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Social Media and Behind the Scenes: AKA Everything Else Not "News and Media"

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24 minutes ago, insomniadreams88 said:

Ugh, probably. And they won’t think about the fact that as soon as they got the test and encountered one other person, that test is void. 

I'm unsure if I believe they even got tested? They've been playing pretty fast and loose with "quarantining" and since Carina never mentioned having gotten tested when she got dragged for lying about them having that (wedding?) party at Stephen's house, I'm guessing it could just be a lie for cover if people start calling them out for hanging with each other if Stephen does have a party - and I can't believe he wouldn't! He's clearly chomping at the bit to move on to life as normal, haha. 

16 minutes ago, Featherhat said:

I swear I've seen that foot holding picture before, is it from last year or did she repost it?

She reposted it.

Emily's messages are cute. Personal and fun, not too OTT.

Edited by apinknightmare
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Yeah it's really cute. Although posts like this (from both of them) do make me slightly side eye when he and their friends start bitching about "OMG can you believe that people might think we're together!" It's great that she posts it but it's a short leap to some people getting the wrong idea if it really bugged them. But it's mostly a way for them (The Jar) to feel morally superior when trolling fans anyway. 

Stephen does realise that if he gets it, it delays life returning to normal and starting to film his new show, even more right? And you know it's even more dangerous for his asthmatic daughter. It's possibly pre damage control for if there's a party. I'm not in LA but I would be surprised that a doctor is okaying potentially large gatherings because even if everyone's had the test there could always be someone who met someone who was infected between the test and now. 

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Seriously, I'm not a real-life shipper but that picture is kind of swoony. LOL

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My BFF's BIL spent a month in ICU and died yesterday from Covid, so I have zero sympathy for these dumbasses. I can only hope they keep their potentially infected selves to each other, though I'm aware, with this crowd, that's 1000% unlikely. 

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So I watched the live reading of Pride of Prejudice (see video posted upthread here or directly on youtube here) and I thought KM did a good job of portraying Lydia (her part is small and I don't think she has any dialogue until after the 17:00 mark). 

This is also cute...

And from the official Arrow account...
Edited by tv echo
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Later today - fyi, I believe that this live streaming event is free to watch (just go to the site link below)...

Virtual Pop Expo, May 9-10, 2020 (live streaming)
Marc Guggenheim and James Bamford
https://www.virtualpopexpo.com
Schedule
-Sat. (5/9) @ 3:40pm PST - DC's Arrowverse

Quote

Join hosts Jay Washington and Jessica Chancellor as they sit down with show-runner Marc Guggenheim and director James Bamford who've helped shape Arrow, Flash, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow, and Batwoman! Discuss epic cross-over events, the future of the DC television universe and what legendary comic events that may yet unfold on screen!

Edited by tv echo

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FYI: As you know, SDCC was cancelled this year - but now it looks like a virtual version will be held (no details yet)...

Announcing Comic-Con @ Home 2020
Comic-Con International   May 8, 2020

 

Edited by tv echo
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These bloopers appear to be from S1 through S7...

(Team Olicity)

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21 hours ago, apinknightmare said:

I'm unsure if I believe they even got tested?

Or if they got tested it’s most likely not for if they have the virus now, but if they have antibodies. But having antibodies doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re immune, plus there’s no standard antibody test and the market was flooded with ones that weren’t reviewed by the FDA (a recent study out of Berkeley found only 3 of the 14 testing kits the study evaluated were reliable). So I wouldn’t go around hugging people just yet.

Meanwhile, SA shaved his beard and head. On AT’s livestream last night his wife said it’s because she tried to cut his hair and messed it up. (He comes in around the 35-min mark.) He looks really bad, IMO. (I don’t think it’s indicative of his mental state or anything. I just think it’s an unflattering look.)

 

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22 minutes ago, Trisha said:

Or if they got tested it’s most likely not for if they have the virus now, but if they have antibodies. But having antibodies doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re immune, plus there’s no standard antibody test and the market was flooded with ones that weren’t reviewed by the FDA (a recent study out of Berkeley found only 3 of the 14 testing kits the study evaluated were reliable). So I wouldn’t go around hugging people just yet.

Carina wrote that they all tested negative for COVID and that their doctor said "you guys can hug each other now if you want," so she made it seem like she and her "best friends" (whoever they are at the moment, the Jar or some other people) went en masse and got tested, which was why I thought Stephen might be having a party, haha. I don't really believe anything she says so maybe they got tested for COVID (great use of resources!), antibodies or not at all.

I've said it before and I'll say it again - Stephen's hotness is heavily dependent on his hair situation, and the shaved head makes him unfortunately look like a thumb with a mustache. 

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I’m just a blow in so sorry for asking but who is the Jar? 🙂

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If there was a reaction button for "yuck", I'd use it.

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I feel like 80% of the Jar's posts make me think they should just not post on social media for the duration of this. 

Also

26 minutes ago, apinknightmare said:

I've said it before and I'll say it again - Stephen's hotness is heavily dependent on his hair situation

I completely agree. 

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27 minutes ago, Avabelle said:

I’m just a blow in so sorry for asking but who is the Jar? 🙂

Stephen, his wife, Emily Bett, Aisha Tyler, Carina MacKenzie, their friend Jarrett, and a couple of other people named their friend group "The Jar" for reasons they never share despite constantly referring to themselves that way on social media lol. 

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1 hour ago, Trisha said:

Or if they got tested it’s most likely not for if they have the virus now, but if they have antibodies.

I'm pretty sure the test that's available with no prerequisites in LA is the test for whether they're infected right now, not the antibody one. At least that's the case in Northern California. 

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2 hours ago, lemotomato said:

I'm pretty sure the test that's available with no prerequisites in LA is the test for whether they're infected right now, not the antibody one. At least that's the case in Northern California

I’m not sure. On their podcast the other day Drew mentioned getting the antibody test in LA (he was negative) but I’m not sure what types of tests they got. Hopefully they’ll still be safe and smart. 

Meanwhile, I love that EBR is suddenly active on IG stories again. She just posted about getting a gift from her hairdresser.

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1 hour ago, calliope1975 said:

Steve should also invest in sunscreen and lots of it. 

He is coming dangerously close to looking like a leather handbag.

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I finally got my blu-ray of Arrow S8 from Amazon - there are 11 deleted scenes (8 of which have already been posted in this forum)...

  1. 801 (Starling City) - DELETED SCENE: On Earth-2, Oliver (posing as E2 Oliver) has dinner with E2 Malcolm, E2 Moira and E2 Tommy - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 801 episode thread.
  2. 801 (Starling City) – DELETED (EXTENDED) SCENE: While at the Queen-Merlyn corporate offices on Earth-2, Oliver sees a blonde woman in a pink shirt and wearing glasses, sitting at a cubicle and chewing on a blue pen, and he mistakenly thinks that she’s E2 Felicity - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 801 episode thread.
  3. 801 (Starling City) - DELETED SCENE: On Earth-2, Oliver gets caught by E2 Rene Ramirez, E2 Malcolm's bodyguard, while trying to get intel from E2 Curtis' computer at Queen-Merlyn Enterprises - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 801 episode thread.
  4. 801 (Starling City) – DELETED (EXTENDED) SCENE: on Earth-2, at Oliver's welcome home party, E2 Tommy tells E2 Laurel that he stocked the bar with pinot noir, and they reminisce about old times - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 801 episode thread.
  5. 804 (Present Tense) - DELETED SCENE: Oliver confronts the Monitor about involving his children, Mia and William, in the coming Crisis - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 804 episode thread.
  6. [NEW] 807 (Purgatory) - DELETED SCENE: Although his right arm is now amputated, Roy Harper tells Lyla and Adult William that he can still use a gun - transcription (but not video) of this scene has now been posted in the 807 episode thread.
  7. 809 (Green Arrow & the Canaries) - DELETED SCENE: Socialite Mia Queen talks to her followers live and introduces her fiancé, JJ Diggle - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 809 episode thread.
  8. [NEW] 809 (Green Arrow & The Canaries) - DELETED SCENE: E2 Laurel and Dinah crash Mia's college graduation party - transcription (but not video) of this scene has now been posted in the 809 episode thread.
  9. 809 (Green Arrow & the Canaries) - DELETED SCENE: Mia has an uncomfortable dinner with JJ after she starts getting her other, pre-Crisis memories back - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 809 episode thread.
  10. 809 (Green Arrow & the Canaries) - DELETED SCENE: Dinah and E2 Laurel tell Mia about JJ's suspicious financial activity - transcription and video clip of this scene was previously posted in the 809 episode thread.
  11. [NEW] 810 (Fadeout) - DELETED SCENE: In a flashback to the Season 1 timeline, Oliver chooses not to kill human trafficker John Byrne in cold blood (this same John Bryne will kidnap Child William in 2020) - transcription (but not video) of this scene has now been posted in the 810 episode thread.

ETA: The blu-ray has 3 discs. The first two discs contain the 10 Arrow episodes, 11 deleted scenes, and 2 featurettes ("The Best of DC TV's Comic-Con Panels San Diego 2019" and "Arrow: Hitting the Bullseye"). The third disc contains the Crisis On Infinite Earths crossover event (all episodes). There are no bloopers.

Edited by tv echo
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The "DC Arrowverse" panel with Marc Guggenheim and James Bamford at Virtual Pop Expo streamed live today (May 9) - here are my notes while watching...
https://www.virtualpopexpo.com/ 

-- Some talk about producing TV shows on a TV budget (having less time to fill than before, but same size scripts).

-- Some talk about the convenience of producing several Arrowverse shows in Vancouver, making it easier to get cameos. But MG said it still wasn't easy (example: getting MBenoist and GGustin for the Arrow series finale).

-- When asked why they started with lesser known DC character like Green Arrow, MG said that it was GB's decision. MG also said that you could do it on reduced budget and more like a "crime drama," because Green Arrow has no superpowers, so fewer visual effects. JBam elaborated on this point (less prep because no superpowers).

-- Some talk about Arrow 407, which was the first TV episode that JBam ever directed. He talked about directing the "one-r" shot with Thea/Speedy (WH) and some problems with broken elevator doors. He said that they did 16 takes and that, by take 12, the stunt doubles were so exhausted from fighting so hard that there was "some vomiting." Once again, complaint about no stunt nominations.

-- When asked about his writing process, MG said that he writes "long hand" first (like having an inner dialogue with himself, asking and answering questions by himself), like an outline, and then he'll just start writing the script. He sometimes watches something while he's writing to use as his "tuning fork" (I think, to set tone and mood). For example, for S1 of Arrow, he used The Dark Knight trilogy as his tuning fork. Now for the crossovers, he'll use the Marvel movies as his tuning fork.

-- When asked what character he wished he could've shown on screen but wasn't able to because of "red tape," MG said that he always thought The Question would've been a good character to have on Arrow. He said that it wasn't always a matter of "red tape," but that sometimes it's a matter of "the right story." MG also said that he wanted the Huntress back but they could never "line up" Jessica De Gouw's schedule with the right story line. JBam said that he wanted Bruce Wayne and Oliver Queen to have a sparring match. MG also wanted "any character or concept" from Jack Kirby's "The Fourth World."

-- When asked who coordinates all the different characters and storylines on all the different Arrowverse shows, MG said that they don't have any one person who does that. He then said that, ever since the COIE crossover, he thinks that they now need someone to do that. He credited the different shows' script coordinators and also said that the different showrunners talked a lot to each other. JBam added that the actors will also police their own characters and mentioned that SA was especially good at being the "bible" for Arrow because he could recall what was done in past episodes. Some talk about keeping each show's thematic tone the same, despite the crossovers (example, Arrow being grounded and gritty, and Legends being "zany").

-- When asked about their fave things or characters, MG said that he finds writing the crossovers the "most fun" and that his favorite thing is usually the last thing he's done (like the Arrow series finale). JBam said that his fave character is Oliver Queen because he's "the constant" and that you can still feel Oliver Queen and his "legacies" even after he's gone. JBam then mentioned Mia (KM), Mia's scene with Felicity at Oliver's funeral, and said some nice things about KM.

-- MG and JBam then gave their social media handles.

Hopefully, there'll be a recording of this panel posted on youtube at some point (so I can correct any mistakes I've made).

ETA: See below for video recording and my transcriptions.

Edited by tv echo

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From 804 (Present Tense) - future kids spill the beans about Grant Wilson and Adult JJ being Deathstroke...

Edited by tv echo

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UPDATED: New Arrowverse guests for HomeCon 2 (this time the panels will be free to watch, but you still have to pay for group chats or 1-on-1 chats)...

HomeCon: 2nd Edition (Virtual Event), May 16-17, 2020 (Twitch streaming)
Brandon Routh and Kris Holden-Ried (also Courtney Ford and Rachel Skarsten) 
https://homeconofficial.com/homepage-v2/ 


ETA: HomeCon revamped its site and now BR & CF are no longer listed as guests for HomeCon 2 (maybe they're still pending) - will have to check again closer to its May 16 date to see if this changes:
https://homeconofficial.com/#guests
https://twitter.com/homeconofficial

Edited by tv echo

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This video is a recording of the entire Day 1 panels at Virtual Pop Expo - the "DC Arrowverse" panel with MG and James Bamford starts at around the 5:48:30 mark...

Virtual Pop Expo - Day 1
Nerdbot   Streamed live on May 9, 2020

-- Jay Washington (Virtual Pop Expo): "Some of the amazing scenes that we've seen throughout the shows, what is it like to put them both on paper and on film?"
MG: "Well, I mean, you know, the shows present a real interesting challenge because, ever since the very first, you know, pilot, the Arrow pilot, we were trying to deliver sort of a feature quality experience, uh, on a television schedule with a television budget. Um, and I'm not going to say we succeeded every single time, that's kind of impossible, but, um, you know, when it works, that's how it feels. You go, 'oh, wow, this - this feels like a movie'. And that's really, really, really cool, and it's exciting. But it ain't easy."
JBam: "The challenges being money and time. Um, and throughout the years, uh, we've run into different safety regulations and hourly regulations through the studio and otherwise. And, uh, where we used to be able to shoot longer hours within the day, which we counted on to be able to, you know, get the production value that we established on the show, um, our hours were cut in the last few years, um, per day by at least an hour, um, which is a lot of shooting time, um, if you average it out, um, over an episode. So, uh, we've been re - remaining, uh, to try and, you know, still get the same quality and scope and scale that we were doing previously with - with less time, which has been the main challenge for me anyways, on the set. Uh, the writing and the scripts have remained, um, sizeable. And because we want to deliver, so, um, the ability has, um - we've had to come up with some tricks of the trade to, um, to sort of adjust."
Jessica Chancellor (Virtual Pop Expo): "I never would've guessed that you were having any issues. Everything's been amazing."
MG: "Oh, I could call you to some episodes."

-- JW: "You guys are now filming five out of six - yeah, five out of six, counting Green Arrow & the Canaries now - up in Vancouver. So, is it easier to do that with the different shows, given the fact they're right there, and if you need a cameo real quick, you can have somebody just slide over to another set or step onto a soundstage?"
MG: "That definitely, like, helps, you know. Um, for example, like the series finale of Arrow, we were able to have Grant and Melissa jump over from their respective sets and do a quick cameo, you know, in Oliver's funeral. But even then, it wasn't that easy. Like, I - we were shooting the funeral, um, before Grant and Melissa even got there. So even that is not [unintelligible words-a piece of cake?]."
JBam: "I think - I think we only had - Melissa was on two units on Supergirl that day. And we had her for - including her hair, makeup and wardrobe - I think we had her for a total of an hour?"
MG: "Yeah, an hour."
JC: "Wow."
JBam: "With 21 cast - uh, something like that? So, um - in a - in a group sequence. Um, so, um, Marc - uh, Beth masterfully, um, shaped the script so that I could, you know, craft it in a way that we could - we could shoot certain people out."
MG: "The original - the original - actually, the script itself - and I think we shot this and then we cut it - um, basically, Kara makes an excuse for why she's late. And, you know, the beauty of the way Bam, you know, blocked and shot that sequence, we were like, you know, you feel all the people there. You don't need to explain anyone sort of showing up late. It just feels like the camera found them late. Um, you know, but we did have that in the script originally and then we cut it in the editing room."
JBam: "[Unintelligible words] come from saving the world somewhere."
MG: "Yeah.... [unintelligible words] 'Sorry, I was saving the world.' ... I'm not a fan of those kinds of moments anyway, those lines of dialogue where you feel the strings, and you feel the fact that it's a television show... A lot of times people ask me, they go, you know, in a world, where you got Supergirl or you got the Flash, why not have Arrow say, 'I asked Barry for help, but he's off busy doing X,' or 'I asked Supergirl for help but she's off doing Y.' And we'll do that on the rarest of occasions, but generally speaking, I find that those questions basically just serve to call attention to the fact that it's a television show. And that's always something we try to avoid."

-- JC: "I was very curious as to why you guys started with the Green Arrow to do. I mean, before Arrow, the show, a lot of people didn't know who he was, even though he's one of my favorite characters. Um, so - so what was the reasoning behind choosing Oliver Queen?"
MG: "It was just - it was Greg Berlanti. You know, Greg had - first, he had the way in, you know, um - but also I think the nature of the character, even though, yeah, he's not at all well-known, um, certainly not at the time we did the show, um, you could do this on a television scale. You know, he doesn't have superpowers, there's not a lot of visual effects. Um, there's - you know, you can really do it more like a crime drama than a superhero show. So it just felt more feasible. And I think, you know, Arrow became sort of proof of concept that, okay, we can do this, now let's - let's extend the degree of difficulty and add in visual effects and add in superpowers and all that, you know, craziness."
JBam: "And we attempted to, um, sort of keep that mandate throughout the series as much as possible, with - with, uh, keeping him or Arrow, the show, specifically, as grounded as possible with as many practical effects, um, and as little visual effects or [unintelligible word] visual effects as we could... And we're very proud of how that showed, because that takes a lot more effort on the set and in preparation than, um, doing it in post, as in a lot of the other shows where the characters have, um, superpowers."

-- JW: "With the practicality and keeping it gritty and grimy, basically, I love how you guys come up with the sequences for the fights, to keep that realistic sense of 'this is not just a superhero show.' Like Marc said, it's a crime drama almost.... So the question would be: what goes into planning those large sequences we see? Like, one of the big ones for me is episode 407, where it was a bunch of one-shots that came together."
MG: "That was his first, uh, episode of Arrow that he directed."
JBam: "That was my first episode of television that I directed. Uh, complete episode... I directed a fair amount of second units and, you know, a lot of pre-viz, and - and planning for fight rehearsals and whatnot. But, um, these guys took a chance on me and, um, allowed me to jump in there. So I just sort of threw caution to the wind and, uh, did what I wanted to do... hoping that my tastes matched with what Marc and Greg's, uh, were, and it seemed to... I think you're probably - the longest one-shot, or the 'one-r,' is the elevator fight there. And we tried to as much as possible keep it an actual one-r, with no wipes, with no, um - with no stitches. There's one stitch in it, you can see it at the beginning, which is the actress Willa, who's playing Speedy. Um, she's at the beginning of the fight - we push into her and black out the lens for a quick second, and then we pull out of the stunt doubles. And, uh, go through the fight into the elevator, into another floor, out the floor, you know, the elevator doors open up, they're fighting in the foreground all the time. Now originally we followed them down the hall, um, ducked into another room, kept fighting, went back in the hall and did another cowboy switch or a Hollywood switch with Willa, who appeared at the end of the fight, um, to shoot, uh, her combatant with an arrow. Um, in total, I think the fight was something like a minute and - a minute and five seconds solid. But, of course, the episode's only 42 minutes broadcast time. So, um, it had to be, you know, curtailed a certain amount. Um, but the preparation I think was your original question - the preparation that went into that fight. I was very specific about the shot first. And then I got together with the stunt guys and I told them, this is what I'm going to do with the camera, and then this is what I want to see in front of the camera. And it being a two-person fight, um, there wasn't the - the relaxation for any stunt performers to run in and just fall down. These two had to keep fighting the whole time. Um, we did 16 takes to get that shot. Um, the elevator doors broke down the first 12 takes and wouldn't open. Um, I should also mention, that was done on one floor, so it wasn't - we built that elevator. So while the elevator doors closed and we were fighting inside the elevator, the Set Dec Department was running around outside and rearranging - taking away a bench, slapping Floor Number 3 or whatever it was onto the wall for some signage, and changing the, uh, decor to look like we were on another floor. So that when the elevator doors opened, um - we stole that from John Woo, by the way, who did that in Hard Boiled in the hospital elevator* many, many years ago, at two-minute one-r. Uh, but the stunt doubles rehearsed for weeks and weeks and weeks, just to make that happen. And, I believe, on that day, on take 12, they were so exhausted, there's was little bit of vomiting, uh, involved, uh, because - because they were so exhausted, um, from fighting so hard, um, they were literally sick. And finally, I didn't know if we were going to make it... I was close to having to build a stitch in there and not doing it practically because I - uh, because of the breakdown of the elevator doors. Um, but, you know, they assured me, 'let's just do it, let's do another one.' And that was - that's what's in the final cut."
MG: "Not a single stunt nomination. Not a single one."
JC: "That's crazy."
MG: "I know."
JW: "It's bananas."
JC: "It's insane."
MG: "It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous."

(* Here's the long-take hospital scene from John Woo's Hard Boiled movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OPyoJgV_YY )

-- JC (reading a viewer question): "'Marc, what is your writing process like? And how does it differ, if any, depending on the type of project?'"
MG: "Ooh, good question. Um, very - I mean, very, very vaguely, just sort of quickly, because if I give a really detailed answer, we'd probably run out of time. But, um, generally speaking, the way I work is, I first work long-hand. Um, when I don't have a writing staff that I'm working with, it's just me in a room. I - I sit and I write long-hand, um, and I just, uh - if you look at those notes, it would look like, uh, a dialogue. It would look like a [unintelligible word] crazy person, because I'm a lot of times talking to myself. I'm asking questions and I'm answering questions, and I'm sort of having this little dialogue with myself. And once I sort of - you know, that's the way I break a story... [Some static noise]... Then I'll, you know, take those notes, I'll have those notes in front of me, and I'll write out like a beat sheet or an outline, uh, like in Microsoft Word. Once I got that, um, and depending on the nature of the project... Sometimes if it's just for me, it's very short-handy. Um, if it's for, you know - if I'm writing like a movie, for example, and I'm sharing the beat sheet with the producers or the studio, uh, it'll be a lot more detailed. Um, but generally speaking, it's like, this scene, this scene, this scene, this scene. And then I go and I start writing. And, um, usually when I'm writing, I - I - if I'm having trouble getting going, I'll use what I call a 'tuning fork.' Um, I'll read or I'll watch a movie or a TV show that is in the same vein of what I'm writing. Uh, for example, like, you know, the first year of Arrow, I would use the Chris Nolan Dark Knight trilogy, ah, as my tuning fork. Ah, you know, even nowadays when I work on the crossovers and I'm scripting on the crossovers, I'll use like, you know, the Avengers movies, um, as a tuning fork. Um, you know, in terms of how it changes from project to project, uh, the process itself, generally speaking, doesn't change. Um, you know, it depends a little bit. Like, there are certain projects that are very, very specific in certain ways and I'll - I'll maybe mix up what I just described... [Some static noise] ... Generally speaking, like whether I'm doing a TV show or a comic book or a movie, um, that's the process I tend to follow. The thing that changes usually from medium to medium, from project to project, is, you know, different times I'll write in a different voice. Um, you know, there's certain projects where I'm like trying to do my best Aaron Sorkin imitation. And there's other projects where, you know, I'm trying to be really, really minimalist. Um, and I try to match the tone and the feel of what I'm writing to the tone and feel of the project... That's true also for my comic book work... I'll create these rules for myself. Like, you know, in this particular project, there's going to be no internal narration, uh, you know, there's going to be no captions. Uh, I'm working on a comic book project now where I'm pretty much trying to do it without sound effects... And sometimes there's a rhyme or reason to it; other times it's just a way of keeping myself fresh and challenged."

-- Video guest T.W. Falls: "In the past, with the Arrowverse shows, you've often used allusions to characters that you weren't actually able to feature on screen. For instance, in Season 1 of Arrow, Oliver took down Brutale, who is a Nightwing villain, and even mentions to Blüdhaven. Um, my question, not including the Bat, what character do you wish that, throughout any of your series, you could have shown on screen, but were just never able to get through the red tape and actually show that character for viewers?"
MG: "I mean, I - I would say - it's funny, I always felt the Question was like the perfect character to do on Arrow. And I wouldn't even say that there was a lot of red tape. Um, a lot of times, you know, on the shows, there's - several things have to align. Um, it's not just a question of, you know, is there no red tape or do we have corporate permission or not? Sometimes it's like, we got corporate permission but we don't have the right story. Or, you know, it's - we got the corporate permission today, but we're waiting until tomorrow, when things change, and by that time we've waited too long, and now we no longer have that permission. Um, you know, sometimes it's, you know, the storyline has to line up, you know, with something else that we're doing. It's not, you know - we always try very hard not to do characters just for the sake of doing characters... We want to marry the characters to a very specific story that we're telling. Um, and that's one of the reasons why, for example, like, one of my big regrets is that we never had, uh, you know, uh, the Huntress back, uh, after Season 2. Um, and it wasn't for lack of wanting to and it wasn't for lack of being able to. It's just, you know, we could never quite line up Jessica De Gouw's schedule and our stories."
JBam: "Whom we loved. Um, there's a few cameos that I've placed personally in my episodes that weren't sanctioned, and we - I ended up cutting them out. But the Joker was in, um - there was a Joker look-alike in one of the prison cells at the end of, uh, Season 6, when Oliver's first placed in prison. There's a slide by a prison cell and the Joker's sort of looked over his shoulder, which was our production manager, uh, Michael Potkins, at the time. But, uh, he was very Joker-esque, so we greened up his hair. And we've thrown Harley Quinn..."
JW: "I remember the Harley one."
JBam: "We had another one. We had another one that we cut... We've done that few times and then sort of, you know, thought better of it... There's a barrage of characters that I would've loved to, you know, have seen. Uh, and, of course, yeah, Bruce Wayne... I always thought that we'd, uh, throw him in somewhere. It would've been nice to have Oliver Queen and Bruce Wayne have, you know, a sparring match or training or something."
JW: "That would've been a fan's delight."
JBam: "That would've been my delight. I would've killed to have done that."
MG: "Any of the 'Fourth World'... Darkseid or Orion... Any - any character or concept from Jack Kirby's 'Fourth World' would've been really fantastic... I will say this, like, you know, we get this question a lot and, ah, I really do choose to focus on the glass being half full, because it's really like 90 per cent full, you know, after eight years. Like, the number of characters we've been able to - to, you know, utilize has been just crazy, um, and far more than any of us ever expected. So, um, I'd like to focus on the positive."

-- Video guest Travis Langley: "Ever since I had a conversation with Jonathan Butler, who works on The Flash, I've been fascinated with how in the world you coordinate all this stuff. Jonathan was telling me one time about seeing some designs for what's going on over on Legends of Tomorrow. And I got thinking later about, how would you coordinate half a dozen TV shows from the level of, okay, which president of this merged world after all, who gets to use what story elements, which characters are we going to use, who plays Johnny DC Cop for all of you?"
MG: "I'll be honest with you, um, we don't have anybody doing that... Since Crisis and since we combined the Earths, uh, I've been saying, we really do need that person now. Um, but basically the way - the way it gets done is, it's sort of, uh - it's sort of a two-layer process. Um, first of all, shout-out to all the script coordinators on the various shows. Um, they really - they're usually the canary in the coal mine. They're the first ones who are reading all the scripts and noticing, hey, that's not lining up, or this is inconsistent with something that was done on a previous show three years earlier. So, um, they're really terrific. And, um, the showrunners - you know, we all talk to each other, um, and we're all trading emails. But, uh, it's - I've been trying to [unintelligible words], but the truth is, it's a lot - the - the connectivity is a lot better than it has any right to be, given, ah - given our lack of normal process. But maybe that'll change in the upcoming season, because, like I said, I feel, you know, with all the shows on the same Earth now, it really is time."
JBam: "And, uh, some of our actors are quite good at policing their own characters, because they've been living in their own skin for quite awhile. Um, Stephen in particular was a bit of an encyclopedia when it came to, 'well, back in Season 2, um, episode 5, I did this,' um, and he'll inform you as to, 'well, maybe I should do this, um, because, you know, I went through this before.' Oh, okay. Sometimes they come up with things that you wouldn't, uh, otherwise consider - well, Marc probably would've considered - but, um, it's nice to have them on set."
MG: "I started noticing like around Season 6 that, like, wow, this is getting harder to hold in my head... There's just so many episodes, uh, and at that point, so many shows, that you go, okay, wow, I need to - we need to like figure out a way to keep track of all this stuff... It's tricky. It's really tricky."

-- TL: "What about like thematic levels? ... Crisis kinda ends with a promise of everybody picking up some of the silliness from Legends. Is this just everybody says, okay, we all get sillier, except for you over in Freeland?"
MG: "No. I think, you know - I don't think so, mainly because, you know, one of the things that we sorta learned - I associate it with the year of Arrow Season 5. That was the year that Supergirl, uh, went from the CBS to The CW and we went from three shows to four shows. And when we went to four shows, we all sort of - all the showrunners, we all collectively were like, we got to start working harder to differentiate the tones of the different shows, um, so there's a reason to watch Supergirl that's different from the reason to watch Flash. And if you look back at that season, that's the season that Supergirl doubled down on aliens, that Flash doubled down on science, that Legends doubled down on the silliness and that Arrow doubled down on the grim and gritty, because those were the four different qualities that each show was unique about. So, you know, there may be an episode of Flash that gets, you know, a little zanier, you know, a little more Legends-esque, but generally speaking, you know, we do try to sort of keep the tones siloed off on each of the different shows."

-- JC (reading a viewer question): "'Who has been your favorite storyline to write for or direct in the Arrowverse?'"
MG: "You go first."
JBam: "Oh, thanks. Um. Hmm. Interesting. (Pauses) I need to think about that for a moment."
MG: "For me, I definitely - writing the crossovers has probably been the most fun. For me, I - I just love - to me, those are the most like a comic book coming to life. Um, you know... as a writer in general, my favorite thing is always the very last thing I wrote. So, you know, I really - I loved the work that Beth and I did on the Arrow series finale. Um, and, uh, I just directed an episode of Legends and, seeing as how it's the first and only time so far I've directed, it's my favorite directing [unintelligible word[."
JBam: "Directed the hell out of it. It's fantastic. Well done."
MG: "I was channeling my inner Bamford."
JBam: "We did have a couple chats. I loved it."
MG: "You were very supportive and very, like, very, very helpful."
JBam: "Um, I thought you killed it. Um. Uh, I'm trying not to be -"
JW: "If you gotta be biased, be biased. If it's something you've done, just go ahead. Just do it."
JBam: "As far as the character - the run through of the character - obviously it's Oliver Queen, because he's the constant in all of the episodes, even, you know, in our departure episodes. You can still feel him, uh, even in the original backdoor pilot that we did, episode 716, um, there's still - you still feel Oliver Queen's story and his legacy. So, um, uh, aside from him, I really - you know what, though, since we - to start there - since we introduced Mia, um, to the mix, it's been a lot of fun, um, sort of bringing her up and seeing her grow up, um, not just in that episode but throughout this series. And I really love, you know, Kat McNamara's performances, um, as a daughter and as a - just as a human being, and seeing her different scenes with - with all - all the characters, particularly with her father - and her mother. When she met Felicity for the first time at the funeral, I was just - I mean, these guys, Marc can tell you, I don't know if he saw a few times, but I was in tears behind the monitor."
MG: "You were crying... It was raining, so Bam was like, 'that's not tears, that's - that's [unintelligible words].'"
JBam: "'I'm not crying.' But, um, quite regularly when those things happened. When - when we got the news that, uh - um, in the finale of episode 6, we were shooting in the hospital in the hallway, we got the news that Lance had died. Um, you know, that's another moment where everybody was together and got the news at the same time. And, you know, I was crying on the side, too, and everybody's like, 'Bam! C'mon, it's hard enough!' When you've seen - when you've lived with these characters, like I have for eight years, and these actors together, you - you know, you have glimpses of reality when you're on set and you're, you know, you're living - you're seeing this play out right in front of you and you're living it. Um, uh, um, so... yeah. There's not just one character. I would - I could go on forever. Which I won't."

Edited by tv echo
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1 hour ago, tv echo said:

You can still feel him, uh, even in the original backdoor pilot that we did, episode 716, um, there's still - you still feel Oliver Queen's story and his legacy

Ha, thanks for the retroactive confirmation, Bamford. Next up, actually confirming that LoT was supposed to be a spinoff for Ray.

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15 minutes ago, way2interested said:

Ha, thanks for the retroactive confirmation, Bamford. Next up, actually confirming that LoT was supposed to be a spinoff for Ray.

No kidding. It was pretty obviously an unannounced BDP. I wonder what happened for them to add the canaries, just KC'S pitch or something else. Aside from the fact that that grimdark, terrible future wasn't popular.

I would also be interested in hearing about the original Ray plans thought it was probably have been a straight forward Iron Man knock off with Arrowverse standard storylines.

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Surprised to see Ben Lewis pop up on the secret celebrity version of Drag Race (he was a friend of the contestant). He’s so charming, I really would like to see more of him. 

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2 script pages for 220 (Seeing Red) and 2 script pages for 810 (Fadeout) - Moira is killed by Slade and then post-Crisis Moira is not killed by Slade...

Edited by tv echo

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Hey, SA - something to do if you're really bored and need social connection...

Meet the stars, from a distance: Toronto actors’ Homecon brings the fan convention experience to your couch
Ryan Porter   May 11, 2020
https://www.thestar.com/entertainment/2020/05/11/meet-the-stars-from-a-distance-toronto-actors-homecon-bring-the-fan-convention-experience-to-your-couch.html 

Quote

Amos plans to hold Homecon on a monthly basis into the foreseeable future, with additional online events between the main weekends. The future of in-person gatherings, after all, remains to be seen.

Also FYI...

MegaCon Orlando has been rescheduled to October 30-November 1, 2020. This con was originally scheduled for June 4-7, 2020, and the original guest list included SA, KM and BL, but now the guests are TBD.

Indiana Comic Convention has been rescheduled to May 7-9, 2021. This con was originally scheduled for June 26-28, 2020, and the original guest list included DR, but now the guests are TBD.

Edited by tv echo

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I really don't see how they can go forward with this in-person comic con in June, but apparently it's not cancelled yet...

Fan Expo Dallas, June 19-21, 2020 (TX)
CONFIRMED: Katherine McNamara, Caity Lotz and Brandon Routh
PENDING: Stephen Amell and Ben Lewis (also Dean Cain)
https://www.fanexpodallas.com/en/guests/celebrities.html

Edited by tv echo

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From 804 (Present Tense) - Oliver takes Mia to her grandfather's gravestone...

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I love that she came back to support a cause. Here's the website for the Downtown Eastside Women's Centre: http://dewc.ca/

 

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Also, with all of the CW announcements today it doesn’t look great for the spinoff.

 

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54 minutes ago, Trisha said:

Also, with all of the CW announcements today it doesn’t look great for the spinoff.

Someone on twitter pointed out that the pickups announced today were all CBS produced shows and there might be more news on the 2 spinoffs (Arrow and The 100) on Thursday.

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6 minutes ago, lemotomato said:

Someone on twitter pointed out that the pickups announced today were all CBS produced shows and there might be more news on the 2 spinoffs (Arrow and The 100) on Thursday.

I thought Kung Fu was WB and Republic of Sarah was CBS, thus leaving the 100 spinoff (CBS) and the Arrow spinoff (WB)?

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10 minutes ago, way2interested said:

I thought Kung Fu was WB and Republic of Sarah was CBS, thus leaving the 100 spinoff (CBS) and the Arrow spinoff (WB)?

I have no idea, tbh. Just repeating some spec I thought sounded credible.

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From 601 (Fallout) - opening scene...

Edited by tv echo

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The link to this Facebook live video was tweeted by UAlbany - I only transcribed a few comments (the video is almost an hour long)...

-- On how it felt watching Arrow come to an end this year, MG: "You know, for me, it was the end of a nine-year journey. Uh, the show ran for eight years. You typically develop a pilot for a year. Um, and I have to say - I always feel like I'm giving the wrong answer here, or at least the answer people are not expecting, but it actually felt really good, um, in large part because I knew, just logically, at some point it had to end. Um, it's not Law and Order: Special Victims Unit. It's not going on forever. Um, and, for me, the best part, the most rewarding part, was the fact that we were able to end on our terms. We ended the show the way we wanted to, creatively, logistically. Um, you know, we were able to do it, uh, while people were still talking about the show, the show was still relevant. I didn't want the show to go on for so long that people went, 'oh, that show's still on?' Um, so it - quite frankly, it just felt really good. Um, I do miss, uh, people I was working with. Uh, that's probably the hardest part, uh, about the show ending is, you create all these relationships, you create all these friendships. You really come to enjoy having these people in your life. And then one day, boom, the show's over and, uh, you know, you're not, you know, talking as frequently as you used to... We still keep in touch, but it's not the same. You're not working shoulder to shoulder with someone."

-- On whether there are any DC comics characters that he would've enjoyed adapting for Arrow, MG: "The answer is definitely 'yes.' Um, I try not to - I'll be honest with you, I try not to focus on that too much, because, to me, we ended up over eight years, uh, getting a chance to include far more DC comics characters than I ever thought was going to be possible. Um, so for me, the glass is not only half-full, it's 99 per cent full. Um, that being said, you know, the character - the one.. the character I sorta call the one that got away is, uh, a character called The Question. Um, and - mainly because I've just always liked that character, but I also really felt that that character would be so perfectly suited, um, for Arrow and the world of Arrow, the show we were doing, that it just made the most sense."

-- On who is his favorite character in the Arrowverse, MG: "Um, gosh. You know, it's funny, I'll - I - I think the answer to that question truly depends upon which day you're catching me. Um, you know, I - I always felt a certain affinity to Oliver, um, a certain affinity for Oliver. I - it's weird because in many ways Oliver, um - you know, he doesn't have - there's certain qualities of his that are not - not great - you know, not particularly heroic. Um, but I think that's the thing I like about him, is that, you know, he really went on a journey, uh, for eight years. But, you know, by the time we ended the show, he had gone from being this spoiled, you know, entitled, rich, you know, jerk to a father and a husband and a hero and a friend. And, um, it was just a really big swing, in terms of his evolution. And I think, you know, it was - it was very enjoyable for me to, uh - to, you know, to both watch and help chart that course. Um, but, uh, ask me tomorrow and the truth is, it'll probably be a different answer, 'cause there's a lot of characters I have a lot of fondness for, you know, for almost all of them."

-- When someone asked him if he would critique her teasers for her animated feature film, MG: "I'd be happy to. I will tell you this: I hate critiquing. Um, and - and the reason for that is, I don't think I'm particularly good at it... I really subscribe to what William Goldman once famously said, which is, 'No one in Hollywood knows anything.' ... So whenever anyone asks me to - to critique or give notes, um, I really struggle, because I can only give you my limited perspective. Um, and I never want to impose my personal taste on either a writer or an animator or a director or the audience themselves, because I don't know what the audience wants. Um, if I did, um, I'd probably go about things - uh, I'll be honest, I'd probably go about things exactly the same way, because I don't believe in adjusting things for an audience. But I will say that I think it's, um, you know, it's very tricky. It's a tricky position to be in, to sort of, you know, impose your perspective on someone. You know, when I work with a writing staff, uh, or I, you know, work with actors, giving notes to them is very different, because then, the exercise is not trying to make it appeal to an audience, not try to impose what I think an audience will respond to. Rather, all I'm trying to get at is, this is the version of the scene or the script or the episode or the season that I'm seeing in my head, this is what I'm trying to get out, this is what I'm working with people to try to achieve. Um, giving notes under those circumstances is very, very different from, you know, just critiquing someone's work, um, that I'm not involved with... If you'd like to, sure, but, uh, with all those caveats and all those grains of salt."

Edited by tv echo

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I love that MG is giving us so much Olicity content even after the show is over. Even though he's kind of revealing how much SA and EBR improve the script with their own additions. 

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This is one of the reasons I don’t need to see another take on Oliver and Felicity. What SA and EBR did with Olicity is so special, I don’t think another set of actors could match them. 

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Mark Bunting, who was 1st Assistant Director and Director for Arrow, and now is 1st Assistant Director for The Flash, was the guest on May 13 - I only transcribed some of the comments...

How'd You Do It? Episode 11: Mark Bunting
Stephen Amell    May 13, 2020

-- MB said that March 13th was his last day at work. He talked about getting a call not to come to the Flash set because production was shutting down (even though that show still had two episodes to shoot for this season) and that they didn't know when production would resume. They were just about to start shooting the first day of episode 21.

-- Per SA, MB was the 2nd AD for the pilot of Arrow and was promoted to 1st AD starting on episode 103. MB remained the 1st AD for the remaining eight seasons. SA then said that MB directed his first episode in S6 and directed another episode in S7, but MB interjected: "5, 6 and 7." (Prior to Arrow, MB was a 2nd AD for about a season on Smallville.)

-- When asked how he went from 2nd AD to directing three episodes of network television, MB: "It was kind of fortuitous how I got onto the pilot [of Arrow], because the 1st AD on the pilot was Jack Hardy, who has since passed away. But, uh, he - I got it through - information through the grapevine that his 2nd AD was not - his usual 2nd AD - he was not going to do the show. So I got that call from a friend of a friend and, uh - so I immediately called Jack, just to check in and see how he was doing. And he was like, 'Mark, unbelievable, I need a 2nd AD.'  I was like, 'Wow, Jack, that is - that's, wow, that's so weird, okay, sure, I'm in.'"

-- When asked to explain the role of a 2nd AD, MB: "So basically the 2nd AD - uh, he's sort of the - the safety net for the 1st AD a lot of it, but he's - he's dealing with everything that happens around set to get it up and running. He does a call sheet every day, which basically lists all the scenes and the actors on the front of the call sheet, with their call times for their makeup and hair and wardrobe and all that, lists all the crew in the back, what time they have to show up, and it's a document that gets sent out every day. And, uh, they're sort of the, uh - they quite often are the conduit to send out information to departments from the 1st AD, just to keep everyone up to date on changes and what's happening. So, yeah. That was - that was sort of my - that was my role on the pilot. And, uh - and David Nutter, who did the pilot, was one day, was like, 'Well, Mark, what do you want to do?' I said, 'Well, I want to be one of the 1st ADs, if this goes to series.' And, uh, he said, 'Great, let's make it happen.' I'm like, 'Okay.' And, uh - and so then JP brought me on as one of the 1st ADs and, you know, the rest is history." 
SA: "JP's our production - " 
MB: "Original producer. He was the original, yeah, line producer on the show. And, uh, he went off to - he was there for a couple seasons and left to go do, uh, Flash." 
SA: "Yes, he did."

-- When asked to explain the role of the 1st AD, MB: "Okay. So the 1st AD - so what happens on a network show is you shoot usually eight days of main unit shooting. So, during those eight days of shooting, there's, uh, the next director and the other 1st AD - 'cause there's two 1st ADs - they're prepping for the next episode. So it's a constant prep, shoot, prep, shoot. So I prepped for actually seven days with the director and get everything teed up and ready to go, so that when we start shooting, we're - we're all lined up and everything hopefully goes smoothly. And then once I hit the floor, it's me and, uh, I'm, you know, making sure that, uh - I'm sort of the keeper of time and make sure that we're staying on schedule and, um, helping to make, um, you know, any - any decisions. I'm always - I'm always thinking in my head worst case scenarios, so I've always got backup plans, backup plans to backup plans. But you sort of mana - I manage the set basically, between me and, uh, the DOP Gord - we sort of  manage the set and keep things going, keep the crew going, keep us moving forward. Um, also the safety officer on set. Uh, so if I'm not comfortable with something, stuntwise or anything, you know, on a location that's not right, then I - I pipe up and make sure that the crew's, uh, is safe."

-- SA then noted the constant "battle" between the 1st AD and the director, who may want to get "super creative," but is subject to "a finite amount of time" to shoot each episode. SA: "There was an incident in our 4th season where an actor got - an actor got, uh, sick and production had to go down for a couple of days. And it happened to be during the crossover. So a lot of - like, a lot of balls in the air. And - and we came out of that basically missing four full days of our production. And you don't just get to push your schedule. You have to piece in that stuff as you go. And Warner Brothers insisted - I sort of think, wrongly - that we needed it done before the end of the calendar year. And, I mean, that's what you deal with every day. If a day doesn't go right."
MB: "Yeah, like, I'm also like - I put a schedule together. I get the script, I break it down into however many days we're shooting, which is eight days plus, you know, one day of 2nd unit in it. And then - "
SA: "Sometimes. Sometimes."
MB: "Sometimes. Um, and I - I try and put together - you know, I'm there to help with the director get his creative vision across, but you're also there to make the days as well, 'cause there's no - there's not much room for error. It's such a tight schedule that you really gotta - you really gotta be efficient."

-- When asked if he remembered any "serious disaster days," MB: "No. I mean, there's always - there's always speed bumps, right?"
SA: "Um-hmm."
MB: "And, you know, for the most part, all the - all the gags that we did, they all - they all went pretty well. It's always those big gags that worry me, because if they don't go well, that really messes everything up. But we had such a good crew that we never really had too many problems. I remember - 'cause I was, you know, trying to - try - basically what happens is, I press the lead at the end of an episode because I have to, like, get into the next one and there's so much running through my head. So I was going back, trying to remember things, and I remember that - I remember one of the most challenging days we had, that I was really worried about, was the, uh, mid-season finale, season 4, I think it was, where we did the sword fight on top of Grouse Mountain."
SA: "That was episode 9, season 3. But, yes, it was a mid-season finale."
MB: "And it was literally on top of Grouse Mountain. And the logistics to get us up there, it was all daylight dependent. We had to truck snow up. All the trucks had to get up there. And we had to take a ski lift to get to the set, which was at the top of the mountain. That day - that day really worried me because there wasn't anywhere you could cheat anything, because you're on top of a mountain."
Drew: "So was that when you fought - and I forget the character's name -?"
SA: "Ra's al Ghul."
Drew: "Yeah, Ra's al Ghul. And you guys were both shirtless out in the snow... You told me about that episode. I remember talking with you about that."
MB: "Stephen was shirtless the whole day, like, the entire day. Fighting out in the - he was in the snow, in mid-October, on top of a mountain."
SA: "It was freezing cold. And the only unfortunate thing is that we've trucked in all this snow and we have this beautiful, beautiful location. And we were f**kin' socked in with fog and we might as well have been on the godd**n soundstage. Seriously, it was like, 'Come on!' ... Like, when they scouted it, was beautiful and clear and it would have been - I mean, obviously, the - the important part is in the - is in the fight and the character exchange between Oliver and Ra's, but it would have looked appreciably better if it had just been a little clearer."
MB: "And I did play devil's advocate in prep about that. But we went up there anyways.... Plus, we had to do a piece from the next episode up there. So we were like running around with our heads cut off, trying to get it before we lost the light. It was - it was fun."
SA: "I was also - I did 100 per cent of my stunts that day, which I'm sure made - made Mark really uncomfortable."
MB (laughing): "Look, overall it was better because it was just all you, right?"
SA: "Sure."
MB: "There was no hiding you. You were there. You did the whole thing. You knew the fight. But I'm always nervous when you do a stunt, Stephen."
Drew (laughing): "Because he's uncoordinated? Prone to hurt himself?"
MB: "No. I don't want him to hurt himself."
SA: "First of all, those were real swords. And I took - I took some raps, like right off the knuckles a couple of times... It did not feel good. I remember taking a kick too, right here. (Gestures to area under left arm) And it like, wham! And I'm like, 'Oh, oh, my God.' ... It could very easily have broken a rib."

-- SA: "When we decided that we were wrapping up the show, um, and I spoke with the crew - sort of the majority of the way through season 7, I want to say, maybe February of so through our 7th season - and announced that we were gonna come back for a little 10-episode stretch, um, how quickly did The Flash contact you to become their 1st AD thereafter?"
MB: "It was pretty quick, but I - they were - they were wondering what my plans were for the next season. And I said, you know, uh, I said, look, I don't know what's happening, you know, I wanted to, you know, keep directing. I also had been on the show since the pilot and I wanted to see it through to the end. And they understood. And I said, you know, look, I'm - I'll be available whatever, mid-November, if, uh, if there's a spot open, I'd love to come and work for you guys. And so they were able to make it happen. Which was great."

-- SA: "I actually remember... Just to sidetrack for a second, Drew, do you remember the day that I met - uh, we first met Emily that Friday afternoon, in Vancouver?"
Drew: "I do. I do. Yeah."
SA: "And that was the first, super late, uh, Fraturday - Friday night shooting into Saturday morning - fight in the sun coming up that Mark and Gord did. That was your first Fraturday. And that was a giant fight after meeting Emily, with, uh, Michael Rowe's character, Deadshot, and that had a bunch of gags and a bunch of stunt stuff, and, um, Mark was stressed that evening."
Drew: "For the amateur, what is a gag versus a stunt? You guys have said 'gag' a couple times and I have no idea."
MB: "So it's like a - like a special effects, um, like if they do an explosion, or... we're doing a ratchet, which is a stunt but also a bit of a gag."
(More stunt talk)

-- When asked how he thought production shooting will change once it resumes, MB thought that there will be less going on location, less crowd scenes, smaller crews on set, and everyone wearing masks (except actors being filmed).
SA: "If we had done a full 22 [episodes] on Arrow this year and knew it was - knew it was our last season and had to shut down two episodes before it finished, which, frankly, is ostensibly what the boys on Supernatural had to do, although I'm sure they'll come back and do something, that would have - that would have been gut-wrenching. That'd be like, oh, my God, like, oh, my God. Can you imagine?"
MB: "Oh, God. That would have been - that would have been horrible."

Edited by tv echo

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I will watch once someone else does and I can be reassured that nothing will ping my secondhand embarrassment meter like the awkward rumor/relationship talk that happened one of the last times Aisha was live with them.

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