Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
Bastet

Pet Peeves: The Holy Trinity and Beyond

Recommended Posts

16 minutes ago, laredhead said:

Unless you have a pot full of unlimited funds, it's probably not a good idea to spend it all at once since you never know when something is going to happen that isn't covered by insurance.  

The house we owned before our current one we knew was going to need some work and we were prepared for that.  What we didn't count on was that there was a lot more wrong with that house than cosmetic stuff.  By the time we'd owned the house for 5 years and fixed EVERY DAMN thing there was no money left.  We sold it in a lot better condition than we found it but we didn't redo the kitchen or the bathrooms or any of the "fun" stuff we'd expected to do.  Actually this comes under one of my pet peeves on HH they never (or certainly I've never seen them) talk about HVAC or the roof or that funny smell in the basement or whatever.  It's like every house is in perfect condition and all it needs is updating.  That's certainly not the experience of most house buyers I know!

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

23 hours ago, BlossomCulp said:

Watched one of those flip shows last night and the way they insisted that they had to have a huge kitchen even if it meant taking space away from the dining and living areas just killed me.  I mean I do understand wanting a nice kitchen but do people really think they are going to spend most of their time in there?  Now I will concede that my grandmother did seem to spend most of her time baking but she also spent a lot of her time in the kitchen cleaning it!  Anyway am I behind the times?  Do most people spend their time in the kitchen nowadays?  If I did that I'd be eating more - this would not a good thing!

I like large kitchens with a good sized eating area because I think dining rooms are a complete waste of space and time. This comes from raising a lot of children and being the one to jump up to get more milk, a rag to wipe up spilled milk, the veggies that were warmed in the microwave and forgotten, and then a spoon to serve them. Plus, I could supervise the children's kitchen chores while sitting at the table with a glass of wine or tea. Now that there's only 3 of us, going to a separate room to eat just seems silly. And, I don't "entertain", my friends who are invited over for dinner aren't that picky about eating arrangements and anyone who is wouldn't be invited to come back.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Nysha said:

I like large kitchens with a good sized eating area because I think dining rooms are a complete waste of space and time.

 The show I was talking about though took away from the eating area because the flippers decided they needed an enormous kitchen with giant appliances and tons of counter space.  Now I want that counter space don't get me wrong! but I like a balance between the "working" area of the kitchen and the socializing side of things.  What also kills me are the flip shows where they insist on having an island and a table even if that means you have an inch or two to move around between that island and the table.  If you've already got that I can see living with it but to create that just because islands are in now just seems so goofy.  I watch these shows where they impose today's must haves and think "ok but in a couple of years things will change and maybe it would actually be better to have a classic set up that will stand the test of time".  Of course that doesn't make for sexy TV I guess!

Edited by BlossomCulp
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Nysha said:

I like large kitchens with a good sized eating area because I think dining rooms are a complete waste of space and time.

And I am just the opposite.  I hate eating in an area with dirty pots and pans all over the place and I never clean up before serving so the food doesn't get cold. I love having a serene, clean place to dine; I can deal with the clean up later; I enjoy having a nice meal in a neat and tidy setting.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, Kohola3 said:

I enjoy having a nice meal in a neat and tidy setting.

For me the best of both worlds is a separate dining room and an eat in kitchen but now that we are househunting it seems like everyone and his uncle has bought into open concept and even 1960s bungalows have had inside walls knocked down to make a huge "great room".  I can live without the dining room but what I can't stand is that you can't even get away from the pots and pans and general mess by going into the living room.  The living room is the kitchen!  Not for me.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, BlossomCulp said:

The living room is the kitchen! 

Yeah, there is nothing like the fumes from a nice fish dinner permeating the whole house.  Give me a kitchen with a door to close!

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post

12 hours ago, laredhead said:

I sneer at some of the HH's we see who declare gut jobs on rooms that could be OK for a while.  Unless you have a pot full of unlimited funds, it's probably not a good idea to spend it all at once since you never know when something is going to happen that isn't covered by insurance.  

Also, while there are some things you know exactly what you want before moving in, there are a number of things you need to live in the house a while before you know the specifics you want to change.

9 hours ago, BlossomCulp said:

For me the best of both worlds is a separate dining room and an eat in kitchen

That's what I have - a "breakfast nook" in the kitchen with a round table and four chairs, and then a separate dining room with a six-person table.  If the kitchen didn't have such a space, I could easily just eat in the dining room (and, quite frankly, when I'm just eating a bowl of pasta or something, I eat plopped in the recliner), but I would hate not having a dining room - I am not "entertaining" guests across the room from the detritus of meal prep!

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, Bastet said:

Also, while there are some things you know exactly what you want before moving in, there are a number of things you need to live in the house a while before you know the specifics you want to change.

I agree.  I vowed when I moved into  my place that I would wait a full year before making any big changes.  As long as things work, what you think is awful might turn out to be a non-issue after you've lived with it for a while. And after that year I did do a couple of minor things but found myself quite happy with items I thought I might have to manage differently.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, Bastet said:

I am not "entertaining" guests across the room from the detritus of meal prep!

This and I am also not planning to entertain while doing that meal prep!  I don't mind people wandering in and out of the kitchen while I'm doing stuff - up to a point - but I don't need or want an audience when I'm peeling potatoes or making a salad.  I guess maybe I do things differently when I have people over but I try to do as much as I can ahead of time so the way people go on and on about being isolated in a traditional kitchen while everyone else is whooping it up elsewhere - apparently for hours at a time - is just not something I've ever experienced.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post

I may be the oddball but I do most of the prep before our family/friends come over so that I can visit with them. I clean up/wash big pots/load things into the dishwasher as I go along. I guess that comes from living without a dishwasher for years when we were in the military. If I didn’t wash/clean as I went, it was a real disaster in the kitchen. I think we all do what suits us best.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

Some things you can't clean up ahead, the plates, silver, serving dishes.
Too, a lot of food I'd keep hot on/in the stove.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

To me the worst part about "entertaining" (does anyone aside from HH people call having people over entertaining I wonder) isn't the prep work so much as it's the debris of the meal afterwards.  I don't want to feel I need to clean up immediately after a meal and I don't usually expect company to snap to it and start loading the dishwasher and put leftovers in the fridge but I think if I had a true open concept house where all is revealed all the time I'd get downright twitchy if I was trying to sit chatting with people while all the dishes and food etc stayed on the table or on counters or piled in the sink or whatever.  I'm getting twitchy just thinking about it!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

37 minutes ago, BlossomCulp said:

I'm getting twitchy just thinking about it!

Ditto!  I want to enjoy the rest of the evening and clean up after the guests have left.  And my sister would insist on "helping" by racing to the kitchen as soon as the meal was finished and start the clean up process because she can't stand a mess.  Since I could hardly leave it to her, I'd feel obligated to be out there slaving as well.  And then the inevitable banging of china, silver, and cookware would be a deterrent to the rest of the guests visiting.

Nope, there's a whole lot to be said for a room with a door!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

Just now watching the realtor and his wife looking at houses in Miami Beach, FL. They are both only children. She just said she didn’t want to give their son, Nicholas, a bath in their master bath. He said yeah, that wouldn’t make it their bathroom. Listen kids, I grew up in a military family with two sisters and we only had one bathroom for most of my growing up years. And then when my husband and children were in the military, our family of four almost always had one bathroom. We had a schedule for everyone and guess what? We managed and even survived. Geez, Louise. I get so tired of hearing these kids feeling so entitled and spoiled. 

Oh, yeah. Their budget is over a MILLION dollars. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
18 minutes ago, Gam2 said:

Oh, yeah. Their budget is over a MILLION dollars. 

I hear you on being annoyed at entitled house hunters but I have to admit if I am spending a million dollars on a house I expect more than one bathtub!!  Which leads to another pet peeve of mine, the way flippers are taking out tubs to put in these giant walk in room for two "wink wink" showers.  I get it if that means there is still at least one bathtub in the house along with the giant walk in room for two "wink wink" showers not so much when it means no tub at all.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

We renovated our master bathroom last year. It had a monster, jetted tub (yuck!) and a small shower that I called the coffin. We had the tub removed and a large walk-in shower put into the space left by the coffin/tub. We love it but we also have another bathroom with a tub on the same floor. We use that for our grandsons. I do recognize the need for a tub in the house but it never once bothered me to bathe our children or anyone else’s in our master bathroom when we finally got one. Who the hell cares if you have to bathe your kid in your bathtub? If you bathe him in another bathroom, that’s one more tub to clean. No thanks. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Gam2 said:

We renovated our master bathroom last year. It had a monster, jetted tub (yuck!) and a small shower that I called the coffin. We had the tub removed and a large walk-in shower put into the space left by the coffin/tub. We love it but we also have another bathroom with a tub on the same floor. We use that for our grandsons. I do recognize the need for a tub in the house but it never once bothered me to bathe our children or anyone else’s in our master bathroom when we finally got one. Who the hell cares if you have to bathe your kid in your bathtub? If you bathe him in another bathroom, that’s one more tub to clean. No thanks. 

There's also the fact that the kid isn't going to be a baby forever and, in just a few short years, will be showering all by himself in the other bathroom anyway.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
2 minutes ago, doodlebug said:

There's also the fact that the kid isn't going to be a baby forever and, in just a few short years, will be showering all by himself in the other bathroom anyway.

Lots of adults like baths for themselves.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

And even if no one in your family uses a bath I would think a lack of a bathtub would have to affect your resale value.  Big showers are popular now, and will probably still be popular in years to come but bathtubs have their uses too and a lot of people out there would expect to find one in any house they are looking at.  Not having a bath in every bathroom might not be a deal breaker, not having a bathtub at all might be though.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/25/2018 at 12:56 PM, CherryAmes said:

I am still kicking myself over turning my nose up at a house we saw years ago because the owners had painted or wallpapered every single room blue.  The house was perfect for us, great neighbourhood, nice layout, awesome price.  But all I could see was blue.  Hindsight being 20/20 I think we'd still be in that house today if we'd bought it.  And knowing my husband and I it would probably still be blue!

It is amazing what you can get used to if you don't have the money/time/energy to redo. We bought our house in 2012, and all the wallpaper and yes, even the *gasp* border in the living room is still there, lol. Lucky for us, the kitchen had been updated in the previous three years, so we got the granite and stainless. No hardwood floors though, and we are living with the carpet it came with - yes, living amongst the hideous dirt and germs of the previous owners! Well, we've cleaned and vacuumed, of course, but you know what I mean. 

We did change most of the light fixtures, and ripped up the godawful astro turf on the stairs and front porch, and had some stuff repaired/replaced (small staircase, skylights, gutters), but there's a lot of the original stuff still around, and I'm fine with most of it - gives our home some personality.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/27/2018 at 12:52 PM, Gam2 said:

I may be the oddball but I do most of the prep before our family/friends come over so that I can visit with them. I clean up/wash big pots/load things into the dishwasher as I go along. I guess that comes from living without a dishwasher for years when we were in the military. If I didn’t wash/clean as I went, it was a real disaster in the kitchen. I think we all do what suits us best.

I absolutely hate the idea of having to tackle a destroyed kitchen after a party, so I'm with you. I'd rather get as much done as possible before guests arrive, and then clean as I go, so that when the last guest leaves, there's only minor cleanup left.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
17 hours ago, Gam2 said:

We renovated our master bathroom last year. It had a monster, jetted tub (yuck!) and a small shower that I called the coffin. We had the tub removed and a large walk-in shower put into the space left by the coffin/tub. We love it but we also have another bathroom with a tub on the same floor. We use that for our grandsons. I do recognize the need for a tub in the house but it never once bothered me to bathe our children or anyone else’s in our master bathroom when we finally got one. Who the hell cares if you have to bathe your kid in your bathtub? If you bathe him in another bathroom, that’s one more tub to clean. No thanks. 

I want to do exactly that with our master bathroom--replace the "garden" tub with a big shower and replace the original shower with a big linen closet (the linen closet in our house simply isn't big enough). I just have to convince my husband. He doesn't use that bathroom--it's only the two of us and he claimed the "guest" bath as his own some years ago--it has a tub so the house will still have one.

Edited by CruiseDiva
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Then you have the wife who stands at the bathroom door with just a cursory glance and talks about whether it will work or not work.  She doesn't enter, and husband is behind her and can't even see in.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I hate hearing "Wow!" every flippin' time someone walks in a room!  Also, "MY." "My white kitchen" or "My 3 car garage". Why can't these people say, "I'm glad this kitchen is white because that's our preferred style." Or "Glad this house has a 3 car garage because we really want/need one."

Also, it drives me mad when buyers complain about a house being "over budget" when it's only by a few thousand or less. Or the flipside, it drives me even crazier when a house is substantially over budget and the buyers are able to "make it work."

Edited by juliet73
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

9 hours ago, juliet73 said:

MY

Along with "I can see myself" - "sitting here with my morning coffee" (patio, balcony), "fixing kids breakfast" (kitchen), "playing with the dog" (yard).  We are fully aware of the purpose of the rooms and spaces.  We don't need to you point out what you can "see yourself" doing there.  What else would you be doing in a kitchen, playing polo?

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

What cracks us up is when they walk into a room and say "This must be the kitchen" or "this must be a bathroom". We always yell out absurd alternatives - no - it's a bedroom or garage or family room.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post

Or “Is this the kitchen?”  “So is this the garage?”  If you can’t tell, you shouldn’t be buying a house.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Kohola3 said:

Along with "I can see myself" - "sitting here with my morning coffee" (patio, balcony), "fixing kids breakfast" (kitchen), "playing with the dog" (yard).  We are fully aware of the purpose of the rooms and spaces.  We don't need to you point out what you can "see yourself" doing there.  What else would you be doing in a kitchen, playing polo?

LOL! Oh yeah, they walk out on a balcony with a table and chairs and say "Wow, this would be a great place to sit and drink coffee and look at the view" - balconies are for looking at views? Tables and chairs are for sitting? You don't say!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Kohola3 said:

Along with "I can see myself" - "sitting here with my morning coffee" (patio, balcony),

I have never been, and have no desire to meet anyone, who gets up so damn early that they have time to loll on a balcony with their morning coffee.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
40 minutes ago, auntjess said:

I have never been, and have no desire to meet anyone, who gets up so damn early that they have time to loll on a balcony with their morning coffee.

Plus. unless they have a Kuerig (and a refrigerator for the cream and dish washing liquid to wash the mugs) in their bedroom they have to schlep downstairs to the kitchen, fix the coffee and cart it back up to sit on their balcony.  I bet that lasts about the first 10 days after they move in before they decide it's too much trouble.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

2 hours ago, Kohola3 said:

Plus. unless they have a Kuerig (and a refrigerator for the cream and dish washing liquid to wash the mugs) in their bedroom they have to schlep downstairs to the kitchen, fix the coffee and cart it back up to sit on their balcony.  I bet that lasts about the first 10 days after they move in before they decide it's too much trouble.

Yeah I have a very large second story front porch and I go out there to...well, nothing. It's main purpose is to cover the basement addition that was the fix to the failing foundation wall, look amazing when you drive up, and protect the windows so I can get a few more years out of them before they rot out totally. I'll still eventually put a patio set up there when I am planning on selling to trick people into thinking they are going to hang out there but never once have I had any beverage at any time of the day out there. (now my back porch is directly off the kitchen and is screened in and that one a person could be forgiven for thinking they'll have a coffee there because that makes sense, being by the kitchen and all)

I still really really hate people pretending that the house they are looking at "is a craftsman" when it clearly, completely is not. "Oh, its a bungalow!" No sweetie, it is just a minimal traditional, maybe a ranch. Not a bungalow, not a craftsman, not a mid-century modern.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, MaKaM said:

"Oh, its a bungalow!"

Crackerbox was another name for what I consider a bungalow.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I always wonder if they are given a list of styles and housing terms and told to use some.

I am skeptical that everyone really has strong opinions on what architectural styles they like to the point of using the terms and demanding that houses they are shown be of that style. (Even setting aside the misuse of the terms by house hunters and their realtors.)

Also, the show definitely plays it up -- the Florida one we were just talking about in the regular HH thread had the narrator saying at one point that the couple was unable to agree on bungalow vs. ranch, when that had nothing to do with what they were actually saying about the houses.

I do know plenty of people with strong opinions about old vs. new or frame vs. brick or multi-story vs. not or even (in a few cases) Chicago bungalow vs. not (since around here that's such a particular and known style), but far, far fewer who insist upon a "Georgian" or "a ranch" or "a mid century modern." 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

The style of home is also very dependent on where they are going to live.  When I bought my house, I chose the suburb where I wanted to live based on schools, taxes, amenities and proximity to my job. I think most people are far more interested in those things than in the architectural style.  The suburb I chose was mostly developed from 1940-1960 and the vast majority of homes here are colonials and virtually all are on relatively compact lots.  You could ask a realtor to find a ranch on 2 acres here and it would probably take years.  Anyone looking for new construction or a condo or duplex is going to have a tough time here, too.  Yes, there are those kinds of properties, but they’re a small fraction of the housing stock and the pickings are slim.  In real life, the style of home is essentially decided based on where the buyer wants  to live.   The fake, staged drama on the show as couples are pitted one against the other with dueling housing styles is a made for TV problem.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, msmarjoribanks said:

I always wonder if they are given a list of styles and housing terms and told to use some.

I am skeptical that everyone really has strong opinions on what architectural styles they like to the point of using the terms and demanding that houses they are shown be of that style. (Even setting aside the misuse of the terms by house hunters and their realtors.)

Also, the show definitely plays it up -- the Florida one we were just talking about in the regular HH thread had the narrator saying at one point that the couple was unable to agree on bungalow vs. ranch, when that had nothing to do with what they were actually saying about the houses.

I do know plenty of people with strong opinions about old vs. new or frame vs. brick or multi-story vs. not or even (in a few cases) Chicago bungalow vs. not (since around here that's such a particular and known style), but far, far fewer who insist upon a "Georgian" or "a ranch" or "a mid century modern." 

I swear the demand for "mid-century modern" has been completely made up by the producers. I've never met anyone who says they prefer that style, and truth be told, I bet most people I know don't even know what it means.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
16 minutes ago, doodlebug said:

The style of home is also very dependent on where they are going to live.  When I bought my house, I chose the suburb where I wanted to live based on schools, taxes, amenities and proximity to my job. I think most people are far more interested in those things than in the architectural style.  The suburb I chose was mostly developed from 1940-1960 and the vast majority of homes here are colonials and virtually all are on relatively compact lots.  You could ask a realtor to find a ranch on 2 acres here and it would probably take years.  Anyone looking for new construction or a condo or duplex is going to have a tough time here, too.  Yes, there are those kinds of properties, but they’re a small fraction of the housing stock and the pickings are slim.  In real life, the style of home is essentially decided based on where the buyer wants  to live.   The fake, staged drama on the show as couples are pitted one against the other with dueling housing styles is a made for TV problem.

I so wish they would get away from the ridiculous staged conflicts. Why do they feel that the couples have to want different things in order for the show to be interesting? Why do they feel that the couples must be deperate to get a bigger place because their current place is so cramped? I don't get it. Did they ask focus groups? Run a quiz on Facebook? Oy - fake drama is not entertaining and not why I watch the show!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

11 hours ago, doodlebug said:

The style of home is also very dependent on where they are going to live.  When I bought my house, I chose the suburb where I wanted to live based on schools, taxes, amenities and proximity to my job. I think most people are far more interested in those things than in the architectural style.  The suburb I chose was mostly developed from 1940-1960 and the vast majority of homes here are colonials and virtually all are on relatively compact lots.  You could ask a realtor to find a ranch on 2 acres here and it would probably take years.  Anyone looking for new construction or a condo or duplex is going to have a tough time here, too.  Yes, there are those kinds of properties, but they’re a small fraction of the housing stock and the pickings are slim.  In real life, the style of home is essentially decided based on where the buyer wants  to live.   The fake, staged drama on the show as couples are pitted one against the other with dueling housing styles is a made for TV problem.

Yes, exactly. I almost wrote something similar.

I wanted an older house, in some neighborhoods that meant Victorian or maybe American 4-square (which I love), in some it's going to mean Chicago bungalow or some other 1940s or 50s house, and where I bought that mostly meant frame workers cottage (which is probably not a style most seek out looking for, to the extent it's a style at all, but I think my place is really cute).  And because these are all folk styles, you get workers cottages from the Victorian era with certain Victorian qualities, ones from the 1910s with some arts and crafts elements and other mix and match.  

And I knew what the standard lot size was, so did not express surprise that I could see my neighbors! ;-)

I am also going to sign on re the fake drama -- why do they need to pretend the couples disagree deeply when most of the time that's not the issue.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
23 hours ago, Gothish520 said:

I so wish they would get away from the ridiculous staged conflicts. Why do they feel that the couples have to want different things in order for the show to be interesting? Why do they feel that the couples must be deperate to get a bigger place because their current place is so cramped? I don't get it. Did they ask focus groups? Run a quiz on Facebook? Oy - fake drama is not entertaining and not why I watch the show!

This!  

Just once I want to watch an episode where the buyers don't care about the style of the house.  I want them to agree (mostly) on what their needs/wants are.  I'm so tired of watching the wife wanting a white kitchen, but the husband prefers dark.   Wife wants fireplace, husband doesn't.  Wife wants a 2 story colonial, husband wants a one story igloo and they are living in Phoenix.  Wife wants a big backyard, husband doesn't want to take care of it.  Wife wants move in ready, husband wants a fixer.

If I were house hunting, I would have a list of needs:  great school district, low(er) property taxes, nice neighborhood, not near an airport, RR tracks or on a busy street, etc and specific wants:  mudroom, master bathroom (I'm fine with one sink), foyer, window over my kitchen sink, window in the bathrooms, flat backyard.  All the other stuff like paint color, wood flooring, backyard fence, etc can all be changed or added.  If you ask my husband what he needs/wants, he would just say a 3 car garage.  That's it!  He's super easy to please!

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
49 minutes ago, juliet73 said:

This!  

Just once I want to watch an episode where the buyers don't care about the style of the house.  I want them to agree (mostly) on what their needs/wants are.  I'm so tired of watching the wife wanting a white kitchen, but the husband prefers dark.   Wife wants fireplace, husband doesn't.  Wife wants a 2 story colonial, husband wants a one story igloo and they are living in Phoenix.  Wife wants a big backyard, husband doesn't want to take care of it.  Wife wants move in ready, husband wants a fixer.

If I were house hunting, I would have a list of needs:  great school district, low(er) property taxes, nice neighborhood, not near an airport, RR tracks or on a busy street, etc and specific wants:  mudroom, master bathroom (I'm fine with one sink), foyer, window over my kitchen sink, window in the bathrooms, flat backyard.  All the other stuff like paint color, wood flooring, backyard fence, etc can all be changed or added.  If you ask my husband what he needs/wants, he would just say a 3 car garage.  That's it!  He's super easy to please!

The move-in vs fixer is one that really bugs - are there NO couples in the world who both want a project or both want move-in ready? Also, there's always one who wants to stick firm to their budget, while the other would be willing to go higher for the right property.

When your audience can predict every twist in the plot of your show, it may be time to mix things up a little - or a lot!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

I see so many episodes though where the conflict is staged, not by the couple but by the voiceover.  There always has to be something and even if the two participants are lovely people who are genuinely working together to find the best house for them that annoying voiceover is saying things like "Mary wants to be near the water but Jim is anxious about the budget".  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
50 minutes ago, CherryAmes said:

I see so many episodes though where the conflict is staged, not by the couple but by the voiceover.  There always has to be something and even if the two participants are lovely people who are genuinely working together to find the best house for them that annoying voiceover is saying things like "Mary wants to be near the water but Jim is anxious about the budget".  

That is true! The voiceover makes it sound almost like the couple is going to come to blows, but then when the couple talks, they're like "I could work with that" - lol!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

We arrived in Salzburg, Austria today, and our travel agent (who always finds us nice hotels) booked us a room that has the biggest hotel bathroom I've ever been in - including double sinks! I'm going to make sure we brush our teeth at the same time, lol.

  • Like 14

Share this post


Link to post

11 hours ago, chessiegal said:

We arrived in Salzburg, Austria today, and our travel agent (who always finds us nice hotels) booked us a room that has the biggest hotel bathroom I've ever been in - including double sinks! I'm going to make sure we brush our teeth at the same time, lol.

Lol. Enjoy your vacation, Chessiegal!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/5/2018 at 12:02 PM, chessiegal said:

We arrived in Salzburg, Austria today, and our travel agent (who always finds us nice hotels) booked us a room that has the biggest hotel bathroom I've ever been in - including double sinks! I'm going to make sure we brush our teeth at the same time, lol.

 

12 hours ago, ECM1231 said:

Lol. Enjoy your vacation, Chessiegal!

Yes, enjoy! I love Austria!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/1/2018 at 7:16 PM, MaKaM said:

I still really really hate people pretending that the house they are looking at "is a craftsman" when it clearly, completely is not. "Oh, its a bungalow!" No sweetie, it is just a minimal traditional, maybe a ranch. Not a bungalow, not a craftsman, not a mid-century modern.

And here we have it again. The idiot on right now calls an obvious contemporary style duplex "craftsman-ish". At least the wife called him on it. Also, he was a whiner. Don't buy a house if you are going to whine about maintenance. Get a condo. I don't understand people who want to buy a house and then think they will just move in and do nothing ever again. Sh1t is never-ending with a house. If trees aren't falling, fascia board is rotting, drywall is cracking around doors, etc, etc, ad infinitum.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, MaKaM said:

And here we have it again. The idiot on right now calls an obvious contemporary style duplex "craftsman-ish". At least the wife called him on it. 

I hate it when buyers can't tell the difference in house styles, but it's even worse when real estate agents do it. It just shows how unprofessional they are. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, CruiseDiva said:

It just shows how unprofessional they are. 

Do they think "seen on House Hunters" on their business card will be a selling point?  I can't imagine making such obvious mistakes on TV would bring in new clients. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I just saw what is being called a hot, new decorating trend - hombre walls.  The picture that was shown was of a beautifully paneled room with white paint on the top half fading to the original paneling finish at the bottom.  The paneling was gorgeous, and was in an older house so it was real wood and expensive.  The overall effect looked like the painted ran out of paint, or walked off the job before it was finished.  Ugh.  Same site said that white was the top color for interior decor in 2017.     

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

They did an ombre wall on Trading Spaces (the Carpenters Strike Back episode) this year and it looked pretty good.  It was all paint however, and over drywall, not wood.  

Share this post


Link to post

I've seen several shows now, where they put the microwave in an island, down low, and I heard some say how it's convenient for the kids to reach.
Is that a plus?  They can reach it before they know how to use it, and how hot containers can get.
Also, I like the microwave where I can see things in it.

Edited by auntjess
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post

×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size