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Small Talk: Out of Genoa

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35 minutes ago, OhioSongbird said:

My brother has Pomeranians.  Feisty critters but cute as hell.

Oh yeah, they're cute as hell but can they yap!

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Amen to that.  They would lay in wait for the mailman and raise holy hell when the mail came thru the slot.  Never tore it up but they sure showed that mailman who 's boss!

 

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Well work sucked again but this time it was my boss' wife who pissed me off. 

I went to ask her about holiday pay because it didn't make sense. I worked Victoria Day (7 hours) but she only paid me a percentage and as a result, I had 3 hours unpaid, and then she made me take the following Monday off also unpaid. I told her normally I should be paid for the 7 hrs I worked (as though it were a regular Monday) and the other Monday I was off should be a percentage. She got pissed. Told me she was losing money, I was wrong, that's not how it works. Turns out I was right. She called the accountant and she owes me 7 hours of pay. 

Then she wanted me to take a one hour zoom course to learn more about the software we use. But it's on my day off and at 9 AM. I asked if I was going to be paid for that hour, she got mad again. I should want to learn, it's for my betterment, why should she have to pay me? I've asked my brother and a friend and my cousin if I should be paid for a training and the answer I got was a resounding yes. She then tells me not to take the course if I don't want to better myself.  That it's clear I don't want to advance. It's clear right now I am not worthy of a raise. Do I think I will just sit around answering phones, billing, entering checks for my current salary? Yes, that is what my job description is. I am a dental secretary. I am not the office manager. She is the office manager. And if I were the office manager, I would want to be paid for it. I told her I don't work for free.

My understanding is that I should know the software enough to schedule, add recalls, enter checks, bill insurance companies, print receipts, etc. Which I have learned. But she seems to want me to know everything about the software. But a lot of that stuff has to be done with the management password and she won't even give me that so what is the point? My belief is that she mentioned she pays a lot for a service where you can call the software company unlimited when you have an issue and I think she wants to cancel that service and just have me know the program inside and out. But first off all, I am not the most tech savvy, and if I were, I would work in IT or for the software company, not a dental clinic. 

And there was more but I'm so exhausted. 

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Plus, if there is a tuition fee for the course, she needs to pay for that, too.  These people are wack-a-doos.  If she thinks anybody is going to learn the software inside and out in a one-hour zoom course, she's delusional.

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No there are multiple courses, she just signed me up for one. But they're all in French and they speak quickly and I have issues understanding. Plus, they're using a paperless version as an example and our layout doesn't look like theirs. 

She was like you want me to take the course and then teach you and that's not how it works. I'm not the secretary, you are. 

I don't know, when I was working at the other clinic, the secretary and the office manager were both teaching me the software. 

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8 hours ago, jewel21 said:

Well work sucked again but this time it was my boss' wife who pissed me off. 

I went to ask her about holiday pay because it didn't make sense. I worked Victoria Day (7 hours) but she only paid me a percentage and as a result, I had 3 hours unpaid, and then she made me take the following Monday off also unpaid. I told her normally I should be paid for the 7 hrs I worked (as though it were a regular Monday) and the other Monday I was off should be a percentage. She got pissed. Told me she was losing money, I was wrong, that's not how it works. Turns out I was right. She called the accountant and she owes me 7 hours of pay. 

Then she wanted me to take a one hour zoom course to learn more about the software we use. But it's on my day off and at 9 AM. I asked if I was going to be paid for that hour, she got mad again. I should want to learn, it's for my betterment, why should she have to pay me? I've asked my brother and a friend and my cousin if I should be paid for a training and the answer I got was a resounding yes. She then tells me not to take the course if I don't want to better myself.  That it's clear I don't want to advance. It's clear right now I am not worthy of a raise. Do I think I will just sit around answering phones, billing, entering checks for my current salary? Yes, that is what my job description is. I am a dental secretary. I am not the office manager. She is the office manager. And if I were the office manager, I would want to be paid for it. I told her I don't work for free.

My understanding is that I should know the software enough to schedule, add recalls, enter checks, bill insurance companies, print receipts, etc. Which I have learned. But she seems to want me to know everything about the software. But a lot of that stuff has to be done with the management password and she won't even give me that so what is the point? My belief is that she mentioned she pays a lot for a service where you can call the software company unlimited when you have an issue and I think she wants to cancel that service and just have me know the program inside and out. But first off all, I am not the most tech savvy, and if I were, I would work in IT or for the software company, not a dental clinic. 

And there was more but I'm so exhausted.

And rightfully so.

Get paid for the overtime you are owed. Commit to nothing regarding the Zoom course you were signed up for, and if possible, have your name removed from the course roster. Take your day off to look for another job, and keep looking. Do not discuss your job search with your employers. For a stop-gap position, try a temporary agency.

Their toxic behavior is escalating. Get out of that office for your own sake, jewel.

 

 

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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Oh, and she is mad that I didn't come work for her right away after my schooling but allowed them to send me to another clinic for a week and went to another place to check it out for a day. According to her it's clear I was her last choice after she gave me a chance and hired me without any knowledge. 

And she was mad that I had stopped back in 2019 to help out my other boss. Their secretary was going on vacation (I told them she broke her leg and they needed me to work her Wednesday shift) and I didn't know how long it would be. I worked from mid January until March 4th and then Covid happened and everything shut down. That boss paid me $22 an hour, loved me, gave me raises every few months without me asking, and paid me for a 7 hour shift when I only worked 4 hours that entire month and a half I covered the other secretary's Wednesdays. And she wonders why I would rather work for them.  She claims it doesn't make sense that the secretary was out that long for a broken leg. She also told me I left in August of 2020. Again, she was wrong. I had the proof I had started in December of 2019 and worked 3 shifts for her before leaving. 

I am looking at some other postings and have been for the past several weeks. But a temp agency is a good idea, Cupid. I used one many years ago.  I can also contact the dental school and see is there are any job postings. 

She keeps telling me that I can't handle stress, I am not good at multitasking, I don't want to learn, etc, and honestly it's starting to wear on my confidence and self-esteem. 

 

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She keeps telling me that I can't handle stress, I am not good at multitasking, I don't want to learn, etc, and honestly it's starting to wear on my confidence and self-esteem. 

She's a lousy, unprofessional bitch. From what I've been hearing lately, there's a real labor shortage out there right now. Employers are scrambling, offering all kinds of hiring incentives. Keep looking and widen your nets. Some of the best, most well paying jobs I've ever had have been in fields I didn't immediately  think would fit my skill set but it turned out I was good at and they were good fits.

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3 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

She's a lousy, unprofessional bitch. From what I've been hearing lately, there's a real labor shortage out there right now. Employers are scrambling, offering all kinds of hiring incentives. Keep looking and widen your nets. Some of the best, most well paying jobs I've ever had have been in fields I didn't immediately  think would fit my skill set but it turned out I was good at and they were good fits.

Jewel21, Peacheslatour is right on the money, this person is an unprofessional bitch.  As Cupid Stunt says too, that toxic behavior and any boss that indulges in such behavior the way she has isn't going to change.  Going to work in such an environment comes at too high a cost.  She's a sadist.

Don't let her take your self -esteem.

Edited by boes
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Frank Bonner, Sales Manager Herb Tarlek on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati,’ Dies at 79

Frank Bonner, the actor and TV director best known for his portrayal of the tactless radio-station sales manager Herb Tarlek on the admired 1978-82 CBS sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati, has died. He was 79.

Bonner died Wednesday at his home in Laguna Niguel, California, of complications from Lewy body dementia, his wife, Gayle, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Bonner also appeared as Father Hargis, headmaster at the fictional St. Augustine’s Academy, on the 1988-90 ABC show Just the Ten of Us, a spinoff of Growing Pains (both series starred stand-up comedian Bill Kirchenbauer).

Bonner played the inept but lovable Tarlek, who was quite fond of polyester, plaid and station receptionist Jennifer Marlowe (Loni Anderson), on 88 episodes over all four seasons of WKRP in Cincinnati. He then returned for The New WKRP in Cincinnati, which ran from 1991-93.

Hugh Wilson, a former sales executive at a Top 40 radio station, created WKRP (the fictional station’s call letters were a pun on “W-crap”).

Bonner directed six episodes of the original WKRP and seven of the reboot as well as installments of Just the Ten of Us and Saved by the Bell: The New Class. And from 1997-2001, he called the shots on 105 episodes of NBC’s City Guys.

His other directing credits included Family Ties, Who’s the Boss?, Head of the Class, Evening Shade and Harry and the Hendersons.

Bonner was born Frank Woodrow Boers Jr. on Feb. 28, 1942, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was raised in Malvern, Arkansas, and spent six years in the U.S. Navy before making his onscreen debut in the 1967 cult film The Equinox … A Journey Into the Supernatural.

He made his way onto such shows as Mannix, The F.B.I., Emergency!, Cannon and Police Woman before striking it big on WKRP.

Afterward, he showed up on episodes of Saved by the Bell: The New Class, Newhart, The Duck Factory, Matt Houston, Night Court, Scarecrow and Mrs. King and Murder, She Wrote.

During a break from WKRP in 1979, he was severely injured in a parachute accident while being towed by a four-wheel vehicle in the Mojave Desert.

In addition to his wife of nearly 15 years — they were high school sweethearts before they reunited — survivors include his daughters Desiree (and her wife, Mona) and DeAndra (and her husband, Matt); sons Justin and Matthew; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

 

 

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Nobody's free until everybody's free. -- Fannie Lou Hamer

 

Happy Juneteenth! This holiday -- named for and celebrated on June 19 -- commemorates the true ending of slavery in the United States. (You'll note, it is not Jan. 1, the date of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. More on that below.) From its celebratory roots in churches across Texas to the impassioned protests of the last year, Juneteenth has come a long way and this year, it has finally gotten recognition as an official holiday. 

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect Jan. 1, 1863, declaring "all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State... shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free." It wouldn't be until two and a half years later, on June 19, 1865, that General Gordon Granger and his Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War had ended and any enslaved people were freed by executive order.

"The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor," Granger's proclamation read. "The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere."

In addition to Juneteenth making its mark for the first time as an official U.S. holiday, this year marks the 100th anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre -- one of the single worst acts of racial violence in history which took place on May 31 and June 1, 1921 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Several documentaries have been released in 2021 to mark the occasion, including Tulsa Burning: The 1921 Race Massacre, executive produced by NBA star Russell Westbrook and directed by Emmy-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson and Peabody Award winner Marco Williams. The documentary focuses on a specific period, from the birth of Black Wall Street to its catastrophic downfall over two bloody days and then the fallout and eventual reconstruction.

 

Marvin Gaye - Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)

 

Saba - Black Astronaut

 

Jean Dawson - Ghost*

 

Black Thought feat. Shavona Antoinette & Ray Angry - Approximately Free

 

Kirk Franklin: Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

 

Terrace Martin feat. Lalah Hathaway - Oakland

 

TLC - Waterfalls

 

Sech - Somos Iguales

 

Tems - Ordinary People

 

Tobe Nwigwe: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

 

Kane Brown - Worldwide Beautiful

 

Honey Dijon Boiler Room x Sugar Mountain 2018 DJ Set

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The June solstice – your signal to celebrate summer in the Northern Hemisphere and winter in the Southern Hemisphere – will happen on June 21, 2021, at 03:32 UTC. That’s June 20 at 10:32 p.m. CDT in North America. Translate UTC to your time. For us in the Northern Hemisphere, this solstice will mark the beginning of summer and the longest day of the year. Early dawns. Long days. Late sunsets. Short nights. The sun will be at its height each day, as it crosses the sky. Meanwhile, south of the equator, winter will begin.

Ancient cultures knew that the sun’s path across the sky, the length of daylight, and the location of the sunrise and sunset all shifted in a regular way throughout the year.

They built monuments, such as Stonehenge, to follow the sun’s yearly progress.

Today, we know that the solstice is an astronomical event, caused by Earth’s tilt on its axis and its motion in orbit around the sun.

It’s because Earth doesn’t orbit upright. Instead, our world is tilted on its axis by 23 1/2 degrees. Earth’s Northern and Southern Hemispheres trade places in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

At the June solstice, Earth is positioned in its orbit so that our world’s North Pole is leaning most toward the sun. As seen from Earth, the sun is directly overhead at noon 23 1/2 degrees north of the equator, at an imaginary line encircling the globe known as the Tropic of Cancer, named after the constellation Cancer the Crab. This is as far north as the sun ever gets.

All locations north of the equator have days longer than 12 hours at the June solstice. Meanwhile, all locations south of the equator have days shorter than 12 hours.

The solstice takes place place on June 21, 2021, at 03:32 UTC. That’s June 20 10:32 p.m. CDT in North America.

A solstice happens at the same instant for all of us, everywhere on Earth. To find the time of the solstice in your location, you have to translate to your time zone.

Here’s an example of how to do that. In the central United States, for those of us using Central Daylight Time, we subtract five hours from Universal Time. Subtracting 5 hours from 03:32 gives us a negative number, because the solstice happens on the previous calendar date relative to UTC. Whenever you face this dilemma, you can always add 24 hours to UTC to get 27:32 (03:32 + 24 = 27:32), and then subtract 5 hours to get 22:32 (10:32 p.m.) the previous date.

Everywhere. For all of Earth’s creatures, nothing is so fundamental as the length of the day. After all, the sun is the ultimate source of almost all light and warmth on Earth’s surface.

If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, you might notice the early dawns and late sunsets, and the high arc of the sun across the sky each day. You might see how high the sun appears in the sky at local noon. And be sure to look at your noontime shadow. Around the time of the solstice, it’s your shortest noontime shadow of the year.

If you’re a person who’s tuned in to the out-of-doors, you know the peaceful, comforting feeling that accompanies these signs and signals of the year’s longest day.

No world body has designated an official day to start each new season, and different schools of thought or traditions define the seasons in different ways.

In meteorology, for example, summer begins on June 1. And every schoolchild knows that summer starts when the last school bell of the year rings.

Yet June 21 is perhaps the most widely recognized day upon which summer begins in the Northern Hemisphere and upon which winter begins on the southern half of Earth’s globe. There’s nothing official about it, but it’s such a long-held tradition that we all recognize it to be so.

It has been universal among humans to treasure this time of warmth and light.

For us in the modern world, the solstice is a time to recall the reverence and understanding that early people had for the sky. Some 5,000 years ago, people placed huge stones in a circle on a broad plain in what’s now England and aligned them with the June solstice sunrise.

We may never comprehend the full significance of Stonehenge. But we do know that knowledge of this sort wasn’t limited to just one part of the world. Around the same time Stonehenge was being constructed in England, two great pyramids and then the Sphinx were built on Egyptian sands. If you stood at the Sphinx on the summer solstice and gazed toward the two pyramids, you’d see the sun set exactly between them.

If the June solstice brings the longest day, why do we experience the hottest weather in late July and August?

This effect is called the lag of the seasons. It’s the same reason it’s hotter in mid-afternoon than at noontime. Earth just takes a while to warm up after a long winter. Even in June, ice and snow still blanket the ground in some places. The sun has to melt the ice – and warm the oceans – and then we feel the most sweltering summer heat.

Ice and snow have been melting since spring began. Meltwater and rainwater have been percolating down through snow on tops of glaciers.

But the runoff from glaciers isn’t as great now as it’ll be in another month, even though sunlight is striking the Northern Hemisphere most directly around now.

So wait another month for the hottest weather. It’ll come when the days are already beginning to shorten again, as Earth continues to move in orbit around the sun, bringing us closer to another winter.

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Stream hundreds of never-before-seen interviews from our 34-year archive

PBS TV series American Masters has been on the air since 1986, profiling prominent American cultural creators. Only a small fraction of the footage for the interviews they do makes it into the episodes, so they’ve created a digital archive of over 1000 hours of footage “from more than 1,000 original, never-before-seen, full, raw interviews”. Many of them clock in between 20 and 40 minutes in length — like these interviews from Maya Angelou, David Bowie, Nan Goldin, and Betty White — but some are much longer, like Carol Burnett’s 3-hour 39-minute interview, Quincy Jones’ nearly 2-hour interview, and Steven Spielberg’s 1-hour 20-minute interview. A treasure trove! 

 

Rev Osagyefo Sekou on Bluegrass Underground, - The Devil Finds Work

 

Stevie Ray Vaughan - Austin City Limits 1983 Part 1

 

Tiësto - The Business

 

Ladysmith Black Mambazo - Oh Happy Day

 

Karma Car - Booka Shade

 

Linkin Park - Leave Out All The Rest

 

 

AC/DC - War Machine

 

Anne-Marie & Niall Horan - Our Song

 

Mocean Worker - Tickle It

 

LITTLE FEAT feat. Inara George - Trouble

 

Aimee Mann - One

 

MASHUP - Tear You Apart + Bela Lugosi's Dead - DJ ALANT Mix - She wants revenge / Bauhaus Re-Upload

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Cupid Stunt said:

Stream hundreds of never-before-seen interviews from our 34-year archive

PBS TV series American Masters has been on the air since 1986, profiling prominent American cultural creators. Only a small fraction of the footage for the interviews they do makes it into the episodes, so they’ve created a digital archive of over 1000 hours of footage “from more than 1,000 original, never-before-seen, full, raw interviews”. Many of them clock in between 20 and 40 minutes in length — like these interviews from Maya Angelou, David Bowie, Nan Goldin, and Betty White — but some are much longer, like Carol Burnett’s 3-hour 39-minute interview, Quincy Jones’ nearly 2-hour interview, and Steven Spielberg’s 1-hour 20-minute interview. A treasure trove! 

This is so weird to me. If ever there was a TV station that could use its hours to show this footage, it would be PBS.

But thank you for this @Cupid Stunt!

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5 hours ago, bannana said:

This is so weird to me. If ever there was a TV station that could use its hours to show this footage, it would be PBS.

But thank you for this @Cupid Stunt!

I hear you, bannana.

But how are PBS stations going to earn their Dora the Explorer and Ken Burns merchandise vigorish if all the station is broadcasting is Maya Angelou navel-gazing?

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Thank you, Cupid! That was wonderful. So fantastic to see a big crowd at a concert again and what a performance!

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Love Chappelle!  He spends a lot of time at his place in Yellow Springs (a short distance from our house) and I used to spend a lot of time there pre-Covid.  Great shops and food, cool vibe, several friends live there and I've run into him a few times.  Nice guy and quiet demeanor (you hear that a lot about comedians).  Popped in one night a few years back at the wine bar/restaurant we were playing (the trio).  We were acoustic so we fit in there nicely, played there about once a month.  Anyhoo...he stayed for a few songs but some non-locals were pestering him for autographs so he left.  All the locals don't bug him.  Pass him on the street and just say hi.

Very talented fellow.

Remind me to tell you sometime about how I owe Michael Jordan $10......

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Remind me to tell you sometime about how I owe Michael Jordan $10......

Reminding. Well? 🤨

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Well Sherman....set the Way-Back machine for 1984.

I'd had the shop open in Springfield for about 5-6 years and word was spreading around the local university (Wittenberg) and the college kids were coming in.  Well Witt hosts some of the national college tournament games...have a pretty good team themselves...and the games were on so colleges from all over were sending teams.  Now I don't follow basketball much and this was before he hit it big.  Three young guys come in and men's vintage overcoats were all the rage.  They each picked one out, gave me a $10 deposit to hold them and they were coming back the next day to pick them up.  Had a great conversation with them, some laughs, and just before they left one of the shorter guys points to MJ and said "Remember this face.  This guys gonna be famous".   Well they never came back and after 30 days I put them back in stock and threw away the tickets.  I regret I didn't get a piece of paper and say "Well, if you're gonna be famous I want your autograph". 

Lo and behold a few years later there's this young phenom I start seeing and......"OMG!!  That's the guy I owe $10 to!!"

My hand to God.

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2 minutes ago, OhioSongbird said:

Well Sherman....set the Way-Back machine for 1984.

I'd had the shop open in Springfield for about 5-6 years and word was spreading around the local university (Wittenberg) and the college kids were coming in.  Well Witt hosts some of the national college tournament games...have a pretty good team themselves...and the games were on so colleges from all over were sending teams.  Now I don't follow basketball much and this was before he hit it big.  Three young guys come in and men's vintage overcoats were all the rage.  They each picked one out, gave me a $10 deposit to hold them and they were coming back the next day to pick them up.  Had a great conversation with them, some laughs, and just before they left one of the shorter guys points to MJ and said "Remember this face.  This guys gonna be famous".   Well they never came back and after 30 days I put them back in stock and threw away the tickets.  I regret I didn't get a piece of paper and say "Well, if you're gonna be famous I want your autograph". 

Lo and behold a few years later there's this young phenom I start seeing and......"OMG!!  That's the guy I owe $10 to!!"

My hand to God.

That is so cool! My mom once saw Michael Jordan at her fancy schmancy athletic club when the Bulls were in town She was thrilled. She said he was one of the best looking men she'd ever seen in her life and she and my dad had hung out with George Clooney in Lake Como.

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6 hours ago, OhioSongbird said:

Three young guys come in and men's vintage overcoats were all the rage.  They each picked one out, gave me a $10 deposit to hold them and they were coming back the next day to pick them up. 

This reminds me of an episode of Seinfeld.

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7 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

That is so cool! My mom once saw Michael Jordan at her fancy schmancy athletic club when the Bulls were in town She was thrilled. She said he was one of the best looking men she'd ever seen in her life and she and my dad had hung out with George Clooney in Lake Como.

Your folks got the fancy ones.

My Dad did run into Myron Floren from the Lawrence Welk Show once in the Men's Room at the County Fair.

He wasn't carrying his accordion, though, mores the pity.

Edited by boes · Reason: Speeling
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1 minute ago, boes said:

Your folks got the fancy ones.

My Dad did run into Myron Floren from the Lawrence Welk Show one in the Men's Room at the County Fair.

He wasn't carrying his accordion, though, mores the pity.

I once saw Bill Macy (Maude) at Safeway on Capitol Hill.

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The biggest celebrity I ever saw was Dustin Hoffman crossing the street. And no, he didn't say *that*.

 

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I met quite a few celebs through my job at the time, but a random celeb sighting was (and I have to google this right now cause I cannot remember his name but he was Carla's hubby on Cheers), wait for it, Dan Hedaya. We were in Venice Beach having breakfast.

I also not too long ago saw Eric McCormack on a flight from LA I was on (pre-covid) and he was greeted by a sign by his driver with his name. He looked good.

Quite a few years ago I was staying at a premium hotel in Winnipeg and Bill Murray was a guest. Hello, it was Winnipeg, everyone knew he was in the hotel. We often saw him in the cocktail lounge.

At the time he owned the baseball team there.

We both were standing outside the hotel one evening; he was probably waiting for a driver. I had a bus full of meeting delegates to take to the races. 

So we chatted a bit. He was way more congenial than one would have expected.

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You know, I like to see a lot of wood in a house. I'm a fan of the "lodge look" but.. DAYUM. Yikes.

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On 6/23/2021 at 2:18 AM, bannana said:

I met quite a few celebs through my job at the time, but a random celeb sighting was (and I have to google this right now cause I cannot remember his name but he was Carla's hubby on Cheers), wait for it, Dan Hedaya. We were in Venice Beach having breakfast.

I also not too long ago saw Eric McCormack on a flight from LA I was on (pre-covid) and he was greeted by a sign by his driver with his name. He looked good.

Quite a few years ago I was staying at a premium hotel in Winnipeg and Bill Murray was a guest. Hello, it was Winnipeg, everyone knew he was in the hotel. We often saw him in the cocktail lounge.

At the time he owned the baseball team there.

We both were standing outside the hotel one evening; he was probably waiting for a driver. I had a bus full of meeting delegates to take to the races. 

So we chatted a bit. He was way more congenial than one would have expected.

Yeah, my standing joke at one point ran like this, "So and so? I sold him his china..." Before this particular incarnation I ran marketing and managed TO's fanciest china store [grew up knowing the stuff and nobody wants multiple English degrees].

Best person I met, as a person, not as a celeb? Vincent Price! A complete gentleman with very good taste in china. We chatted a couple of times--I was usually dragged out to handle celebs, and he had the best watch. It was an old Timex on a silver/turquoise concho band--given to him by John Ford.

Worst? A tie between Lee Majors [tried to wrestle me into going out]--totally uncharming and I was quite happy when his MasterCard bounced; and, sorry to say this, Alex Trebek [RIP]--at that point, really pretentious and full of himself for a guy from Sudbury who just got off a third-rate Canadian quiz show.

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Best person I met, as a person, not as a celeb? Vincent Price! A complete gentleman with very good taste in china. We chatted a couple of times--I was usually dragged out to handle celebs, and he had the best watch. It was an old Timex on a silver/turquoise concho band--given to him by John Ford.

I've heard that about Vincent Price. He was a national treasure. I was lucky enough to see him on stage when he was on tour with his one man show as Oscar Wilde. I still have the playbill (I framed it).

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33 minutes ago, pearlite said:

Best person I met, as a person, not as a celeb? Vincent Price! A complete gentleman with very good taste in china. We chatted a couple of times--I was usually dragged out to handle celebs, and he had the best watch. It was an old Timex on a silver/turquoise concho band--given to him by John Ford.

Worst? A tie between Lee Majors [tried to wrestle me into going out]--totally uncharming and I was quite happy when his MasterCard bounced; and, sorry to say this, Alex Trebek [RIP]--at that point, really pretentious and full of himself for a guy from Sudbury who just got off a third-rate Canadian quiz show.

It's always surprising. Best celeb I met, kindest, most down to earth, genuinely nice and friendly: Hal Linden. Richard Dean Anderson was also pretty great.

I have some worsts: almost made cry was Joe DiMaggio; rude to little children who were his fans was William Shatner; just generally ornery was Tom Skerrit.

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Kinda bummed to hear that about Alex.  Always loved him and he seemed to be so refined and gentlemanly.

The worst for me was a member of The Association (Never My Love, Wendy).  Shop was downtown then (I've had 3 locations) and they were in town in the late '80's doing our summer arts festival.  3-4 guys came in and looked around (can't remember if they bought anything) but this one guy was just really snotty and at one point he said:  "Don't you know who we are?  Ever hear of The Association?"   I replied 'yeah' and started listing their songs while *in my head*  Dude...your heyday was 20 yrs ago.  Get over it.....

Putz.

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just generally ornery was Tom Skerrit.

My parents hung out with James Woods in Europe at one point. They said he was rude to waitstaff, hotel workers and pretty much everybody. I don't know why Tom Skerrit reminded me of that.

Edited by peacheslatour
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My celebrity interactions have been few and far between but I had one that for me was unforgettable.  20, maybe more, years ago, Ruth Warrick aka Phoebe Tyler from All My Children was doing the play Love Letters at this tiny church in San Francisco, really just a converted storefront off of Fillmore Street.  I doubt the place held more than 80 people.  Her co-star was a man active in local theater out here and she was doing it as a benefit to raise money for this church.  It was some sort of metaphysical, positive attitude, universal Christianity congregation, very welcoming to all people that was very dear to her heart.

I was really too old to be such a fan boy but that I was and the chance to see her in person was too good to pass up.  She was terrific, just terrific and there was a social hour afterwards.  She was a tiny woman physically - who knew? - her onscreen presence was always large - and eventually I got the chance to speak with her, one on one.  I kept it brief, telling her how much I loved her work and her character.  She laughed at that and used her Phoebe voice to say "You really shouldn't, Phoebe can be awful!". I told her what a fan I'd been of Kay Campbell ( who had also been on AMC) and asked after Mary Fickett, another longtime AMC actor who had retired because of ill health.  It was maybe only 5 minutes conversation in total but she was as kind and accessible as I could have wanted.

That's a very sunny memory for me.

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That is awesome.  I watched AMC practically from the beginning till it ended  *sob*.

Loved Phoebe and don't forget her in Citizen Kane.

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2 hours ago, boes said:

My celebrity interactions have been few and far between but I had one that for me was unforgettable.  20, maybe more, years ago, Ruth Warrick aka Phoebe Tyler from All My Children was doing the play Love Letters at this tiny church in San Francisco, really just a converted storefront off of Fillmore Street.  I doubt the place held more than 80 people.  Her co-star was a man active in local theater out here and she was doing it as a benefit to raise money for this church.  It was some sort of metaphysical, positive attitude, universal Christianity congregation, very welcoming to all people that was very dear to her heart.

I was really too old to be such a fan boy but that I was and the chance to see her in person was too good to pass up.  She was terrific, just terrific and there was a social hour afterwards.  She was a tiny woman physically - who knew? - her onscreen presence was always large - and eventually I got the chance to speak with her, one on one.  I kept it brief, telling her how much I loved her work and her character.  She laughed at that and used her Phoebe voice to say "You really shouldn't, Phoebe can be awful!". I told her what a fan I'd been of Kay Campbell ( who had also been on AMC) and asked after Mary Fickett, another longtime AMC actor who had retired because of ill health.  It was maybe only 5 minutes conversation in total but she was as kind and accessible as I could have wanted.

That's a very sunny memory for me.

That's lovely.

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8 hours ago, pearlite said:

Best person I met, as a person, not as a celeb? Vincent Price! A complete gentleman with very good taste in china. We chatted a couple of times--I was usually dragged out to handle celebs, and he had the best watch. It was an old Timex on a silver/turquoise concho band--given to him by John Ford.

You just reminded me that the only celeb I've met and talked to was Vincent Price in ~1972.  I was taking a short course on silent films at the George Eastman House, and he must have been in Rochester for something else, but happened to know the ~80 yr old piano player who had been playing live at silent movie showings since ~1910.  VP dropped by unannounced, not as a celeb.  Vincent was there because he loved silent films, especially with live piano. Though he only appeared in talkies, I'm sure VP got a lot of his ideas for facial expressions from watching silent films. We were a bunch of teenagers and Vincent was just there talking to us like equals studying films. He wasn't introduced to us by name, though some of us noticed the resemblance and assumed he was just a local, classy patron of the arts with a diamond pinky ring.  One of the kids told him he looked a lot like VP; he responded "I do".  Then the teacher & piano player explained that he was the actual VP & how they knew each other.  It was cool; all we talked about were the films we had just watched and the choices of music.  If we had known who he was beforehand we would have talked about HIS films instead of the silent classics.

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1 hour ago, deirdra said:

You just reminded me that the only celeb I've met and talked to was Vincent Price in ~1972.  I was taking a short course on silent films at the George Eastman House, and he must have been in Rochester for something else, but happened to know the ~80 yr old piano player who had been playing live at silent movie showings since ~1910.  VP dropped by unannounced, not as a celeb.  Vincent was there because he loved silent films, especially with live piano. Though he only appeared in talkies, I'm sure VP got a lot of his ideas for facial expressions from watching silent films. We were a bunch of teenagers and Vincent was just there talking to us like equals studying films. He wasn't introduced to us by name, though some of us noticed the resemblance and assumed he was just a local, classy patron of the arts with a diamond pinky ring.  One of the kids told him he looked a lot like VP; he responded "I do".  Then the teacher & piano player explained that he was the actual VP & how they knew each other.  It was cool; all we talked about were the films we had just watched and the choices of music.  If we had known who he was beforehand we would have talked about HIS films instead of the silent classics.

How exciting for all of you!  I would have been in awe.

I just have seen him in Dragonwyck a hundred times when I was a kid, him and Gene Tierney and Anne Revere and Jessica Tandy, on the late show.  VP was so much more than just his horror movies, though I liked them too.  Then when I found out later that he was married to Coral Browne.....

What a treat you had!

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When I worked for a company that sold antique rugs, around '92, one day I was in the show room and on my way back to the office when I saw Rick Moranis. I was so surprised to see him and so surprised at how tiny he was that I tripped over a big rolled up rug. He turned and saw me. Then I hightailed it out of the showroom. Hahaha.

When I cashiered in a soap store at the South Street Seaport, around '82, Fred Gywnne and his wife came in and bought some soap so I had a chance to talk with him while they were at the register. He was lovely, charming and gracious, he gave me a couple of autographs, and he had such crystal blue eyes. One autograph was for me and one was for one of my roommates. My roommate Valters (Lithuanian) used to sing the Munsters theme to me when he'd see me in the morning and I told FG this and asked him for an autograph for Valters. He laughed and signed it, To Valters,  from "Verman", then his name. He was delightful.

 

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9 hours ago, boes said:

How exciting for all of you!  I would have been in awe.

I just have seen him in Dragonwyck a hundred times when I was a kid, him and Gene Tierney and Anne Revere and Jessica Tandy, on the late show.  VP was so much more than just his horror movies, though I liked them too.  Then when I found out later that he was married to Coral Browne.....

What a treat you had!

VP had such a great range [before Hammer]! His Kind of Woman is one of my big faves.

He was buying the china [demitasses, I think] for Coral Browne, who must have had a yen for Crown Derby.

Speaking of Ms Browne, have you ever seen The Ruling Class with Ms Browne, Peter O'Toole, and so on? Another fave.

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35 minutes ago, pearlite said:

VP had such a great range [before Hammer]! His Kind of Woman is one of my big faves.

He was buying the china [demitasses, I think] for Coral Browne, who must have had a yen for Crown Derby.

Speaking of Ms Browne, have you ever seen The Ruling Class with Ms Browne, Peter O'Toole, and so on? Another fave.

It's one of my favorites!  Coral Browne entranced me from the first time I saw her in Auntie Mame.  I read her bio a few years back.  There were so many laugh out loud quotes from her - this one - 

‘Nobody we know, dear.’ Coral Browne on seeing the giant phallus used on the set of Peter Brook‘s production of Oedipus for the National in 1968.

 

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