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Pet Peeves: The Holy Trinity and Beyond

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If you say you want a loft, please know what a loft is. Please don't complain about the lack of privacy or the lack of huge, walk-in closets. 

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And if you are going to insist that you simply CANNOT live without something, at least recognize it on sight.  Love the women who demand granite counter tops and then walk into a kitchen, run their hands over the counter and say "is this granite"?  If you can't tell the difference between laminate and granite then why are you so bent on having it?

 

Because HGTV programs have brainwashed everyone into thinking granite is the only game in town.  Now that the new thing is quartz, everyone who sees a home with granite will be talking about "gutting the kitchen" because it's SO outdated.

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I'm still waiting for gray to be passe and for people to walk into these all gray homes and talk about how dated and drab it is (not that I don't like gray, I do but it's gotten so ubiquitous that the last time I went furniture shopping every single chair and sofa I saw was upholstered in some shade of gray or another).  The tide will turn any day now on all the things that are considered essential now.  Builders are going to make a fortune putting walls up on open concept homes as soon as the owners kids hit their teens for instance!

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I was shocked at an episode where the couple actually wanted carpeting instead of hardwood, and separate rooms -- they wanted to hide the kitchen mess.  Good for them!

 

In a recent repeat, a woman in Arizona complained about the desert landscaping.  She wanted grass.  What does it cost to maintain real grass in the desert?  I keep hearing about severe drought in the Southwest.  Isn't water being rationed? 

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I'm always amazed that the HHs know words like "trey ceiling", etc.  There's no way men know those words.  No way!

 

And please stop kissing every time you decide on the same house at the end.  We know it's fake.

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I'm always amazed that the HHs know words like "trey ceiling", etc.  There's no way men know those words.  No way!

 

And please stop kissing every time you decide on the same house at the end.  We know it's fake.

 

This is so funny because my husband is more into the details than I am.  He picked out all of the colors and finishes for our home.  Of course, he's in construction mgmt./architecture too.

 

As far as young house hunters that want it all, that is because they have been raised with the mentality that they deserve it all.  My kids have been driven by the 400 sq ft trailer (gasp!) that their dad and I lived in when first married, then past the apartment that was the next stop then onto the 1600 sq ft fixer home they came home from the hospital in (the older two remember it) and understand that this 2200 sq ft house was a PROGRESSION of hard work and sacrifice.  But then that's just how I parent.

 

Prices around the country are still a bit of a surprise to me they vary so much for the same sq footage. When DH and I were buying our first home, a friend and her boyfriend were SHOCKED to hear that we were paying 72k for a house.  They were from NJ relocated to FL, she told me once we closed and she came to help us move in that she was so relieved that the house wasn't a dump because that's all you'd get in NJ for that price.  Of course this was in the 90s and it was a foreclosure that needed (and got) a lot of renovation: we lived without a master bath for 2 yrs while DH finished school.  God forbid, we had to shower in the same bathroom that we bathed the babies in!

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Well, there are the distractions of all the bars and shops within walking distance.

 

But no close neighbors nearby! 

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Nope. Fences block the view. Not that I have a view (I live in Iowa) but I don't want to feel closed in. We live on the edge of town. Our back yard is farm fields. When the farmer plants corn (every other year), I can't see a damn thing, have to walk two blocks to see northern lights, meteor showers, lightning storms, etc.

If your backyard fronts fields, and the corn is as high as a elephant's eye, who's watching you anyway?
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If your backyard fronts fields, and the corn is as high as a elephant's eye, who's watching you anyway?

Nobody.  That's why we like it.  :-)  

 

But even when we've had close neighbors (and no fences), we've never felt like we were being watched.  Don't most people -- when they're on their deck, patio, whatever -- give most of their attention to what they're doing, the people they're with, instead of peering at the neighbors?  It's like pretending nobody else is around -- it does give one a sense of privacy. 

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An off-beat question: What kind of home do you think the posters here probably live in? What do you think is our reality? I'll jump in as soon as I give it some thought. Initially, I'll say that few of us have "updated" homes, and few of us care as long as we're not about to sell them. Of the homeowners and renters, I'd guess that 40% have been in their places for the last 10 years at least. I'd guess that half of us aren't thinking about moving into a new place.

Edited by mojito

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In a recent repeat, a woman in Arizona complained about the desert landscaping. She wanted grass. What does it cost to maintain real grass in the desert? I keep hearing about severe drought in the Southwest. Isn't water being rationed?

It depends on where in the Southwest you are. Here in far West Texas, there are days and times for you to water. But during those times, you can water your heart out. Your water bill will be astronomical, but that's another story.

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It's another example of people moving to an area but wanting things to look like what they are used to.  That's fine to a point but when it's a drain on the environment, it's just wrong.  If you are going to live in the desert, you shouldn't plan on landscaping like it's the midwest.  It uses resources already in short supply (water) even if you can afford it.

 

By the same token, if you want a house built in the 1800's, don't expect "open concept", "en suite bathrooms" or "walk in closets".  Do some research, people.  That stuff didn't exist back then so quit complaining that ye olde farmhouse doesn't have any of those things.

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I remember an episode from a few years ago where a couple was looking for a 1910-1920ish house in the Chicago area. They insisted that they had to have a two-car garage. Every house - "But it only has a single car garage". And every time, the realtor told them they simply didn't build two-car garages back then because most people didn't have more than one car, if they had one at all. Yet, each time, the HHers seemed surprised to hear that.

I am surprised we haven't seen people wanting original Victorians with original media rooms.

It is like people who want to live in the city center, walking distance to shops and restaurants, but with a large yard. Unless you, or a previous owner, buy the neighboring lot(s), you are going to have a small yard. Get over it.

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I'm still waiting for gray to be passe and for people to walk into these all gray homes and talk about how dated and drab it is (not that I don't like gray, I do but it's gotten so ubiquitous that the last time I went furniture shopping every single chair and sofa I saw was upholstered in some shade of gray or another).  The tide will turn any day now on all the things that are considered essential now.  Builders are going to make a fortune putting walls up on open concept homes as soon as the owners kids hit their teens for instance!

These are things I think of watching the That's So 80s and That's So 90s shows.  When they do the That's So 00s or That's So Teens, gray walls and exteriors should feature prominently, and also Moroccan pattern rugs.

 

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There is a Canadian show I stumbled onto yesterday called (I think) Humble House Hunting.  The concept is that people are looking for houses in the $150,000 price range.  While watching I had to wonder if the producers have read this thread because they had some funny, snarky little voice overs.  For instance one guy kept talking about how none of the bedrooms had closets big enough for all his shoes so at one point the narrator says something along the lines of "Imelda here needs more space". They also had a couple, looking for a budget home bemoaning the lack of stainless appliances but instead of rolling my eyes the way it was set up made me think they knew they were being unreasonable or whoever scripted the show sure did!

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HH:  I really, really, really, really, really want an industrial loft.  Industral loft, love, want, must have an industrial loft with industrial ductwork, with industrial loft interior, all industrial all the time.

 

Agent:  Here's an industrial loft, there's the bedroom.

 

HH:  What?  The walls don't go to the ceiling.  How can that be a bedroom?  That's not a real bedroom is it?  I couldn't consider this a bedroom.  The walls don't go to the ceiling.  There's no privacy.  You can hear everything.  What if we're cooking and all that smell and soot (???) gets into the master?  It can't be a bedroom without walls that to go to the ceiling.  There's no privacy in this place!

 

Agent:  I don't think industrial means what she thinks it means.

Edited by izabella
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I think they're repeats, but I'm starting to see Hunters who want white kitchen cabinets.  Oops.  I meant cabinetry.  They're even painting oak fireplace mantels and trim, as well as kitchen cabinets.  I can understand doing that if a kitchen is dark -- small windows. low ceiling, no natural light, but it's starting to look like natural wood is out of style.

 

Who decided white was in?  How much influence does HGTV have with stuff like this? 

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How much influence does HGTV have with stuff like this?

 

Apparently quite a lot since every single "contestant" parrots the latest trends in their list of demands like automatons.

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I am surprised we haven't seen people wanting original Victorians with original media rooms.

It is like people who want to live in the city center, walking distance to shops and restaurants, but with a large yard. Unless you, or a previous owner, buy the neighboring lot(s), you are going to have a small yard. Get over it.

 

You asked, HH provides. Newlyweds looking in Baltimore, wanting to be in Greektown. She wanted a classic Baltimore row home with details but a modern kitchen, walk in closets, soaking tub and he simply had to have space for their 9' x 12' couch (that was ugly anyway) and a media room. Because those are totally standard in 15' wide row homes. They were...awful. I know they were given a script but holy f*ck, get a new sofa fools! But they ended up going back to Texas to get a second chaise side instead of love seat side that they had. I think it perfect that they ended up next to a railroad track and an ugly industrial area. Hoping someone puts up some skyscrapers that block their view.

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I have a hard time believing HGTV dictates what the current trends are, despite their good ratings. I think HGTV is following what design trends are. Until someone can point out I'm wrong, I just don't think a Life and Style cable can dictate a national trend.


I have a hard time believing HGTV dictates what the current trends are, despite their good ratings. I think HGTV is following what design trends are. Until someone can point out I'm wrong, I just don't think a Life and Style cable channel can dictate a national trend.

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I have a hard time believing HGTV dictates what the current trends are, despite their good ratings. I think HGTV is following what design trends are. Until someone can point out I'm wrong, I just don't think a Life and Style cable can dictate a national trend.

I have a hard time believing HGTV dictates what the current trends are, despite their good ratings. I think HGTV is following what design trends are. Until someone can point out I'm wrong, I just don't think a Life and Style cable channel can dictate a national trend.

I don't think HGTV dictates the trends, but they do disseminate them far more widely than they'd be otherwise.  So, in that respect they are partly responsible for how long some trends last.  I don't blame them for granite and stainless becoming trendy, only for it becoming ubiquitous.

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the narrator says something along the lines of "Imelda here needs more space".

Pretty funny, but...

surely the target audience of this, or any show, is too young to get the reference.

I know, but I'm not who anyone is aiming at, except when the Fonz is selling a reverse home mortgage.

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One of my pet peeves in the HH lineup of shows:  HH's budget - $200,000-$350,000.  Agent shows them a house that costs $325,000.  HH:  That's over budget!!!  No, it isn't if you stated that you would go up to $350,000!.  I can understand wanting to stay closer to the lower end of a budget, but once the higher number is out there, finding a home that is lower than that but higher than the lowest end of the budget is NOT over budget.  grrrrrrrr.  lol 

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One of my pet peeves in the HH lineup of shows: HH's budget - $200,000-$350,000. Agent shows them a house that costs $325,000. HH: That's over budget!!! No, it isn't if you stated that you would go up to $350,000!. I can understand wanting to stay closer to the lower end of a budget, but once the higher number is out there, finding a home that is lower than that but higher than the lowest end of the budget is NOT over budget. grrrrrrrr. lol

The flip side of that pisses me off. HH says they have a budget of $350,000. Agent shows them a house that's $475,000.

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Real estate agents make commissions so of course they are going to show the properties that are at the higher end of the client's budget - especially for the folks on HH who want more features than their money will ever buy.

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Yeah, they work on commission, but the agent themselves typically split their share of the commission 50/50 with their broker, so if it's a 6% commission on the sale split between buyer and seller agents, most agents make about 1 1/2% of the sales price, so you'd really have to boost the price significantly to make a difference. Agents are just work horses for brokers. I took the state training necessary to get a RE license in Maryland. After I passed the class, I was inundated with invitations to join an agency. I had no intentions of selling, it was just something I did after I retired. One broker was so insistent, I finally went in for an "interview". Strangest interview I've ever had. In 1 hour, I think I said 2 sentences. The broker spent the whole time selling me on why I should work for them. The fees they wanted were eye opening. In the end, for over $4,000 out of my pocket, I got a chair and phone in his office. At 1 1/2% commission, that's a lot of houses to sell to even break even! No thanks.

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Another thing that drives me nuts are the people who live in the desert who insist on having lush, green yards and hate desert landscaping. Talk about an enormous waste of limited resources, for absolutely nothing. You live in the desert! You want lush, green yards, move to the north, or the Midwest or the east or ANYWHERE else! Arrrgggh! Drives me crazy.

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Another thing that drives me nuts are the people who live in the desert who insist on having lush, green yards and hate desert landscaping. Talk about an enormous waste of limited resources, for absolutely nothing. You live in the desert! You want lush, green yards, move to the north, or the Midwest or the east or ANYWHERE else! Arrrgggh! Drives me crazy.

Yeah, I hate the desert (I've spent a fair amount of time in AZ) so on one hand I kind of get it, but on the other ... that's why I don't live in the desert. (That and the heat. "It's a dry heat!" I don't care; 125 degrees is too fucking hot, thank you and good night.) And if you don't have a choice about living there (like if you're transferred there for work or something), I still think you should acclimate to where you live, rather than forcing it to acclimate to you.

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I recently moved after living in the desert for over 30 years. Where I lived, the water company would pay you to remove your grass, etc in favor of desert landscape. All new builds automatically came with desert landscaping after 2000, I believe. I don't know why realtors don't mention that to these "I want lush green grass" homebuyers.

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Drives me crazy.

 

Ditto.  But with the crack down on water use these idiots will soon wake up.  It's so ecologically unsound and wasteful to pretend you are in MIchigan while living in the desert.

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"My."  

 

"Where's my mid-century modern?"  "Where's my pool?"  "Where's my white kitchen?"  "Where's my open concept?"

 

Where's my baseball bat?  I need to beat something.

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"My."

"Where's my mid-century modern?" "Where's my pool?" "Where's my white kitchen?" "Where's my open concept?"

Where's my baseball bat? I need to beat something.

Lol! I wish the realtor would respond, "in a house you can't afford!"
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Lol! I wish the realtor would respond, "in a house you can't afford!"

 

I understand your frustration with the homes that significantly exceed the stated "budget" but the realtors have encountered more difficulty locating decoy homes over the years.  The HH programs air 6 months after filming so there's usually no advantage for sellers to offer their homes.  Plus, HH doesn't feature listing agents so why bother with filming?

 

Most of the buyers probably didn't tour the expensive decoys on their actual house hunt.  I view HH strictly for the RE so I enjoy seeing other, different types of properties and hopefully fewer basic tract homes. 

 

Besides that, the listing price is one of the few things that HH doesn't normally fake.  If forced to stick to the "budget", bet that's what they'd do!  

Edited by aguabella

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Serious question: anyone on here been on the show, or know someone who has? if so, do the producers actually tell you to act like an a$$hole? I wish someone could point me in a direction where i can read someone's take on being on the show. I am not sure I have ever seen a couple I would actually like to be friends with.....

 

Sorry for the late response (no time to post) but I'm sure you'd find the population of HH participants like any other group, i.e. most are nice people with only a few exceptions.

 

Guess I'd qualify for your question, indirectly.  I have professional ties to a national organization that acts as a feeder to the various HH casting teams.  So, I have both spoken to and corresponded with many participants - mostly realtors but a few house hunters, too.

 

Haven't ever posted their specific information, primarily b/c I usually chat with them months after the air date, long after posting. Plus, I don't want to violate their confidences.  (They've all signed non-disclosures.) Mostly, they've just confirmed that my beliefs / hunches about the show's filming practices and procedures are correct.

Yes, I'd say the shows are "semi-scripted" so lines are suggested to the participants to further the plot. WRT reading about their experiences, HHI often finds ex-pats via their blogs. A few years ago, those people would post details about the show. No more, probably b/c the nondisclosure was tightened up several years ago.

Publicly, participants mostly indicate how much fun they had and the team was great, etc. That's usually about it

Edited by aguabella
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Saw a few shows recently that reignited some of my pet peeves..

1.  i understand having young kids and taking their safety into account when buying a house, but if you have a toddler, and worried about certain things such as grade of the yard, etc..., shouldn't you also consider that your toddler isn't going to stay the same age for the next 7 to 10 years you are going to be in that house?  You buy the house for the way the toddler is today but in the next 2 years, those concerns won't be an issue.

 

2. Just because a house is listed at the top of your limit or a little above it, doesn't mean the sales price has to be that high.  Just make an offer that meets your needs.  a few extra dollars a month savings versus your comfort while you are in the house?....

 

3.  People not thinking longer term when buying houses.  Just because the house is listed a few thousand $s above your desired price, you opt for another house that has no garage, less bedrooms , and less space than you need, and will probably be harder to sell if and when you want to sell.

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What annoys me are the people who buy their homes thinking what the next owner is going to want. I've got a sibling like that; everything that's done to the house is done with an eye to its resale value. Doesn't anyone just buy a home to live in and enjoy themselves? Why do the colors have to be on-trend? Why does it always have to be what the "other" would like? Are they so afraid of imposing their own personality on their home - or do they have no personality to begin with, so they go the safe route ?

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What annoys me are the people who buy their homes thinking what the next owner is going to want. I've got a sibling like that; everything that's done to the house is done with an eye to its resale value. Doesn't anyone just buy a home to live in and enjoy themselves? Why do the colors have to be on-trend? Why does it always have to be what the "other" would like? Are they so afraid of imposing their own personality on their home - or do they have no personality to begin with, so they go the safe route ?

if you intend to sell your house and want to ensure appealing to the maximum number of potential buyers, get the best price, and shorten the time it takes to sell, i believe that is a sound approach.

if you have ever sold a house and took a loss or had it take a long time to sell, you would better understand why being too specific on taste can harm you in the long run.

 

this is the reason why i would never buy a house near a power line, in a bad neighborhood, in a poor school district, on a busy street, next to industrial or retail property, next to apartment buildings, etc...even if the price is attractive because when it comes time to sell, i would be limited to a few specific buyers who will use those defects to their advantage for a lower sales price.

 

when you pay attention to trends as to what buyers want, you increase the pool of available buyers, thereby increasing the potential sales price and shorten the time it takes to sell your house.

 

only scenario where this wouldn't be an issue is if i intended to stay at that house forever.

Edited by dga28
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Well, I stayed in my first house for 34 years and never once thought about what to do in terms of resale value.  Most of my friends stayed in their places long terms as well.  And my current house was built with everything I wanted, resale be damned. If you don't like it, don't buy it.

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Even if you think you'll only be in a house 5-7 years I still say paint and decorate for what you like.  When it comes time to sell you can repaint and all that then.  Enjoy it and live in it the way you want until then.

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I see it both ways, personalize with paint and furniture and knick knacks but bear in mind that major expenses may not be recouped if you sell no matter what the TV shows tell you.  We had neighbours who gutted a 10 year old kitchen and spent a small fortune giving it the designer look.  They were genuinely shocked to learn that although buyers liked the kitchen just fine none of them were prepared to pay $20,000 more for their house than the house down the street that hadn't been "upgraded". 

 

I put upgraded in quotes because there was nothing wrong with the original kitchen!  This was a house built in 2002 - it may not have been up to HGTV standards but it did not need upgrading.   There is need and there is want and if you want to do something to your house for your own personal preference knock yourself out just don't kid yourself that the house actually needed it and that you'll make the money back when you sell.  Sometimes you will, often you won't.

Edited by CherryAmes
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I'm one of those people who would renovate/decorate with an eye toward resale value, but I live in a condo in a desirable part of a big city where prices and property taxes are high.  Meaning, buyers around her have to spend a lot of money to buy and high mortgage payments, and that means they have less for renovations...condo buyers want to buy "move in ready' and that usually means "up to date" finishes.  I know we see a LOT of people on HGTV that are all about renovating and "putting their own stamp on it," but in the real world, most buyers can barely scrape up a decent down payment to eliminate the PMI on their mortgage. 

 

It's important to understand the market you're in, and what sort of reno's are worthwhile.  My parents' kitchen would be frowned upon here where I live, but it would be silly to deck it out in granite and 42 inch cabinets and whatnot because it would kick the price of the house too high, and buyers out there don't care about granite.  A full basement with high ceilings under the house, on the other hand?  Worth every penny and then some.

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I don't think anyone is saying you should ignore resale all together.  But are you planning on selling right away?  If not, it's OK to not have stainless appliances and all neutral rooms.  You can paint the walls colors, or buy homes with walls in colors other than eggshell or taupe.  You can have linoleum floors and upgrade later when you can afford it or when you plan on selling.  You can also buy homes with white appliances or use a bedroom as an office, etc.  Do they not want to personalize at all?   And really, the more I think about it, I think it's more that ALL 'buyers' on these shows are talking about resale right away and none are talking about what they actually like.  If even a few said something like "cool - a pink bathroom, how fun!" or something rather than "Gut job.  How will ever resell???"

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I don't think anyone is saying you should ignore resale all together.  But are you planning on selling right away?  If not, it's OK to not have stainless appliances and all neutral rooms.  You can paint the walls colors, or buy homes with walls in colors other than eggshell or taupe.  You can have linoleum floors and upgrade later when you can afford it or when you plan on selling.  You can also buy homes with white appliances or use a bedroom as an office, etc.  Do they not want to personalize at all?   And really, the more I think about it, I think it's more that ALL 'buyers' on these shows are talking about resale right away and none are talking about what they actually like.  If even a few said something like "cool - a pink bathroom, how fun!" or something rather than "Gut job.  How will ever resell???"

Exactly.  When I was house shopping, I was looking for something I'd be in for years, so resale value was a minor consideration.  I painted my walls in strong colors, changed the flooring only in rooms where the carpeting was badly stained, and replaced the fridge (with a WHITE one!!!) when the one which came with the house died.  Still using the white stove and black dishwasher because they work just fine.  Now, someday when I might want to move, I'd make cosmetic changes for resale value, but I bought a house intending to live in it and made it what I wanted to live in.  It would be nice to see at least a few people on HH do the same.  And in the early seasons, we did.

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My husband and I were in the kitchen fixing dinner tonight when he turned to me and said "I'm glad our kitchen is big enough for both of us to be in here together" (with a big grin). I think he's watched too many HHs, lol. We do have a spacious kitchen - not why we bought the house, just a perk. We bought it for location and master on the main floor.

Edited by chessiegal
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