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Small Talk: Out of Genoa

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Yes!  Happy Birthday, peaches!

I shall raise a glass or three in your honor....

 

Happy Easter everybody!

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Yes, it's @peacheslatour's birthday!  Perhaps you heard of her.  Have an eggs-traordinary day!  (Sorry, I had to do that for the Easter Punny. 🐰🐣🐇)  Happy birthday, and best wishes always! 💓  I hope your year goes a little something like this:

 

 

Peaches birthday.jpg

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D'aww thanks youse guys! My birthday has fallen on Easter quite a few times in my life. It's better than having a Christmas b-day though.

image.png.d3961ae1607ac8a1d9dcc2beb97fb733.pngHappy Easter, don't skimp on the chocolate!

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I was born on Easter Sunday...March 25, 1951.  Easter hasn't/won't fall on 3/25 again until 2035.  So it's never happened to me.  It's been the 24th-26th lots of times but not the 25th. 

I always count Easter as my 'second birthday'. 

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10 minutes ago, OhioSongbird said:

I was born on Easter Sunday...March 25, 1951.  Easter hasn't/won't fall on 3/25 again until 2035.  So it's never happened to me.  It's been the 24th-26th lots of times but not the 25th. 

I always count Easter as my 'second birthday'. 

When I was a kid, I always got ear infections in the spring. I've spent many birthdays and Easters in bed, sick.

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Happy Birthday, Peacheslatour!!  

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HBD Peaches! My younger son’s birthday is on Tuesday, so it has fallen on Easter before. Easter was quite early in 2005, the year he was born - it fell on the last Sunday in March. 

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2 minutes ago, Capricasix said:

HBD Peaches! My younger son’s birthday is on Tuesday, so it has fallen on Easter before. Easter was quite early in 2005, the year he was born - it fell on the last Sunday in March. 

Thank you! My son's birthday is the eighth but I don't think it's ever fallen on Easter. Happy spring!

 

image.png.e6b525ed12d02a3b073d35616263e570.png

  

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9 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

My birthday has fallen on Easter quite a few times in my life. It's better than having a Christmas b-day though.

When I was six or seven I had an Easter bday and I got toys (Liddle Kiddles) in my Easter basket. Best Easter ever! I also had an Easter bday in my twenties and threw one helluva bash.

6 hours ago, OhioSongbird said:

I was born on Easter Sunday...March 25, 1951.  Easter hasn't/won't fall on 3/25 again until 2035.  So it's never happened to me.  It's been the 24th-26th lots of times but not the 25th. 

I always count Easter as my 'second birthday'. 

I just checked, I'm not having another Easter bday again. Oh well.

I was born on a Holy Thursday, so I always secretly think of Holy Thursday as my birthday, too.

oh, Peaches...

image.png.ec67c357bd88807ce2262b9194776181.png

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Thank you for the swell birthday wishes, you guys are the best!

Quote

When I was six or seven I had an Easter bday and I got toys (Liddle Kiddles) in my Easter basket. Best Easter ever! I also had an Easter bday in my twenties and threw one helluva bash.

OMG! Liddle Kiddles! I was crazy about them when I was a kid. When I was in my thirties my mom started working a the doll museum in the next town over, she began buying me vintage Kiddles, the same ones I used to have as a kid. I now have almost every one of the ones I used to have. I also collect Petite Princess furniture. I have set up a "mansion" for them both on a glass case.

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7 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

OMG! Liddle Kiddles! I was crazy about them when I was a kid. When I was in my thirties my mom started working a the doll museum in the next town over, she began buying me vintage Kiddles, the same ones I used to have as a kid. I now have almost every one of the ones I used to have. I also collect Petite Princess furniture. I have set up a "mansion" for them both on a glass case.

Can I come over and play? haha I am greeeeeeen with envy.

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4 hours ago, SweePea59 said:

Can I come over and play? haha I am greeeeeeen with envy.

Come on over! We'll have popcorn and orange juice with seltzer in it. (That's what my BFF and I used to have when we played Kiddles). BTW, they're not that expensive on Ebay.

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DMX, Rapper Who Blended Menace With Emotional Sincerity, Dead at 50

Earl Simmons, the rapper better known as DMX, died on Friday at White Plains Hospital in White Plains, New York, one week after suffering a heart attack. He was 50 years old.

“We are deeply saddened to announce today that our loved one, DMX, birth name of Earl Simmons, passed away at 50 years old at White Plains Hospital with his family by his side after being placed on life support for the past few days,” his family said in a statement. “Earl was a warrior who fought till the very end. He loved his family with all of his heart and we cherish the times we spent with him. Earl’s music inspired countless fans across the world and his iconic legacy will live on forever. We appreciate all of the love and support during this incredibly difficult time. Please respect our privacy as we grieve the loss of our brother, father, uncle and the man the world knew as DMX. We will share information about his memorial service once details are finalized.”

On Friday, April 2nd, Simmons was rushed to the hospital and by Saturday morning, the rapper’s lawyer, Murray Richman, confirmed that he was in a coma and on life support in the hospital’s critical care unit. “Last night, Earl ‘DMX’ Simmons was rushed to the hospital after collapsing at home,” a rep for the rapper said in a statement on Saturday. “At this time, he remains in ICU in critical condition.”

The rapper — whose brain was reportedly deprived of oxygen for 30 minutes following the medical emergency — remained in a vegetative state while family, friends and fans gathered outside White Plains Hospital for a prayer vigil. Following a battery of brain function tests, the rapper was taken off life support Friday.

DMX’s two-decade-plus career was beset by legal troubles, tabloid headlines, and struggles with drug addiction. But he was also one of the most successful hardcore rappers to ever cross over on a mainstream stage — an artist with a huge cultural impact and influence that extended well beyond his core audience, and a powerful artistic style of passionate urgency.

His arrival in the mid-Nineties coincided with hip-hop’s emergence as a commercialized global phenomenon; DMX provided a grimy counter-narrative to the glossy big-budget sheen of the era’s most popular rap. He also revitalized the Def Jam label, inadvertently provided a blueprint for Jay-Z’s own popular breakthrough, and developed a career as a charismatic film star in movies like Belly, Romeo Must Die, and Exit Wounds. Yet DMX is best remembered today for his gripping music, which matched his aggressive machismo with an emotional sincerity that resonated around the world.

Although his persona fit a familiar hip-hop archetype — DMX was a muscular street rapper who sold rugged credibility with an aggressive edge — his approach to rapping was a radical departure from other stylists at the time. His voice rose and fell with a preacher’s cadence; the tone of his vocals bleeding raw at the surface. His verses were punctuated with growls and barks, yet his art was far too earnest for these elements to scan as gimmickry. The gravelly texture and loose rhythms of his rapping — he often seemed less interested in riding the groove than in confidently forcing it to follow his lead — gave the songs an urgent, unrehearsed feeling.

“Tupac [Shakur] was gone [and] there was a void,” Kendrick Lamar told Complex in 2012. “Something was missing in the game and he came through to fill that.” When DMX first hit mainstream America, it had been two years since Shakur’s death, and his success was propelled by an urgent longing in the collective psyche. But as Marcus Reeves argued in his 2008 book Somebody Scream!, DMX took his own path, shifting from “the sociopolitical to the spiritual.”

Christian themes permeated his work much more openly than in Shakur’s. (“People believe you can only catch the Holy Ghost in church,” DMX told Vibe in 1998. “I get it onstage.”) But what gave his art its most potent energy was how he believably and accessibly reconciled strength with vulnerability. As he told MTV’s Carson Daly on Total Request Live in 1999, “The toughest guys have the biggest hearts. But you gotta be like that to protect the heart. Because the heart is soft. You gotta be a tough guy to keep it safe.”

Earl Simmons (“My alias,” as he once told Vibe) was born December 18th, 1970, in Mount Vernon, New York, the only child of Arnett Simmons and Joe Barker. Arnett was 19; Earl was her second child. Earl’s father, an artist who’d attended high school with Arnett, was soon out of the picture. Arnett moved the family to Yonkers, New York, where he endured a deeply troubled childhood: Beset by poverty and abuse, he was in and out of group homes and, eventually, jail. “I never had many friends in Yonkers,” he once told MTV News while visiting his hometown. “I never had many friends, period.” He struggled with drugs and became a stick-up kid.

“I robbed niggas,” DMX told Rolling Stone in a 2000 cover story. “I’m not ashamed of that. That’s my s***. Robbery. I’m not a hustler. I’ve tried it. That’s not me. I’d rather do the stick-up s***. But what got me over was, I had a rep in Yonkers. Niggas knew DMX would get ya. And I’d be straight-up robbin’ niggas, no mask or nothin’. Half of my weapon was my face. I’d just walk up to niggas and be like, ‘Yo, lemme get that.’ I wasn’t the biggest n**** in the world. I couldn’t beat everybody, but dawg, my rep superseded me.”

In the mid-1980s, he beatboxed for Brooklyn rapper Ready Ron before writing his own personal, therapeutic verses. Although DMX received a co-sign from The Source’s Unsigned Hype column in 1991 (as DMX the Great), he struggled at first to gain much success; a deal with Columbia subsidiary Ruffhouse led to a failed 1992 single (“Born Loser”) and a similarly unsuccessful follow-up (1995’s “Make a Move”).

After leaving Ruffhouse, DMX became the primary cause of Irving “Irv Gotti” Domingo Lorenzo Jr., a newly appointed Def Jam A&R who’d obtained his position by helping to arrange Jay-Z’s deal with the label. “This guy comes into my office saying, ‘The only way niggas is going to dance again is like this,‘” Russell Simmons told Vibe in 2008. “And he started bouncing. Because that was the vibe DMX and Ja Rule had.”

“First meeting I ever had, I was like, ‘We gotta sign DMX,’ and they laughed at me,” Gotti told Complex in 2015. “Jay and Dame [Dash] did not believe in DMX. I said, ‘If you look in the hood, there’s less niggas like you, and more niggas like him.'” Gotti’s enthusiasm came in part from the rapper’s new single, “Get at Me Dog,” which originally had been a freestyle made for a DJ Clue tape and also featured the Lox. Then-Def Jam exec Julie Greenwald told Vibe in 2008, “Gotti plays me ‘Get at Me Dog,’ and is like, ‘It’s going to sell 5 million.’ I’m like, ‘Irv, you’re out of your mind.'” Ultimately, Gotti convinced top execs Lyor Cohen, Kevin Liles, and Damon Dash to come up to Yonkers and let DMX freestyle for them. DMX performed with his jaw wired shut, the result of a fight with “10 guys,” according to Vibe‘s 1998 profile of the rapper. Def Jam signed him soon thereafter.

The 1998 video for “Get at Me Dog” got no MTV play after DMX refused to allow it to be censored. Yet the song became a rallying cry for hip-hop’s axis of gritty realism. In an era of flashy chains and profligate spending, DMX was an Everyman. “You can’t take money with you to heaven, baby,” he once told The Source. “Only love.” By the end of 1998, DMX’s debut album, It’s Dark and Hell is Hot, had gone four times platinum — 1 million shy of Gotti’s promise, but enough to convince Def Jam’s suits of Gotti’s vision. “Jay looked and seen what I did with X and was like, ‘H*** s***, that s*** worked,'” Gotti told Complex.

“Def Jam Recordings and the extended Def Jam family of artists, executives and employees are deeply and profoundly saddened by the loss of our brother Earl ‘DMX’ Simmons,” the label said in a statement. “DMX was a brilliant artist and an inspiration to millions around the world. His message of triumph over struggle, his search for the light out of darkness, his pursuit of truth and grace brought us closer to our own humanity. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and all those who loved him and were touched by him. DMX was nothing less than a giant. His legend will live on forever.”

“Earl Simmons was a wonderful, caring father, and a sensitive, thoughtful man,” former Def Jam head Lyor Cohen said in a statement. “Unfortunately, Dark Man X took over and ran amok, tormented and struggling to find the light…. DMX gave me the inspiration to keep going at Def Jam when rap became soft and silly.”

DMX’s first five albums, including 1998’s Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood and 1999’s … And Then There Was X, all debuted at Number One on the Billboard charts, and his sixth — 2006’s Year Of the Dog … Again — missed the Number One spot by a few hundred copies. His work crossed over beyond hardcore hip-hop fans, and DMX noticed, telling Spin magazine in 2000: “I will never compromise my work. What I say, I mean. … But sometimes you have to speak to people who you don’t necessarily think are your audience, just because they like you.” His team successfully marketed his work across demographics; for 1999’s “What’s My Name?,” the video transplanted X’s world to a set based upon Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way?” video.

His career slowed in the mid-2000s, with his substance abuse issues often blamed as the cause (although he suggested in 2012 that Jay-Z, with whom he’d long had a rivalry and who’d become head of Def Jam, had intentionally withheld the rapper’s material from the public). Since that time, DMX appeared on reality television — a format that seemed especially friendly to his confessional pathos — and had frequent public struggles with the law, including arrests for identity theft, animal cruelty, and impersonating a federal agent. Yet nearly two decades on, his music remains a major influence in hip-hop to both underground rappers and superstars. “That’s the first album that got me writing,” Kendrick Lamar told Complex of DMX’s debut. “I wrote my first lyrics to that album actually, [at] about 13, 14. I just got inspired and started writing, so that will always be one of my favorite albums.”

However, the past five years of DMX’s life were plagued by more legal issues and drug use: In 2017, the rapper was arrested on tax-fraud charges and accused of withholding $1.7 million from the IRS. While awaiting trial, the rapper again relapsed and was sent to a drug-rehabilitation center. He ultimately pleaded guilty to the charges and was sentenced to one year in prison. Following his release from prison in 2019, and a triumphant return to the stage at the Masters of Ceremony event at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, DMX embarked on a tour to celebrate the 20th anniversary of It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot. Months later, however, DMX canceled a slate of concerts in order to return to rehab.

“In his ongoing commitment to putting family and sobriety first, DMX has checked himself into a rehab facility,” a rep for DMX wrote on his Instagram in October 2019. “He apologizes for his canceled shows and thanks his fans for their continued support.” In July 2020, DMX re-emerged to face off in a Verzuz battle against Snoop Dogg. It would mark his final public performance.

Long after his death, DMX will be remembered for blazing new paths and remaining defiantly himself. “I’m definitely a free spirit,” he once told MTV. “I could go with no direction. Just go. I’ll find what I find. I’ll end up where I end up. I’ll end up there. And there is never a bad place, because you always learn something from it. … I like to just go with the wind.”

-- David Drake

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Ramsey Clark, former U.S. attorney general and human rights activist, dead at 93

Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, who helped shape U.S. civil rights law during the Johnson administration but went on to travel the globe to fight human rights abuses by his own country as he saw them, has died at age 93.

Clark, one of the architects of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965 and Civil Rights Act of 1968, died on Friday, family member Sharon Welch said, according to media outlets including the New York Times and the Washington Post.

In a lengthy career of representing unpopular causes, Clark defended or gave advice to Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, Liberian political figure Charles Taylor and Iraq’s Saddam Hussein. Domestically he was active for conservative politician Lyndon LaRouche, Branch Davidian leader David Koresh and antiwar activist the Reverend Philip Berrigan. In the 1990s, he helped found the leftist International Action Center in New York, which drew attention in 1999 for street protests condemning the U.S.-led NATO bombing of Yugoslavia.

In an interview with Reuters in July 2001 as he was preparing to give Milosevic legal advice on charges filed by a U.N. international war crimes tribunal, Clark discussed his commitment to human rights. “For 30 years I’ve supported the idea and worked for the creation of an international criminal court that has universal jurisdiction and is independent of all political influence and that has the power to prosecute the high and the mighty as well as the weak and the defeated,” Clark said. “Equality is the mother of justice. If there is no equality in law, there is no justice.”

Cuba’s president, Miguel Diaz-Canel, lamented Clark’s death on Twitter on Saturday. “He was an honest and supportive man that stood by our side during crucial battles and denounced the great injustices committed by his country worldwide,” Diaz-Canel wrote. “#Cuba pays him grateful tribute.”

Hanan Ashrawi, a former member of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s Executive Committee, wrote on Twitter that Clark “was an indefatigable defender of Palestinian & human rights, a lawyer who knew & pursued genuine justice & the rights of the oppressed.” Clark was an advocate for Soviet and Syrian Jews, but outraged many Jews over other clients. He defended a Nazi prison camp guard fighting extradition, and the Palestine Liberation Organization in a lawsuit over the slaying of a cruise ship passenger by hijackers.

The United Nations recognized Clark’s work in 2008 by naming him one of the winners of its prestigious prize in the field of human rights. Others who have received the prize include former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt and South African leader Nelson Mandela.

Clark was born in Dallas into a prominent Texas family on Dec. 18, 1927. His father, Tom Clark, was named U.S. attorney general by President Harry Truman in 1945 and then to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1949. Ramsey Clark served in the Marine Corps in 1945-46, making the rank of corporal, attended the University of Texas and the University of Chicago and then practiced law in Dallas. He joined the Justice Department under Democratic President John Kennedy in 1961 and served in top posts until Democratic President Lyndon Johnson nominated him as attorney general in 1967. His father retired from the Supreme Court to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest.

In the years after government service, Clark raised eyebrows many times by befriending some of the declared enemies of the United States, including Gaddafi, Saddam and Milosevic. Clark, in response to a 1986 U.S. military attack on Libya which Washington had accused of terrorism, visited the North African country. At the outbreak of the 1991 Gulf War, Clark defied the U.S.-led coalition to visit Saddam in Baghdad. He returned to Iraq several times over the years to condemn U.N. sanctions that were depriving Iraqi children of food and medicine. He joined Saddam’s defense team when the former Iraqi president went on trial for war crimes and even lectured the judge on how to conduct a fair trial.

In the Milosevic case and in the case of a Rwandan militiaman he represented on war crimes charges, Clark argued that the international tribunals established by the United Nations were illegal because there was no provision for them in the U.N. Charter.

As a top Justice Department official, Clark engaged himself in civil rights. Among his many tasks were surveying Southern school districts desegregating under court order in 1963 and supervising the federal presence at the University of Mississippi following the admission of James Meredith as the school’s first black student.

Clark also helped draft and direct passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968 containing the first federal open housing law.

In an ironic twist considering his later activist role, Clark as attorney general oversaw the prosecution during the Vietnam War of an antiwar group known as the “Boston Five” for helping draft resisters. Four of the five, including famed pediatrician Benjamin Spock and Yale chaplain William Sloane Coffin, were convicted. “We won the case, that was the worst part,” he said years later.

There were usually two to three dozen active cases on Clark’s legal calendar, and about 100 more in the background. Capital punishment cases were a staple. “We talk about civil liberties,” he said. “We have the largest prison population per capita on Earth. The world’s greatest jailer is the freest country on Earth?”

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Undated photo issued Monday April 12, 2021, by West Mercia Police, showing the world's biggest rabbit, Darius, who has been stolen from it's home in Worcestershire, police have said. West Mercia Police are appealing for information after the 129 centimeters (4 feet, 3 inches) long Continental Giant rabbit named Darius was taken from its enclosure in the garden of the property in Stoulton, England, overnight on Saturday. (West Mercia Police via AP)

Bunny snatched: Record-holding giant rabbit stolen in UK

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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Mr. Stunt, Thing's 1&2 and I got our first Covid-19 shots this afternoon at Walgreens, with half of Mr. Stunt's employees. We all walked across the street and had dinner at a Vietnamese food truck to celebrate! The truck closed early because we ate all the food.

 

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3 minutes ago, Cupid Stunt said:

Mr. Stunt, Thing's 1&2 and I got our first Covid-19 shots this afternoon at Walgreens, with half of Mr. Stunt's employees. We all walked across the street and had dinner at a Vietnamese food truck to celebrate! The truck closed early because we ate all the food.

 

Hurrah!

🤘

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Pennsylvania just opened eligibility to my age group yesterday!  It wasn't supposed to be until April 19th, but the governor pushed it up a few days. There are about ten places I can go within 7 miles of my house (5 of those places within 2 miles), but getting an appointment is a bit of a challenge.  But I keep plugging away!

How were MM and BJ kissing today?  If Y&R tapes ~6 weeks in advance, and you aren't considered fully vaccinated until two weeks after your second dose, they would have to have started their shots back in January.  I'm not being snarky here, but are actors considered essential workers in California?

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4 hours ago, Cupid Stunt said:

Mr. Stunt, Thing's 1&2 and I got our first Covid-19 shots this afternoon at Walgreens, with half of Mr. Stunt's employees. We all walked across the street and had dinner at a Vietnamese food truck to celebrate! The truck closed early because we ate all the food.

 

Wow!  Your Walgreens has much higher capacity than ours do in the Bay Area.  None of our have more than 2 people giving the shots at one time and another person to monitor the 15 minute wait times post shot.  

It's great you all found one that could handle that many people.  Only the Coliseum in Oakland and the Moscone Center in SF up here are set up for that capacity.

You must be so happy to have that first shot behind you!

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7 hours ago, boes said:

Wow!  Your Walgreens has much higher capacity than ours do in the Bay Area.  None of our have more than 2 people giving the shots at one time and another person to monitor the 15 minute wait times post shot.  

It's great you all found one that could handle that many people.  Only the Coliseum in Oakland and the Moscone Center in SF up here are set up for that capacity.

You must be so happy to have that first shot behind you!

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Patti Labelle Praise Dancin'!

I had a vaccination appointment at my regular clinic for June 23. I cancelled it last night. There's been so much death and illness worldwide, the opportunity to be vaccinated is a light at the end of a very dark journey. I gladly stopped cleaning the oven when I got the call to group up.

The shots party was organized within a few hours by an HR employee of Mr. Stunt's. She personally took on the coordinating Covid-19 insurance disbursements/shot appointments for employees. The Walgreens runs an occasional Covid-19 shot drive up in a parking lot next to their store. The store got an excess of vaccines than they could store and contacted HR Lady to invite people to line up. A school bus hire, round up volunteers, and we were in line for our jabs and making appointments for the 2nd shot. Mr. Stunt invited the bus driver join us for a shot and dinner.

It was a good Wednesday in Los Angeles.

 

12 hours ago, Snaporaz said:

Pennsylvania just opened eligibility to my age group yesterday!  It wasn't supposed to be until April 19th, but the governor pushed it up a few days. There are about ten places I can go within 7 miles of my house (5 of those places within 2 miles), but getting an appointment is a bit of a challenge.  But I keep plugging away!

How were MM and BJ kissing today? If Y&R tapes ~6 weeks in advance, and you aren't considered fully vaccinated until two weeks after your second dose, they would have to have started their shots back in January.  I'm not being snarky here, but are actors considered essential workers in California?

Keeping Preverts in my prayers for local vaccinations.

I can't speak to their circumstances for the Y&R producers to allow it, but many actors and musicians have been able to get fully vaccinated and cast/employees are regularly tested by the production companies -- Which has a had a major impact on production budgets and the quality of Shows.

Essential workers? It depends on who you talk to. In SoCal the TV/Movie/Music/Pot Dispensary business are the engines that drive the state economy.

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Yes - Roundabout https://youtu.be/cPCLFtxpadE

 

Rubén Jordan - "Melodía de atnayeca" https://youtu.be/PM9gsodxNj8

 

Jimmy "Duck" Holmes – All Night Long https://youtu.be/FQOySANPuFQ

 

The Undisputed Truth - Smiling Faces Sometimes https://youtu.be/3GXSHRJYxTQ

 

Eminem, featuring Dido - Stan *Seven Dirty Words Warning* https://youtu.be/HIqQ0PfuPo8

 

The Sundays - Here's Where The Story Ends https://youtu.be/FHsip5xOenQ

 

Britney Spears - Perfect Lover  *Seven Dirty Ideas Warning* https://youtu.be/gtZw6TtflJI

 

Angela Winbush - Angel https://youtu.be/HKhgZwL8cKk

 

Nina Simone - Live At Montreux 1976 https://youtu.be/_fn9K1UI_IA

 

ASHFORD & SIMPSON - SOLID AS A ROCK https://youtu.be/Lv-uWegEbTQ

 

Joni Mitchell - Sunny Sunday https://youtu.be/GBRppmWyWmQ

 

JIMI HENDRIX - Cry of Love https://youtu.be/Q124xL2nlVw

 

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble - Riviera Paradise (Live From Austin, TX) https://youtu.be/3c_8VUL5jks

 

Jane Birkin et Serge Gainsbourg - Je T'aime,...Moi Non Plus https://youtu.be/k3Fa4lOQfbA

 

Bach - Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major BWV 1068 - Netherlands Bach Society https://youtu.be/oqU4rF_ysQo

 

Camila Cabello, ft. Young Thug - Havana https://youtu.be/BQ0mxQXmLsk

 

Blackstreet, ft. Dr. Dre, Queen Pen - No Diggity https://youtu.be/3KL9mRus19o

 

Steve Earle Live Acoustic Show: 1991 Live at McCabes https://youtu.be/0m-p2IAQj5A

 

Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli - Jattendrai Swing 1939 https://youtu.be/ANArGmr74u4

 

St. Vincent - Year Of The Tiger https://youtu.be/b4qG06Q2zac

 

Indeep - Last Night A D.J. Saved My Life https://youtu.be/_dKlLHE6sMQ

 

Freya Ridings - Blackout https://youtu.be/fFZS630ubtE

 

Black Pumas - Colors https://youtu.be/0G383538qzQ

 

Badi Assad - Valse d'Amelie https://youtu.be/UEgmzQTqOkg

 

Nelly Furtado - I'm Like A Bird https://youtu.be/roPQ_M3yJTA

 

Heavy D & The Boyz ft. Aaron Hall - Now That We Found Love https://youtu.be/NNEgUPKxk7A

 

"Dust Buddies " by Beth Tomashek & Sam Wade https://youtu.be/mZ6eeAjgSZI

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Google Earth

Google Earth users can now see the striking effect of climate change over the past four decades.

Google's latest feature, Timelapse, is an eye opening, technical feat that provides visual evidence of how the Earth has changed due to climate change and human behavior. The tool takes the platform's static imagery and turns it into a dynamic 4D experience, allowing users to click through timelapses that highlight melting ice caps, receding glaciers, massive urban growth and wildfires' impact on agriculture.

Timelapse compiles 24 million satellite photos taken from 1984 to 2020, an effort Google (GOOG) said took two million processing hours across thousands of machines in Google Cloud. For the project, the company worked with NASA, the United States Geological Survey's Landsat program — the world's longest-running Earth observation program — the European Union's Copernicus program and its Sentinel satellites, and Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab, which helped develop the technology behind Timelapse.

To explore Timelapse in Google Earth, users can type any location into the search bar to see it in motion, whether it's a landmark or the neighborhood in which they grew up. Google said it removed elements such as clouds and shadows from the images, and computed a single pixel for every location on Earth for every year since 1984; ultimatel stitching them together into a timelapse video

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Is it just me or is something wrong with this site? My homepage is all fucked up and I have to scroll through every damn show to find my follows.

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12 minutes ago, peacheslatour said:

Is it just me or is something wrong with this site? My homepage is all fucked up and I have to scroll through every damn show to find my follows.

It's the site.

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3 minutes ago, Cupid Stunt said:

It's the site.

Shit. Quite a few of the shows I follow are gone. Like all of the British mysteries. 😢

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I had trouble navigating too but finally clicked on the icon to the left of the search button at the top right of the screen and then click forums which are on the right hand side of the screen.  

ETA:  ok went to another app then came back in and was back to the whole forums listing and wasn’t able to find that icon again....maybe it will correct itself overnight and give us back our forums followed home page

Edited by Foghorn Leghorn
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4 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

Is it just me or is something wrong with this site? My homepage is all fucked up and I have to scroll through every damn show to find my follows.

The site is finally working better for me for the first time in a long time.

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Ethel Gabriel the First of the 5%

Ethel Gabriel (1921-2021) may be one of the most prolific recording industry professionals you’ve never heard of. Ethel was the first woman record producer for a major record label, and one of the first women in the world to work in A&R. She had a 4-decade career at RCA starting with an entry-level job and rising up to being an executive in the company.

During her career, Ethel produced over 5,000 records – some original recordings and some repackaged – by nearly every artist on the RCA roster (including Elvis Presley and Dolly Parton). Ethel was the woman in A&R to receive an RIAA Gold Record in 1959, and the first woman to win a Grammy for Best Historical Album (1982).

Ethel was willing to take risks, such as producing the first digitally-remastered album or working with artists who brought new types of music to the mainstream. Her credits include everything from mambo to easy listening to rap.

Ethel was born in 1921 in Pennsylvania. She started her own dance band at age 13 (called “En and Her Royal Men”) where Ethel played trombone. She originally wanted to go to college for forestry (at the encouragement of her father) but women were not allowed into the program. She decided to attend Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) and study music education.

A relative helped Ethel get a job at RCA’s record plant (in Camden, New Jersey) to help pay for tuition and expenses. Ethel’s first job included tasks like putting labels on records. She was promoted to record tester where she had to listen to one out of every 500 records pressed for quality. She learned every note of the big hits since Ethel had to listen to them over and over.

Ethel was allowed to visit the nearby RCA recording studios. She brought her trombone with her, playing with major artists for fun between sessions. She also learned how recording sessions worked. Ethel was secretary to the manager of A&R at the time, Herman Diaz, Jr. Ethel got to produce her first recording session (with bandleader Elliot Laurence) when Diaz called in sick and asked her to do it.

In 1955, Ethel convinced her boss, Manie Sacks, to sign Perez Prado to RCA’s label. She produced his record, Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White, which became a worldwide hit and helped bring the mambo craze to the US.

PEREZ PRADO - CHERRY PINK AND APPLE BLOSSOM WHITE

She was with RCA during the creation of their Nashville studios, the signing of Elvis, and their transition from mono to stereo.

Through Ethel’s career, she was willing to take risks and experiment with new technology or music. In 1959, Ethel launched Living Strings, a series on RCA Camden’s label that ran for 22 years.

Henry Mancini "Living Strings Play Henry Mancini"

In 1961, she produced Ray Martin and his Orchestra Dynamica, the first release using RCA’s “Stereo Action.” In 1976, she was executive producer of Caruso,’s A Legendary Performer, the first digitally-remastered album. The technology used by Soundstream Inc (lead by Thomas Stockham) has gone on to be widely used in audio and photography restoration and Stockham’s work on the Caruso album was the basis for a 1975 scientific paper. In 1975, Ethel gave a chance to then-unknown producer Warren Schatz, who produced RCA’s first disco album, Disco-Soul by The Brothers.

Ethel managed RCA’s Camden label (designed for budget records) starting in 1961. Camden was struggling when she took over and went on to become a multi-million dollar label under Ethel’s watch. Some of RCA’s major artists even asked to be released on the Camden line over the flagship RCA label because of Camden’s success.

Ethel received two RIAA Platinum records and 15 Gold records (over 10 million record sales total) during her career with numbers still growing. Many of these were repackages or re-releases where Ethel put her expert eyes (and ears) on song selection and label redesign. One album she re-packaged, Elvis’ Christmas Album, was the first Elvis record to reach Diamond (10 million sales). Ethel said of creating special packages (in Billboard Magazine Sept 5, 1981), “It’s like second nature to me. The secret is that you know the market you’re trying to reach. You can’t contrive a special record. It has to be genuine and full of integrity because people know the difference.” Ethel re-issued albums for nearly every RCA artist (including the Legendary Performer series, RCA Pure Gold economy line, and the Bluebird Complete series).

Towards the end of her time at RCA, Ethel asked the company to fund a women’s group for lectures and seminars. She wanted to help women learn to become executives. Ethel said she felt like a mother to some of the women she mentored (Ethel was married but did not have children). She wanted to teach skills like how to network, how to dress or behave. Ethel also became involved with Women in Music, one of very few groups available to women in the music industry at the time. In 1990, Ethel publicly spoke out against the “boys club” in a Letter to the Editor of Billboard Magazine (Oct 6). She said, “Yes, there are ‘record women’ in the industry – and they have ears, too!”

Ethel also worked with many artists and ensembles in the studio during her career including Chet Atkins, Caterina Valenti, Marty Gold, Los Indios Tabajaras, Teresa Brewer and hundreds of recordings under the Living series. She said of working with artists, “There are times to ‘harness’ artists and times to ‘push.’” Ethel said her most helpful qualifications to do the job were “her knowledge and love of music and her ability to make difficult decisions and hold to them.” (Cincinnati Enquirer August 18, 1983)

Ethel was not promoted to Vice President at RCA until 1982, over 40 years into her career. Many colleagues said it was long overdue. The following year, she won a Grammy for Best Historical Album (for co-producing The Dorsey/Sinatra Sessions). After leaving RCA, Ethel remained in the industry where she worked as president and vice president to smaller record labels.

Ethel’s story is being captured in a documentary film about her life and career, called LIVING SOUND. Production on the film started in 2019, when Gabriel was 97 years old. The documentary began (with the aide of SoundGirls) through uncovering archival materials and conducting interviews with Ethel.

Announcing the Ethel Gabriel Scholarship

 

Ethel Gabriel obituary

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Mike Mitchell, Guitarist on the Kingsmen’s ‘Louie Louie,’ Dies

Mike Mitchell, the lead guitarist and co-founder of the early rock band the Kingsmen, best known for their 1963 hit single, “Louie Louie,” died yesterday (April 16, 2021). His death, on his 77th birthday, was confirmed by the group on its louielouie.org website. Mitchell reportedly died of a heart attack; the location was not revealed.

Mitchell was the only surviving member to continue with the band since its start in 1959.

The posting on the group’s site noted, “We are deeply saddened by Mike’s passing. He was the kindest and most generous man on the planet.

“Mike is irreplaceable and he will be greatly missed not only by us but the fans as well. Mike was a favorite for his kindness, comedic nature as well as his musicianship.”

The Kingsmen formed in Portland, Oregon, in 1959 with singer (and guitarist) Jack Ely, drummer Lynn Easton, bass guitarist Bob Nordby, and Mitchell. As teenagers, they played high school parties, teen dances and even supermarket openings and fashion shows. Like many fledgling bands of the day, they copied what they heard on the radio: Elvis Presley, the Ventures, country music, R&B and the burgeoning Northwest Sound. In 1962, keyboardist Don Gallucci was added to the lineup.

The garage rock band started recording in 1963. Their first effort was “Louie Louie,” a song written and first recorded by Richard Berry in 1955, and played by virtually all Northwest rock and roll and R&B bands. The session cost a reported $36 at Portland’s Northwest Recorders. Jerry Dennon, a record producer in Seattle, pressed a few hundred copies on his regional label, Jerden. Northwest music fans were already familiar with the song from Berry’s version and a subsequent cover by a local band, the Wailers (1961).

The Kingsmen’s version found its way to the East Coast, where a couple of Boston radio stations played it, generating a huge response from listeners. Dennon entered into an agreement with New York’s Wand label for immediate mass pressing and distribution and “Louie Louie” rapidly broke out in several markets, climbing the charts.

As it began to drop in popularity, a controversy regarding the lyrics spread across America. The record was banned from sales and airplay in Indiana and elsewhere because teens countrywide thought the recording was riddled with obscene lyrics. That naturally stimulated even more interest, so much so that the FBI investigated the band, following them as they crisscrossed the country for over a year until the recording was deemed “unintelligible.” Wand reissued the song in 1964 (and again in 1965 and 1966). The single ultimately reached #2 on the Hot 100.

The group rode the success to become a popular concert attraction, appearing in those years with such British Invasion acts as the Rolling Stones, the Zombies, the Kinks, Peter and Gordon, Chad and Jeremy and others, as well as North American acts the Beach Boys, the Righteous Brothers, the Isley Brothers, the Turtles, the Byrds, and the Lovin’ Spoonful.

The Kingsmen were featured on the era’s top TV music shows, including Shindig, Hullabaloo, American Bandstand and Where The Action Is, and in the beach party movie, How to Stuff a Wild Bikini.

They earned subsequent chart success with a 1964 cover of “Money” (#16) and the novelty hit, “The Jolly Green Giant,” about the frozen foods character, which reached #4 in 1965.

Watch the Kingsmen perform in 1965, with lead singer Jack Ely explaining the controversy of the “Louie Louie” lyrics

Ely died in 2015 at age 71. Easton died in 2020.

Mitchell is survived by his children, Samantha and Max.

 

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When we have our post-Covid Bacchanalia, I'm giving all of my jukebox money to Cupid Stunt!

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22 minutes ago, Snaporaz said:

When we have our post-Covid Bacchanalia, I'm giving all of my jukebox money to Cupid Stunt!

She can be our DJ! It would be perfect. Getting my first jab on Tues. Hurray!

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