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Social Media and Behind the Scenes: AKA Everything Else Not "News and Media"

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Posted yesterday (June 22)...

Edited by tv echo
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On 6/20/2020 at 2:21 AM, xtwheeler said:

. In that interview SA said a lot about how he got where he is because he worked so hard, the implication being that it had nothing to do with being easier because he was a straight white cis male, or that the reason the industry is almost impossible to break into for Black actors, writers, directors, etc., is that they're just not working hard enough. Such a rich white people thing to say.

Reading this it struck me how things have been changing in the last few years in Hollywood in a good way. A few years ago "emphasize how you sweated blood, got rejected so much, put up with crappy jobs, gawky teen years, bullying and how no one liked you and even more" would have been great advice for a good looking, athletic, straight white guy in Hollywood, even if that had to make half of it up, because no one likes to hear how easy you've had it. Humble brag basically. Now people want to hear someone like SA definitely acknowledge their privilege and how much easier they've had it than any other group of people trying to make it. Even just because of the sheer number of roles available in that category compared to everyone else. It's an interesting shift.

I do think he's worked hard, and I do think he's actually insecure in some ways, No one who's actually secure in themselves has "well fed artist" as a tag because of something his ex wife once said in an interview. His can't let anyone have a different opinion or acknowledge different experiences and points of view -especially if it's worse than his, can't/won't really see how privileged he is and how lucky or apparently relate to anything that doesn't tie back to him and his comfort zone, is a reflection of that but that doesn't excuse his attitude or behaviour in any way, AT ALL. That has been consistently awful for a while and has only got worse. 

Edited by Featherhat
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22 hours ago, Featherhat said:

I do think he's worked hard, and I do think he's actually insecure in some ways,

I'm so, so curious how he's dealing with everything and what the path forward looks like. He basically was trying to build out a brand-new revenue stream with the podcast and completely torpedoed it. Does he just drop it? Does he return to it in the fall? Return to it before then and hand the first few episodes over to special guests who are more qualified to discuss BLM? 

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50 minutes ago, Trisha said:

I'm so, so curious how he's dealing with everything and what the path forward looks like. He basically was trying to build out a brand-new revenue stream with the podcast and completely torpedoed it. Does he just drop it? Does he return to it in the fall? Return to it before then and hand the first few episodes over to special guests who are more qualified to discuss BLM? 

I assume he's stopped it now? Probably a good idea. Especially if a lot of his friends/ex friends/ex colleagues were going stay clear of it. 

I'm not sure how much money it would actually have made when more interesting celebrities are producing content for free. Not to mention podcast use is/was way down in general. 

From his and his advisers POV I would say drop it for now and concentrate on getting the new show filming (assuming it does go ahead) and have less time to go crazy/self pitying not doing anything. And have something new to talk about on SM. This is the time of year the problematic stuff he said during the hiatus used to start dying down because the show was back to filming and spoilers etc. That's not going to happen right now. It would be great if he could show some growth and/or self reflection and apologise but I'm not holding my breath at all at this point. 

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KM has joined this virtual comic con...

Dream It At Home 2
https://www.dreamit-conventions.com/en/dream-it-at-home-2.html

Quote

Dream It At Home 2 will be held at home on June 27th & 28th, 2020. Come meet the actors ONLINE for a day filled with exclusives activities: Panels & Meetings Room

The schedule of the convention will be downloadable here soon.

Edited by tv echo

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Yesterday Greg Berlanti participated in a panel titled "Keynote Conversation with Creator Greg Berlanti and Showrunner Nikechi Okoro Carroll" as part of Variety's first ever Virtual TV Fest...

Variety Virtual TV Fest, June 23-25, 2020 (Streaming)
Greg Berlanti
https://onlinexperiences.com/scripts/Server.nxp?LASCmd=AI:4;F:QS!10100&ShowUUID=37FB80CB-A174-4EA2-9131-766ECD4014EF&affiliatedata=pressrelease

berlantitn.jpg?w=681&h=383&crop=1

I haven't found any video yet, but here's Variety's report on this panel...

Nkechi Okoro Carroll, Greg Berlanti Talk ‘Unfortunate Perfect Storm’ of Race, Coronavirus
By Joe Otterson  June 24, 2020
https://variety.com/2020/tv/news/nkechi-okoro-carroll-greg-berlanti-race-coronavirus-1234648279/ 

Quote

“All American” showrunner Nkechi Okoro Carroll and series executive producer Greg Berlanti joined Variety‘s Virtual TV Fest on Wednesday for a discussion on COVID-19 and race in entertainment.
*  *  *
Berlanti echoed those sentiments, while also saying that it is important for the shows that are being made today to reflect the current times.

“In the DC Universe especially, there’s been a focus on us recognizing that we want to create heroes that look and felt like today, not the 1940s or 1950s,” he said. “They were all very well intentioned when they created those back then, but there’s a certain responsibility that you have if you’re going to escort these iconic characters into this generation to make sure they have the heart of that character, but they don’t have to have the gender or the color of that character or the sexuality.”

The pair also addressed ongoing concerns around restarting TV production amid the ongoing pandemic. Many of the shows Berlanti produces shoot in Canada, with international travel adding an extra layer of complexity to the problem.

“The biggest one is travel in and out,” he said. “How are we getting cast up there? Are we getting directors up there? Those are the biggest considerations, I think will initially be around travel. The shared considerations we have on all the shows, wherever you are, is how available is testing and I’m still waiting for something very clear from the guilds and unions saying, ‘This is what we deem safe.'”

Edited by tv echo

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2 hours ago, tv echo said:

Many of the shows Berlanti produces shoot in Canada, with international travel adding an extra layer of complexity to the problem.

“The biggest one is travel in and out,” he said. “How are we getting cast up there? Are we getting directors up there? Those are the biggest considerations, I think will initially be around travel. The shared considerations we have on all the shows, wherever you are, is how available is testing and I’m still waiting for something very clear from the guilds and unions saying, ‘This is what we deem safe.'”

Wow, I never thought of that. Testing if pretty available in BC but there is a 14 day self-quarantine period for anyone coming into Canada especially from the US.

I wonder if the shows will start shooting in the US now.

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50 minutes ago, statsgirl said:

Wow, I never thought of that. Testing if pretty available in BC but there is a 14 day self-quarantine period for anyone coming into Canada especially from the US.

I wonder if the shows will start shooting in the US now.

That'd be the best thing in the world but I doubt it. 

They'll just have Bamford direct everything

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B4TV (United Kingdom) interview with Paul Blackthorne...

In conversation with Paul Blackthorne
B4    Jun. 24, 2020

-- Richard Rosser (B4) "So of late, you've been in Arrow."
PB:
"Yeah. I found myself in the states in 2002. Um, um, uh, I sort of seemed to fall into American television and film, but, uh, primarily television out there, um, for the years since, really. But actually, an interesting moment, when I - um, when I got to L.A., I - I was there by sort of circumstance. I did a - I did a Bollywood film, which would - had become, um, India's entry for the Best Foreign Language category at the Oscars in 2002. And, um, I happened to be floating around in California with, um, with my girlfriend at the time, and Aamir Khan, who's the big super duper star of Lagaan, this big Bollywood film, called me and he said, 'Paul, it's become India's entry for the, uh, Best Foreign Language category. Um, we're going to try and get the Academy members to watch the film. You're in California, right? You want to come help us?' And I said, 'Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course. Let's do that.' No idea how we're going to do it, but, you know, got to start somewhere. And, um, I called my London agent at the time and I said, 'Listen, I'm kind of in L.A.' - you know, it's sort of - just sort of found myself here, really, because I've just been living in London and doing - uh, doing some television and film out there. Um, but I called her up and I said, uh, 'I'm in L.A. Any chance you could set up some meetings with some, uh, agents and managers out here?' And she said to me, um, 'Well, I don't know, Paul. It's, uh, it's very competitive in L.A.' And I said, 'Anyway, I'm in L.A. Can you set up some meetings with some managers and some agents out here?' Because she herself was a big London agent. And she said, 'Well, you know, it's not going to be easy in L.A., Paul.' 'Anyway, I'm in L.A. Can you set up some meetings with some managers and ...' - the point being, I wasn't going to subscribe to her story, do you know what - do you know what I'm saying? I could've just sat there and go, you know what, you're right, what was I thinking, little old me in L.A.... yeah, right, sorry, I'll just get this done and I'll be right back. But I - I - wasn't through any great sort of place of wisdom. There's just some instinctive thing. I just remember thinking, well, yeah, I mean, it's kind of a miracle getting born in the first place, isn't it? You know. Getting this far in life without getting run over by a bus. So why start thinking that something's impossible, you know? It's - you create the life you - you - you think about. You know? ... And eventually she set me up with - with two meetings in L.A. One was with an agent that didn't go any further. And the other was with the manager who's still my manager today, 18 years later. So, you know, sometimes you just kind of got to [unintelligible word] people on their nonsense sometimes. You know? ... And I've also got the same agent throughout that time. ... Essentially, the difference is, the - the - the agent will try and get you the work, um, in a sort of a job-to-job basis. Your manager is sort of, um, managing your career and perhaps your life to a certain degree, depending on how needy you are. But certainly managing your career, uh, to a greater sort of extent. 'Well, that job's coming, Paul, but is that really the one you want to do right now?' ... And you could have sort of more just discussive sort of, um - more deeper sort of discussions with. However, again, I'm lucky. My agent and my manager, um, worked together brilliantly and there isn't really much differentiation. But, um, when I got there, I was like, hang on, why am I paying 10% to an agent, 10% to a manager? In London, it's just 10% to an agent. And I thought to myself, well, not many people know me here, so I'd rather pay - I'd rather have two people sort of working with each other and perhaps pushing each other, um, um, and then pay 20% of something, than 10% of nothing. So I just thought the more people I've got on my side here, the better, so... it's been great. ... Now I actually have a new London agent. So what - what they do in that case is, they sort of split it in various ways, but it comes down like a 7, 7, 7 situation, depending on, you know, um, where the job hails from. Um, it gets a bit more complex than that, but, yes, they find a way."

-- RR: "So how are things looking forward?"
PB:
"I was shooting a film in Prague, um, just prior to the lockdown and, um, got the call on Thursday, the 12th of March, saying that the Republic is closing down, off you all go. Um, obviously there was 100 people - actually, more than that, there were extras of background involved as well. Um, but they were stopping gatherings of more than 50. So we all had to leave the next day, for that March 13th sort of moment when it was all kicking in. But I'm actually off back there on June the... 17th, I think it is. ... And it's going to be interesting to see how the film, sort of television world, um, resurrects itself. Um, for a start, I've got a COVID test happening tomorrow... I've got another COVID test happening, uh, two days before I leave. Uh, they're having everybody drive, um, the Czech Republic. Um, they can't rely on flights. So I've got a driver coming to pick me up, drive me to Prague, um, and I'll be there very briefly, shoot, and then come back. Um, the - obviously there's be - um, there'll be a lot of PPP involved in the process, social distancing. ... (RR: "How long is that going to take to Prague, then?") It's about 15 hours. ... With respect to the future of film and television, you know, obviously those sets, uh, you know, ordinarily have a huge number of people involved. Um, I think the old adage 'never waste a crisis' will come into play here with the studios. You know? ... 'We can't have all these people here now because of the social distancing. So we can't employ them all. Oh, that's cheaper. Oh, let's keep that going, shall we? That seemed to work.' You know? So I'm sure that'll - that will happen. ... The digital, um, aspect of things will come into play more... There'll be a lot more sound studio based filming with, you know, any digital backdrop. You know, it's a lot easier. It's a lot more difficult trundling around with a massive, uh, infrastructure in - on locations, a lot more out of - out of control, out of your - out of one's control. Yeah, they'll - they'll - they'll be going further in that direction. Um, more localized, uh, um, work. ... (RR asked if the "end product" with all the special effects will be the same for the audience or if it'll be impacted.) Well, you know, they'll never be - you know, it'll never be the same as Lawrence of Arabia, will it? Let's face it, you know. It's not going to be Dr. Zhivago, you know. You've got your old school film and epic locations and, you know - and when it comes to that sort of stuff, you know, there's obviously something a bit intangibly magical about that. But, you know, Pixar films are pretty good, aren't they? (Laughs)"

-- RR: "After Prague... have you got stuff in the pipeline coming forward, or is it looking a little bit - a little bit thin?"
PB:
"Well, I put myself on tape for a couple of projects, a couple of films, that were shooting in, uh, Canada and, uh, California, um, in July, but - I mean, what they're doing, they're moving forward with the process of production, and then if it comes to sort of the day before they can't film, because of whatever the circumstances is at that time, if that's the case, then, you know, they'll no doubt press the insurance button. But, um, I think they've got to - you know, optimistically they're moving forward, um, and then seeing what it is. Obviously it's a fast-moving situation, isn't it? Things are changing rapidly, in terms of the conditions we're living and working under. So I - I think a lot of them can be moving forward. On the personal front, I've been using this time to write. I've been doing a lot of writing. Um, I've been enjoying that and, uh, I'll be pushing forward on - on that, uh, myself. (RR: "What's the end product, Paul?")  A book. Yeah... I wanted to just put some experiences down on - on - um, on - uh, actually, it's akin to what we were talking about earlier. You know, we live the life according to the story that we grow up in, you know, the psychological layers that we take on, because we - we grew up in this world, our parents said this, our friends said that, our socio-economic sort of background. We create the story in our minds of who we are and quite often all it does is keep us down, you know? So I'm sort of writing the story of my story, to show what a waste of nonsense, waste of time, that is keeping. And then, when I free myself of my story, I actually got much more chance of living a life of sort of full potential. Do you know what I mean? And service and such like. So I'm actually just using my nonsense as an example of a story that's well worth letting go of, in terms of what I've always thought of myself. You know what I mean? (RR: "So when do you hope that to be out?")  Um, I don't know. I'm writing it now, so, um, I'm literally working on it this morning. So, um, I don't know. ... So I've just been doing that because, hey, we've been locked down. Um, and with regard to getting back to the acting stuff, you know, I'll see - I'll see how it goes. See what comes up next. I don't think I'll be back in the States until September, probably." 

-- PB said that, in December, he sold his house in California and relocated to New York State and bought a house there (two hours north of NYC) in December, "just in time for the pandemic." He also said that all these NYC residents were fleeing the city and that he's been renting out his house there "to give someone some refuge from the craziness in the city."

Edited by tv echo

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That's June 27 in 2021...

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Here's video of JB's virtual panel for Fan Expo HQ - I only transcribed Arrow comments...

JOHN BARROWMAN (Doctor Who, Arrow) Virtual Panel – FAN EXPO HQ
Fandom Spotlite   Jun 26, 2020

-- Ansley (Fan Expo HQ): "But, of course, Jack Harkness is not the only role that you are known for. There is another franchise that you have, uh, starred on and that is, of course, Arrow - 'cause Malcolm's a little bit more complicated when it comes to Jack - Jack's got a heart of gold. I think Malcolm's a little bit more of an anti-hero."
JB:
"Naah... I played Malcolm as a hero of his own story, which is what a lot of villains, uh, look, and I didn't see - look, they look at it that way. I didn't see Malcolm as being a bad person. I saw Malcolm as being a little misunderstood, because Malcolm's justification was, how come I'm getting bombarded for doing these things when Oliver is doing these things also, but he's getting - you know, he's - he's a vigilante and he's - he's hitting people and he's doing things and he's getting rid of people and he's blowing people up and he's doing all sorts - but he's not getting the bad rap. I'm getting the bad rap. And then when he needs help, he comes to me! So it was - for me, it was great to play him because - and it was also great for the fandom, who I'm really, uh, grateful that they came along on that journey with me also. Because I've also tried to put a little bit of smirk into Malcolm when - you know, you always knew you were gonna die when Malcolm would just look at you and smile. And then he'd turn and that would be - you knew that character was gonna be gone. But again it was his - I looked at Malcolm as being a good dad, although some people might disagree with that... (Laughs) ... With the way - the way that he - he - he not only loved Thea, but he wanted her to be strong, because he knew how the world was gonna turn out and he knew what was gonna happen to, uh - he knew things that were gonna happen that nobody else could - would understand. He wanted her to be tough. How he went about it might be a little disagreeable to other people. But also he loved Oliver as a son because Oliver was best friends with Malcolm's son. He also loved the team - I call them Team Oliver - but it was that kind of love which Gwen and Jack also had. They loved each other, would help each other, but if you crossed them or you messed with their family, they would kill you. Right? And that - that was clearly - he said, uh, by, um, uh, it was the - it was a - Katie Cassidy's character in one of the big fight scenes - I think it was on - gosh, it's going on a little while. I think it was on Arrow and we were all fighting the alien spaceship or something - I can't remember. But we were fighting, uh, uh, in a big, uh, quar - quarry - it was a quarry - and we were fighting... [unintelligible words] and she turned to me and she went - she went, uh, she went, 'Thank you for saving me, but I'd still kill you.' And that was it. And that summed up their relationships."

-- Ansley: "Do villains have more fun?"
JB:
"I don't know, you tell me. Do blondes? ... I loved playing both, but Malcolm was particularly delicious... I have his bow. I have, um, I have a couple things of Malcolm... They're all in the other room."

-- Ansley: "Speaking of the bow, a lot of fans want to know what type of physical training you had to actually undergo to play Malcolm. Are you as good with a bow as he is? Did you have to go into a regimen? Is it all smoke and mirrors?"
JB
: "No. They did train us in archery. I had - I did have some training in archery before. We had an archer there with us, uh, someone who was a professional archer, who, um, kept us looking good. And one of the things I'll always remember, uh, was that, what I'm told with - with the archery, is when you pull it - draw it back, it - it's not The Hunger Games, we don't go... (Makes exaggerated gestures with face and body) ...  So The Hunger Games, it's all that kind of lip action and stuff. But you really got - it - it's right to here (Mimes drawing bow back right by cheek) and 'boom' - and you just release and let it go. I'm actually quite good, but the one time that I was filmed, uh, doing archery, I was doing a TV show for A - ABC television here. It was, um, Battle of the Network Stars, and I had an archery moment. And they gave me a, uh, one of the old-fashioned bows, not the modern one that I used to have, just to make it easier for people to understand, a compound bow. Um, and so I was - I wasn't used to shooting that and I was absolutely rubbish. The girl from Baywatch, who'd never held one in her life, beat me... I will tell you, Stephen Amell and everybody did not let me live that down. My husband even didn't let me live it down."
Ansley: "So who's the better archer, you or Stephen?"
JB: "I'm saying nothing... He's had a lot more practice. Stephen is - is way better. However, a lot of the stuff that we did, eventually when we have to - we'd have to fire multiple, really rapid rounds, that was CGI."

-- Ansley: "So our comic fans want to know, are you a fan of the comics as well? Did you read them beforehand? Did you use them as inspiration, or did you do what a lot of actors do and sort of try not to delve too far into the source material, to take your own fresh take on the character?"
JB:
"Well, I wanted to add my own fresh take on the character. I did not know Malcolm Merlyn. When they talked to me about it, I was literally in the kitchen, sitting on one of these stools, and, uh, they called up and they said, 'We, you know, we're great fans of Doctor Who, we're great fans of Captain Jack. We wonder if you'd be interested in creating his new universe with us, the Arrowverse. Uh, you'd be Malcolm Merlyn. You'd be in the show from the beginning until it ends, you know, solid at times, and bits and bobs here and there.' And, um, you know, uh, that was, uh - so I said, 'Yes, absolutely,' because they told me - talked with me with the same kind of passion as they did with - when I got Doctor Who. However, um, I tried to look - I have a DC, uh, encyclopedia and we have a Marvel encyclopedia, uh, either sides - bed sides of the bed, because Scott's one and I'm the other, and sometimes the two come together. Um, and we, uh - I was looking up in there and there was very little about Malcolm Merlyn, and the first, um, Malcolm Merlyn comic is in the Justice League, when Malcolm Merlyn appears. I don't know the number off the top of my head, but I have it in my collection and I have a vast amount of comic books and different styles of comics and all sorts of things. Um, I then did the research on that... There wasn't much. And that was why I was left open to be kind of up to me of what I wanted to do in that aspect. I just knew that he was also the one - the Dark Archer, when he became Ra's al Ghul, or Ra's al Ghul, however you want to say it - he was the teacher of Batman and he trained Bat - so there was all this history and those little bits and bobs that I was able to put into that and, um - but otherwise, I've always found with my characters on television, if I add my personality to them as much as I can, that's what people connect to and that's what I think is - that is what a lot of actors who are successful in those character parts, they put a lot of their own personality into it, and that's why it works."

-- Ansley: "So on behalf of all the Arrow fans, we have to ask, because Jack came back, so have we seen the last of Malcolm Merlyn? Is there any chance we're gonna see him again? Can you tell us anything?"
JB:
"Um, well, I can tell you honestly, I - I - I don't think so, um, because Malcolm - uh, I mean, they blew him up. And when they blew him up, I found [out] 24 hours before we shot it, so I didn't know. And they told me at the time I wasn't coming back. And when I raised a little bit of - you know, you know me, I don't keep my mouth shut. I like to voice my opinion. And I - you know, Kelsey, who, uh, works with me, knows, she was there when the phone call was done, and she knows exactly what I'm saying is truth. I let them know my piece of mind, very forcefully, because at that moment they told me that I was never coming back. And then they came out in the press and they said that, 'Oh, it's always open for John.' They never told me that whatsoever. So that's how it stands. And I - I will stand and stick to those words, uh, firmly. So I don't think he's coming back. ... However, I say that. I love that character. And if they had've asked me back, I probably would have been - and, you know, they did every, for a couple of things towards the end, right? But then they - there was - they did ask me about being in the final episode. But they waited too long to ask in order to, uh, uh, get the booking. And I have to clarify, I did come back after a group of producers left, okay? And that was because the others brought me - the other ones brought me back in for bits and bobs towards the end of the season. But they didn't get in touch with me time enough to book and get ready for the final, which I would've loved to have been in, because I love the character, I love the show, and I love working with Stephen."

-- Fan Q: "Have you ever played a character with an aspect to their personality that either you have but wish you didn't or don't but wish you did?"
JB:
"That's like asking me if I regret playing the character because of that. And I - I don't - I get - so if I ask the question, Malcolm Merlyn had a bad temper. I - I have a short fuse. If you cross me, you'll never cross me again. Um, that's me talking. Uh, and also, um, let me think...  So it was a quality what I - I would - I kinda - a character had that - that I don't like that I might have. So that would be a temper and then the other - or patience. And then the other quality' is a quality the character has that I don't have that I would like. Right? ... Um, oh my gosh, I'm just trying to think off the top of my head. Uh, well, I do it in real life anyway, so, I mean, I was gonna say, one of my characters in a musical, because when they can't explain themselves anymore with dialogue, they burst into song. But I do that anyway in my everyday life. So, you know, I don't - I think... the other part of the question, I think I'm pretty much okay with all the good things."

-- Fan Q: "You worked on Doctor... Who, Torchwood and Arrow. Any other franchises you want to fly your geek flag on?"
JB:
"I just read for a part in, um, The Boys on, uh, Amazon Prime... and I, uh, love that character... I think the fandom would love that. I think I'd be - I'd be alright at it. But whether they want me or not, that's another story. And so I'd like to be part of that - those kind of - that dysfunctional superhero realm. Um, and also - what else? I'd like to do a comedy. I'm not sure which one, but I'd like to be part of a - I tested for a comedy with Cheyenne Jackson, uh, that he and I tested together. Uh, and I was to put - it was a role to play his husband. And we, um - uh, I didn't get it. So it was - I tested and I didn't get it. They - the gentleman they gave it to was also - I know who it was, but I - that show hasn't aired yet. Uh, I don't know if it will, but it was for, um, Disney and, uh, I didn't get it."

-- Fan Q: "If you and Scott were to play villains in the DC Universe, who would you be and why?"
JB:
"I think Scott would be (Laughs) - okay, these are jokes now. Um, I think Scott would be, uh, The Flash... and I'd be Green Arrow."

Edited by tv echo
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Podcast recording not yet posted...
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KM participated in a Shadowhunters virtual panel for Dream It At Home 2 yesterday (see Nocking Point mention below)...

Edited by tv echo

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Podcast interview by Between a Pod and a Hard Place with MG on June 27, 2020...

Marc Guggenheim
Between a Pod and a Hard Place (Stephen Culton)  Posted: June 28, 2020
https://anchor.fm/Betweenapodandahardplace/episodes/Marc-Guggenheim-efvtjs 

-- Between a Pod and a Hard Place: "What have been your experiences with depression, anxiety, any sort of issues like that?"
MG:
"Uh, how much time do you have? (Laughs)... Um, I have quite a bit. Um, I come from a long line of people who suffer from anxiety, um, you know, very severe anxiety, to the point where, you know, I call it the family curse. It's just - it's just this genetically ingrained thing. Um, you know, I've been on medication for depression and anxiety for - I have to do math here - it's a goodly long time, something close to, uh, something close to 17 years now. Um, you know, to digress for just a little bit, uh, about three years ago - this is right after - this was a bad time - right after we finished Crisis On Earth-X and around the time the whole Andrew Kreisberg thing was happening, uh, I - I made the very questionable decision to go off my medication, ah, and that, uh, kicked off basically among the six months of my life that are among the worst... The discovery that, oh my God, I really need this medication, and then, of course, you know, it takes time to go off of it, it takes time to go back on it. Um, and for like six months I was someone I didn't recognize. Um, and it wasn't even just - quite frankly, it wasn't even just the anxiety that did just come absolutely roaring back, uh, or the depression that also came roaring back, but also a, uh - ah, just a personality shift. Like, I found myself getting - getting angry at the smallest little things and, um, it was really, truly horrific, and I'm really grateful to everyone who was working with me at the time, my wife and my kids, who were incredibly patient with me, because I was just - for a good chunk of those six months, I was not anyone I recognize. Um, so I've had quite a bit of experience. I've been in therapy for - whoof - um, you know, about - you know, over 20 years. Um, I started the medication after my grandmother passed away from cancer... lung cancer... It is a daily struggle... I know oftentimes we put anxiety and depression into the same sort of category, like we say, it's anxiety and depression, like Batman and Robin. But the truth is, while they are related, they are, at least in my case, they're different things, they're different animals. Um, and, you know, the way I manage the two is different. Um, and, so, long story short, yeah, I have a great deal of experience with it, um, cannot tell you honestly that I have either one kicked. Um, and certainly, you know, the pandemic, ah, and just the state of the world right now has, uh, definitely given me my, uh, depression a run for its money."

-- BAPAAHP: "Has your writing helped you with that?"
MG:
"You know, I'm a funny kind of writer... There's two sets of writers, really. I think there's the writers who hate writing, uh, and the writers who love writing. I become a real d*ck if I'm not writing. Uh, I [unintelligible word] writing almost every day, um, or I just become very, uh - very difficult to live with... I'm one of those few writers who really does love the practice of writing. Um, or, you know, I - the way I like to express it is, I'm not, you know... I don't consider myself a particularly smart guy. Um, the guy who types, that - the writer guy, he's much smarter than me. And he's much more creative and clever than me. And he thinks of things that I would never think of. And I basically write to spend as much time with that dude as I can."

-- BAPAAHP: "I've always had a certain level of social anxiety where new situations, new people - I've missed out on jobs because I couldn't get through the interview very well... I was on medication for about a year. And so, um, I lost my job and lost the insurance that came with it. And so I couldn't get back on medication. And I've kind of learned to manage it without. And it is - it is rough, because I saw myself transition from just outrage over the littlest things to noticing that go away and then watching it as it returns. And then finding little ways to kind of manage through that, uh, one of those being this podcast, or binge-watching shows like Arrow or Legends. And I've found that those things have helped. And, uh, it's kept me kind of relaxed and in a fun mood, I guess you could say."
MG:
"That's really, you know, terrific to hear. I'm a big believer, when it comes to anxiety and depression, um, there's no magic bullet, there's no 'one size fits all' remedy. Um, you know, hearing your story, on the one hand, I'm like, oh, that's really sweet that, you know, Arrow and Legends have helped you through this. Uh, and at the same time, I'm kind of outraged on your behalf that, like, you lose your job and therefore you lose access to medication and you have to sort of self-medicate, basically. Um, and, you know... that's a huge problem to me in our country... There's a lot of work that I have to do, even while I'm on medication. Uh, but to take away medication is, uh - that's really horrible. Um, and that's not a circumstance I think anyone, uh, you know, in this country should have live with. Unfortunately, far too many do." (Discussion became more political at this point. Then there was some discussion about the lack of understanding about the seriousness of anxiety and depression, the lack of empathy, and the now reduced social stigma in talking publicly about such issues.)

-- BAPAAHP: "Being a writer, did you always want to be a writer...?"
MG:
"I think I was sort of always interested in storytelling, but it never occurred to me that there was a career path for me for it... I did some short stories in high school. I was the editor-in-chief of the school literary magazine. But it was never anything I truly considered as a career path. Um, I actually wanted to be a lawyer. Ah, and that's what I ended up going to school for and that's what I ended up doing. Um, but for me, it was my third year of law school, which is kinda like your senior year of high school. Um, you know, my brother Eric - I'm the oldest of three and he's the middle child - and my brother Eric was in his senior year of film school at NYU and he asked if I would co-write a - a script with him. He wanted to learn more about scriptwriting. Um, and we wrote a couple scripts together. And I found I really got bit by the bug. Uh, I found I really, really enjoyed it. One thing I always enjoyed was putting words together. Um, I - I really did like writing research papers, you know, in high school and college. I - I liked the music of language. Um, that's always appealed to me. Um, but it wasn't until I started scriptwriting with Eric that I realized, oh, I also like telling stories. So it was sort of the realization that those two things could go together in my mind, uh, just made me want to continue doing it. So I - you know, I graduated law school and started practicing, but, uh, you know, in all my free time, I would write. I would wake up at 5 in the morning to write for like an hour or two hours each day before going into the office. And, uh, you know, as my writing refined itself, I started getting meetings out in California. So I would take my vacation time, uh, away from the firm and always spend my vacations out in Los Angeles and take meetings. Um, sort of started building up, you know, kind of a reputation and, you know, a fanbase around town. Um, but it was not - yeah, it was not a foregone conclusion that I was going to be a writer." (MG then answered a question about advice to anyone wanting to get into screenwriting or the film industry.)

-- BAPAAHP: "I noticed that you've written for both Marvel and DC comics... How important or influential is that for you in kinda developing what you'd eventually do with the Arrowverse?"
MG:
"I think, you know, when you're a writer, everything's grist for the mill. Um, and every project I've ever worked on in any medium has always helped provide, uh, another brick in that wall of education. So, it, you know, I - at the same time, it's kinda hard for me to articulate it. Um, but I will sorta say this, in writing Marvel comics, in writing DC comics, the two universes, um, they don't handle the same. I tend to think of each universe as like sports cars. Um, but a Ferrari handles differently than a Lamborghini. Um, and, um, I would say that, in many ways, Arrow was - our - our - our execution of Arrow, I should say, our interpretation of Green Arrow for television, was a bit more Marvel-esque, um, than DC. Uh, you know, and I hope that's not a controversial statement, but, uh, you know -."
BAPAAHP: "I'd like you to explain it a little bit... What does that exactly mean?"
MG: "Well, you know, I think the Marvel universe - and here I want to be clear, I'm referring to the comics... because obviously there's the DC cinematic universe and there's the Marvel cinematic universe. In terms of the comics, Marvel has always sort of been the 'world outside your window.' It's always had a bit more grounding to it, a bit more sort of 'man on the street,' uh, kind of sensibility. You know, there's no Gotham or Metropolis. There's Los Angeles and New York City. Um, and, you know, there's - there's a - and - and I will say, you know, as a result of that, there's also a slightly darker tone. Um, you know, whereas the DC comics has a more hopeful, sunny disposition. And I think, you know, this - this difference, this dichotomy that I'm talking about, is actually best represented by the amazingly incredible, seminal, never to be repeated again, crossover that Kurt Busiek and George Perez did, uh, JLA and Avengers. Um, and, by sort of taking the heroes from one universe to the other, and vice versa, you - they really highlighted, you know, how the Marvel universe is different from the DC universe. Um, so, I think that sort of grounded, 'world outside your window' sensibility was, uh - was really driving, uh, a lot of the choices we made, uh, with Arrow."

-- BAPAAHP: "What are some of, like, the favorite projects that you've done over the years?"
MG:
"First of all, like, it's always the last thing I did that's the favorite. The youngest child is the cutest... And probably if you ask me this question tomorrow or next week, you'd get different answers. Um, you know, I would say, Eli Stone, uh, was - you know, was the first show I co-created, um, the first time I showran. Uh, that show is, you know, had a lot of hope and inspiration and just a message that I think, you know, we could really use right now... What else? Uh, you know, I loved - you know, my time writing Spider-Man, you know, was absolutely a career highlight. Uh, you know, certainly Arrow, that's had such a huge part of my - you know, such a huge part of my life. Trollhunters, that has been part of my life for as long as Arrow has, actually I worked - I started working on Trollhunters during the first season of Arrow. Um, you know, but every - every project, I have to say, like, has its, you know - has, you know, things about it I remember fondly. Sometimes it's just a small moment or the fact that we were able to do something that I never thought we'd be able to do or a, you know, down to a clever line of dialogue. Um, at the same time, there's not a single project of mine that I wouldn't like another at bat on. Um, you know, everything I've ever worked on, um, I've got regrets about. And I think that's true for - for every writer.  Um, you know, so, it's - it's a weird - it's a weird thing... It's funny, I tend not to think about my own work, like, you know, usually I do something, it comes out or it doesn't, and I move on and I'm on to the next project. But I don't spend a lot of time kinda looking backwards. Um, and then there's also, you know - then there's also the project and then there's the experience. Um, and sometimes they're equal. Like, sometimes, you know, it's a great project and it was a great experience. But like, ah, there was a year when we were developing Eli Stone and I was - we were casting it sort of during a very long pre-production, I spent the year, ah, as a consulting producer on Brothers and Sisters. And - and this is not to take anything away from the show, I absolutely loved the show, but, like, I just had the best experience. Like, that was just - it was so much fun. It was just like, where everything sort of came together and the show was a hit and everything was magical... I look back at that year of working on Eli and working on Brothers and Sisters, I'm like, oh, that was like one of my favorite years of my career."

-- BAPAAHP: "I grew up during the '90's, during a time when I'd read comic books and I would dream what those comic books would look like when they finally were in a movie or when they put into a TV show. And at the time the CGI just wasn't there to make it - to make it quality. They had tried a couple times in the past and they just hadn't been very good. But I remember the dream that someday I'd be able to see my favorite characters, um, on TV. And, um, certainly we had seen that before with a couple of the shows, but for me, uh, Arrow was one of those - one of those programs that, um, I think first really got my attention. Um, can you kinda explain a little bit about how you went about, uh, creating Arrow and if you had realized that it would kind of create this - this universe that we've been enjoying?"
MG:
"Uh, yeah, absolutely. Well, I can tell you, I can't talk about Arrow without first talking about Green Lantern, because so much of the Green Lantern experience informs the - informs Arrow.... I'll give you a little backstory. So, um, Greg and I - Greg Berlanti and I were working on Eli Stone and, uh, even though it's funny, we hadn't even started filming the pilot yet, uh, we - we felt like the network was not behind us. Uh, it felt like we were swimming upstream. It felt like they didn't quite respect or appreciate the project. And we were in New York, uh, and we were casting pretty [unintelligible words] of the pilot, and we were flying back, and on the flight back, Greg said to me, like, 'I have an idea for a move take based on Green Lantern.' And we just spent the whole flight back talking about it. Um, and we, you know, then Michael Green, who both of us had worked on - with on Jack and Bobby, and Greg worked with on Everwood, uh, you know, came into the fold, and the three of us spent, you know, like six months to a year writing a draft of Green Lantern. Um, and then, you know, Greg was attached to direct, and we were - you know, we did several drafts. And then, you know, they - they - basically, I think what happened was, Warner Brothers realized, wait a minute, um, are we really going to let three TV writers, um, do a 250 million dollar movie? Um, and then that's when Greg was replaced with Martin Campbell, and Michael Goldenberg was brought to - in to rewrite the script. And, you know, long story short, uh, the project kinda got taken away from us. Um, and, you know, and - and the movie that you saw is - is, you know, what resulted. And the lesson there was, first of all, you know, not that we needed to be taught this particular lesson, but adapting the Silver Age characters for the 21st century is really hard. Um, you know, Marvel has it a little bit easier. Their characters are from the 1960s. There's not a domino mask in sight. Um, you know, they don't have a character who makes big green fists and whose weakness is yellow. Um, you know, and that's to take nothing away from what Kevin Feige, who's an absolute modern genius, uh, has done for the Marvel cinematic universe. But, um, it's just the degree of difficulty is a little, you know, is a little, uh, higher. At any rate, um, recognizing that degree of difficulty, uh, we went into Arrow with a lot of trepidation. Um, there was, you know, a good period of time where we didn't even want to do it, um, because we were just afraid that history was going to repeat itself, that we would, you know, do this work and then eventually it would get taken away from us. Now in television it works a little bit differently than features, but we were fundamentally afraid of the notes process. Um, you know, we were afraid of the project becoming something different, much the same way Green Lantern had, just by simply being noted to death. Um, so, the - our first goal really was, we said, look, we can't develop this the traditional way, in the traditional network way, which is, typically, you pitch to the studio, then you pitch to the network, then you write a story area, then you write an outline, then you write a script, then you write - rewrite the script 20 million times to get notes, all in the hopes of getting a green light for your pilot. Um, and it's a process that just, you know, has a lot of notes and in a lot of cases can take you away from what the essence of what the project wants to be. And what Greg and I said is, we're not going to do it that way. Uh, we will pitch to the studio, we'll pitch to the network. And then if you guys like what we pitch to you, you'll get a script. There won't be a story area. There won't be, you know, an article in Variety. Um, there won't be an outline. It'll just be us in a room working on a draft that no one knows we're working on. Um, and then we will give it to you, and you will decide whether or not you want to make the pilot.  Um, and, you know, and that's - by the way, you know, that's not to take anything away from the executives we were working with, who are all very fine people and really are friends of the show and everything, but we really felt like the way to pull this off, uh, required us to have a lot more autonomy than is typical. Um, and then, you know, we turned in our first draft and David Nutter, who directed the pilot, uh, and David Nutter just - you can IMDb him, but basically he's the Steven Spielberg of pilots... He's the best pilot director in the history of television. Uh, and, you know, his record for getting pilots picked up... He did Smallville, he did Supernatural... He directed the Red Wedding episode of Game of Thrones... I always said like, I've never met anyone so suited to their job as David is to directing pilots. It's like he was grown in a lab for that purpose. And, you know, he was a big part of the reason the pilot, you know, was what it was. And, you know, it was just a process of us, you know, just having the vision and always sticking to it, uh, and always fighting for it. Um, and putting every decision, the big ones and the small ones, through the lens of that vision. Uh, at the same time, like to answer the second part of your question, you know, did we think it was going to spawn anything, from my perspective, the answer is 'no.' Um, you know, from my perspective, the exercise was, how do we not embarrass ourselves? You know, how do we avoid a repeat of the Green Lantern experience? Uh, that being said, I think that halfway through Arrow, uh, Season 1, Greg started to feel like, well, maybe we can do a Flash spinoff. But I think, even then, I don't think he was envisioning, you know, what we ultimately ended up doing. I mean, I remember, when we did Crisis On Earth-X and we had the big scene on the bridge of the Waverider with all the characters, I sent a picture of it to Greg and going like, did you ever think this was ever going to happen? You know, um, I don't think any of us had, you know, a - the ambition to - or the foresight to go, you're going to have this many characters, you know, all in one place at one particular time. I mean, it continues to blow me away that we did that."

-- When BAPAAHP asked about what projects he's working on now, MG mentioned three projects: Jackpot (for Sony Pictures), Gantz (for Sony Pictures), and Prophet. He also mentioned Wizards (third and final of Tales of Arcadia series for Dreamworks and Netflix). He's also mentioned writing a lot of comics, including his own original comics. 

-- BAPAAHP mentioned Pagey's youtube complaint that Season 8 of Arrow spent too much time setting up the Green Arrow & The Canaries spinoff and then asked: "Do you know where that's going? Has there been any progress with that as of now?"
MG:
"Yeah. Um, well, first of all, it's funny, I don't know if I accept Pagey's premise, um, that - that, you know, Canaries took over too much of Season 8. Um, I know that there had been - there have been people who are like, if you only have, you know, if you only have, uh, 10 episodes, why are you spending one-tenth of your season on a backdoor pilot? Um, you know, the answer to that question is, if we didn't do the backdoor pilot, we'd only have 9 episodes. Uh, that - that objection is premised on the assumption that we always had 10. Uh, the truth is, we actually always had 9, um, and we added the tenth episode, um, you know, once the studio and the network asked us for a backdoor pilot. Um, and that's sort of - by the way, not to digress too much, but this is something that's sort of - I do see a lot on twitter. Like, people, you know, making a lot of assumptions that tend to be incorrect about just the way television is produced. Um, so, you know, uh, and I don't personally feel like the narrative of Season 8 was hijacked by, uh, Mia and her cohorts at all. But, you know, everyone's entitled to their opinion. Um, you know, that's totally fine. As far - as far as what's going to happen, uh, I don't know. Um,  and even if I did know, I wouldn't be in a position to announce it. Uh, uh, I am expecting an answer very soon, within the next couple of weeks. But, you know, one thing that's clear is the pandemic has thrown a lot of things into, you know, uncertainty. Um, but, you know, we'll, you know - I'm optimistic. Uh, I think I - in one interview I'd said, I wanted to, if we didn't get picked up, I wanted to sort of continue the story in the comic books. Um, and I think a lot of people, like, you know, read far too much into that, uh, quite frankly, uh, you know, um... I always sort of look at things one step at a time. The first step is, we have to find out, you know, what the powers that be want to do with respect to Green Arrow & The Canaries. Um, and if they decide not to pick it up, well, then we'll have to, you know, discuss a variety of different solutions, um, you know, or a variety of different ways to keep those characters alive. Um, you know, but I think - I - I - I tend to look at these things as really quality problems in the sense that I love the fact that we have characters who people really want to see, uh, in some way, shape or form. We have actors who really want to play those characters, um, who are - who are very interested in returning, uh, to play them, even if the spinoff doesn't get picked up. Um, you know, these are all - these are all wonderful quality problems. And, truth be told, the quality problems is what I think has led to a lot of the cooler things we've done in the Arrowverse. Um, you know, it's - it's sometimes these things have sort of forced us to come up with creative solutions. And sometimes we do it as a different kind of spinoff. Sometimes we do it as a crossover. Sometimes we do it as an animated. Sometimes we do it as a comic book... One of the earliest decisions we made was that everything that was a tie-in to the live-action shows would be considered canon. So, um, it - that's allowed us to do, I think, the animated shows that actually [uninteligible word] mean something, or stories that actually, you know, [unintelligible word] what happened. Uh, and the same thing with the comic books. Um, you know, I love comic books. I love the fact that we can, you know, stretch into them. But yeah, I wish I had an answer, believe me. Uh, I - I'm as desperate for it as you guys. Uh, Beth Schwartz and I text about it, you know, pretty much almost every day. Uh, Kat McNamara and I were just texting about it. Um, you know, but this is - yeah, this is show biz. You gotta - sometims you gotta wait, you know. There's a lot of projects, you know, that I have on the 10-yard line where I'm just waiting to hear back... That's the nature of the biz." 

-- MG answered a fan question about the Green Lantern movie.

-- Fan Q: "Did Earth-66 survive the reboot? Also, what Earth would the Gotham series and the Dark Knight trilogy be set in?"
MG:
"My general sort of, uh, rule is, all the Earths that got destroyed, uh, were reconstituted when the multiverse got reconstituted. And the reason for that is that, um, I didn't feel it was our place to destroy the universes of - of - created by other people. Um, similarly, I don't feel like it's my place to, uh, dictate an Earth designation for, you know, things like, you know, the - we'll call it the Nolanverse. Um, I will say that - with a couple of exceptions - but generally speaking, our naming convention, uh, was, um, based upon the year the property came out. So, uh, it would've been, um - you know, Gotham came out - Gotham came out during the second season of Arrow, which was... I gotta count, that's math, you can IMDB that. Uh, same thing for when Batman Begins came out. Um, the only time we didn't do that is when there was an overlap, um, or if we had some cheeky, you know, Easter eggy thing. But generally speaking, the Earth designations, uh, were based on - on the years of premiere."

-- Fan Q: "Why was Oliver written like Bruce Wayne, instead of the funny, more comedic Oliver from comic books and from Smallville?"
MG:
"Great question... By the way, I get a lot of questions-slash-criticism for this... It wasn't so much that we were trying to make him like Bruce Wayne. Actually, kind of - kind of, to be honest with you, kind of the opposite. Um, you know, the thing about Bruce is, he comes back from his training - and this is comics, this is Batman Begins, this is, you know, every iteration - he comes back and he's kind of laser-focused on - you know, he goes through this formative period where he's learning to be Batman. He comes back and he's - you know, he's kind of the best version of himself. Um, we wanted actually our Oliver to be suffering from PTSD. Um, we wanted you to go, wait, what happened during those preceding five years? How badly did that screw him up? ... There's a Bruce Wayne aspect in that they're both orphans, you know, they're both wealthy, you know, in the comics, you know, he had an Arrowcave, an Arrowjet, an Arrowmobile. Um, you know, as far as why not wise-cracking and stuff? Um, it would've been antithetical to our, you know, hyper grounded approach... We were going for dark, we were going for, you know, mysterious and moody. And, um, you know, it's funny - I - my - the Green Arrow that I know, that I sort of fell in love with, was the Green Arrow of Longbow Hunters, uh, the Mike Grell, uh, Green Arrow, who, you know - when I read it as a teenager, you know, he never struck me  as being particularly light-hearted or funny. Um, but I know that that version of Green Arrow exists and is loved by a certain segment of fans. Uh, I won't say it's a large segment of fans. Uh, because if that were true, then Green Arrow would be as popular as Wolverine in sales. Um, but certainly there's a - a small but very vocal segment of the Green Arrow fandom that, you know, misses the goatee and the Robin Hood hat, the liberal politics. ... But that character wouldn't have been consistent with the sort of really dark, you know, post-traumatic-stress version of Oliver Queen that we were going for. ... (Some talk of the boxing glove arrow on Arrow.) ... Here's the thing. There are Silver Age conceits that you can do in the modern day, um, and you can even do with a darker, more grounded take. Um, it took us three years to kind of get there, to come up with that idea. Um, also, you know, if - if we had done that in the second episode of the first season, I think it would've sent the wrong tonal message of what we were going for. You know, but by the time we did it... towards the beginning of Season 3, uh, I felt like, you know, we had earned it from a tonal perspective."

-- When asked, MG said that there are no plans to crossover Titans into the Arrowverse. 

-- When asked how they top Crisis on Infinite Earths, MG said that they can't, because Crisis was the culmination of nine years of world-building. He added that, to top Crisis, they would have to "do it at the right time, in the right way."

-- Fan Q: "What is the next hero that you would add as a standalone series?"
MG:
"I'm going to answer your question in the worst way possible. I'm going to rewrite it and say - pretend that you asked me what I wish we could do. Um, one of the things that I really, really wanted to do - and I pitched it and it never really gained any traction - was, I wanted to, you know, with Arrow going down, I wanted to take the Arrow sound stages and the crew and department heads and basically - ... it would form what I would call a production hunt. And we would basically use all that talent and all those amazing people to do like a mini-series about Sara and Nyssa, or a Constantine movie, or you name it, you know. And sort of - less bring in new people, but rather, you know, play with the existing toys. Um, and sort of create, you know, like an anthology...  An Arrowverse anthology remains, uh, one of the things that I would really love to see. I will say, never in my wildest imaginings did I ever think we would end up, you know, seeing on The CW the characters we ended up seeing. I mean, when we introduced Slade Wilson in Season 1 of Arrow, that was - that was at least a year ahead of our original plan. Um, same thing with Roy Harper, you know, at least a year ahead of our original plan. Um, we ended up adding all these characters so much faster than, you know, than we ever discussed with the studio network or really ever discussed amongst ourselves. We always said, oh, okay, if we get to a Season 3, we'll do this; if we get to a Season 5, we'll do this. We ended up doing, you know, all the 'we'll do this' stuff, we ended up doing it in the first two years."

-- When asked if iZombie is part of the multiverse, MG said that that was up to Rob Thomas, but that he would love it to be.

-- Fan Q: "What pop culture references can we expect from the next season of Legends?"
MG:
"Ooh, good question. Um, honestly, it's just too early to answer." He added that he's read "story areas for the first three episodes, but who knows how anything's going to be impacted by how we have to produce things post pandemic or during the pandemic." Therefore, he's "very loath to say" what we're going to see next season on Legends
MG: "I can tell you that there's something in the works that's Legends-related, that it's very, very, very cool and very fun pop-culturally, and is, you know, is actually happening, but, um, you know, it hasn't been announced yet."

-- Fan Q: "When they hired Caity Lotz to be Sara Lance, how far out was her storyline planned?"
MG:
"Okay, so here's - here's sort of the backstory about really Sara Lance. So in the pilot obviously Sara Lance was played by an actress who's not Caity Lotz, um, and seemingly died. And one of the first conversations we actually ended up having - let me go back a little bit. Um, the normal part of a pilot process is, you write the pilot, you, you know, go into pre-production on the pilot, you go into production on the pilot, and then you go into post-production on the pilot. And during those three stages, you kinda can't help but start having conversations about what the post pilot episodes are going to be or even what the post first season episodes are going to be. Um, and one of the first things that we discussed was the idea that Sara Lance did not in fact die aboard the Gambit. Um, when we knew we were going to tell that story at the - uh, you know, in Season 2, the beginning of Season 2, um, we discussed, you know, recasting, um - I'm a horrible person, I forget the name of the actress. Uh, she was unavailable, uh, because she was doing, um, a show for E, I believe, um, and - E is a now defunct, uh, cable channel - um, so we had - we knew we would have to recast and we went through our normal casting process - you know, David Rapaport and Lindsey Baldasare are incredible casting directors who cast all the shows. They brought us many wonderful actors, uh, but Caity was the standout. Uh, and actually, Stephen was kind enough to fly down from Vancouver, uh, on one of his days off to do a chemistry read with Caity. Um, uh, and it was great. We just knew. We just knew it was a perfect bit of casting. Um, in terms of like our plans for her, um, we - it kind of came in sort of fits and starts. Um, we knew that, you know, the whole reason to bring in Sara Lance was really to tell the story about, you know, Slade Wilson and Lian Yu, um, and, you know, that folded into the League of Assassins, which set up Season 3. Um, I - I can tell you that when we -we brought in Caity, we didn't - it's not like we knew we were going to do Legends at that stage. Um, that came later. Um, but when we killed her off at the start of Season 3, um, we always knew that the Lazarus Pit was, you know, was not only available to us, but would make a lot of sense, uh, given her connection to both Nyssa and, uh, the League of Assassins."

-- Fan Q: "If Green Arrow & The Canaries do go to full series, will they continue the journey of JJ, William, Connor and Zoe?"
MG:
"Um, you mean, will all those characters be in the show? (Interviewer replies, "Yes")  Yeah. Oh yes. Absolutely. Um, absolutely. We - we love those characters and we love those actors. Um, you know, there's always, um, you know, there's always the question of sort of actor availability, but, um, you know, one of the things that we've gotten very lucky with over the years is, you know, even when actors haven't been available to do a full season, you know, we're always able to make things work out where, oh, they can - you know, they come in, you know, they come in or come in and out, or recur and stuff. Uh, we kind of pride ourselves on being as inventive as we can to sort of work around everyone's - you know, everyone's schedules... Look, Lord knows, post pandemic, who knows what those schedules will look like? ... Beth Schwartz and I were just talking in general about, you know, how our jobs are going to change, you know, in a pandemic and post pandemic world. And the thing we were sort of saying to each other was that this is just gonna require writers, um, to just be more creative, um, you know, to - to think outside the box and, you know, try different things and, uh, you know, come up with cool stories that, uh, hopefully are invisible - that the part that's invisible to the audience is the pandemic restrictions. You know, um, I think that's the, you know, the best thing that we can do. And a lot of times, you know, like I said, uh, we - we come up with things that are solutions for our scheduling and logistical and production problems and budgetary limitations that the audience doesn't know about. If we're doing our jobs right, they never know."

-- Some talk about the rumors of Michael Keaton reprising his role as Batman in the new Flash big screen movie and whether or not that was influenced by Ezra Miller's cameo in COIE. MG said that the multiverse has been a DC concept. Also some talk about Marvel versus DC's versions of time travel.

-- Some talk about how politics informs what we see on television (if at all) and MG's politics and also issues of inclusivity and diversity on television. MG: "If inclusivity is a progressive issue, then we're all in a lot of trouble... I'm talking about in front of the camera, behind the camera... I don't make television for bigots." MG also said that when you're doing a superhero show, he considers it not a progressive issue, but a moral issue, to have superheroes who reflect society and not be limited to just straight white men (like they have been in the comics for decades).

Edited by tv echo
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Thanks @tv echo for your transcription work. Really interesting to see what he says about Sara. I think they'd have recast Jaqueline McInnes Wood even if she had been available. Interesting that he mentions the idea of possibly bringing Sara back to life via LPs even if the spin off didn't need her (as ATOM). It kind of lends more weight to CLs assertion that she was going to be a regular in S3 until things changed BTS. Although whatever did happen, they certainly didn't *have* to kill her off to kickstart Laurel's journey even then. And the plan was always to have death stop meaning anything on their oh so dark and gritty show in S3. Except for E1LL.  

So way too much emphasis by the interviewer on what Pagey thought of the intro of Mia to the story. It was never just spin off related but incredibly entwinned with Oliver's swan song as well, getting the gift of seeing his kids for a few weeks  and they him. 

Still doesn't look like they have any concrete plans to make any more of FTA regulars if the spin off is picked up, which is pretty unlikely now anyway. I get that he said they'd been lucky with actors being willing to recur but, it will theoretically be a very frustrating show for me if it's only/mostly about the relationship between those three unless they do some serious quick work on BS and her attitude. 

They did have 20 Canaries, including all the ones assumed for the CN in the FFs. Which pretty much devalued the whole brand, especially when the first one was by far the best. 

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Since we’re on the topic of MG, I’m going to be participating in a group Zoom Q&A with him later on this week, and if anyone has a question they’d like me to ask him, let me know and I’ll try to bring it up.

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34 minutes ago, lemotomato said:

Since we’re on the topic of MG, I’m going to be participating in a group Zoom Q&A with him later on this week, and if anyone has a question they’d like me to ask him, let me know and I’ll try to bring it up.

Ha, how did you get involved in that?

Idk, I kind of would wonder a little more definitively how much of Arrow stuff was his contribution vs Beth's for s7 and s8. Like, I always figured that, yeah it was more collaborative for s8 but that he was a bit more focused on crossover stuff while Beth did the pre-prod and post-prod showrunning work for the Arrow stuff (or at least for working on the actual 810, Beth seemed to do the scheduling and the calls for that one aside from MG still co-writing it, along with that 809 which Oscar and Jill seem like they would be/would have been the showrunners, how much did they do vs just MG and Beth?)), but I always want more details on collaborative efforts on the day to day or idea stuff (ex: whose idea was it to bring the kids back to the present in s8 and how did that come about, whose idea was it for Felicity to be pregnant in s7 and how did that come about, how did the story breakdown go for Crisis on Earth-X, etc.).

1 hour ago, Featherhat said:

Still doesn't look like they have any concrete plans to make any more of FTA regulars if the spin off is picked up, which is pretty unlikely now anyway. I get that he said they'd been lucky with actors being willing to recur but, it will theoretically be a very frustrating show for me if it's only/mostly about the relationship between those three unless they do some serious quick work on BS and her attitude. 

Yeah, guessing those "we'll find out very soon" comments refer to maybe actor contracts (KM or KC or JH, or all 3 of them) being up at the end of June and forcing a decision from the CW?

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4 hours ago, tv echo said:

Ugh...

Yeah, say what you will about how Arrow handled Canaries, but I don’t think anyone can argue there were too few. In the S7 FFs, it was basically, “you’re a female character in 2040 Star City, you’re either a Canary or we’ll try to make you one.”

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18 hours ago, tv echo said:

Uh, and actually, Stephen was kind enough to fly down from Vancouver, uh, on one of his days off to do a chemistry read with Caity.

I think it's funny that SA did a chem test with the love interest who was only on Arrow for one season as a de facto regular (in terms of her screen time), but he did not do a chem test either with his originally intended OTP for the series (KC) or with his ultimately intended OTP for the series (EBR).

Edited by tv echo
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Video includes quick clip of Brandon Routh as Westley in the Fire Swamp...

Edited by tv echo

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He's baaack...

Youtube version:
How'd You Do It? Episode: 18 - Justin & Suzi Wilkenfeld
Stephen Amell   Jul 1, 2020

ETA: I didn't listen to the entire podcast, so I don't know if he said anything important.

Edited by tv echo
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3 minutes ago, tv echo said:

He's baaack...

I didn't watch the whole thing but I watched the intro. Here's what they had to say about their last episode and subsequent absence:

Quote

SA: It's not as though we didn't talk about serious issues before, I mean, not all our guests were us just sitting and laughing but part of it was with everything that's going on with the global pandemic it just felt good to sit down with your buddy and promote Nocking Point - which was doing so many philanthropic things and continues to do so - so I can't promise that we're not going to laugh during the course of this podcast. But the last time that we spoke, which was just you and I going back and forth with one another, I didn't necessarily think that we did anything or said anything wrong. But when you end up (and not that it's all about me) but when you end up in Us Weekly with the word "racist" in the title, it's just not good. So clearly we didn't strike the right tone and what we've been thinking about and what we're going to continue to think about is the ways that we can continue to use our platforms, and try to use them a little bit better.

AH: Yeah. Absolutely. And uh, some of the conversations you and I have had offline are on a variety of topics related to that. Like how we're going to think about our hiring as we hire more people. We just talked about that 10 minutes ago, right? I think that being more aware of supporting causes that support racial justice is obviously something that we are already starting to do that we can talk about either today or we can talk about later. But I think that you know taking a month off was the right thing to do so that we could listen, right? I feel like that was the most important thing to do for both you and I. 

SA: Well, that's what I was just going to say.

AH: And for a lot of people out there. I mean, a lot of our peers and colleagues, I think so, too. I think that it is something that we've known for a long time and heard about for a long time, but to really kind of pull back the curtain and listen and really have some, you know, serious understanding from what is happening in this country for far too long and how deep it goes. So this is a long way of saying we felt like taking a pause, not just because we didn't want to do a podcast but, you know, it was so that we could spend our time elsewhere doing things that we thought would be more meaningful currently and in the future for us, so there you go.

SA also mentioned that he's leaving for Canada soon, and that he hopes it's just for a month but he's going to play it by ear based on what's happening with covid in California. 

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The new deluxe hardcover edition of Crisis On Infinite Earths: Paragons Rising book apparently contains concept art of the following...

Variations of Oliver's Look as the Spectre:
crisis-on-infinite-earths-spectre-concep

https://comicbook.com/tv-shows/news/crisis-on-infinite-earths-oliver-queen-spectre-variations-concep/

Michael Keaton as Earth-99 Batman:
michael-keaton-crisis-on-infinite-earths

https://comicbook.com/tv-shows/news/crisis-on-infinite-earths-concept-art-shows-michael-keaton-as-ea/

More Comics-Accurate Harbinger:
harbinger-1-1227251.jpeg

https://comicbook.com/tv-shows/news/crisis-infinite-earths-concept-art-harbinger-audrey-marie-anderson/

The Monitor's Originally Planned Satellite:
monitor-ship-1227297.jpeg

https://comicbook.com/tv-shows/news/crisis-on-infinite-earths-concept-art-reveals-the-monitors-satel/

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New KM event...

WrapWomen's 2020 BE Mentorship Conference, July 20-24, 2020 (Virtual Event)
Katherine McNamara
https://wrapwomen.thewrap.com/
https://beconferences.com/

Niecy Nash, Jessica Yu, Katherine McNamara and Madison Bailey Join BE Mentorship Conference 2020
Emily Vogel   July 1, 2020
https://www.thewrap.com/niecy-nash-jessica-yu-katherine-mcnamara-and-madison-bailey-join-be-mentorship-conference-2020/

Quote

Emmy award-winning producer and actor Niecy Nash, Academy award-winning director Jessica Yu, "Arrow" star Katherine McNamara and "Outer Banks" star Madison Bailey will join WrapWomen's 2020 BE Mentorship Conference, a five-day virtual event July 20-24. These leading Hollywood creatives will be inspiring the next generation of industry leaders, providing inspirational advice and mentorship and sharing stories about overcoming challenges on their personal journeys.

With health and safety top of mind, WrapWomen has created a digital-first experience for the 2020 BE Mentorship Conference. This year's event will focus on providing opportunities for the next generation of women in media and entertainment, specifically underrepresented voices within the community. Speakers and mentors will address topics dedicated to breaking barriers, inspiring action and creating a more inclusive industry. Attendees will select from sessions designed to cultivate change through storytelling, entrepreneurship and personal development.

Edited by tv echo

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1 hour ago, Trisha said:

SA also mentioned that he's leaving for Canada soon, and that he hopes it's just for a month but he's going to play it by ear based on what's happening with covid in California. 

Must be nice to be able to just flee like that, congrats to him lol.

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6 hours ago, Trisha said:

SA also mentioned that he's leaving for Canada soon, and that he hopes it's just for a month but he's going to play it by ear based on what's happening with covid in California. 

Hope he respects the quarantine that Canada will expect from him and his family.

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SA is going to find it very hard to quarantine for 2 weeks. Canadians are dead serious about quaranting.

Is he doing it for his family?  BC is doing great, Ontario not so much but it's still better than California.

ETA: the 14 day mandatory quarantine was set to end Tuesday but it's been extended to Aug 31 now. I wonder if he was counting on it ending for July.

12 hours ago, tv echo said:

More Comics-Accurate Harbinger:

It looks like she's wearing a codpiece.. Sometimes, it's better not to be comics-accurate.

Edited by statsgirl
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1 hour ago, statsgirl said:

Is he doing it for his family?  BC is doing great, Ontario not so much but it's still better than California.

He mentioned being done with quarantine and wanting to go out to eat and take Mavi to a theme park and whatnot, so I think he’s just going somewhere he can do that, although I think it being any better here in a month is a pipe dream. He waxed poetic about what his life would be like in Canada a podcast or two ago, so maybe he’ll just stay up there and come back when it’s safe, since he’s privileged enough to be able to do that. 

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Video of the #CWPride Instagram Live Q&A with Colton Haynes and casting director David Rapaport (recorded June 30, posted July 2)...

-- CH talked about his personal journey from growing up in a small town to moving to L.A., getting the "performance bug," his early acting jobs, and "coming out of the closet." DRap remembered reading CH for an early role and thinking they had to save him for something good. CH remembered testing for all the CW jobs, getting close multiple times, and then finally landing a role.

-- CH said that when he got the call that he got cast on Arrow, he called his brother, who's a comic fan, to find out about the comics character of Roy Harper. 

-- DRap talked about the need for "self-acceptance" as a gay man and noted how he would sometimes lower his voice. CH agreed with the lowering the voice and added that that was how he got cast on Arrow. DRap said that it took him "years" to come out. 

-- CH said that, since he came out, he no longer gets auditions for straight roles and that 90-95% of the roles that he now gets auditions for are for a gay character. However, he said that he's now healthy and gets to be "authentic." He added that he's stayed busy in quarantine. DRap said that, when CH auditioned for them for Arrow, CH was out in the gay community and that it was never a factor in the casting. CH said that Greg Berlanti has always been one of his biggest supporters. 

-- CH has noted an increase in Zoom auditions. DRap: "We're casting Batwoman right now, um, and it's, uh - it's fascinating. We've seen hundreds of women - hundreds of women over Zoom. The hardest part for me is, like, the direct contact. It's hard not to, like, be in a room and work with somebody. You can give someone notes over Zoom, obviously. It just - it just feels differently. I think I pick up so much of my instinct by being in person with somebody. Um, you just have a sense if someone's right or wrong when they walk in the room. It's very much like dating. It's hard to date over Zoom-made matches, as opposed to, like, sitting down to coffee with somebody. You get that immediate chemistry or you don't. Um, and then with the delay and you can't hear people, you know, there's always something. But I'm excited that we're still - we're still working, and we're hoping that things go back in September. There's no firm start dates, but it looks like a lot of these shows are looking to go back in September."

-- CH said that he's looking to start working on something "as early as the end of July... which is really weird. We're trying to figure it all out right now... when it comes to quarantining and things like that." He added that Vancouver "has it down" and that he has a friend who is about to start working on a project in Vancouver and "they're making her stay for, like, a crazy extended amount of time, uh, even though she's not going to be working that whole time. But they're making her stay, just so she's not leaving... just for safety."

-- CH: "I've been seeing all this stuff, you know, about - that you guys have been casting for Batwoman and just seeing the rumors and everything. We won't get into that." DRap: "None of them are true. None of them are true." CH: "Well, I hope one of them is, but it's fine." DRap: "It probably isn't. It probably isn't. If it's out there, it's not true... We've been seeing a lot of incredible actresses, and I'm sure you know a lot of them. It's such a small community out here."

-- Some talk about dating life during quarantine. DRap mentioned that, when this Instagram Q&A was announced, he got a lot of texts asking for CH's number or asking CH for a date. CH: "Dating is not in my - has not even been in my sights or my thoughts... I'd rather rip my fingernails out... I'd rather crawl in front of a semi than go out... Dating is not going to be in my future... Sorry to your friends." 

-- DRap then had CH play five games of "Kiss-Marry-Kill," first with Prince Harry, Harry Potter and Harry Styles, then with Jared Padalecki, Jensen Ackles and Misha Collins (CH apparently has a crush on Jensen), and then with Tyler Hoechlin, Stephen Amell and Emily Bett Rickards, "who's a good friend of both of ours." CH: "You are seriously trying to destroy me. You are seriously trying to rip my heart out... Oh my God, this is so bad... Here's the reasons why, okay. So... I will marry Tyler Hoechlin. He is my - one of the closest people in my life, literally like my - like my soul brother. He's - we're just separated at birth... He means everything to me. I love him. So marry him. And I would - crap - um, oh gosh, I would kiss Stephen because I've already kissed Emily. And I will, uh - yeah, so I guess I would have to maybe - yeah, maybe kill Emily - but it's not because I don't love her. She's one of my best friends." DRap: "No, we can say, clearly, you love all three of these people... This is just for fun, guys." The last two games were with Barack Obama, Joe Biden and Gavin Newsom, and with Richard Madden, Luke Evans and Michael B. Jordan.

-- CH then gave some advice to young people who are bullied in high school and said that things will get better. He said that things that seemed important in high school don't really mean anything after you get out of school and into the real world. He mentioned that some of his school bullies later apologized to him.

Edited by tv echo
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Quote

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited 819 artists and executives to join the organization in 2020.

*  *  *
Music
...
Blake Neely – “Assassins,” “Life as We Know It”

Edited by tv echo
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18 hours ago, Kymmi said:

Hope he respects the quarantine that Canada will expect from him and his family.

Yeah, he mentioned having to quarantine for two weeks. His wife was posting from an airport so they traveled yesterday. Based on her latest post with mountains in the background, I'm guessing they ended up going to BC, which is much more open than here in Ontario.

 

Edited by Trisha

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I'm sure they'll "quarantine" in Canada about as well as they "quarantined" in the US - here's hoping that this time they're not dumb enough to post about it on social media.

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Is Canada strict?

Australia will chuck you in a random hotel, give you rations and you can't get out for 14 days. They have guards in the hallways.

Hehe I'd love to see him get chucked into an Aussie quarantine hotel. You can buy one take out meal a day of you choice.

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5 hours ago, Mellowyellow said:

Is Canada strict?

Australia will chuck you in a random hotel, give you rations and you can't get out for 14 days. They have guards in the hallways.

We’re not as strict as that. It varies by province but they’ll have been asked about their quarantine plan and contact info before leaving the airport, and health officials will call throughout the 14 days to confirm they’re sticking to it. I know BC was sending police officers to do home checks whenever they couldn’t get a hold of people in quarantine, and I assume that’s still happening. It would be  incredibly easy for them to maintain quarantine as most grocery and food delivery now offer contactless drop off, so assuming they just stay put in whatever house or Airbnb they rented, they should be fine. 

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18 hours ago, apinknightmare said:

He mentioned being done with quarantine and wanting to go out to eat and take Mavi to a theme park and whatnot,

Whu? There are no theme parks open. The camping parks are barely open.

I hope he did his research before deciding to embark on 2 weeks of quarantining with just his wife and child

 

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37 minutes ago, statsgirl said:

Whu? There are no theme parks open. The camping parks are barely open.

To be fair he said that when it seems like he was planning on staying here in the US because our theme parks are open for the most part. I just included it because the gist of the commentary from him was that he was done with quarantine and wanted to get back to his regularly scheduled life programming and it seems like he went somewhere that was closer to that than he can get here since disease is rampant and LA is closing down again.

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It's slightly ironic that one of the reasons he wanted to be finished with Arrow is to spend more time with his family who are based in LA and the opportunities that are there. Now a year later the world has changed in a pandemic and exactly when filming would have begun they're fleeing LA for potentially a long stay Vancouver for the opportunities there. 

Not that I would want there to be an Arrow Season 9. Or indeed the current situation.

Edited by Featherhat
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Updates on some upcoming cons/events in 2020...

Christchurch Armageddon is still scheduled as a live con but will have virtual guests (since NZ's borders are closed) and is scheduled for July 18-19, 2020. Virtual guests include John Barrowman, Tom Cavanagh and Danielle Nicolet:
https://www.armageddonexpo.com/

WrapWomen's 2020 BE Mentorship Conference is a virtual event scheduled for July 20-24, 2020. Participants include Katherine McNamara:
https://beconferences.com/
https://www.thewrap.com/niecy-nash-jessica-yu-katherine-mcnamara-and-madison-bailey-join-be-mentorship-conference-2020/

SDCC is a virtual con this year (COMIC-CON @HOME 2020) and is scheduled for July 23-26, 2020. Celebrity guests and panels are still not posted yet:
https://www.comic-con.org/cci/programming-schedule

Tauranga Armageddon is still scheduled as a live con but will have virtual guests (since NZ's borders are closed) and is scheduled for July 25-26, 2020. Virtual guests include John Barrowman, Danielle Panabaker and Danielle Nicolet:
https://www.armageddonexpo.com/

Wellington Armageddon is still scheduled as a live con but will have virtual guests (since NZ's borders are closed) and is scheduled for August 1-2, 2020. Virtual guests include John Barrowman, Carlos Valdes and Danielle Nicolet:
https://www.armageddonexpo.com/

Wales Comic Con: Telford Takeover is still scheduled as a live con on August 22-23, 2020, in the U.K. Guests still include John Barrowman, Summer Glau and Sean Maher:
https://www.walescomiccon.com/guests

Heroes of the Shadow World is still scheduled as a live con on September 11-13, 2020, in New York City, but includes an "at home" option for attendees. Guests still include Katherine McNamara and Anna Hopkins:
https://jalmics.com/nyshadowcon-guest-categories/
https://jalmics.com/jalmics-at-home/

Rebel Spartacus VI is still scheduled as a live con on September 19-20, 2020, in Paris, France. Guests still include Katrina Law and Nick Tarabay:
https://www.people-convention.com/en/event/rebels-spartacus-vi-2/

FedCon is still scheduled as a live con on October 9-11, 2020, in Bonn, Germany. Guests still include John Barrowman, David Nykl, Alex Kingston and Rachel Luttrell:
https://www.fedcon.de/de/

Dallas Fan Festival is still scheduled as a live con on October 16-18, 2020, but has no guests posted yet: 
https://www.dallasfandays.com/en/home.html

MegaCon Orlando is still scheduled as a live con on October 30-November 1, 2020, but has no guests posted yet:
https://www.megaconorlando.com/en/guests/celebrities.html

Winnipeg Comiccon is still scheduled as a live con on October 30-November 1, 2020. The "Guest of Honour" is John Barrowman:
https://comicconwinnipeg.com

GalaxyCon Minneapolis is still scheduled as a live con for November 6-8, 2020. Guests still include Juliana Harkavy, John Barrowman, Summer Glau and John Wesley-Shipp:
https://galaxycon.com/minneapolis-guests/

London Film & Comic Con is still scheduled as a live con on November 20-22, 2020. Guests still include David Ramsey (FRI. ONLY) and Ben Browder (also John Wesley Shipp)
https://www.londonfilmandcomiccon.com/index.php/guests

Dutch Comic Con-Anniversary Edition 2020 is still scheduled as a live con on November 21-22, 2020, in Utrecht, Netherlands. Guests still include David Ramsey:
https://www.dutchcomiccon.com/guests/

GalaxyCon Raleigh (originally scheduled for July 30-August 2, 2020) was rescheduled to December 10-13, 2020, still as a live con. Guests previously included Juliana Harkavy, John Barrowman and John Wesley-Shipp, but are now TBD:
https://galaxycon.com/minneapolis-guests//galaxycon-raleigh-announcement/ 


ETA: Other comic cons that were previously included in the 2020 list have been postponed to 2021.

Edited by tv echo

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JB is scheduled as a virtual guest for these three upcoming Armageddon Expo cons, which will still be live events in NZ, but all celebrity guests will be streaming in their appearances (since NZ's borders are closed)...

Christchurch Armageddon, July 18-19, 2020 (New Zealand)
Virtual Guests: John Barrowman (also Tom Cavanagh and Danielle Nicolet)
Christchurch_2020_Poster.jpg

Tauranga Armageddon, July 25-26, 2020 (New Zealand)
Virtual Guests: John Barrowman (also Danielle Panabaker and Danielle Nicolet)
Tauranga_2020_Poster.jpg

Wellington Armageddon, August 1-2, 2020 (New Zealand)
Virtual Guests: John Barrowman (also Carlos Valdes and Danielle Nicolet)
Wellington_2020_Poster%20-%20Copy%201.jp 

Edited by tv echo

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