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Holiday Food Traditions!

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That sounds great. I tried to convince my in-laws to do that one year so everyone could enjoy presents without having to jump up to cook. No one else wanted to do it.

 

 

Do you own a fire arm?  You may have to get pushy. 

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I have never had a big meal on Christmas day. Everyone got new PJs or sweat suit and we wore those all day. I made a fancy and special brunch and we snacked the rest of the day and played games.

I hosted a huge party xmas eve with a lavish buffet of delicious and special dishes. Not a meal, just really good food and I made it all myself. I don't trust pot luck gatherings for special occasions. Too may dips in hollowed bread show up! We ate those leftovers on xmas day. Lazy, delightful and yum!

I don't trust pot luck meals because you never know what somebody's kitchen looks like. Have you ever seen Hoarders?!

We just do a ham on Christmas. We cook here just the 2 of us while my kids do their thing with their families. The afternoon is usually a sweat pants by the TV day for most of the day then we go to my daughter's in the evening to do presents and have dessert.

At Thanksgiving we buy a big turkey and a smaller one. I freeze the smaller one and we have a turkey dinner around April or May, right before it gets hot.

Edited by Maharincess
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LOL!  None of my friends are hoarders and their kitchens are clean!  Not all of them cook well, thus my decision to do it all.  I enjoy it, too.  

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For Christmas Day we do french toast/pancakes around mid morning, and then have a nice if not "big" dinner, usually a ham, which I don't really consider "cooking'. I also make up a big pan of utterly sinful yukon gold/sweet potato gratin. 

 

I'm not sure what to do about NYE this year, I typically like to stay in and have apps/d'oerves and champers when the ball drops, but this year my team is in the College Playoff (GO GREEN) so I might actually consider going out to the bar up the street to watch.

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Yum, thanks so much. I'm under Doctor's orders to gain at least 20 pounds by my next appointment so I'm looking for some good fat filled recipes and I love potatoes.

Thanks again.

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I like broccoli salad because it is something green so it looks nice among all the brown dishes and provides some kind of green vegetable. It may not be super good for you with the dressing and bacon, but it's something. Also it has some crunch. I also like sweet potatoes made with savory spices rather than marshmallows.

Late to the party, but all cooked vegetable salads are good with me - not only are they more filling (there's always a vegetarian guest) but they are are still good the next day. Broccoli, cauliflower, grean beans or any other beans, or even lentils, chick peas, etc. work. And you can still add raw veg (or cheese) to it anytime - tomatoes, lettuce, etc. you can never go wrong.

 

(added bonus: even if mixed with seasoning/vinaigrette, cooked veggies will still be good, which is not the case for raw lettuce/spinach salads, which tend to wilt).

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This weekend I made deviled eggs which is more traditional for my family at 4th of July cookouts than Christmas but I had some eggs that needed using and a craving.  I make mine with just pickle relish and mayo seasoned with paprika.  That may give some traditionalists the shudders but it's the family method.

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We always had celery sticks stuffed with onion dip made from a pack of Lipton's and cream cheese at holiday meals when I was growing up.

 

I love this stuff.

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Whenever I think of deviled eggs, I am reminded of a former coworker. He brought a tray of them to an office party -- he had made them himself instead of asking his wife to help. They were good, but he didn't know that the "red stuff sprinkled on top" is usually paprika. He used chili powder.

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This weekend I made deviled eggs which is more traditional for my family at 4th of July cookouts than Christmas but I had some eggs that needed using and a craving.  I make mine with just pickle relish and mayo seasoned with paprika.  That may give some traditionalists the shudders but it's the family method.

 

I think it's great that families have their own tradition/method for foods.  My mom got us all hooked on how she 'doctored up' the traditional deviled egg, and now I can't make any without adding some softened cream cheese to the mixture (along with a little minced onion).  Of course, I loved deviled eggs, so I'll eat them with or without cream cheese (just don't put olives on top or in the mixture!).

 

They were good, but he didn't know that the "red stuff sprinkled on top" is usually paprika. He used chili powder.

 

That would probably be tasty, unless he sprinkled a lot of the red stuff.  A little bit would go a long way.

Edited by BooksRule

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My local grocery store is having their traditional December Buy One Get One Free on brie cheese this week so I will be having my December traditional brie and stone wheat crackers with homemade spiced pair chutney.  Mmmmmm.

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My local grocery store is having their traditional December Buy One Get One Free on brie cheese this week so I will be having my December traditional brie and stone wheat crackers with homemade spiced pair chutney.  Mmmmmm.

Would you share the pear chutney recipe? Sounds delicious!

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Qoass, your focaccia recipe is very similar to what I make. I use fire-roasted tomatoes, Brie, sweet onions, and a little crumbled bacon. No-salt Italian seasoning (no garlic, though) and a ready-made pie crust. Next time, I'll try the focaccia!

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Though we're not Jewish, my Mom makes Noodle Kugel (sweet, baked noodle pudding) on Thanksgiving, Christmas, or both, & she has for years. She's making it for Christmas (she forgot at Thanksgiving); she got the ingredients at the store yesterday.

She was given the recipe years ago by a Jewish family living in the neighborhood at the time, whom we became good friends with & whose daughter went to school with my brother. I have to admit, I don't know that I liked it that much the first time we had it--& I can't remember if my Mom made it then, or the lady who gave her the recipe did--but, ever since then I look forward to Mom making it & completely devour it whenever she does.

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Saying "noodle kugel" in my head sounds funny. In a good way.

I know. If you've never had it, & you go to a Jewish deli that serves it or a meal at someone's house & they've made it--especially the sweet kind (you can also make a savory version)--try it.

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That reminds me of attending a Jewish friend's wedding many years ago.  I was single at the time so of course I was seated at the proverbial "single's table",  at the head of the table.  So, after we were about 3/4's of the way through the meal, someone said, "Oh look, they're bringing the kugel".  I said, "What's a kugel?"  Every head, and I mean every head at that table swiveled in my direction and looked at me as if I'd said, what's butter. A very nice young man, seated next to me, explained what the dish was.  It was quite tasty.  That was not a friendly table filled with miserable singles ;>)

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That reminds me of attending a Jewish friend's wedding many years ago.  I was single at the time so of course I was seated at the proverbial "single's table",  at the head of the table.  So, after we were about 3/4's of the way through the meal, someone said, "Oh look, they're bringing the kugel".  I said, "What's a kugel?"  Every head, and I mean every head at that table swiveled in my direction and looked at me as if I'd said, what's butter. A very nice young man, seated next to me, explained what the dish was.  It was quite tasty.  That was not a friendly table filled with miserable singles ;>)

 

I was introduced to kugel by my (now) husband!  And yes, it's delicious :)

 

Interesting note:  According to WIkipedia, "kugel" in South African Jewish slang is an insult.  Think "Jewish American Princess." 

Edited by PRgal

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My brother is coming for a few days on Monday so I'm starting the holiday baking and cooking early! He is in the Navy so we only get to see him about once a year. Tomorrow me and the boys will start making Christmas cookies. Peanut butter blossoms, pretzel m&m hugs, cookie dough truffles and sugar cookie they can decorate for Santa.

I picked up some nice steaks to grill one night along with shrimp, Brussel sprouts, potatoes and sautéed mushrooms. The next night I'll make some good old Eastern NC BBQ, Cole slaw and bacon green beans for a taste of home before my brother leaves for a ship in the middle of the ocean again.

Christmas Day my inlaws stop in for a bit to see the grandkids, nothing formal. For breakfast I'll make a sausage egg casserole and cinnamon rolls. After that we will just graze on food all day. I'm going to make a veggie, olive and cheese tray, meatballs, pigs in a blanket, Santa fruit kabobs, stuffed mushrooms and then have a honey baked ham out for sandwiches.

Dec. 27th my parents come for a night so I'm going to try my hand at making a standing rib roast. I've never made one before and I'm so afraid of ruining a $50.00 hunk of meat. I'm a good cook but man, it's a little nerve wracking.

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My extended family will have our potluck at my brother's this year. 

Christmas day, I usually make a roast.   but, my one son won't be in town, and the other's plans are up in the air, depending on when he and his girlfriend are seeing her family.   SO -   I'm making lasagna.  I rarely make it any more, because a recipe makes so much, and I can't eat it too many days in a row.   But my husband has been asking me to make it, so Christmas day that will be dinner.   That way, servings can be heated up later for whoever comes hungry.   Also, lasagna can be made assembled the day before, and cooked when people are hungry. 

Oh - and the recipe is simply the recipe on the Prince Lasagna box. 

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My brother is coming for a few days on Monday so I'm starting the holiday baking and cooking early! He is in the Navy so we only get to see him about once a year. Tomorrow me and the boys will start making Christmas cookies. Peanut butter blossoms, pretzel m&m hugs, cookie dough truffles and sugar cookie they can decorate for Santa.

I picked up some nice steaks to grill one night along with shrimp, Brussel sprouts, potatoes and sautéed mushrooms. The next night I'll make some good old Eastern NC BBQ, Cole slaw and bacon green beans for a taste of home before my brother leaves for a ship in the middle of the ocean again.

Christmas Day my inlaws stop in for a bit to see the grandkids, nothing formal. For breakfast I'll make a sausage egg casserole and cinnamon rolls. After that we will just graze on food all day. I'm going to make a veggie, olive and cheese tray, meatballs, pigs in a blanket, Santa fruit kabobs, stuffed mushrooms and then have a honey baked ham out for sandwiches.

Dec. 27th my parents come for a night so I'm going to try my hand at making a standing rib roast. I've never made one before and I'm so afraid of ruining a $50.00 hunk of meat. I'm a good cook but man, it's a little nerve wracking.

Mountainair, I've never made a standing rib roast, and I'm sure one of our more accomplished posters can reassure you that you'll be fine, but I made my first ever tenderloin last Christmas. It turned out so beautifully and has zero waste, and I'm doing it again this year. I went to a local meat market aka meat heaven, and one of the butchers told me how to prepare it and reassured me that there is no way I could screw it up. He was right. It was ridiculously easy. Yes, it was outrageously expensive ($38/lb), but for a special occasion (and given the fact that nothing is thrown away), it is worth every penny. We made tenderloin sandwiches and steak salads with the leftovers. It was just as beautiful as any tenderloin you'd get in a fine steak restaurant. Good luck with your rib roast and let us know how it goes!! And hugs to your brother! Edited by Spunkygal
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This weekend I made deviled eggs which is more traditional for my family at 4th of July cookouts than Christmas but I had some eggs that needed using and a craving.  I make mine with just pickle relish and mayo seasoned with paprika.  That may give some traditionalists the shudders but it's the family method.

 

My mother-in-law makes the best deviled eggs I've ever tasted. She usually makes them for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and other holidays. The first year my husband and I hosted Thanksgiving, someone set them out as an appetizer, and my husband didn't get any since he was dealing with frying the turkey. That was 8 or 9 years ago, and I'm still hearing about it. The tradition in his family was that you have them with dinner.

 

I found a recipe on Pinterest for buffalo deviled eggs, which sound amazing, but I have not tried them yet.

 

My plan today was to do my last round of holiday goodie baking for the neighbors. I make pumpkin pie truffles, which are always a huge hit. But the grocery store was completely cleaned out of white chocolate chips. So the neighbors are getting bags of Lindt truffles this year. I do enjoy making them, because they really are amazing, but I was not too sad to get 6 hours of my weekend back.

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Dec. 27th my parents come for a night so I'm going to try my hand at making a standing rib roast. I've never made one before and I'm so afraid of ruining a $50.00 hunk of meat. I'm a good cook but man, it's a little nerve wracking.

I've had good results with the slow-roasted (or low and slow) method for standing rib roasts.  It takes time and hogs up your oven, but I've been really pleased with the result.  There's some folks that claim searing it first is essential and others who opt to sear after with this low and slow method (I've only done the sear first method myself since I figure trying to manhandle a whole roast after it has been cooked is not ideal)

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Yes, everything I've read says to start it out high in the oven-like 500 degrees for a bit and then lower the temp. I'm right on the cusp of high elevation though which can alter cook time so I'm a bit nervous about that. I've asked Santa for a good quality meat thermometer in my stocking so I hope he delivers :)

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Yes, everything I've read says to start it out high in the oven-like 500 degrees for a bit and then lower the temp. I'm right on the cusp of high elevation though which can alter cook time so I'm a bit nervous about that. I've asked Santa for a good quality meat thermometer in my stocking so I hope he delivers :)

 

Hi Mountainair. Don't fear the standing rib roast! :)  It is really, really simple. I've tried the cooking at a high temp method first before, but, personally, have not found that it makes any difference. We love garlic, so I cut some small slits in the meat all over, and then stuff them with peeled garlic cloves. Then I generously salt (I prefer kosher salt, or any course-ground salt would work), and pepper the roast; sometimes I add a little chopped rosemary and thyme. Then I plop it in a roaster pan in a 325 degree oven, approximately 15-17 minutes per pound. When I take it out of the oven, I tent it with some foil, and let it rest about 30 minutes. Voila. That is all I have ever done, and it always comes out medium-rare, juicy, tender, and flavorful. I have no doubt that yours will be delicious. Let us know how it turns out for you.

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We love garlic, so I cut some small slits in the meat all over, and then stuff them with peeled garlic cloves.

 

That's what I do with pork roast.  That's how my mom made it, and now I can't make it any other way.

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I did a standing rib roast once and did very close to above. It was delish!

We do a brunch for Christmas. I make Paula Deen's (I know, I know) French Toast casserole which is amazing. From an old The Masters cookbook (yes- the golf tourney) I make a ham and cheese quiche. It's so good!!! Cant figure out why I love it so much- maybe bc it just calls for 3 eggs? Lots of yum flavor and not too eggy.

Historically I've made a sausage/hashbrown thing (no eggs). I'm not a huge fan but my family loves it. I find it a tad sausage heavy. I'll probably make it again just because they like it. But if anyone here has a non egg breakfast casserole, Id love to hear it.

And my dad makes a fruit salad. I love to cook, but hate to cut fruit. So always pass that task to pop.

We are a family who look for any excuse to cram as many calories as possible during the holidays but with the French toast thing, dessert isn't needed. Like I would love an excuse but really, no way after that and everything else.

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For breakfast/brunch I always serve coffee, orange juice, scrambled eggs (I make the BEST scrambled eggs if I do say so myself), buttered English muffin halves and this super simple overnight sticky bun recipe. Yes, it's Paula Deen, but it is definitely not her recipe originally. I made it years before I ever heard of her, it's just the only internet recipe I could find that's almost identical to the one I make. Coincidentally, I then make standings rib roast for dinner, so yeah no dieting on holidays around here.

Edited by mansonlamps
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I always make monkey bread for Christmas morning. The high-class version with the biscuits from a tube. I keep suggesting pizza for dinner, but nobody else goes for it. I am just not a big fan of most of the traditional holiday foods. I would really prefer an all-day graze than a big meal.

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Me too, Mittengirl. I would love to just do a bunch of appetizers some time, just to do something different. We usually do a scaled down version of Thanksgiving dinner. My husband smokes a turkey, and makes mashed potatoes, and I make stuffing. For Thanksgiving I finally landed on an apple dessert worthy of the occasion, a salted caramel apple crisp. I'm going to make it for dessert for Christmas dinner. 

 

If you want a great appetizer, I make dates stuffed with a mixture of cream cheese and goat cheese, wrapped in bacon, and rolled in brown sugar. You pop them under the broiler for 10 minutes, flip them over, and then let them go for another 10 minutes. Soooooo good.

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Last I talked to my mom, she still didn't know what we were having for Christmas dinner. One niece said we should have pizza, and Mom said if the pizza place was open on Christmas day, she'd do it.

 

I just know what we're having for dessert because I'm making it: chocolate cherry Dr. Pepper cobbler in the Crock-Pot. I made it once before, and it turned out to be really fudgy and good. Also, it's easy.

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My mom informs me she's doing a beef tenderloin roast for Christmas Eve and ham for Christmas (we generally do the ham for Christmas, but Christmas Eve it just depends on what she's in the mood to make).  I do the veggie sides, so I need to put my thinking cap on today so I can get to the market tomorrow, although it's going to come down to what looks good when I get there.  Maybe Brussels sprouts one night and Ina Garten's spinach gratin another -- the latter is so good, but so rich that it's definitely reserved for special occasions.

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That's what holidays are made for....rich! Do it! Do we fit into these tight ass pants all year in vain? Hell no- bring on the calories for a day and for the love of all dogs let me indulge. Then I resume boring and no fun.

So...I made a pretty good ad hoc but well received Mexican dip at the Xmas work party today. The lowdown;

2 cans of refried beans mixed with a jar of Ortega taco sauce. That's the base layer.

Next I took a 16 oz sour cream, 2 XL dollops of mayo and a Hidden Valley ranch seasoning packet I did these layers night before so as to let layers "marry" as they say on fancy TV

This morning I grated half a block of extra sharp and half a block of Colby Jack (8 oz each) and made sure had full cheese coverage. Had cheese leftover but to hell with it- I'll find a purpose.

Cut some green onions on the bias and threw those on.

Drained in colander and then paper towered til dry a mild can of rotel (bc I never liked tomatoes thius have never been a great tomato cutter). Scattered that on top.

It was demolished with people asking for recipes! If you knew would be eaten soon then add shredded lettuce, guac etc. Freaking home run, I tell you and so easy!

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That sounds excellent, KnoxForPres, but what is this "leftover cheese" you speak of?  I am unfamiliar with it.

 

I baked two cookie recipes last night start to finish and prepared the doughs for two more to bake tonight.  It's been years since I've attempted gingerbread cutouts so I'm hopeful the dough isn't too sticky to roll.  If it doesn't work out, I will feel no guilt in tossing it.  I bought some strawberries to scatter on the platter as well, dipped or not depending on what kind of time I have.

 

While getting the recipes out, I came across a dumpling recipe I'd forgotten all about from last year.  I've mentioned my enjoyment of round won ton wrappers so for New Year's, I'll be sticking them in mini muffin tins and filling them with brie and fruit, ham, egg & cheese, and spinach and bacon.  Much easier than making dumplings or quiche crusts.

Edited by Qoass
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That's what holidays are made for....rich! Do it! Do we fit into these tight ass pants all year in vain? Hell no- bring on the calories for a day and for the love of all dogs let me indulge. Then I resume boring and no fun.

One reason it's fun to be pregnant during the holidays is maternity pants! No waist to button and zip up, pants pull up all the way to your chin and you still look like your being fashionable!

I have my two nieces coming over tomorrow so they don't have to go to daycare all day. Afterward we will all meet up at my parents in law house for Christmas Eve festivities. My two boys are 6 and 3 and my two nieces are 6 and 3. They are all super close cousins. I'm going to make up some sugar cookie dough this afternoon so tomorrow we can decorate cookies for Santa when they come over.

Edited by Mountainair
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My xmas starts on the 26th when my son comes into town and will pick up his kids.  No cooking for me.  Ahhhhhhhhhhh.  I am going to pick up a prime rib in the days after he is home and have a delayed holiday meal.  Some vegetable sides and Yorkshire pudding.  Bang!  a good dinner with little effort.  I am looking forward to that.  

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My xmas starts on the 26th when my son comes into town and will pick up his kids.  No cooking for me.  Ahhhhhhhhhhh.  I am going to pick up a prime rib in the days after he is home and have a delayed holiday meal.  Some vegetable sides and Yorkshire pudding.  Bang!  a good dinner with little effort.  I am looking forward to that.

Mmmm, Yorkshire pudding. Last time I made prime rib I wasn't allowed to make that as a side because no matter how many times I tried to explain that it was like a popover, not pudding, I was met with so much resistance I didn't want to go through the effort for nothing. Hahaha, autocorrect changed popover to pooper, now THAT, I would have understood resistance to.

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Mmmm, Yorkshire pudding. Last time I made prime rib I wasn't allowed to make that as a side because no matter how many times I tried to explain that it was like a popover, not pudding, I was met with so much resistance I didn't want to go through the effort for nothing. Hahaha, autocorrect changed popover to pooper, now THAT, I would have understood resistance to.

 

 

Your mistake was running your menu by the riff raff.  Just do it.  Never seek feedback from family about food.  EVER.  

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The past few years, my cousin has ordered Christmas dinner for my family from Luby's (yummy Southern cooking). I'll pick everything up tomorrow morning and only have to reheat it on Friday. Christmas is also my dad's birthday, so Saturday we'll either take him to dinner or pick something up. Today, a family friend called to say that she's bringing us a couple dozen enchiladas PLUS a chocolate cake tomorrow afternoon.

 

Come January 2, y'all can just roll my overstuffed body down to the gym. They'll know what to do with me.

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Christmas morning I'm going to my parents and her morning tradition is she serves mixed nuts in the shell (many kinds), chocolate covered berries, canapés and phyllo dough appetizers, little smokies and ham, a cheese ball &/or cheese plate with fancy crackers, a punch, hot toddies.

Those are what she always has ready in the morning I remember when I was a kid and Santa came and that was set up too! Haha.

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Well, I had no problem rolling out and cutting my gingerbread cookies but the recipe I use is for soft cake-y cookies and they came out crisp.  Edible but not what I wanted.  I don't know what I did wrong.

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My family isn't getting together until Christmas morning.  My jobs today (other than a little housework) include boiling a hen for chicken gumbo and making a cake (sour cream pound).  I'm also going to make some potato salad to go with the gumbo, but we won't be eating gumbo until the day after Christmas, so I'll probably wait until sometime tomorrow afternoon to get that done.  (Gumbo and other assorted sides are usually our traditional Christmas Eve fare, but we're all gathering a day later, so we saving that menu for the day after Christmas this year).

 

I think this is the first Christmas in a long, long time that I didn't do some holiday baking.  I usually make shortbread cookies, ginger snaps, candies, etc. for the family and to give away to friends.  I just wasn't in the mood for some reason.  (Today's stormy weather isn't helping.)

Edited by BooksRule

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Well, I had no problem rolling out and cutting my gingerbread cookies but the recipe I use is for soft cake-y cookies and they came out crisp.  Edible but not what I wanted.  I don't know what I did wrong.

 

Huh; maybe something with the leavening? Too little baking powder/soda? Too much sugar to fat?

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Me too, Mittengirl. I would love to just do a bunch of appetizers some time, just to do something different. We usually do a scaled down version of Thanksgiving dinner. My husband smokes a turkey, and makes mashed potatoes, and I make stuffing. For Thanksgiving I finally landed on an apple dessert worthy of the occasion, a salted caramel apple crisp. I'm going to make it for dessert for Christmas dinner. 

 

If you want a great appetizer, I make dates stuffed with a mixture of cream cheese and goat cheese, wrapped in bacon, and rolled in brown sugar. You pop them under the broiler for 10 minutes, flip them over, and then let them go for another 10 minutes. Soooooo good.

Queasy-bo, would you share the apple crisp recipe? That sounds great.

Our Christmas Eve traditions are a fancy lunch out (prosecco cocktail, steak frites, salted butterscotch pudding) and the appetizers for dinner. I'm making hot crab dip, mushroom pate, and bacon Parmesan gougeres. There's also shrimp cocktail and a few mini desserts I picked up from Whole Foods.

Tomorrow is ham, mashed sweet potatoes, corn casserole, braised green beans and homemade rolls. At the last minute I decided to bake a gingerbread layer cake, which is cooling on the counter right now.

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That sounds excellent, KnoxForPres, but what is this "leftover cheese" you speak of? I am unfamiliar with it..

Haha! Me too, really. That makes me think of a joke my sister and I have. Once I was reading a review of a caramel apple covered in toffee and a reviewer said "too much candy". My sister and I both said "the hell?"

Since then if we're eating something amazing like a Mac and cheese or calzone, one will say "too much cheese".

No, no such thing.

Speaking of, tonight I'm making Trisha Yearwoods cheese boat (sans the corned beef). If you have friends who like cheese and bread, I highly suggest it for your next get together. It would warrant a sister joke reply, it's that good.

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Your mistake was running your menu by the riff raff.  Just do it.  Never seek feedback from family about food.  EVER.  

Yeah...don't run it by the riff raff.  I never knew what Yorkshire pudding meant for many years other than it sounded horrible for some reason.  And to think, it's popovers + the wonderful gravy from the meat.  I have found the less said the better.  Just go ahead, make the recipe and let people discover on their own a new, wonderful food.  I've made a recipe for Laura Bush's anchovy green beans.  I never mention that there are anchovies in it and people love it.  Go figure!

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