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Game Of Thrones In The Media

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I think the cast has a right to defend their work, but attacking fans, critics and other material is not a smart move. Assuming they want careers post-Thrones, they might want to take the high road in their approach. Kit telling "haters" to "go fuck themselves" and Maisie calling other shows trash does nothing but dump fuel on the fire. Yes, fans can be ridiculous and entitled, but they're also the ones who either will or won't dish out $11.00 to see your latest movie. Don't burn bridges.

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Yeah, they have a right to defend their work and if Maisie had just said GOT had the best scripts she'd every received, I don't think that would have been a problem.  But trashing other scripts and shows seems ill-advised to say the least.  Attacking the fans as well.

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4 minutes ago, benteen said:

Yeah, they have a right to defend their work and if Maisie had just said GOT had the best scripts she'd every received, I don't think that would have been a problem.  But trashing other scripts and shows seems ill-advised to say the least.  Attacking the fans as well.

I didn't see where she is trashing the fans.  And I would never think that it was a good idea to tell anyone in that industry not to speak out.  Il-advised is how they ended up in a system that covered for men in power being abusive.  So they get to talk all they want.  If people don't like it move on.  If the fans are so butt hurt that these actors don't agree with them then they need more in their lives.  This isn't who they should turn to for validation.

Think of the personal opinions of most of the industry.  I see a lot of movies/tv from people I think are just plain wrong. If I stopped .. Ack, I'd have to start reading books.  Oh but then the personal opinions of some authors disgust me as well.  

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She didn't say ALL other scripts are trash, she said: 

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"I read other scripts now and think, 'This is trash!' The stories are just not complex," she said. "And then sometimes you read a script which is definitely like 30 pages too long and you think, 'But there's still no twist!'"

Williams thinks it was the show's constant shocks that made it so special, explaining: "It's sometimes really difficult to find something that surprises you. I think that's what the show has always done so well."

She didn't say anything negative about fans either.

I think I've heard many, many other actors say that there are a lot of "trash" or "crappy" scripts out there over the years, coupled with how much they like the one they are doing.

Jack Nicholson in the commentary on Somethings Got To Give dvd, for example, praises the writer Nancy Meyers for her writing, and says he reads everything out there and most is (trash) but hers was complex, mature, interesting...

It's said all the time at awards shows, and in interviews, and on commentaries Breaking Bad, Mad Men, hell, I could find dozens of comments like this.

These guys spent nearly ten years together, of course they will have each others' backs.

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2 minutes ago, QuinnM said:

I didn't see where she is trashing the fans.  And I would never think that it was a good idea to tell anyone in that industry not to speak out.  Il-advised is how they ended up in a system that covered for men in power being abusive.  So they get to talk all they want.  If people don't like it move on.  If the fans are so butt hurt that these actors don't agree with them then they need more in their lives.  This isn't who they should turn to for validation. 

That can go both ways. You can also argue that the actors who were paid millions of dollars to appear on this show need to get over it and move on as well. It's the nature of the business and especially series finales. There's always going to be a percentage of the fan base that's disappointed.

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9 minutes ago, Growsonwalls said:

Well Kit Harington has just checked into rehab.

Here is an article on it.

https://pagesix.com/2019/05/28/kit-harington-checked-into-luxury-rehab-for-stress-and-alcohol/

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The British actor has been undergoing psychological coaching, practicing mindful meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy to combat stress and deal with negative emotions at the facility, which costs over $120,000 a month.

His actress wife, Rose Leslie, 32, whom he met on the set of “GoT” and played Jon Snow’s Wildling companion Ygritte, is being “extremely supportive,” we’re told.

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I wish him all the best on his recovery. Actually heard rumors several weeks ago, right around episode 4 airing that he had checked himself in.  I thought he was having some issues for a while now because during season 8 filming, he did not seem to be engaged as normal.   

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Poor Kit. It's common for actors to feel a bit depressed after a play/movie/tv show wraps because it's such an intense experience when you're in it and then suddenly it's over and the daily routine is gone as are the people who have become your support system. I can only imagine how much harder it's been on him as one of the main characters who's had really pivotal storylines, a lot of publicity, and so much scrutiny because of his character dying, coming back to life, hooking up with the future queen, etc. (not to mention having to lie/keep secrets about the plots). I hope that he gets some good advice/help while he's there.

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Ready for the abuse, but I hope whatever therapy he gets helps him with his acting.  First of course I want him to be better for his personal well being, but I also hope getting a handle on the issue will allow him to show some growth as an actor. Maybe his issues are what is holding him back.   Personally he is not all that attractive to me and coming late to the series and watching his acting I always wondered what the big deal was about Jon Snow. 

I suspect that in their own way a lot of these actors and actresses from this series are going to struggle, including possibly being typecast, or not being able to handle not finding another hit. ......it happens sadly. 

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Lots of love to Kit and Rose as they deal. ❤️ 

Sophie and Maisie both had issues with depression while filming and sought help. All three of the youngest actors were treated to negative social media sadly. 

It can be a rough business. 

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3 minutes ago, PatsyandEddie said:

Lots of love to Kit and Rose as they deal. ❤️ 

Sophie and Maisie both had issues with depression while filming and sought help. All three of the youngest actors were treated to negative social media sadly. 

It can be a rough business. 

Yes, but engaging in social media and letting  it influence you is a choice. I am not saying it is o.k. for people to do abuse others but I am not really on social media. A friend just watched something with Anthony Mackie and he stated he is not on social media, and only checks his phone a few times a day.  People need to stop putting so much value on social media and start engaging with real people more.   When you see it is negative, just stay away from it. People get obsessive checking it and worrying about anonymous posters.  It really is a shame that it has affected so many people when if used correctly it could be positive. 

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Kit had two incidents last year involving being drop dead drunk at bars and taking swings at people. 

At his audition for GoT, he had a fresh black eye from a fight in a London McDonalds after a night of drinking.

It's a wonderful press release but Kit is an ugly drunk. That's why he's in rehab. 

Hope he gets sober.

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1 hour ago, kieyra said:

https://www.vulture.com/2019/05/kit-harrington-rehab-report.html

Honestly, just has me wondering if the show was even worth the negative effects it’s had in so many ways.

You mean the ending or the entire show? I’d think almost everyone involved would say it was worth it. 

I wish Kit the best. Also wish his character (and everyone else) would have had a better final season.  I realize that’s trite but 🤷‍♀️

Maisie isn’t an actress whose career I would be interested to follow at all but as I said a few pages back, the actors have a right to say whatever they want but they do so at their own peril. 

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I mean, I don't know Kit's situation, but doing press for a show like GoT must be incredibly stressful. You're traveling, the media has constant demands, your photo is constantly being taken, you're being asked the same question a thousand times. I can't imagine it's good for anyone's mental or physical health.

It amazes me that Sophie rolled right into press for Dark Phoenix. On the heels of GoT press, it must be incredibly exhausting.

Edited by Minneapple
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1 hour ago, catrice2 said:

Ready for the abuse, but I hope whatever therapy he gets helps him with his acting.  First of course I want him to be better for his personal well being, but I also hope getting a handle on the issue will allow him to show some growth as an actor. Maybe his issues are what is holding him back.   Personally he is not all that attractive to me and coming late to the series and watching his acting I always wondered what the big deal was about Jon Snow. 

I suspect that in their own way a lot of these actors and actresses from this series are going to struggle, including possibly being typecast, or not being able to handle not finding another hit. ......it happens sadly. 

Well, one issue really has nothing to do with the other. Heartbreakingly sensitive actors like Philip Seymour Hoffman, Montgomery Clift or Heath Ledger struggled with substance abuse their entire lives and paid the ultimate price for it. Other actors like Ben Affleck also struggle with substance abuse but rehab hasn't made Affleck a better actor.

His lack of growth as an actor isn't something they could have predicted when they cast him. TPTB cast a lot of young actors. There were no huge known stars (except for maybe Diana Rigg as Oleanna). Some actors absolutely took off and grew season by season in depth. I always point to Alfie Allen as someone who grew not only season by season but episode by episode. I don;t think TPTB could have predicted that Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Gwendolyn Christie had chemistry that could spark a Fourth of July fireworks show. 

Jon Snow was such a central part of the storyline that killing him off wasn't really an option. 

Anyway my point is Harington's sobriety will likely have very little do with how well he does in rehab.

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You really can't compare one actor to another...and I never said anything about rehab making him a better actor. What I said was I hoped therapy helped him with his issues....which can be totally separate in my opinion from substance abuse.   

The reality is he may well already be a great actor, but clearly something is standing in the way.   How well an actor acts is always a matter of opinion.  I am sure there are some people who thought his acting was fine, and I don't always agree with what other people feel are all star performances.  

I personally feel that people usually have issues that cause them to turn to substance abuse, so until that underlying thing is addressed they still struggle.  In reality some people are still creative and amazing artists even when they struggle with issue and/or substance abuse ....and some are not. 

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1 minute ago, catrice2 said:

 I am sure there are some people who thought his acting was fine, and I don't always agree with what other people feel are all star performances.  

I tend to be like that as well. For example, I don't think Emilia Clarke is a particularly good actress. She's definitely improved since S1, but her charisma and likeability sells her performances rather than raw talent. 

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25 minutes ago, BitterApple said:

I tend to be like that as well. For example, I don't think Emilia Clarke is a particularly good actress. She's definitely improved since S1, but her charisma and likeability sells her performances rather than raw talent. 

I agree, and I feel the same way about Sophie and Maisie. None of these actresses will set the Oscars on fire, but if they choose the right scripts and are paired with the right casts, I think they will have long careers. 

The best young talent discovered by GoT was Richard Madden. And at the end, the best actors left were Lena and Peter.

Edited by Minneapple
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1 hour ago, catrice2 said:

I am sure there are some people who thought his acting was fine, and I don't always agree with what other people feel are all star performances.  

Yeah, it’s all subjective. You don’t care for Kit’s acting or Emilia’s or whoever else, someone else worships them. 

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There are actually a lot of actors from this show that I'll probably end up seeing future projects from because I got to know them through Thrones. Sophie Turner, Maisie Williams, Madden, Emilia Clarke, Dinklage (who I knew before GoT, but didn't have as positive an impression of before), Harington, Natalie Dormer, Charles Dance, Hivju, Christie, Momoa, Conleth Hill, Jacob Anderson, Diana Rigg. I've already watched several films / shows because of them that I probably wouldn't have took notice of otherwise. I'll check out whatever Toby Sebastian (Trystane Martell) does for purely superficial reasons...

I hope Harington will be alright. At first I thought this was something being used as a cover for his recent comments which drew some ire from the fans, but after reading this thread I realized it must be more serious than that.

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On 5/27/2019 at 12:17 PM, sistermagpie said:

I think it's true that shows do often start turning exactly this way, but I also think the article is correct in seeing a more obvious shift where you've literally got a story started by one person whose interest has stayed pretty steady so far (that is, steady until he stalled at least since the books aren't finished!) and one that was taken over by other people who probably are, imo, coming at it from a very different perspective--whether or not that's because Hollywood only knows how to tell a certain story.

The main reason I question that explanation is because Benioff and Weiss have been running the show all along, and it's not like there was initially a stark contrast between how the show felt when they were hewing to GRRM's source material and how it felt when D&D were going their own way. Heck, probably the showrunners' single best contribution to the entire series was their extremely revisionist take on Queen Cersei in season 1 -- which is actually more nuanced and sociological than Martin's own. Where book!Cersei was just kind of an awful person all along, D&D turned show!Cersei into someone who became awful as she was ground down by both the unfair expectations placed on an eligible young noblewoman and the cruel disjunction between the legend of a victorious warrior king and the pathetic reality.

And the narrower character-based focus is something that starts to creep in gradually even before the showrunners run out of book material. Even in season 2 there's the stuff in Harrenhal between Sassy Arya and Grampa Tywin, which completely effs up Arya's book arc for the sake of "Wouldn't it be cool if these two badass characters everyone loves got some fun scenes together?"

Quote

Lost, to me, did a bait and switch at the end, but I never felt like it was about whether these people would form a society on the island because their personal psychologies were always front and center.

Well, Lost is a tricky example, since I'd say it went through this shift very early on -- probably after the first half-dozen episodes or so, when everyone realized the show was going to be a mega smash hit that could run for years and years, rather than a nichey genre show that might make it through a few good seasons. It immediately shifts out of "dangerous survivalist series where anyone could die at any time" mode and gets much safer and soapier.

Battlestar Galactica is a much closer match for Game of Thrones in terms of how gradually the intimate character stuff supplants the show's bigger-picture aspirations, over the course of multiple seasons instead of just a few episodes.

On 5/27/2019 at 3:59 PM, Umbelina said:

I think "Bran" was acting as he was directed to act.  I don't see his portrayal as anything showing his faults as an actor, rather, the writing for him, and the way they directed him made him seem wooden and a bore.

Agreed. I can't imagine that Isaac Hempstead Wright decided between seasons, on his own accord, to start playing the formerly soulful Bran as an exposition robot. It's such a drastic change, unmotivated by anything the character had gone through to that point, that it must have been a directive from the producers.

Now, do I think it would've hypothetically been possible to make Creepy Robot Bran a more interesting character if the acting had been a bit more nuanced? Sure. But I can't really blame a very young actor for not getting his head around a dumb and arbitrary change to a character he'd been playing one particular way for the better part of a decade.

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2 hours ago, Dev F said:

The main reason I question that explanation is because Benioff and Weiss have been running the show all along, and it's not like there was initially a stark contrast between how the show felt when they were hewing to GRRM's source material and how it felt when D&D were going their own way. Heck, probably the showrunners' single best contribution to the entire series was their extremely revisionist take on Queen Cersei in season 1 -- which is actually more nuanced and sociological than Martin's own. Where book!Cersei was just kind of an awful person all along, D&D turned show!Cersei into someone who became awful as she was ground down by both the unfair expectations placed on an eligible young noblewoman and the cruel disjunction between the legend of a victorious warrior king and the pathetic reality.

And the narrower character-based focus is something that starts to creep in gradually even before the showrunners run out of book material. Even in season 2 there's the stuff in Harrenhal between Sassy Arya and Grampa Tywin, which completely effs up Arya's book arc for the sake of "Wouldn't it be cool if these two badass characters everyone loves got some fun scenes together?"

Well, Lost is a tricky example, since I'd say it went through this shift very early on -- probably after the first half-dozen episodes or so, when everyone realized the show was going to be a mega smash hit that could run for years and years, rather than a nichey genre show that might make it through a few good seasons. It immediately shifts out of "dangerous survivalist series where anyone could die at any time" mode and gets much safer and soapier.

Battlestar Galactica is a much closer match for Game of Thrones in terms of how gradually the intimate character stuff supplants the show's bigger-picture aspirations, over the course of multiple seasons instead of just a few episodes.

Agreed. I can't imagine that Isaac Hempstead Wright decided between seasons, on his own accord, to start playing the formerly soulful Bran as an exposition robot. It's such a drastic change, unmotivated by anything the character had gone through to that point, that it must have been a directive from the producers.

Now, do I think it would've hypothetically been possible to make Creepy Robot Bran a more interesting character if the acting had been a bit more nuanced? Sure. But I can't really blame a very young actor for not getting his head around a dumb and arbitrary change to a character he'd been playing one particular way for the better part of a decade.

They've explained why Bran changed after becoming the Three Eyed Raven  Also he probably saw his father's death, the Red Wedding, and Sansa being raped, along with a lot of other horrible stuff I can understand him changing.

My feeling now after seeing the finale is they were setting this up because nobody would have selected old Bran as the new king of Westeros. And when I mean "old" I mean the immature Bran who whined about not wanting to live in a tree like the old 3ER and whose carelessness unintentionally ruined Hodor for life. Creepy Robot Bran is so detached and no longer prone to human failings that he seems the safest choice.

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5 hours ago, VCRTracking said:

Creepy Robot Bran is so detached and no longer prone to human failings that he seems the safest choice.

At the very least, everybody can count on at least a smidgen of actual logic behind any of Trance Bran’s decision-making.

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IA Nashville. This is precisely the reason Bran’s name was offered as the perfect choice. He doesn’t feel much emotion, has no wants, is barely Bran let alone a Stark and has the knowledge of the sum total of all events at his disposal. Bran is the choice if the wheel is to be broken. 

Unfortunately, Dany’s idea of breaking the wheel was to only stop it with her on top, making all of the choices for everyone. 

Eventually, Sam’s suggestion of democracy may be the norm. At this point, it’s not logical if the 6 Kingdoms are to be at peace. 

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Given his current state and history of bad decisions, Tyrion never should have been allowed to choose the new king.

I think democracy is the future of Westeros but not for a few hundred years.  I was glad they didn't go that route because to me, Game of Thrones is a world of kings and queens and lords and ladies.

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17 hours ago, raven said:

 Yikes, poor Kit. Good that he's dealing with it before jumping into any other big projects, though. I was hanging out with friends over the weekend and one remarked that he was spotted at the bookstore mentioned in the article. I couldn't figure out why he'd be there, of all places. Now we know why. The store's in a cute little town next door to the one where the rehab is. It's about half an hour from where I live, and my bestie and I go to the arts cinema there all the time. He made a good choice; that part of the shoreline is beautiful and quite peaceful, even during the high season. Many of our towns and villages up here date back to the Revolution (or earlier) and are very similar in layout and feel to English villages, so that might be nice for him. I hope people continue to respect his privacy and that he gets the peace he needs.

Edited by spaceghostess · Reason: untethered parenthesis
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7 hours ago, PatsyandEddie said:

That’s lovely to know,spaceghostess! It sounds like a beautiful place for him to find balance. 

Yes, I'd imagine the place where he's rehabbing is very secluded and probably right on the Long Island Sound, so he'll have beautiful water views, plus the white noise of the (small) waves. I'm a transplanted New Yorker and consider myself very lucky to now call these parts home. We're in Mystic, and I always say to my kids that it's like living in a postcard. 🙂 

Edited by spaceghostess · Reason: Because he's rehabbing AT a place, not flipping a house
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14 minutes ago, spaceghostess said:

Yes, I'd imagine the place he's rehabbing is very secluded and probably right on the Long Island Sound, so he'll have beautiful water views, plus the white noise of the (small) waves. I'm a transplanted New Yorker and consider myself very lucky to now call these parts home. We're in Mystic, and I always say to my kids that it's like living in a postcard. 🙂 

ITA.  Work has had me up around the Uncasville area several times, and (especially in autumn) it’s one of the most beautiful places to which I’ve ever had the opportunity to travel - second only to Middle Tennessee, of course. 😉

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I think it's understandable that some of the younger actors could have issues when the show ended.  After all, for some, it was nearly all of their adult lives so far, longer than junior high through the first years of college for the ones who began as teens.

I'm sure many friendships and relationships were made, and now?  Scattered, and it's different when you see the same people every day, for very long days at that, and then, POOF.  Gone.  Phone calls are very different from practically living with these people for 10 years.

Older actors, or those who have been through something similar before would have more resources, more experience saying goodbye, but especially for those where this was pretty much their first acting gig?  Could struggle.

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18 hours ago, Dev F said:

The main reason I question that explanation is because Benioff and Weiss have been running the show all along, and it's not like there was initially a stark contrast between how the show felt when they were hewing to GRRM's source material and how it felt when D&D were going their own way. Heck, probably the showrunners' single best contribution to the entire series was their extremely revisionist take on Queen Cersei in season 1 -- which is actually more nuanced and sociological than Martin's own. Where book!Cersei was just kind of an awful person all along, D&D turned show!Cersei into someone who became awful as she was ground down by both the unfair expectations placed on an eligible young noblewoman and the cruel disjunction between the legend of a victorious warrior king and the pathetic reality. 

And the narrower character-based focus is something that starts to creep in gradually even before the showrunners run out of book material. Even in season 2 there's the stuff in Harrenhal between Sassy Arya and Grampa Tywin, which completely effs up Arya's book arc for the sake of "Wouldn't it be cool if these two badass characters everyone loves got some fun scenes together?" 

Ah, I see. Then yes, I agree. I was thinking in far broader strokes of books vs. movies and how you're seeing the story from such different perspectives etc. And it definitely, for me, wasn't some sudden change just in season 8. Of course, it's also not just one thing--as I think the author of the article even says, the road they did take had all its own flaws on its own. Doing everything as quickly as it happened would have felt just as unsatifying no matter what the type of story it was.

9 hours ago, PatsyandEddie said:

IA Nashville. This is precisely the reason Bran’s name was offered as the perfect choice. He doesn’t feel much emotion, has no wants, is barely Bran let alone a Stark and has the knowledge of the sum total of all events at his disposal. Bran is the choice if the wheel is to be broken.  

It's funny because to me it seems like the idea of making the leader not human sounds like the beginning of some sci-fi dystopia!

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https://comicbook.com/tv-shows/2019/05/26/game-of-thrones-final-season-bad-words-per-minute-chart-graph-hbo/

This is what I've been saying all along.  WORDS!~ not just CGI, fight scenes, and battles. 

If Jon and Dany actually had love scenes, maybe we would buy that they were in love.  It wasn't lack of chemistry, it was lack of actually acting scenes.  On and on.

Number of WPM in each season of GoT.

When they ran out of books, this became action/adventure, and what words they did write?  Mostly went to a very few actors.

According to the chart, Thrones' debut season had around 60 words per minute, which gradually decreased to under 40 words per minute in the final batch of episodes. Somewhat-unsurprisingly, Season 8's "The Long Night" was by far the lowest in this data, with around 15 words per minute.

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Edited by Umbelina · Reason: According to the chart, Thrones' debut season had around 60 words per minute, which gradually decreased to under 40 words per minute in the final batch of episodes. Somewhat-unsurprisingly, Season 8's "The Long Night" was by far the lowest in this data, w
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5 hours ago, Umbelina said:

This is what I've been saying all along.  WORDS!~ not just CGI, fight scenes, and battles. 

If Jon and Dany actually had love scenes, maybe we would buy that they were in love.  It wasn't lack of chemistry, it was lack of actually acting scenes.  On and on.

I was thinking about this exact chart when I was writing my last post -- shaking my head at how the same writers who couldn't think of anything to do with Cersei other than have her stand at a window and drink wine are the ones who wrote this for her back in season 1:

"You've always hated him."
"Hated him? I worshiped him. Every girl in the Seven Kingdoms dreamed of him, but he was mine by oath. And when I finally saw him on our wedding day in the Sept of Balor, lean and fierce and black-bearded, it was the happiest moment of my life. Then that night he crawled on top of me, stinking of wine, and did what he did, what little he could do . . . and whispered in my ear 'Lyanna.' Your sister was a corpse and I was a living girl and he loved her more than me."

And that's not something they cribbed from the book -- most of the ideas and most of the language are original to the show. What happened to that version of D&D's writing? I can't think of a single piece of dialogue from the past few seasons that comes close to being as interesting or as well composed.

Edited by Dev F
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In spite of my cynicism I honestly wish these shows...like those stupid reality shows like the Bachelor....would offer counseling for the participants.  Look at this history of these younger stars and what happens to them when shows are over........Eight is Enough, Different Strokes, Family Matters, and even more recent shows.  Young stars who had a steady workplace and a  work family and when it was over they struggled.  You would think that would have shows have a therapist or someone on staff to help them deal with the struggles as they go along.... as well as access to a financial planner....although I think most of the people on there reality shows had problems before they become contestantss

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2 hours ago, Dev F said:

I was thinking about this exact chart when I was writing my last post -- shaking my head at how the same writers who couldn't think of anything to do with Cersei other than have stand at a window and drink wine are the ones who wrote this for her back in season 1:

"You've always hated him."
"Hated him? I worshiped him. Every girl in the Seven Kingdoms dreamed of him, but he was mine by oath. And when I finally saw him on our wedding day in the Sept of Balor, lean and fierce and black-bearded, it was the happiest moment of my life. Then that night he crawled on top of me, stinking of wine, and did what he did, what little he could do . . . and whispered in my ear 'Lyanna.' Your sister was a corpse and I was a living girl and he loved her more than me."

And that's not something they cribbed from the book -- most of the ideas and most of the language are original to the show. What happened to that version of D&D's writing? I can't think of a single piece of dialogue from the past few seasons that comes close to being as interesting or as well composed.

They simply didn't care. They stopped giving a shit, imo.

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5 hours ago, MadameKillerB said:

They simply didn't care. They stopped giving a shit, imo.

In truth?  I think over time, they just got distracted and lost focus.

Edited by Nashville · Reason: Expansion
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53 minutes ago, PatsyandEddie said:

Joe Dempsie is such a sweetheart. His interviews are very enjoyable. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07bnppt

That's a really good, mature interview and I really liked the points that he made. I assume, aside from enjoying being clean for the first time on the show in the finale, going to Spain and not needing to bother with learning any lines is a pretty sweet deal. 

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8 minutes ago, bijoux said:

That's a really good, mature interview and I really liked the points that he made. I assume, aside from enjoying being clean for the first time on the show in the finale, going to Spain and not needing to bother with learning any lines is a pretty sweet deal. 

I fell in love with him after his interview on ‘the’ scene with Maisie.  Really charming and articulate.

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http://collider.com/game-of-thrones-finale-explained/

Cliff Notes version of a show.

If at any time before this shambolic final season of Game of Thrones someone had handed you a few notes about the series finale, there might have been some poetry to it. You might have imagined how Daenerys Targaryen’s slow, subversive turn into a megalomaniacal, dragon-wielding villain would play out, or how the beleaguered Stark family would eventually find their way back to power by ruling the North as its own kingdom. The stuff about Bran controlling Westeros (despite formerly insisting that he’s not “Bran” but the Three-Eyed Raven) is weird enough to pique your interest probably, after the presumption that (of course) the mythology around his warging abilities and connection to the Night King and the Children of the Forest would be further explored. As for the series’ “politics as usual” final scenes, well, the show (and George R.R. Martin’s books) has always spent a lot of time exploring the realpolitik of the Great Houses of Westeros, so them choosing Bran as King would surely have interesting practical basis.

Except none of that happened. The plot points happened, but any emotional connection or deeper exploration of the material did not. It was a slap in the face to viewers as well as, frankly, the actors themselves to spend as long as the show did building up a complicated and nuanced world only to shove together a hasty outline of where these characters end up. It’s why the finale, titled “The Iron Throne,” felt mildly satisfying as it played out, but doesn’t hold up under scrutiny. It wasn’t an absolute abomination, because there is a general sense that the story might have been heading this way all along. And yet, the particulars of how it played out and the pacing that got us there were a disgrace.

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22 hours ago, Umbelina said:

This is what I've been saying all along.  WORDS!

visual medium is using everything to tell a story. words, music, directon, cinematography,.. words are not the only tool.

I like that D&D used cinematic language to tell the story. 

Edited by nikma
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