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Vacations: Where to go, What to see, Where to eat

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Duly noted. :)

The only thing I am really dreading is going through your customs (not sure which airport we'll be flying into from London Heathrow). I can understand the reasoning of course, but by all accounts those customs guys are not the happiest of people. I just hope I don't get singled out and end up with a greased finger up my bum, lol

PS. I just noticed in my previous post I typed "funny fags". It just dawned on me that that may be construed as offensive and derogatory over your side of the Pond. While over here it means "funny cigarettes" like spliffs or weed.

Anyway, it's lunchtime here and I need foodage - a BLT is in order while I read about Monument Valley in Arizona :)

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1 hour ago, Zola said:

(and I must remember that nearly everyone in your country carry guns,

I honestly only know two people who even own guns, and they don't carry them around on a daily basis.

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25 minutes ago, Katy M said:

I honestly only know two people who even own guns, and they don't carry them around on a daily basis.

Thank you. This is all good information to know: and certainly separates the myths from reality

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22 minutes ago, Katy M said:

I honestly only know two people who even own guns, and they don't carry them around on a daily basis.

I know a lot of people who have guns. Almost none carry one (not including the police officers I know) except when hunting. None of them are idiots. All the idiots I know wouldn't touch a gun. They are idiots for unrelated reasons.

Honestly, I don't know how many carry guns because they don't talk about it and they don't flash guns around. So I don't know if they have concealed carry permits. Since the people I know aren't criminals, they would have permits.

It is still a good idea to watch what you say, however, as people can seriously hurt you without a gun, and you never know when someone with rage issues might be around until it's too late. And watch the smoking of funny cigarettes. It's not legal everywhere.

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3 hours ago, Zola said:

and I must remember that nearly everyone in your country carry guns, therefore I had better not piss people off with my juvenile behaviour when I am a little drunk or smoked a couple of funny fags, lol

Ditto what the others have said about the guns (and I live in Texas).  I think that most people who have grown up around guns and live in a less congested environment are not my concerns when it comes to guns.  Being in a larger city and just Joe Schmoe with a gun is where I would be worried.  But keep an eye out for the aggressive drivers - those can happen anywhere.  And Aggressive Driver + Gun = a no win situation.

I knew what you meant by fags, so didn't think twice.  It probably is good to be mindful though - not sure how well known that fag=cigarette is these days.

And since our tourism is down and the industry is feeling it, hopefully you'll have people going out of their way to ensure you get good service.

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Hey, Z - forget about all those mythical dead presidents and read about the REAL Americans.  I.E. the true natives who get short shrifted here and everywhere else.  Any fool with dynomite and a chisel can deface a mountain.

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12 minutes ago, Moose135 said:

I've been to most of those places, @Zola, and I'll be glad to help answer any questions you might have as you plan your trip.

Thank you, Moose. I will do that!

And thank you to all of you who have offered me some good advice and guidance. It is really nice of you to take the time. I do appreciate it.

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On 1/31/2018 at 5:19 AM, auntlada said:

Honestly, I don't know how many carry guns because they don't talk about it and they don't flash guns around. So I don't know if they have concealed carry permits. Since the people I know aren't criminals, they would have permits.

Don't forget the open carry states.  I've seen only one person openly carrying, in a sandwich shop in Phoenix.  I spent most of my life in Texas, and grew up around guns and have played with them a little as an adult, and it still un-nerved me. 

If you're not otherwise prohibited from owning a gun, Arizona doesn't require any sort of permit to carry a gun, either openly or concealed.

And on to more pleasant matters, a couple of tips if anyone reading this happens to be going to...

Vancouver, BC - Go down to Richmond, to the Daiso Japan store in Aberdeen Center.  It's like a dollar store, but $2 (most things), and it's enormous--two stories of random cheap crap that you will realize you can't live without.  It's the only location in Canada, and I think the biggest store they have outside of Japan.  The location in Japantown in San Francisco is no Vancouver, but it's a decent substitute--much bigger than other U.S. locations.   Daiso is spreading, so it might be coming to a city near you, but even if you have one next door, you have to see the Vancouver location to believe it.  I am most definitely not a shopper but I make a point to visit it whenever I'm there--it's that amazing.  [ETA: The U.S. stores are $1.50 for most things.]

And, in San Francisco, I have to give a huge thumbs-up to these little yellow 2-seater cars that tourists drive around on the streets.  I've been to San Francisco a few times and have seen them around and always thought, "No way," but something came over me this time and I decided we had to do it.  It was a GAS.  They're actually motorcycles with side-by-side seats.  I just wonder how many facebook photos and videos there are of me driving that thing down Lombard Street, with Mr. Outlier riding shotgun--all the tourists were documenting our plummet down the curves.  Even tourists riding cable cars were taking pictures of US.

We've seen all of the sights before, and know our way around pretty well, so we spent three hours just cruising the neighborhoods.  But you can stick to set routes that take you past the various sights, and the car plays narration of what you're seeing.  Now, you can't take it across the Golden Gate Bridge, but you can go to the base of it and pretty much anywhere else you can get without crossing a bridge, including up to Twin Peaks. 

I usually think seeing a city by bicycle is the optimal pace, but those damn hills!  And traffic!  A few years ago, we rode bikes around SF on Christmas Day, so as not to have to deal with traffic, and it was great, but there was one hill I had to ride up in a serpentine in order to maintain forward movement.  In these little cars, you're not going to feel like Steve McQueen in Bullitt, but we never had to get out and push.

And people in real cars are amazingly polite and cooperative, and it never for a second felt the least bit unsafe, despite what it looks like from the outside.  After a few minutes, you forget what you must look like, until some kid crossing the street in front of you at a light stops and says, "That's AWESOME!"

I must sound like a shill, but I swear I'm not.  I don't mind obviously being a tourist, but there's a difference between standing on a corner looking at a map and driving around in a miniature open-top  three-wheeled yellow car.  So I'm surprised I wanted to do it in the first place, and I obviously thought it would be fun, but I had no idea it would be that much fun. 

I guess I can give their website.  I really am just a surprisingly satisfied customer, and want people who might be on the fence about making a fool of themselves in one of these things to be assured that if they're remotely inclined to do it, they shouldn't hesitate.  http://www.gocartours.com

BTW, they also have them in San Diego, and Lisbon, Madrid, and Barcelona.  But for me, it was all about the hills.

Edited by StatisticalOutlier
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If anyone has been to Barcelona, can you tell me if Park Guell and La pedrera are worth going to see? We have a tour of the city in the morning and if I go to see these two things I will miss out on anything else in the city as we have a limited amount of time there.

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At the ripe old age of 60, I've decided to start crossing off bucket list items while I am in good health and can travel overseas, so, I am going to shell out the big bucks to go to Wimbledon. I am considering renting a flat rather than a hotel room.  My question is what area of London do you recommend? Obviously, we are looking for a safe area, not too far from a tube station. We will be doing other things than just going to Wimbledon (we're doing just one day at the tournament) so staying in that area is not a requirement. Or, if anyone knows of a reasonable, clean hotel in a good area, I'd welcome that info too. Thanks and cheers, y'all! 

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Be aware that short term apartment rentals are a legal minefield in many large cities.   In addition to condo rules that prohibit renting, and apartment leases which prohibit subletting, many cities have regulations and bylaws that strictly govern such rentals.  For example, they are highly regulated in San Francisco, Paris and Montreal, and virtually illegal in New York City.   It's always just easier to book a hotel. 

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38 minutes ago, Spunkygal said:

At the ripe old age of 60, I've decided to start crossing off bucket list items while I am in good health and can travel overseas, so, I am going to shell out the big bucks to go to Wimbledon. I am considering renting a flat rather than a hotel room.  My question is what area of London do you recommend? Obviously, we are looking for a safe area, not too far from a tube station. We will be doing other things than just going to Wimbledon (we're doing just one day at the tournament) so staying in that area is not a requirement. Or, if anyone knows of a reasonable, clean hotel in a good area, I'd welcome that info too. Thanks and cheers, y'all! 

Although I live in England, I don't live in the London area. But I do know a couple of friends that do. So I will ask them for some tips. 

What I will say is that you need to either rent a flat or book a hotel room quite soon because it's not untypical to find vast areas in and around the Wimbledon area fully booked up; and any spare places remaining will be demanding sky-high prices.

But there are many places elsewhere in London that might be of some benefit: in fact there is so much choice it's difficult to know where to start. I suppose another question I would ask is do you want to stay in central London or in the outer boroughs? The former will be more expensive but easier to get around in terms of transport and sight-seeing. 

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1 hour ago, Spunkygal said:

At the ripe old age of 60, I've decided to start crossing off bucket list items while I am in good health and can travel overseas, so, I am going to shell out the big bucks to go to Wimbledon. I am considering renting a flat rather than a hotel room.  My question is what area of London do you recommend? Obviously, we are looking for a safe area, not too far from a tube station. We will be doing other things than just going to Wimbledon (we're doing just one day at the tournament) so staying in that area is not a requirement. Or, if anyone knows of a reasonable, clean hotel in a good area, I'd welcome that info too. Thanks and cheers, y'all! 

We went to Wimbledon in 2003 and stayed at the Rembrandt Hotel across the street from the Victoria and Albert Museum.  It's near everything, including transit, and doesn't seem too expensive.  I just checked and it seems to have a pretty good rating with Google reviewers.  That's the last time we were in London, so that's the best I can offer right now.  Good luck and have fun!!

Edited by ebk57 · Reason: while vests are nice, they have nothing to do with this post
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Thanks for everyone's responses! Staying in a hotel vs. a flat may be the best choice and we don't have to worry about deposits, etc. @ebk57, did you get your Wimbledon tix through the Wimbledon Debenture Holder website?  I've heard several times that that is the only sure website to buy tix from. The Rembrandt Hotel is such a lovely and reasonably priced property and will be added to our shortlist. I love that they offer a free breakfast. We'll be eating lunch and dinner out so saving on breakfast helps.

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1 hour ago, Spunkygal said:

My question is what area of London do you recommend? Obviously, we are looking for a safe area, not too far from a tube station. We will be doing other things than just going to Wimbledon (we're doing just one day at the tournament) so staying in that area is not a requirement.

Wimbledon would be a bit too far out for my tastes.  I generally stay in the Kensington area when I visit; nice but not too posh, easy access (via tube) to everything, near to Hyde Park/Kensington Gardens (where I love to stroll), and just enough removed from the hustle and bustle to feel like I'm coming "home" at night (yet still with plenty of local restaurant and other options) yet close enough in that everything is a short tube ride away.

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4 minutes ago, Spunkygal said:

Thanks for everyone's responses! Staying in a hotel vs. a flat may be the best choice and we don't have to worry about deposits, etc. @ebk57, did you get your Wimbledon tix through the Wimbledon Debenture Holder website?  I've heard several times that that is the only sure website to buy tix from. The Rembrandt Hotel is such a lovely and reasonably priced property and will be added to our shortlist. I love that they offer a free breakfast. We'll be eating lunch and dinner out so saving on breakfast helps.

Wish I could help with tickets, but I work in the sports industry and that's how I got ours.  Good luck!

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On February 15, 2018 at 5:33 PM, goodbyeglittergirl said:

Suggestions for Berlin with children? They are 10 and 12.

Berlin is such a fun city - esp if your kids like history, there is a lot to do and see...for all ages.

Just depends on what your family likes to do, how long youll be there etc. Get online and start searching for activities (or use sites like trip advisor) - good starting points for planning what you want to do while youre there.

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On ‎2‎/‎18‎/‎2018 at 12:15 PM, Spunkygal said:

At the ripe old age of 60, I've decided to start crossing off bucket list items while I am in good health and can travel overseas, so, I am going to shell out the big bucks to go to Wimbledon. I am considering renting a flat rather than a hotel room.  My question is what area of London do you recommend? Obviously, we are looking for a safe area, not too far from a tube station. We will be doing other things than just going to Wimbledon (we're doing just one day at the tournament) so staying in that area is not a requirement. Or, if anyone knows of a reasonable, clean hotel in a good area, I'd welcome that info too. Thanks and cheers, y'all! 

I stayed in the Grosvenor Square area during my first trip to London and it was very quiet, close to a tube station, some walkable fun stuff, and affordable. That's been about 7 years now, so it's possible prices have gone up, but you might look in that area! Have FUN! I love London!

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2 minutes ago, Spunkygal said:

Florida or California?

Florida 

Grandson is doing his Eagle Scout Project, always makes honor roll and is a avid sports player. Not the best but a team player. I just want him to have the best time. His siblings are jealous but I’ll do something with them over the summer according to their likes. 

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17 minutes ago, Mindthinkr said:

Florida 

Grandson is doing his Eagle Scout Project, always makes honor roll and is a avid sports player. Not the best but a team player. I just want him to have the best time. His siblings are jealous but I’ll do something with them over the summer according to their likes. 

What treat for this young man! I know you are so proud. Sorry, I can't help. We went to Universal in California last year and I was going to recommend the Hilton which was practically on the property. I did buy us the advance entry tix so you get in an hour before it technically opens and I would recommend that. Have fun! And I hope you don't have a propensity for motion sickness! 

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10 minutes ago, Spunkygal said:

What treat for this young man! I know you are so proud. Sorry, I can't help. We went to Universal in California last year and I was going to recommend the Hilton which was practically on the property. I did buy us the advance entry tix so you get in an hour before it technically opens and I would recommend that. Have fun! And I hope you don't have a propensity for motion sickness! 

We are staying at the Hard Rock which is on site and just have to take a 5 minute boat ride from the property to the City Walk. (Entrances to everything is right there)  Due to the fact that we are staying on property we will be getting those early admissions and perks. You are correct. They do make a difference)  Like I stated. I want this to be an experience for him to remember.  He is finally at the age where these memories will stick. I had the blessing of two grandmothers who lived to be 100. I don’t have younger child memories but at around his age I can still recall so many good things. (Also a good team player I have compartmentalized anything negative). 

Well if anyone knows I’d be interested in food/restaurant choices. Thank you. 

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If you and/or your grandson are into Harry Potter, the Unspoiled Harry Potter podcast cohosts were just there in November. You can listen to their trip report ep on iTunes—they had a real blast! 

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P.S. If you ever go there try a restaurant named the Palm. It’s in the Hard Rock (you don’t have to stay there to go there) and ask for a server named Joyce. (Reservations recommended)  Tell her the little lady from NC recommended it. (I’ve eaten there more than once) She will make it worth every penny you spend. Outstanding food and service. 

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Diagon Alley is a phenomenal experience.  Even pictures don't quite do it justice.  It puts most of what Disney has done the last fifteen years to shame, although now that Universal has provided them some real competition, they're upping their game again.  Pandora: The World of Avatar doesn't really interest me, although their E-ticket flight simulator is supposedly awesome.  I'm kind of lukewarm on Toy Story Land, and they really need to knock Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge out of the park (pardon the pun).

I'm hoping the new Guardians of the Galaxy rides mean that Disney is edging towards buying out Universal's contract with Marvel, because they've really neglected that area, and I've wanted them to replace it with some other property like Star Trek or Lord of the Rings for a while now.

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Not doing our usual vacation to visit family this year so I'm looking for recommendations for a week somewhere on the eastern states , preferably a day's drive or less from Philly.

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I live in South Jersey.  Last September a friend (who lives in Richmond) and I went to Massachusetts for a few days. She flew to Philly airport; I picked her up there and we drove up to MA.  Stayed in a little town about 1/2 hour from Boston; took the train there for a day (you couldn't  pay me to drive in Boston); drove to Salem.  All in all a fun time.  If you stay outside of the city the hotels aren't as expensive and their train system is easy to navigate.  Washington DC isn't far either.  Or you could go west and drive out to Pittsburgh (my home town).  Lots to do there also.

Edited by AuntieL

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20 hours ago, Hanahope said:

Not doing our usual vacation to visit family this year so I'm looking for recommendations for a week somewhere on the eastern states , preferably a day's drive or less from 

Are you travelling with children or just adults

 

Have you been to the Outer Banks? It's a good day drive from the Philly/South Jersey area. There is not a lot of things in terms of amusements the further you go down but if you enjoy beach activities its one of my favorite places to go.

https://www.outerbanks.org

Brigantine in New Jersey while it's still crowded its not quite as crowded as some of the other shore towns and still close to places like Cape May and Ocean City if you wanted to do day trips.

https://bb-nj.org

If you are looking for more adult activities there are wineries in Cape May and breweries all in a bunch of towns. Plus it's next to Atlantic City.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g659474-Activities-c36-t132-Jersey_Shore_New_Jersey.html

https://newjerseycraftbeer.com/new-jersey-breweries/

( This is all for new NJ but there are good breweries in Atlantic Cape and Ocean counties)

If  you have children there is the Ocean City and Wildwood boardwalks . There is also the Cape May Zoo which asks for a donation but is otherwise free to get into and has a picnic and park just outside and is a nice way to spend a day

 

https://www.cmczoo.com

Edited by shoregirl · Reason: To add some links

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On 4/20/2018 at 3:34 PM, Hanahope said:

Not doing our usual vacation to visit family this year so I'm looking for recommendations for a week somewhere on the eastern states , preferably a day's drive or less from Philly.

I will also say that the Outer Banks of NC offer a lot to do and see. There’s a huge sand dune that’s so fun to climb and the roll down on, the Wright Brothers Kitty Hawk, fishing, a lighthouse, great shell seeking, and some pristine beaches. There’s a nice Aquarium in Manteo that your children might like. From the Philly area it’s about an 8 hour drive. 

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I'm going to New York City for the first time on Tuesday. Very nervous but excited as well! We have a City Pass and we are planning to do the Best of New York Circle Line Cruise. We are signed up for the NBC Studio Tour too. Any recommendations for places to eat in Midtown?

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I’d try the Katz Deli. Their sandwiches are a mile thick. They do have many options but it’s no frill but the food is great. Don’t let the prices deter you. Everything is large enough to be shared and they don’t skimp on the fillings. 

Edited to add:  205 E. Houston Street 

Edited by Mindthinkr
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@Hanahope I went to Boston last August and scored a deal at the Sheraton Boston Hotel. The location was amazing, about a half mile from Fenway (easy, safe walk), not far from the Freedom Trail (we Ubered to one end and walked back). My friend wanted to eat at Neptune Oyster and while we were waiting for our table we strolled right into a neighborhood street fair. It was great.

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@riley702, I was there just over a year ago and we didn't have time to fit in a ghost tour, but we randomly happened across one of the ranger-led tours of the battlefield while visiting the museum/visitors center and it was the absolute highlight of the trip.  The whole place was amazing, though.  Have fun!

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On 4/21/2018 at 7:47 PM, Spartan Girl said:

I'm going to New York City for the first time on Tuesday. Very nervous but excited as well! We have a City Pass and we are planning to do the Best of New York Circle Line Cruise. We are signed up for the NBC Studio Tour too. Any recommendations for places to eat in Midtown?

NYC - the Greatest City in the World!!! 

Let's see - Midtown...  We like Glass House Tavern on 47th.  Cafe Un Deux Trois on 44th.  Virgil's BBQ on 44th.  Marseilles on 44th and 9th. Junior's for dessert on Shubert Alley or the newer one on 7th (?), or is it Broadway around 50th.  Esca on 43rd.  Joe Allen for the theatre experience on 46th.  Right next door is Orso, also fabulous. 

If you want to venture uptown a bit, Red Farm on Broadway at 76th is my new favorite place to eat.  Also uptown is Nice Matin at 79th and Amsterdam.

I can think of more places if you need them... 

Go to a show or twelve!! 

Have fun!!!

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What I personally do every time before going on a vacation, is to check the destination on Pinterest and Instagram. Usually, when you write it down in google you will find the most popular places that all tourists visit, which are beautiful, but not as unique as some others (hidden from the public) are. I think that in order to have a proper vacation and dive into the culture, except visiting the main attractions, you should also see some traditional and/or hidden places for tourists. I find Pinterest extremely helpful in that case! There are amazing boards with unusual gardens, sculptures, etc which are worth seeing!  For restaurants, I most often search on Instagram because there, I can find pictures of the meals that people have posted, look at their feedback, as well as the way the food looks. Which is always important for me before sitting at a restaurant I haven't been to before- especially if you are on a budget! ;) Here is some more information on both platforms that might be helpful for comparing the features they have. However, there is no need to use them both, but that's what works best for me.

 

Ps when you search in Pinterest type "unusual things to do in" or something of that sort, also the platform has some nice restaurant suggestions as well.

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I booked my hotel today. Decided on the Inn at Herr Ridge, which served as a field hospital during the conflict. Per reports, the most active rooms are in the old part, rooms 1-4. I booked room 4. They have a touristy, "extra" thing during my stay I'm not so sure about - dinner with a ghost, where they try to draw out spirits on the premises while giving you the history of the place, and after dinner, conduct an "investigation" with various paranormal gadgetry. Sounds like a lot of hooey. I'm tempted to instead just take a recorder to my room and talk and ask questions and see if anything answers. Not sure about haunted tours - seems like they promise the possibility of much and probably deliver nothing. Going on one might be interesting for the historical info.

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@riley702, I've been to Gettysburg quite a few times -- for the history, anything paranormal is just gravy.  As you noted, there are several different ghost tour companies offering different types of experiences.  From fellow guests I've heard most about the Ghosts of Gettysburg Candlelight Walking Tour, a traditional historical walkabout thing led by someone in costume who is usually well-versed and informative.  Lots of history and storytelling, but I'm not sure how much actual haunty stuff you might encounter.  There are also companies that supply equipment and lead late-night investigations on areas mostly adjacent to the battlefield (because the battlefield proper is only accessible until 10pm).  Over 100,000 soldiers fought the battle and it moved all over town, so you don't need to be exactly on the battlefield to be where men were fighting and dying.  I heard a couple reports of people on this kind of tour having some good encounters and enjoying the experience, but I don't know which particular company they used.

Being at Herr Ridge, you'll be near Iverson's Pits, if you're interested. Not walking distance (about a mile, but cars fly by on part of the route), but a two-minute drive.  Five hundred soldiers were mowed down while marching across a field and buried in shallow graves where they lay; Iverson is the general who ordered them forward.  After the war, farm workers reported weird stuff at that location (and often quit on the spot), and it's popular with ghost seekers.  You can pull off in front of the monuments on Doubleday Avenue and walk out into the field.  Maybe bring good hikers, because it can be muddy depending on the weather, and the ground can be a little uneven. That goes for the whole battlefield, though. It's been my experience that the hard-to-explain stuff always happens when you're not looking for it, so what do I know?

You may have planned it this way, but you will be there during/around the anniversary of the battle (July 1-3), so traffic around town will be a little crazy.  On the other hand, there will be plenty of re-enactors about and around, and some believe that this type of stuff helps stir up the spirits.   I hope you have a good time and get some responses; sorry to have over-replied, but I love the place. 

Edited by harrie
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On 31/01/2018 at 9:33 AM, Zola said:

Just digging out this old post of mine from a few months back now that 2018 has finally arrived and we need to decide what places to visit for our five week trip to the States.

Late September/early October, is what we have agreed on; as well as focusing in the west coast (specifically Utah, Arizona and perhaps California, in that order of preference). We've also provisionally pencilled in New Mexico and South Dakota, which are more central based, and only if time permits.

Another definite is Washington DC on the East Coast, and I am hoping we can drop by into Baltimore purely because I am a big fan of the TV drama "The Wire", and would love to take a closer look at that city.

So the itinerary looks like this:-

DEFINITES (agreed by all 4 of us)

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Monument Valley, Arizona
Red Rock, Utah
Washington DC
Baltimore

 

MAYBES (we're not all agreed, and worry about time constraints. But not dismissed completely)

*Yosemite National Park,California

*Redwood National Parks, California
*Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico
*Mount Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota
 

What we can't get around to seeing this year we hope to add to next year, when we plan to venture out to the East Coast of your beautiful country.

I think come April we will have a definite plan of action laid out once the final destinations have been agreed; we will then have to figure out transport and motels/hotels/money/spending costs etc (trains, planes and automobiles. I have never driven in a car with the wheel on the left, and neither have I driven on the right. But one of my colleagues has, so it will be on her to do all the driving)

I will no doubt nag you all for more advice as the months count down to September/October. I have quite a few questions, so please bear with me. :)

Just a quick update: my friends and I have finally agreed on where to visit when we fly out to the States in October. We're sticking with our original "Definites" over that 5 week period, and nothing additional to that (the "maybes" can wait till next year). So we're now preparing all the logistics, requirements and "dos and dont's" for those particular areas, along with good places to stay. Our spending budget between the 5 of us will be around $10-15,000 (which includes motels, hotels and transportation etc.) Not sure if that will be enough for 5 people over 5 weeks, but we do have our credit cards as a Plan B.

Fortunately, I won't be driving during the trip, primarily because my small brain can't cope with driving on the right side of the road, with the car steering wheel on the left. Just as well we have 2 peeps in our party that don't mind doing the driving.

 

Getting excited now! 

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I hope so! But I think I speak for all of us and say our trip is more to learn and discover your country's natural history more than anything else - hence our unusual choices. 

Of course, I do sometimes worry about a worst-case-scenario of having five women in their 20s stuck in a the middle of nowhere because our RV has broken down! Perhaps I've been watching too many horror films - Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and the like, lol.

I also hope people we meet over there will be able to understand our broad and eclectic accents? More so with some of the words we come out with, which is standard fare over here, but might cause a lot of confusion over there - not least the word "pissed" (which over here means being drunk or annoyed); "fag" (over hear means cigarette), "bonnet" (to your car hood), "tights" (to your panty hose), "knackered" or "shagged" (your tired).. and a shedload more!

Just don't ask us about "fanny packs" ha!

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