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Quarry

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When Marine Mac "Quarry" Conway returns home to Memphis in 1972 after fighting in Vietnam, he finds that he has been shunned by his loved ones and demonized by the public. Upon his return stateside, Quarry struggles to cope with what he experienced and witnessed while at war and readapt to civilian life. As he struggles to make ends meet financially, Quarry gets drawn into a network of killing and corruption that extends throughout the length of the Mississippi River, and The Broker -- the cunning, secretive crime boss who runs the operation -- takes a special interest in him.

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I was amazed once I figured out that the dude singing, "I can't live without you"  in Spanish...in his underwear... was Dewey Crowe.  (Damon Herriman).  Amazing transformation!

The supporting cast is given such meaty stuff to work with.  I look forward to whatever/whomever is coming up next!

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Being a lover of Banshee - I was really looking forward to the pilot episode. I was very impressed with what they brought us.

The acting of Logan Marshall Green was impressive.  He brought a lot of (era authentic) layers to his character in a short amount of time. 

Particularly the "Otis Blue" scene toward the end - when Mac/Quarry's wife comes home and heard, "You Don't Miss Your Water" on the stereo....no words were spoken....but so much was said.

I look forward to the next 7 episodes.

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So hard to watch the scorn for the returning servicemen.  Makes me curl up inside.

Someone recently remarked on one of these boards that saying "Thank you for your service" is just empty PC rhetoric, but this show is a reminder why it's good to put that sentiment out there.

His father doesn't think he should come by the house???  That was almost the worst part.  WTF.

Everything about the whole Vietnam . . .chapter was so awful, top to bottom and off to the sides.  Truthfully I don't know if I want to watch this guy struggle for seven episodes--but I feel like I should, you know?

Edited by candall
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6 hours ago, candall said:

So hard to watch the scorn for the returning servicemen.  Makes me curl up inside.

Someone recently remarked on one of these boards that saying "Thank you for your service" is just empty PC rhetoric, but this show is a reminder why it's good to put that sentiment out there.

His father doesn't think he should come by the house???  That was almost the worst part.  WTF.

Everything about the whole Vietnam . . .chapter was so awful, top to bottom and off to the sides.  Truthfully I don't know if I want to watch this guy struggle for seven episodes--but I feel like I should, you know?

You should never feel obligated to thank someone for doing their job. Vietnam was America's last effort to colonize a nation (until this last decade+) for profit and resources. The domino theory about the spread of communism was the cover. Vietnam was also the last war that was covered without censure. The reporters could show the atrocities on both sides and let the people at home decide for themselves. We now have reporters embedded with the military and having their stories screened by the military before they are published. Vietnam was also the last of the draft into the military. Part of the reason for some of the hostility to those who served was the fact that they had other choices than a gun, although some of the choices were not great. Leaving Canada out, men ( army draftees) could opt for conscientious objector status, this was rarely given without a prison sentence. Fort Leavenworth Prison in Kansas was largest base for men with COS status in the nation. A man could also go to college or join the National Guard and have his  combat status deferred, and last if your family had connections, your status could be deferred for years for a variety of reasons. The people who were sitting in the rice paddy were mostly poor, and minority, the people up in the ranks were usually second generation military and careerists who rose through the ranks. Bullets and bombs did not care who was there, but the aftermath with those who returned finally made the military and the nation wake up and start to recognize PTSD as a contributing factor to many of the veterans problems when they returned home. Of those I know they don't want a hollow thank your, they want respect, recognition of their struggles, and help. "Thank you for your service"is like saying "have a nice day," or "God bless." it's sweet but meaningless.

I think that part of our attitude today toward war and its aftermath is we have sheltered our children/grandchildren from  anything that might cause distress. It is part of the everybody get a trophy for attending syndrome. We want to shield them from the ugly instead of teaching that the ugly exists and we should try to overcome it or shape it into something better; and that we all have different gifts and some can do some things better than others. Or as friends says 'don't hate, celebrate!' I don't know how this show will turn out, but I suggest you talk to some Vietnam Veterans and others from that era. Some of the stories are fascinating and enlightening. I also suggest talking to anyone who has been combat in any war, it can be therapeutic for both parties; I know that I have learned at lot over the years.

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I express my appreciation when someone attends to my needs, regardless of whether that's the job and they're getting paid.  I don't have a lot of people running up and volunteering to help me out, so just about everyone I interact with--waiters, nurses, cashiers at Walmart, tollbooth operators!--gets some sort of genuine, non-obligatory, version of "thank you for the service you provided."

 

I believe that military service today is a hard job and the 'employer' is falling outrageously short of the contractual terms everyone agreed to during the hiring process.  So although I find it extremely uncomfortable laying a personal sentiment on a stranger, I do say "Thank you for your service"--but I suppose this is really shorthand for indicating (as you say) respect and recognition.  Maybe I can adjust that so that it sounds less hollow and meaningless.

 

The boys in my class barely slid under the age for the draft lottery, so it's not like I wasn't around for the homecoming reception the Vietnam vets got or I need to get acquainted with some soldiers from that 'era.'  Which is the main reason I make it a point to walk across a room and say thanks to someone in uniform.  Keeping my mouth shut and saying nothing does not seem a sufficient point for the pendulum's arc to stop.

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Glad to see that Jodi Balfour from Bomb Girls is getting work (and looks good naked).

Jodi Balfour's (naked) body was the only thing that wasn't consistent with 1972. (yes I am old enough...)

She was just a bit too perky and fit to be authentic to the era. :-)  Nonetheless - she IS easy on the eyes.

As an aside - the pacing and little moments of the episode really set the tone that this will be a quality show.  For example, the tortoise at the beginning of the episode...it was unnecessary to the narrative, but it allowed the scene to breathe and provided marvelous subtext for the Mac/Quarry character.

Also - in the shoot-out sequence it was refreshing that the Mac/Quarry character isn't a great shot.  Unlike in Banshee - the lead actor emptied his gun - and didn't take out his targets.

Edited by Melissa56789
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I wasn't sure about the show until the end, when Mac went home after retrieving his record album.  It's always impressive when a writer makes good use of silence, and when the actors can pull it off.  I had a visceral reaction to that scene, and feared for both Joni and Mac.  What the hell do they do now? 

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He's gonna be a scene stealer, just like in Justified.  Whodathunk he had a good singing voice?

I hated to see Jamie Hector gone, but maybe he'll return in flashbacks. 

I didn't recognize anyone else, but I'm not good at that anyway.

Edited by AuntiePam · Reason: typo
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I really liked this, even though it does not seem like quite the successor to Banshee that I thought it might be. Not because of a difference in quality, but because they both seem to be extremely different in tone and style. This seems to less with the campy ridiculousness of Banshee, plus Banshee has all the stuff with the issues in the Native American and Amish communities, while this seems generally darker, with more time spent on the period than the community around him. However, both places do seem to have a gift for mixing acting, character, and cinematography. Its a lovely series, and, like Banshee, does have a strong sense of place. 

Plus, the music is awesome. 

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On 9/12/2016 at 9:47 PM, Melissa56789 said:

Particularly the "Otis Blue" scene toward the end - when Mac/Quarry's wife comes home and heard, "You Don't Miss Your Water" on the stereo....no words were spoken....but so much was said.

If I were Jodi, I would've packed my shit and hit the road.

Sorry to see MarloArthur get killed so quick.

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I like this show so far despite Green (not a fan). Herriman has a distinct face (it stood out in Candy as Heath Ledger tried to impersonate him) yet he's able to morph into so many different personas. His take on this particular character is awesome. And Mullan is always great. After two eps, I'm looking forward to seeing how the police investigation pans out. The meatball guy holding his leg and moaning was a bit much; the director could have found another way to keep him in one spot. How did the one-legged man track down Mac?

Edited by numbnut

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8 hours ago, numbnut said:

How did the one-legged man track down Mac?

To paraphrase Geico, he's a P.I., it's what he does.

I was really impressed with Jodi Balfour's performance. Joni had so much going on, the guilt for the affair and for getting Chris killed (I'm sure she doesn't know he had a contract on him), fear of Mac, yet still protective of him from the police. It'll be interesting to see what happens to them after the deal with the one-legged man is over. (I don't think it's too much of a stretch to speculate that both will survive.)

Damon Herriman, as always, is a delight.

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Another strong episode, even though it still sucks that Arthur is gone. 

It took me a little while to figure out what was going on with Joni, but when I did, I could really admire the performance, and how they kind of left us to fill in some of the blanks. 

Still love the use of both music, and long periods of silence. 

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9 hours ago, tennisgurl said:

Still love the use of both music, and long periods of silence. 

I totally agree.  Dramas with constant conversation leave us no space to think about what's in these people's heads.

I do wish Gwen from the bar didn't look so much like Joni.  The only way I knew Mac was boinking Gwen and not Joni was because he was wearing that same grimy brown tank top.  At least I assume it was Gwen -- she was wearing the same short white nightie that we've seen Joni wear, so it was hard to be sure.  

I like the cop, and his bushy-bearded partner, despite his politics.   

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The Broker: Is there a term for what you were just doing?

Buddy: I believe...breathtaking.

 

The Broker: I'm offering you a chance to make real money. Right here at home. Just like you did for those crackerjacks overseas.

Mac: What? Prevent the spread of Communism?

 

The Broker:  People have problems. I provide solutions. Permanent ones.

 

The Broker: I don't think you have any idea how bad it's going to be for your out there.

 

The Broker:  It was war, son. You do what you gotta do to survive.

 

Mac: Why don't I just pull this trigger? Hmmm? It's somethin' we both know I'm damn good at.

The Broker: It takes a certain kind of man to do that kinda thing. Hollowed out from the inside. Hard as rock. Kinda like this place. Maybe I'll call you Quarry. It's gotta nice ring to it.

 

Buddy: I'm not going to tell you we're doing the world a service here, but we're doing the world a service

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The Broker: You know what makes us miserable? The expectation that he world is something else other than what it is.

Buddy:  He's got your wranglers around your knees and your ass over a whiskey barrel, doesn't he?

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Let me ask you a question, does everything go to shit in this perfect system of yours or did i just come on board at a really bad time?

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There have been a couple of scenes with Quarry submerged in his pool and shows him looking at this weird "something" in the water.  I can't figure out if it's a jellyfish/stingray hybrid or some kind of tiny UFO.  First time I saw it, I wondered if the show was going to take a sharp turn into sci-fi territory.  

The water thingy showed up again and now I really don't know what to make of it.  Anyone have any theories on WTH Quarry is seeing and what it could mean in regards to the story line?

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patty1h, I noticed something weird too -- it looked metallic, like a small piece from a machine.  I plan to rewatch these first two episodes* and will pay closer attention.

*Because I'm curious about what happened to the $30K, and how Arthur's shooting went down -- who was in that room -- and whether there were two black cars, and I want to watch Dewey's karoake again.  Is the one-legged man dead?

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I was right there with you all the way, Joni. You handled your shit like a boss and saved yourself and I know you'd been through a pretty traumatic experience, but you're going to throw Mac's indiscretion in his face? Really?

Buddy and his mama was pure delight. A little quick to be developing an addiction, though. I hope he was already taking pills before he got shot.

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26 minutes ago, AimingforYoko said:

I was right there with you all the way, Joni. You handled your shit like a boss and saved yourself and I know you'd been through a pretty traumatic experience, but you're going to throw Mac's indiscretion in his face? Really?

 

Did she do that?  I couldn't catch all the dialogue in the car, even with the volume way up.  I hate that Joni being kidnapped gave her a reason to be pissed at Mac, but damn, it was his fault. 

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1 hour ago, AimingforYoko said:

Buddy and his mama was pure delight. A little quick to be developing an addiction, though. I hope he was already taking pills before he got shot.

When he told her he didn't think he could do this anymore, I wondered if she knew just what it is that he does.  But since she had just bandaged a gunshot wound, apparently she knows.  I liked her.  She reminded me of Margo Martindale in Justified.  I hope we see more of her.

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14 hours ago, AimingforYoko said:

I was right there with you all the way, Joni. You handled your shit like a boss and saved yourself and I know you'd been through a pretty traumatic experience, but you're going to throw Mac's indiscretion in his face? Really?

Buddy and his mama was pure delight. A little quick to be developing an addiction, though. I hope he was already taking pills before he got shot.

I think her fixating on the redhead was a way to show that, despite everything else, they both still care about maintaining their relationship. It makes no sense to me, but that's why humans are so complicated. That said, I watch WAY too much TV, and assumed that she would somehow be recaptured by someone on shore when she managed to reach relative safety. Glad they didn't go there, and her character got major points from me for being considerate of the dog.

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I cant blame Joni for being pissed off at Mac. I mean, if I was kidnapped by some asshole pissed off at my husband, while said husband was screwing some random bartender, I would be pissed too. Yeah, she really has no room to call him out for having an affair when she had one too, but she had a tough day. I will cut her some slack. Plus, Mac STILL wont tell her anything! After all this, he better give her a full run down in the next episode. 

I rolled my eyes at Joni getting put into peril this early into the shows run, but she handled things like a boss. I bet the actress was thrilled when she read the second part of the script, and saw she got to do more this episode than just be gagged, tied up, and whimpering. She gets to do cool stuff, like punch out creepy guys, crawl through worms, and give water to poor junk yard dogs!

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Speaking of that bait shop, major kudos to whoever's doing the set decoration or scouting the locations.  Every place we've seen looks authentic and lived-in.  Buddy's mom's place (that kitchen!), the various bars, Mac's house, creepy guy's houseboat -- nice work!

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I've watched all three episodes, not with total attention, but I'm pretty caught up of what's going on.  The one thing that confuses me is who was the dude with the funky yellow glasses and a mustache who appeared twice in the episode?  He brought Quarry $20k, then at the end of the episode, he gave Quarry a gun and a different car.  Who is he - when did he show up previously?  Thanks.

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I think he's the Broker's right-hand man.  I'm pretty sure he was in Ep 1, with the Broker and Mac at the quarry.  Not sure if he was in Ep 2.

Yes, it was Karl - the Broker's right hand man.  Karl and Quarry don't seem to like each other much.  

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Buddy and his mama was pure delight. 

Buddy and his mama were my favorite part of the episode. 

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It feels like they're wasting no time at all getting deep into the story. I'm liking it though. I thought it looked like Ann Dowd playing Naomi, Buddy's mother. The scenes with those two were great. Glad that Joni got away quickly instead of dragging out any endless torture.

Edited by Fisher King
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Well, that was a really slow episode, until it wasn't. I suspected Bill Irwin as a plant, 'til he got killed by Suggs. I knew somebody in the motel was. Looks like the Broker's organization is pretty progressive for 1972.

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Slow, but riveting.  Now that Mac and Joni have cleared the air -- well, I'm not sure what I want to happen.  I don't see Joni getting on board with living with a hit man, and there's the detective to worry about. 

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Mac is going to have to up his game if he wants to survive.  He should have known that Harlowe wouldn't be asking for his tools in the middle of the night.  So yeah, go to the door, but with gun in hand.  So suspicious, until he needed to be suspicious.

Broke my heart when Harlowe said 'I'm sorry, Sam'.  That character reminded me of a similar character in Rectify, same set-up too, working to fix up a motel pool.  The whole episode reminded me of No Country for Old Men, and that added to the tension.

I think what Harlowe said will help Mac adapt and survive, but will Mac accept the "randomness" or will he try to take control? 

I missed Dewey this week.

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That was uncomfortable. I was alive during the Munich Olympics, but I'll be darned if I can recall where I was or whether it had an impact on me when it occurred, unlike several other historic events. I need to ask my siblings if we might not have had TV at the time.

 I want to know more about the clean-up woman! I was actually disappointed when we followed our POV couple home for more couple's counseling! Glad they cleared the air finally. It would have been helpful to do so IN the motel so that they might have been on the same page and working in unison instead of at each other's throats, but, then, we wouldn't have had the same amount of tension.

 Felt so badly for the motel owner. I guess it's going to be up for sale.

 I haven't seen the lead in any other stuff, so I assumed at first that that bump on his forehead happened in a scene I'd forgotten, but that's really just him? If it were me, I'd part my hair differently. I find myself staring at it all the time now.

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I cannot think of a theory for why Mac keeps daydreaming about being underwater and now sees Asian masks in the motel and in the water.   A stretch - maybe he almost drowned during his tour of duty in Viet Nam?

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patt1h, I have no clue.    

Maybe it's just a sign of his mental state.  He got back home safely, to his wife and his pool, two things that he probably dreamed about in Vietnam, but he still has no peace, no security, no comfort.

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On 10/2/2016 at 5:49 PM, patty1h said:

I cannot think of a theory for why Mac keeps daydreaming about being underwater and now sees Asian masks in the motel and in the water.   A stretch - maybe he almost drowned during his tour of duty in Viet Nam?

I have heard that we'll eventually get to see the 'incident' that happened to Arthur and Mac in 'Nam.

Second pretty slow episode in a row, but I enjoyed the world-building of 'real' Memphis and the 'other' Memphis of Broker's world.

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2 minutes ago, AimingforYoko said:

Second pretty slow episode in a row, but I enjoyed the world-building of 'real' Memphis and the 'other' Memphis of Broker's world.

I liked that too.  The place looked magical, dreamy.

So -- butter in coffee.  Would it taste like cream in coffee, only salty?

I like that Joni talked about the affair and the effect it might have had on Mac, would he still want to "do this" (make love), when what she meant was would he still love her.  Looks like he does.

If an episode can be boring and interesting at the same time, this one was.

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I'm lucky in that I was not born in the U.S., and when I did move here I lived in northern Minnesota, where the only diversity was my Italian family not having a "son" at the end of our name. I remember being bused 15 miles one semester early in the morning because they were building a new school nearby, and this other school was splitting the shifts so that one school attended in the morning and the other in  the afternoon. It was my only experience being "bused" and I hated it, so when I read about forced busing in the South I imagined something similar. Obviously I was wrong, but it still makes me wince whenever I see what part of the country I moved to used to be like.

  I just realized this episode where I know Arthur's widow from! She's in a ton of BBC shows! Great range! Joni was dumb getting caught like that.

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I'm still hanging in, but the glacial pace of this show is making it very hard.  The deal between The Broker and Mac is so low-key, cause it seems to have no consequences.  Also, driving through dark roads and mysterious, vague conversations, random trips to dive bars aren't enough to hold my attention.  First he says "kill the fat man", then forget it.  Why the games?   I hope that whatever the Broker is cooking up with the Asian dudes picks up the action in the coming weeks.

Oh happy day!  Now that Mac and Lori are back together, Cinemax will be able to shoe-horn in the requisite sex scene (or three) into the episodes.  /sarcasm/  

Edited by patty1h · Reason: Doh! Her name is Joni, not Lori.
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56 minutes ago, patty1h said:

Oh happy day!  Now that Mac and Lori are back together, Cinemax will be able to shoe-horn in the requisite sex scene (or three) into the episodes.  /sarcasm/  

+1.  Thank heaven for the DVR.  Not a prude, but sex on TV is pretty much "seen one, seen 'em all". 

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Broker is running quite the progressive organization for 1972 Memphis, isn't he? Hiring black folks, gays and women? If he wasn't killing people, he'd be kind of admirable. That said, nobody's gonna mourn Linwood. Like Mac said, the world's a better place.

Mac sleepwalking like he was back in 'Nam was scary as hell, I thought for sure he was going to fire that shotgun at somebody.

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The stuff about school integration covers a part of recent US history that isn't dramatized a lot, and has done a pretty solid job thus far of giving as the black perspective on events, so I feel weird saying this in one sense, but:  what does this have to do with anything else on the show?  This stuff feels like it would be a great historical drama in its own right, but its connection to a pulpy show about a hitman is rather tenuous.

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