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In Memoriam: Celebrity Deaths

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Nooooooooo!  Not Jessica Walter.  Loved her!  Damnit.  R.I.P. dear lady.  

25 minutes ago, scarynikki12 said:

 

 

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I first became aware of the wonderful Ms Walter when she voiced the mother on the show Dinosaurs, my son's favourite show back in the day.  So sad.  RIP.

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No no no no.  Not Lucille Bluth.  And it will be frustrating for me to watch some of the male Arrested Development stars talk about how great she is given how they just rolled over her bad experiences with Tambor while filming the series.

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I remember when she played the psycho in Clint Eastwood's directorial debut, Play Misty For Me. R.I.P.

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1 hour ago, scarynikki12 said:

 

Holy Shit, Holy Shit, Holy Shit.  This one gets me.  I floved her as Lucille Bluth and as Malory Archer. RIP Ms Walter.

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I wasn't expecting this one. 😥 I just love her. A beautiful lady.

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A wonderful actress. May she Rest in Peace.

Edited by Hiyo
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45 minutes ago, DearEvette said:

This one gets me.  I floved her as Lucille Bluth and as Malory Archer. RIP Ms Walter.

Me, too:  this one really hurts.  Original recipe Arrested Development is one of the seminal comedies of my life (despite the male cast’s best efforts to extinguish my love for it a couple years ago with that dumpster fire interview).  And Lucille Bluth was just the best character on the show, due to Jessica Walter’s cutting and ruthless comedic performance.

”Plate or Platter?”

“I don’t understand the question, and I won’t respond.”  Sniff.

Edited by Peace 47
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After Shirley Knight's death, I finally caught The Group on TCM.  So many actors at the beginning of their careers, Jessica Walter being one of them.  In both comedy and drama, she was such a talented actress to watch.  More tributes:

https://deadline.com/2021/03/jessica-walter-hollywood-celebrity-reactions-arrested-development-archer-cast-tony-hale-david-cross-1234721964/

Edited by MissAlmond
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1 hour ago, AimingforYoko said:

I remember when she played the psycho in Clint Eastwood's directorial debut, Play Misty For Me. R.I.P.

That movie was the movie I immediately thought of.  She was great playing the psycho.  

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2 hours ago, MissAlmond said:

Nooooooooo!  Not Jessica Walter.  Loved her!  Damnit.  R.I.P. dear lady.  

 

No! First George Segal and now Jessica Walter! Oh, my God! Stop 2021! You made your point. WTF?

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No.  Jessica Walter hurts! At least she's resting with Ron by her side 😢

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40 minutes ago, Angeltoes said:

Richard Gilliland at only 71.  I always had a thing for him on Designing Women.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/richard-gilliland-designing-women-actor-and-husband-of-jean-smart-dies-at-71

WTH!  I remember him from The Waltons when he played Mary Ellen's second love interest/husband. No disrespect to actor Tom Bower, but I readily admit preferring Jonesy over Dr. Curtis Williard, a character I couldn't stand pre or post death (Waltons fans know what I mean). R.I.P. Mr. Gilliland.  

Edited by MissAlmond
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11 minutes ago, MissAlmond said:

WTH!  I remember him from The Waltons when he played Mary Ellen's second love interest/husband. No offense to actor Tom Bower, but I readily admit preferring Jonesy over Curtis Williard, a character I couldn't stand pre or post death (Waltons fans know what I mean). R.I.P. Mr. Gilliland.  

I had such a crush on Jonesy!!  I can't believe he's died.  This is a sucky sucky day.

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1 hour ago, Angeltoes said:

Richard Gilliland at only 71.

That's sad.  I only "know" him from Designing Women and a couple of TV movies, but I've only ever heard great things about Jean Smart, so I figure if she married him he's a nice guy.  Their son is grown, but their daughter is just barely a teenager.  I feel sorry for all of them, and everyone else who loved him, but that's a particularly rough age to lose a parent.

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Loved Jessica in Play Misty for Me, she was wonderful.

 A hearty 'FUCK YOU!' to Jason Bateman....I haven't forgotten how you didn't have her back during that AD fiasco, you have some balls offering any kind of condolences.  

Rest well, lovely....same to Richard Gilliand and Craig Grant

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1 hour ago, Bastet said:

That's sad.  I only "know" him from Designing Women and a couple of TV movies, but I've only ever heard great things about Jean Smart, so I figure if she married him he's a nice guy.  Their son is grown, but their daughter is just barely a teenager.  I feel sorry for all of them, and everyone else who loved him, but that's a particularly rough age to lose a parent.

I think the first thing I remember seeing him in was the tv show "Operation Petticoat", with John Astin and Jamie Lee Curtis, but I loved him on Designing Women.

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Never cared for Arrested Development but I am a HUGE fan of Archer and Jessica Walter’s line reading for Malory Archer was so acidicly funny.   Damn was not ready for the news of her death.  Nothing on tv so I think I am gonna watch old episodes of Archer on Hulu tonight.

Edited by Chaos Theory
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10 minutes ago, scorpio1031 said:

I think the first thing I remember seeing him in was the tv show "Operation Petticoat", with John Astin and Jamie Lee Curtis, but I loved him on Designing Women.

Someone else remembers this show!  It wasn't on long but I was a devoted viewer while it lasted.

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I didn't watch Just Shoot Me. I remember George Segal from the 1977 movie, Rollercoaster

 

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In addition to his work, I will always remember Larry McMurtry for speaking this truth decades ago: "Powerful, rich, talented, intelligent women always make men angry."

Edited by Bastet
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Beverly Cleary  

 Beloved Children’s book author Beverly Cleary died on March 25, 2021, in Carmel, California, where she’d lived since the 1960s. She was 104 years old.

Beverly Cleary’s first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950, immediately setting a standard for realistic children’s fiction. More than forty published books later, Beverly Cleary has become beloved by generations of children.  Mrs. Cleary has also inspired authors, including Judy Blume, to deal with the real issues in young readers’ lives. As the author and reviewer Ilene Cooper said in ALA Booklist, “When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”

You can't argue that she didn't live a long and good life but I am still saddened that one of my all-time favourite children's authors has died.

Edited by WinnieWinkle
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1 minute ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Beverly Cleary  

 Beloved Children’s book author Beverly Cleary died on March 25, 2021, in Carmel, California, where she’d lived since the 1960s. She was 104 years old.

Beverly Cleary’s first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950, immediately setting a standard for realistic children’s fiction. More than forty published books later, Beverly Cleary has become beloved by generations of children.  Mrs. Cleary has also inspired authors, including Judy Blume, to deal with the real issues in young readers’ lives. As the author and reviewer Ilene Cooper said in ALA Booklist, “When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”

Beezus and Ramona was one of my favorites as a kid.

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Just now, doodlebug said:

Beezus and Ramona was one of my favorites as a kid.

Even as an adult I find her books very readable.  Her autobiographies are also very well worth reading.  

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I adored Beverly Cleary growing up. IMO, Ramona Quimby remains one of the most well-written, well-realized child characters of all time. Cleary wrote, with humor, clarity, and sensitivity, the joys and pains of childhood, rivaled only by Judy Blume. I maintain that Mr. and Mrs. Quimby are among the best parents in literature. I loved how Cleary accurately detailed Ramona's motivations and misadventures without judgment or sugar-coating. She basically had the one quality that makes a great author of children's books: Cleary never, ever forgot what it was like to be a kid.

I also absolutely loved the magical Ralph S. Mouse trilogy, and the super-underrated Emily's Runaway Imagination, the last chapter of which yanks at my heartstrings to this day. 

It warms the cockles of my cold, cold heart that her books are enjoyed by the younger generation to this day. That is truly the sign of greatness.

Thanks, Ms. Cleary, for helping this "pesky little sister" find a protagonist to relate to while discovering the wonders of chapter books. 

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1 minute ago, Wiendish Fitch said:

and the super-underrated Emily's Runaway Imagination,

YES!  I love that book.  Also a shout out to Ellen Tibbetts!  She's no Ramona Quimby but she's remained with me for a very long time.  I totally agree with you about the Quimby parents - it's rare to have parents who make mistakes but are still loving and supportive in kids books.  

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I didn't read every single one of her books (I wasn't into the First Love series), but I'm sure I came close.  Definitely every Ramona and Ralph S. Mouse book.  Probably most of the Henry Huggins books.  Ellen, Socks, Ribsy ...  Beverly Cleary brought me many hours of enjoyment as a kid.

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2 minutes ago, Bastet said:

Probably most of the Henry Huggins books.  Ellen, Socks, Ribsy ...  Beverly Cleary brought me many hours of enjoyment as a kid.

I loved all her books (including the First Love ones - never heard them called that before 🙂 ) but I do think the Henry ones are quite dated in comparison to the Ramona ones.  Not sure why.  But that doesn't mean they still aren't good reading!

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49 minutes ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Beverly Cleary  

 Beloved Children’s book author Beverly Cleary died on March 25, 2021, in Carmel, California, where she’d lived since the 1960s. She was 104 years old.

Beverly Cleary’s first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950, immediately setting a standard for realistic children’s fiction. More than forty published books later, Beverly Cleary has become beloved by generations of children.  Mrs. Cleary has also inspired authors, including Judy Blume, to deal with the real issues in young readers’ lives. As the author and reviewer Ilene Cooper said in ALA Booklist, “When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”

You can't argue that she didn't live a long and good life but I am still saddened that one of my all-time favourite children's authors has died.

You bet, and she did live a century (not many of us are that lucky).

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Like all of you, I grew up with Beverley Clearly; they were the first chapter books I ever read. Ramona was definitely my favorite, but I have a soft spot for Ralph and Socks.

She was an awesome lady right to the end, and 104 years is way beyond more than anyone could ever ask. RIP

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1 hour ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Beverly Cleary  

 Beloved Children’s book author Beverly Cleary died on March 25, 2021, in Carmel, California, where she’d lived since the 1960s. She was 104 years old.

Beverly Cleary’s first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950, immediately setting a standard for realistic children’s fiction. More than forty published books later, Beverly Cleary has become beloved by generations of children.  Mrs. Cleary has also inspired authors, including Judy Blume, to deal with the real issues in young readers’ lives. As the author and reviewer Ilene Cooper said in ALA Booklist, “When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”

You can't argue that she didn't live a long and good life but I am still saddened that one of my all-time favourite children's authors has died.

Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck.   

I loved beverly cleary's books.   Although I did not like how Ramona took over everything.   But any NON Ramona book I loved.

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Loved Beverley Clearly's books. Read all the Beezus and Ramona books. Still hate Romona's friend Howie ever since the show and tell thing at her school and he didn't back up her story ( she didn't explain it well) ...what a prick. There I got that off my chest 😄

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RIP Beverly Clearly and Larry McMurtry

An illustration I always remembered. Beezuz and Ramona's Aunt Bea:

258997611_IllustrationsofBeverlyClearyE28099sbooksfeaturingsistersRamonaandBeezusbyLouisDarling.Beezus27birthdaycake-1.thumb.jpg.af11238eb8612e8ad586ab7cfd1435e8.jpg

And the theme to LONESOME DOVE:

 

 

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1 hour ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Beverly Cleary  

 Beloved Children’s book author Beverly Cleary died on March 25, 2021, in Carmel, California, where she’d lived since the 1960s. She was 104 years old.

Beverly Cleary’s first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950, immediately setting a standard for realistic children’s fiction. More than forty published books later, Beverly Cleary has become beloved by generations of children.  Mrs. Cleary has also inspired authors, including Judy Blume, to deal with the real issues in young readers’ lives. As the author and reviewer Ilene Cooper said in ALA Booklist, “When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”

You can't argue that she didn't live a long and good life but I am still saddened that one of my all-time favourite children's authors has died.

My introduction to Beverly Cleary began when my daughters and I checked her books out of our little local library in the 1980s. I enjoyed reading the books aloud to the kids and also reading them myself. Since my daughters were separated in age much like Beezus and Ramona, the older girls also read Cleary’s books to the younger ones. The 2 younger daughters resented the implication that they were ––like Ramona–– “pests.” But when the sneaker fits, LOL, it may be time to behave. 
and I was the younger sister too 😉

Thank you, Beverly Clearly, for countless hours filled by your books ––especially since we didn’t have a TV at the time. 

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I've always wanted to visit Portland, Oregon just to see the real Klickitat Street. I loved all of Beverly Cleary's books, but especially related to Ramona and her family. Mr. Quimby's struggle to find a teaching job while plugging away at menial jobs to provide for his family always struck a chord with me - even as a little girl, because my dad went through the same thing. The Quimbys' financial woes (no money to pay for a new transmission for the car, for starters) are still relevant today, through the eyes of an adult reader.

I read Dear Mr. Henshaw so many times I wore the back cover off of my paperback copy. A couple of years ago, my now 11-year-old nephew won a paperback copy of Ribsy at school - for winning a class spelling bee, I believe. Who could think of a better prize than that? 🥰

Mrs. Cleary's contributions to the world of literature will never, ever be underestimated. Her books helped this little girl fall in love with reading forever. God rest you, Mrs. Cleary...and thank you. 🙏😢

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I have to say, when someone dies at 104, I'm less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary. R.I.P.

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Like many of you I adored Beverly Cleary! I read all the Ramona books, Henry Huggins, Socks, Ribsy, and Ellen. I fell like rereading them all again now.

Edited by Constant Viewer
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19 minutes ago, AimingforYoko said:

I have to say, when someone dies at 104, I'm less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary. R.I.P.

The same is true of me when it comes to even those who do not become centenarians, like the late Hugh Downs of 20/20; albeit he fell just short of being a centenarian (99), he deserved to have his life celebrated, because 20/20 was just one strong aspect of a life incredibly well-lived (Tonight, Today, 20/20, and at least one, maybe two books).

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45 minutes ago, AimingforYoko said:

I have to say, when someone dies at 104, I'm less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary. R.I.P.

Yes, "less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary," but sometimes it's not that simple. 

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5 minutes ago, shapeshifter said:

Yes, "less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary," but sometimes it's not that simple. 

That's true, especially since her work was such a big part of multigenerational childhoods.

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7 minutes ago, shapeshifter said:

Yes, "less inclined to mourn their death than celebrate their life. Especially someone as accomplished as Ms. Cleary," but sometimes it's not that simple. 

Yes, exactly true for me as well.  I mean of course at 104 news of her death was hardly unexpected but even with that a piece of my childhood and for that matter the childhoods of my children and grandchilden is gone.  Offhand I cannot think of another writer, currently still with us, who spans our 3 generations.  

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2 hours ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Yes, exactly true for me as well.  I mean of course at 104 news of her death was hardly unexpected but even with that a piece of my childhood and for that matter the childhoods of my children and grandchilden is gone.  Offhand I cannot think of another writer, currently still with us, who spans our 3 generations.  

Amen to that. Like everyone else here, I grew up with Beverly Cleary's books and still read them from time to time whenever I want to tune the world out for a bit. Sure, the language in some of them is a bit dated, but the stories are timeless because, as someone pointed out, she understood what it was like to be a kid and what kids went through during their childhood and even up through their teen years (Jean and Johnny is dated as hell, but even as a guy, I can still understand what 15-year-old Jean went through when she first discovered boys and then discovered that some boys can be real jerks).

Thank you, Ms. Cleary, and rest in power. 104 is a good run indeed, and we've been ever so blessed to have you with us for so long!

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5 minutes ago, legaleagle53 said:

(Jean and Johnny is dated as hell, but even as a guy, I can still understand what 15-year-old Jean went through when she first discovered boys and then discovered that some boys can be real jerks).

I just referenced this title in the "Books you're reading" thread.  I'm so glad someone else loved this book as much as I did (and still do).  

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Damnit to hell.  Beverly AND Larry?

I remember Ralph's ride through the night, in the tiny ambulance, to bring his friend an aspirin.

And Ramona! in her shiny new boots that got stuck in the mud, forcing a disgruntled Henry to yank her from them & carry her to safety (even as a 6-year-old, I recognized that as Great Romance: The Beginning);  telling her mother about the lamp they sang about in school ("It's a 'dawnzer'...it gives off a 'Lee light'!"); adding whiskers to the Q in Quimby so it was recognizable as a cat.

And McMurtry's Aurora, and Cadillac Jack! and Woodrow & Gus: two of the greatest characters in American literature; not to mention, stars of one it's best scenes (a dusty bar, an insolent bartender with a broken nose, and Call rolling his eyes while McRae explains that "...in addition to the whiskey, we'll require a little respect.").

Eloquent and hilarious and always in my heart.   Thanks for the inspiration.  Thanks for all those  books. 

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Mike Bell, bench coach for the Minnesota Twins and a former MLB player, has died of cancer at 46.

He was part of a rarity in baseball, a family with three generations of major leaguers with his grandfather Gus, father Buddy and brother David having long and successful careers as players.  Mike Bell spent only a short time in the majors and often wasn't mentioned when announcers talked about the three generations.  I had just looked up his bio a week or so ago when he was left out of one of those discussions, unaware that he was ill.  He joined the Twins' coaching staff last season after having spent the past decade in roles away from the dugout.  I hope he got to enjoy that experience.  It's very sad that he passed so young and, as is often the case, left behind young children.

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