’s True Nature

Actor Max Minghella pinpoints one line in Nick’s heated exchange with Offred that represents a totally “masculine mistake.”

 

http://www.salon.com/2017/05/29/watch-these-conservatives-do-mental-gymnastics-to-convince-themselves-the-handmaids-tale-is-not-about-them/

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So as the show becomes impossible to ignore,  a number of polemics by right-wing pundits have reverberated around the web, some decrying the show, others attempting to argue that it’s actually serving up a pro-conservative message — a jejune rhetorical treatment that the far right previously performed on noted socialist George Orwell in attempting to count him as one of them.

I have been following the right’s mental gymnastics regarding “The Handmaid’s Tale” with glee. What follows is my attempt to catalog the best of the worst takes on the show. Their tortured rhetorical logic is humorous, but it’s also a good case study in the way that the conservative mind works.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/get-it-together-handmaids-tale-256086

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Let’s begin there, because to start anywhere else with this scattered and somewhat troubling episode of The Handmaid’s Tale is to do the same disservice to this remarkable moment that the episode itself does. “Jezebels” is a messy hour, journeying between Nick’s backstory and June/Offred’s nightmarish field trip by way of thematic links that, to be generous, require some work on a viewer’s part to make them feel relevant. Add in some ambiguities that may or may not be intentional, tonal inconsistencies that can’t really be ignored, and a performance that’s fine, but just not up to par, and you’ve got what’s easily the weakest outing of a series that’s been good-to-excellent thus far.


 

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There’s one example that sticks out as particularly troubling, and which got worse on a second viewing—the moment where we see Nick pull down the lifeless body of the previous Offred. The problem is not that the scene exists, though the previous Offred’s story and death would almost certainly be more effective when left to the imagination, so that we, like June/Offred, have to imagine the woman who gave June the gift of those words in the closet. Still, the issue isn’t its presence. The issue is that a young woman killed herself and the show makes the moment of her death all about Nick.

In “Jezebels,” the experiences of both Offreds feed into our understanding of Nick. Why not the reverse? It’s possible that this is intended, as some of Luke’s scenes seem to have been, to illustrate another aspect of toxic masculinity, something you don’t need a dystopian landscape to encounter on the daily. She’s raped, and he’s... jealous? Angry? Resentful? It’s not clear, an issue that’s probably of both writing and performance—

 

Edited by Umbelina
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https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/5/31/15714246/handmaids-tale-hulu-episode-8-jezebels-recap

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I had the same confusion. It’s not that everything in the TV show has to be true to the book; we’ve seen many times over these eight episodes how diverging from Atwood’s original text has served Hulu’s adaptation well, especially as it expands the world of Gilead and beyond. But the shift in tone for the brothel itself really is jarring enough to make me look at it more skeptically in terms of what the series is trying to say here. It was obvious from the second the Commander pulled out a beautiful beaded dress for June that this particular part wasn’t going to mimic the book, which instead had June shrug on a hasty smear of lurid red lipstick and fraying Vegas showgirl castoffs.

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/handmaids-tale-cast-boss-eerie-parallels-trumps-america-1006299?facebook_20170524

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'Handmaid's Tale' Cast and Boss on Eerie Parallels to Trump's America

 

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YVONNE STRAHOVSKI [Fiennes and I] are the villains. Suddenly Trump is elected, and all this negative behavior comes to light. I start seeing these parallels between [my character's] actions and what Trump's doing. It's in a weird way an inspiration but also a horrid parallel.

http://www.salon.com/2017/06/05/margaret-atwood-handmaids-tale-abortion-slavery/

Margaret Atwood compares abortion restrictions to “slavery”

The "Handmaid's Tale" author discussed abortion restrictions at a New York City Book Con
 

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Atwood responded to the question by saying: “Sometimes people have to live their dream. So if living their dream means a lot of dead women and orphans, maybe they’re going to have to live that dream and maybe they’re just then going to have to figure out, ‘Who’s going to pay for this?'” she asked. “Who’s going to pay for the orphans and the dead women, because that’s what you’re going to have. And I’m waiting for the first lawsuit. I’m waiting, you know, in which the family of the dead woman sues the . . . state and I’m also waiting for a lawsuit that says if you force me to have children I cannot afford, you should pay for the process.”

She continued to say that should such bills become the law of the land, the state should foot the bill for prenatal care, the hefty delivery expenses and health care for any unwanted child legally forced into birth. “That’s where the concern seems to cut off with these people. Once you take your first breath, [it’s] out the window with you. And, it is really a form of slavery to force women to have children that they cannot afford and then to say that they have to raise them.”

 

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This was probably already mentioned, but I found The Handmaid's Tale as a "free to read" for those with Prime. 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/drama-actress-roundtable-oprah-winfrey-reese-witherspoon-rage-sorrow-grief-sexism-hollywood-1010883

Interesting interview here, not just about women's roles, but also at a couple of points they discuss The Handmaid's Tale.

Drama Actress Roundtable: Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon on "Rage, Sorrow, Grief" and Sexism in Hollywood, with Nicole Kidman, Jessica Lange, Elisabeth Moss and Chrissy Metz —

Note, printed and with video clips of the conversation.

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/handmaids-tale-los-angeles-for-your-consideration-emmys-1012705

Women dressed up as handmaids from The Handmaid's Tale strolled around Los Angeles on Monday and over the weekend as part of a Hulu "For Your Consideration" campaign.

The women were clad in red dresses and white caps inspired by the novel-turned-television-series, and they walked around West Hollywood, explored the lampposts outside of LACMA and waited on benches together in pairs for buses.

(lots of photos, some video)

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Margaret Atwood Annotates Season 1 of ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/14/watching/the-handmaids-tale-tv-finale-margaret-atwood.html

AV Club: 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/handmaids-tale-leaves-us-dark-thoughtful-thrilling-256782
 

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Over the course of its often staggering first season, The Handmaid’s Tale has been many things, but ambiguous hasn’t often been one of them. When they did go to that particular well, it was often emotional in nature, achieved through extended close-ups and killer performances. The show didn’t need to tell us what was going on with June/Offred, or Moira, or Emily/Ofglen, or Serena Joy, because the faces of those performers carried that burden. Elisabeth Moss would smirk, or stare, or shudder, and it was up to us to decide what that meant. Because Moss is very, very good at her job, it probably meant lots of things, all at once, and so the feelings of those watching her work became tied up in the moment, too.

In “Night,” writer and creator Bruce Miller embraces narrative ambiguity as well, and the marriage of the two in the episode’s final seconds makes for an image and a moment as striking as any we’ve yet seen from this series. What happens to June/Offred after she climbs into that van? Are the hands that help her those of friends or enemies, saviors or oppressors? Are they both? From whence, exactly does her serenity spring—from trust, from acceptance, from defiance, from the knowledge that she’s pregnant? We don’t know, and we’re not meant to. What we know is what she tells us, and what she tells us is that she doesn’t know, either. Into the darkness within; or else the light.

 

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Ann Dowd on The Handmaid's Tale: it's a form of activism

After a late-career renaissance with roles in The Handmaid’s Tale and The Leftovers, the actor explains why her work is defiant and how she got inspiration from an unlikely source: American football coach Bill Belichick

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/jun/14/ann-dowd-interview-handmaids-tale-hulu-leftovers
 

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How Dowd pulls it off makes sense only when we speak; her performances are so nuanced and immersive that their conception can seem unintelligible, a scrumptious meal with a secret recipe. But she found inspiration for Lydia and Patti in strange, unexpected places: a Yeats poem, New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, a former Catholic schoolteacher named Mother Claude. An actor of lesser ability might hyperbolize, turn Lydia and Patti into caricatures of cultish evil and ideological zeal, but not Dowd.

“First of all, if you’re playing a character, it’s a relationship,” she tells me of her experience playing Aunt Lydia. “And you better not move in with judgment because you’re not going to get anywhere. You’re going to have a one-sided evil person, and then it becomes a horror movie where you can say, ‘Thank God that’s not real.’”

Dowd, 61, frequently slips into the first person when talking about her characters, which is immensely charming and a bit scary, especially when it seems like Aunt Lydia’s talking directly to me.

 

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VOX: The Handmaid’s Tale season 1, episode 10: “Night” is the best season finale the show could have had

https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/6/14/15782104/handmaids-tale-hulu-season-1-finale-night-recap-review
 

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The Handmaid’s Tale has an awful lot of tricky elements to balance, and the strain of that task showed in the middle of its first season as flashbacks and tangents focusing on people other than the actual Handmaids overshadowed most everything else. But “Night” is a really good season finale, if only because it manages to tie together so many of the season’s most pressing conflicts and themes and the characters they center on: June’s fear versus her determination, Serena Joy’s impotent fury, the Commander’s willful oblivion. The season’s final scene is almost exactly like the book’s, with June being taken away in an Eye van. The biggest difference, though, is a crucial one: A test confirms that June is pregnant.

Between that, Moira’s escape to Canada, Serena trying to keep her Handmaid in line by almost literally dangling June’s daughter in front of her as collateral, and the Handmaids’ refusal to stone Janine to death, there’s a lot to talk about. How did you both like the finale? Was it a satisfying end to the season and/or a decent setup for season two?

 

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Vulture:   The Handmaid’s Tale Season-Finale Recap: I Have No Choice

http://www.vulture.com/2017/06/the-handmaids-tale-season-1-finale-recap.html
 

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When you feel like you’ve lost everything, you want someone to blame for it, and the other woman is always the easiest target to hit — especially if you own her. Although the racial politics of The Handmaid’s Tale (or rather its desire to sidestep racial politics entirely) remain a glaring weak point, there’s an undeniable echo here with the experiences of enslaved women throughout history, trapped between the desires of their masters and the jealousy of their mistresses.

 

In Its First Season, The Handmaid’s Tale Greatest Failing Is How It Handles Racehttp://www.vulture.com/2017/06/the-handmaids-tale-greatest-failing-is-how-it-handles-race.html    https://theundefeated.com/features/hulu-handmaids-tale/ 

“You could have left me with something,” Serena Joy says, as though anything June got was something she wanted, as though anything has been hers or for her in a very long time.

 

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Sepinwall:  Offred Hits A Breaking Point In ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Finale

http://uproxx.com/sepinwall/the-handmaids-tale-finale-recap-review-night/

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What a great and terrible season of television this was — in that it depicted so many terrible things so greatly that (as I suspected at the start of the season) I began to dread watching episodes after a while. The real world is dark enough these days, you know? And the toughest part is, if I wasn’t in the mood to watch Handmaid’s in a particular week, that meant I had multiple episodes to try the following week, and this is not a show that’s particularly conducive to bingeing — or even, at times, watching whole episodes in one sitting.

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Offred’s reaction to this power play, and to the psychological torture of bringing her so close and yet so far from her daughter, is stunning even by the standards Elisabeth Moss has set in the previous nine hours. So much of what Moss has done over the rest of the season is powerful precisely because of all the anger she is clearly keeping under tight wraps because of how dangerous self-expression is for the women of Gilead. This is the wrapping being torn to shreds by a rage so primal and ferocious, it seems barely human. Moss’s entire face seems to change shape and proportion as she begins cursing out this woman who holds her captive (and who, we know, helped write the disgusting and misogynist laws that define this hellscape). She has endured rape and beatings and all manner of abuse since America fell and Gilead rose to take its place, but this is a bridge too goddamn far for June. The explosion would be cathartic except for the fact that there’s nothing she can do in the moment.

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11 hours ago, ElectricBoogaloo said:

A parody by Funny or Die:

Wow, I have so many reactions to this (one of which was, of course, belly laughs....)

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Yikes, Funny or Die. The only funny thing was "Finally, a show for men." Otherwise, just...not funny. I think I kind of get what they were going for, but it didn't work. I mean, it's making light of rape. I can't laugh at that. 

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It's like posts I see every single day on Facebook, lamenting how hard white men have it.  No thanks.

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17 hours ago, Umbelina said:

It's like posts I see every single day on Facebook, lamenting how hard white men have it.  No thanks.

Yeah. I'm REALLY tired of all of these "reverse discrimination" idiots. And I think the video also bothered me because so many men I know won't watch this show because it's "too dark" - yet they watch Game of Thrones, Walking Dead, Lost, etc. After about 30 seconds of discussion, they all basically admit that they think the premise is nothing but feminist alarmism that "would never happen," which they don't realize really drives home one of the main themes of the show (and of the book). Sigh. I have laughed at many Funny or Die videos - not this one...

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20 minutes ago, Stiggs said:

Yeah. I'm REALLY tired of all of these "reverse discrimination" idiots. And I think the video also bothered me because so many men I know won't watch this show because it's "too dark" - yet they watch Game of Thrones, Walking Dead, Lost, etc. After about 30 seconds of discussion, they all basically admit that they think the premise is nothing but feminist alarmism that "would never happen," which they don't realize really drives home one of the main themes of the show (and of the book). Sigh. I have laughed at many Funny or Die videos - not this one...

On another show's forum, in a recent post someone (slightly off-topically) admits they fled the US because of the current regime, but that they are armed and fully prepared for, nay, looking forward to ... wait for it ...

The zombie apocalypse.

When I made a counterpoint about Handmaid's Tale, they were all "NO, ZOMBIES."

There is basically nothing to do at this point but laugh.

Edited by kieyra
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2 hours ago, bijoux said:

I didn't really think she fell in love with Nick, but okay.

I didn't either. That's another thing DS and I both don't want next season, a love triangle.

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5 minutes ago, OtterMommy said:

Great news - I love what she brings to the show! Now if there's a way to bring back Janine/Madeline Brewer for some scenes, that would be perfect.

ETA: the article also says that the second season will have 13 episodes. I hope there's enough compelling new material to create 13 strong episodes, and TPTB are not just stretching it out with boring filler (*cough* Luke *cough*).

Edited by chocolatine
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2 hours ago, Deputy Deputy CoS said:

In other good news, Alexis Bledel is the front runner to win Emmy in her category 

I saw that article as well - but she hasn't even been nominated yet and they just polled nine journalists.

Would she even be an appropriate nominee for 'guest actress' category?

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Much as I was (and am) a devoted GG viewer, and as much as I could tell her Mad Men arc showed some unexpected range, I still never expected to see "Alexis Bledel" and "Emmy" in the same sentence. Good for her.

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1 hour ago, secnarf said:

I saw that article as well - but she hasn't even been nominated yet and they just polled nine journalists.

Would she even be an appropriate nominee for 'guest actress' category?

From what I understand, actors can submit under "Guests" if they appear in less than half of the total episodes. She was in 4 of 10 episodes 

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15 hours ago, kieyra said:

Much as I was (and am) a devoted GG viewer, and as much as I could tell her Mad Men arc showed some unexpected range, I still never expected to see "Alexis Bledel" and "Emmy" in the same sentence. Good for her.

Seriously! I liked her for what I thought she was - a limited actor who had the looks and the charm to pull off a semi-decent career. I had no idea she was capable of what we saw on this show. In a cast this strong, her scenes still stand out. Even thinking of her in that van will make me tear up. Good on you, Alexis Bledel! I love that she is getting recognition, because she deserves it, and I am THRILLED she will be back. I don't care how they have to write it, heh. It's like when Moira made it to Canada...don't care how, just glad it happened. :) 

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I didn't watch her TV show, just saw her in Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, and Mad Men before this.  I thought she was perfect in both of those shows.  I hope she at least gets a nomination.

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3 hours ago, SnoGirl said:

I wish I lived in a big city. I dont think I could ever find the books she leaves behind, but it would be fun to look.

I wonder if The Handmaid's Tale is the next book to be read in her book club...

If you are just interested in looking for books, try www.bookcrossing.com or www.littlefreelibrary.org (both of which are awesome!).

The picture that Emma Watson posted on twitter shows the "our shared shelf" sticker and the official "our shared shelf" page lists The Handmaid's Tale as the book currently being read (beginning May 1st).

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