Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
funkopop

Movie Going Experiences

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, Shannon L. said:

However, when I went to see Titanic in a crowded theater, a bunch of tweens would scream every time Leo was on screen and I couldn't hear whatever was being said at that moment.  I don't enjoy that kind of thing (it was cute at first, but when the did it through most of the movie, it got old fast).

The absolute best part of seeing Titanic for me was the audience, because everyone was so quiet throughout except when a crewman tried to tell Molly Brown (Kathy Bates) what to do in the lifeboat and some guy in the back row shouted, "Oh shit, dude, you've pissed her off now!" and the entire theater laughed. It was a nice pressure release during some tense/sad scenes. And then we all went back to quiet and well-behaved. Even the tweens.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

23 hours ago, Anduin said:

So, audiences. This article has a video of the reaction to Endgame's biggest and most fanservicey moment. And the comments have an argument about how people should behave in the cinema. What do we like in an audience? At my local cinema, they're generally dead quiet the whole time. A moment like that one, I was certainly screaming with joy, but purely internally. Sometimes I'd like a bit of external reaction.

Yet, it's better than the alternative. I've heard horror stories of people talking over movies, children running amok, and so on. Is there a good medium, or is dead quiet as good as it gets?

Note, I'm not talking Rocky Horror screenings and such. Audience participation is expected there.

If I am in a crowded theater, I expect some noticeable audience reactions--laughs, gasps, scattered applause, etc.  I find it enhances the movie-going experience.  If I want silence, I will wait for the dvd and watch it at home.  Some of the best movie going experiences I have had have been because of other audience members.  I will always remember watching Halloween H20 in the theatre and a woman yelling

Spoiler

"That's what you get for killing LL!" when Alan Arkin's character is murdered by Michael Myers.

Or seeing Eyes Wide Shut with the two black women sitting behind me giving their own commentary.  There is a fine line between being obnoxious and being funny, and I can see where it differs from person to person. For me, that is what makes it worthwhile to go out the theater, pay for a ticket and pay for overpriced popcorn and a drink.  I do draw the line at clapping at the end of the movie though.  That is completely unnecessary unless you are at the premier where the actors, directors, writers, etc can appreciate it.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Ohiopirate02 said:

I do draw the line at clapping at the end of the movie though.  That is completely unnecessary unless you are at the premier where the actors, directors, writers, etc can appreciate it.

When I saw Dreamgirls a woman sitting in front of me gave a [brief] standing ovation after "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going". Her husband protested that Jennifer Hudson wasn't there and her response was more or less, "I don't care. If you hear singing that good, you have to clap!" I'd read reviews mentioning audiences bursting into applause at that part, so knew to expect it. During the latest Mission: Impossible there were claps and cheering as one of the stunt sequences got more and more audacious. Now, I look at in-theater applauding as people expressing how a movie is making them feel, the same as any other reaction. As long as it's not a constant thing for the entire runtime, I don't mind.

There are some movies where I think a lively crowd would enhance the experience, but other times it's the last thing you want, so you pick the theater accordingly. I was worried about A Quiet Place being ruined by people talking, but it was the best moviegoing experience I had last year. On the other hand, even in what passes for an arthouse theater in these parts, the ending of The Favourite got some heckling. I [internally] laughed. 

On the occasions that I see the same movie in theaters more than once, it's interesting to compare the reactions between screenings. The crowd might have more kids/teens vs seniors, so the same references might not land. A more sedate matinee audience won't react to something that makes a nighttime crowd go crazy. I saw Hidden Figures with two audiences that had very different racial makeups, but the moments seemed to go over the same way each time.

Edited by Dejana
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
15 hours ago, Dejana said:

When I saw Dreamgirls a woman sitting in front of me gave a [brief] standing ovation after "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going". Her husband protested that Jennifer Hudson wasn't there and her response was more or less, "I don't care. If you hear singing that good, you have to clap!" I'd read reviews mentioning audiences bursting into applause at that part, so knew to expect it. During the latest Mission: Impossible there were claps and cheering as one of the stunt sequences got more and more audacious. Now, I look at in-theater applauding as people expressing how a movie is making them feel, the same as any other reaction. As long as it's not a constant thing for the entire runtime, I don't mind.

There are some movies where I think a lively crowd would enhance the experience, but other times it's the last thing you want, so you pick the theater accordingly. I was worried about A Quiet Place being ruined by people talking, but it was the best moviegoing experience I had last year. On the other hand, even in what passes for an arthouse theater in these parts, the ending of The Favourite got some heckling. I [internally] laughed. 

On the occasions that I see the same movie in theaters more than once, it's interesting to compare the reactions between screenings. The crowd might have more kids/teens vs seniors, so the same references might not land. A more sedate matinee audience won't react to something that makes a nighttime crowd go crazy. I saw Hidden Figures with two audiences that had very different racial makeups, but the moments seemed to go over the same way each time.

Yeah, it really depends on the movie.  If it's a comedy, I expect to hear audience laughter.  If it's action, I expect some reaction to the events on screen.  If it's a drama, especially a quiet arthouse-type film with a lot of dialogue, I want as close to silence as you can get in public.  But unless it's a really terrible movie which thoroughly merits the MST3K treatment, I don't want constant commentary from people around me; I'm there to hear the movie, not the other audience members.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
On ‎12‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 5:02 AM, Browncoat said:

And have one of the Coke polar bears pouring out a glass of water, reminding you to go to the bathroom before the movie starts so you won’t miss anything by going during the movie.

Ok, funny enough, the past few times I've been, one of the Charmin bears does EXACTLY THAT.

  • Like 2
  • Laugh 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 1/15/2020 at 2:21 PM, dmeets said:

Ok, funny enough, the past few times I've been, one of the Charmin bears does EXACTLY THAT.

D'oh!  You're right, my bad -- it's a Charmin bear, not a Coke bear.  Clearly I don't pay that much attention to the bears.  LOL

Share this post


Link to post

On 12/5/2019 at 11:45 PM, Dejana said:

 

There are some movies where I think a lively crowd would enhance the experience, but other times it's the last thing you want, so you pick the theater accordingly. I was worried about A Quiet Place being ruined by people talking, but it was the best moviegoing experience I had last year. On the other hand, even in what passes for an arthouse theater in these parts, the ending of The Favourite got some heckling. I [internally] laughed. 

 

It's funny, I would actually like to go my local art house theater more, but I find it to be a far worse experience than at my local multiplex.  People show up late, the sit right and front of you (and unlike the mall the floor is pretty flat) and talk.  And I've also frequently had people react really strangely to movies.  I saw the Whedon version of Much Ado about Nothing there and a couple was laughing at the scene where Leonato yells at Hero and wishes that she was dead...I know it's a comedy but that scene isn't supposed to be funny.  It's not the only time I've had people react strangely to movies there, but it is the one that stands out the most. I'm always baffled because you would think people who go to that kind of theater would be film buffs....I'm fairly lucky that most even indie arty movies I wan't to see wind up in the bigger local theaters where I generally have a pretty good experience.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I just got an email from AMC Theaters.  From today until the end of April, they are blocking off half of their theater seats and, in auditoriums with more than 500 seats, they are limiting them to 250 guests.  They also outlined the extra steps they are taking in regards to cleaning highly touched areas.

Edited by Shannon L.

Share this post


Link to post

Laemmle (a group of about half a dozen arthouse theaters in the greater Los Angeles area) sent this email on Friday:
 

Quote

 

The health and safety of our customers and employees is always foremost in our minds. For now, we are open and showing movies for those who would like to attend. We believe we can responsibly do so by following WHO and CDC guidelines with the following actions:

Regularly disinfecting and sanitizing restrooms, concessions stands, auditoriums, and commonly touched surfaces.

Ensuring all employees frequently and properly wash their hands.

Monitoring employee health, and insisting that any sick employees stay home if sick, and immediately go home if they feel unwell while at work.

We are following current recommendations for social distancing by limiting seating capacity to no more than 50% of auditorium size, enabling patrons to keep an appropriate distance from other patrons who are not part of their immediate party.

We are asking patrons to stay home if they are not feeling well, and request that they follow guidelines for personal contact by minimizing hand-to-hand contact (where possible) with other patrons and staff.

If governing authorities require that we go to a stricter quarantine, we will of course comply. But until then, we hope to preserve some semblance of normalcy by staying open and providing quality entertainment for people who want to get out of the house and escape for a few hours.

If you've purchased tickets to an upcoming show and it's cancelled, we will email you with instructions on how to get a refund. If you have purchased tickets to a cancelled program, or if you feel that you would like to get a refund for an upcoming film for any reason whatsoever, please contact the theatre directly:

[contact info]

Visit laemmle.com/covid-19 for updates.

Let’s all stay informed and follow science-based recommendations to help stem the spread of this virus. Together, we will get through this. 

 

 

Edited by Bastet

Share this post


Link to post

Regal has sent out a similar statement.  Not sure what my local art-house theatre is doing, though.  I should probably check, since I go there more often than I do to the chains.

Share this post


Link to post

My local art-house theatre is shuttered as well.  😞  I am very sad.  I understand why, of course, but I go to the movies more often than I go out to eat (or even get take-out).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

So, went to the theater for the first time in 3 months. Let's just say there was no social distancing concerns. They even gave me my own theater! In the theater I went to they had recliners so if they go every other seat, it should be no problem. The rows are already far enough apart. If you're the slightly nervous type, (If you're really nervous, I'd imagine you won't be going at all)I'd sit in the last row.

  • Like 8
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/19/2020 at 6:24 PM, AimingforYoko said:

So, went to the theater for the first time in 3 months. Let's just say there was no social distancing concerns. They even gave me my own theater! In the theater I went to they had recliners so if they go every other seat, it should be no problem. The rows are already far enough apart. If you're the slightly nervous type, (If you're really nervous, I'd imagine you won't be going at all)I'd sit in the last row.

I'm not going to be comfortable with going to a movie theater for quite some time to come, and even then, it would have to be a movie I desperately wanted to see on a large screen.  In the theaters near me, the rows are not far enough apart, despite having recliners, to make me there's sufficient social distancing.

Honestly, it's just too much of a risk, imo.  I'm not particularly nervous, but I have an 80 year old mother, and this is not something that seems work it to me.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post

It's gonna take a Jaws or first Star Wars to get me motivated enough to go to a theater, pay exorbitant ticket prices, endure half-an-hour of ads as a captive audience member, and risk disease.

Are these places gonna alternate the seats used from show to show, or are they simply gonna designate one "spread" layout?  If that is what they do, good luck sanitizing all of them after use.  Given the typical "quality" of the adolescents who are tasked to clean out theaters, just how diligent do y'all believe they will be? 

Thought so. 😉

Edited by Lonesome Rhodes
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Regal has stated that they'll be using electrostatic foggers to clean the auditoriums between shows -- kind of the same thing airplanes are using, I think.  

I will likely (sadly) skip the popcorn for a while, and possibly wear gloves, and absolutely wear a mask for the duration of my stay in the theater.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Lonesome Rhodes said:

Are these places gonna alternate the seats used from show to show, or are they simply gonna designate one "spread" layout?  If that is what they do, good luck sanitizing all of them after use.  Given the typical "quality" of the adolescents who are tasked to clean out theaters, just how diligent do y'all believe they will be? 

Thought so. 😉

Yea movie theaters seem like they would be one of the worst places with respect to having to deal with a pandemic. I mean even if you have 250 people in a 500 seat theatre that is still a lot of people in an enclosed space, all potentially laughing at the same time). Especially when you consider all the touch points like the door into the theatre and the handrails on the stairs. And then throw in you have a bunch of people eating with their hands which means a lot of touching their mouths. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Browncoat said:

Regal has stated that they'll be using electrostatic foggers to clean the auditoriums between shows -- kind of the same thing airplanes are using, I think.  

I will likely (sadly) skip the popcorn for a while, and possibly wear gloves, and absolutely wear a mask for the duration of my stay in the theater.  

Here's what Cinemark is doing:

*

These theaters will all be selling concessions and presumably allowing people to consume them, so I didn't understand the outcry about the mask policies. You'll have people with their masks off the entire time because they'll be eating/drinking, or saying they are because they don't want to wear a mask, and how well will the policy be enforced once the lights go down? I'd only consider a drive-in or outdoor showing right now.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, Kel Varnsen said:

Yea movie theaters seem like they would be one of the worst places with respect to having to deal with a pandemic. I mean even if you have 250 people in a 500 seat theatre that is still a lot of people in an enclosed space, all potentially laughing at the same time). Especially when you consider all the touch points like the door into the theatre and the handrails on the stairs. And then throw in you have a bunch of people eating with their hands which means a lot of touching their mouths. 

That sounds horrible but it’s also the worst case scenario. Where I am that’s very easy to avoid. I am wondering if what you describe is what will realistically happen in most cities. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

A couple of days ago, I saw an ad for the Amazon Prime release of Knives Out.

That movie will always have a nostalgic spot in my heart. Not just because it was a very good movie, but because it was a movie I saw with multi generational family group in the "before times".

I sincerely don't know when/if that will happen again.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I appreciate the efforts, but I just don't see myself going to the Walmart drive-in parking lots.  Will those stores stay open for night showings?  Are the movies going to be Pixar-/family-heavy?  

Will there be "ushers" who shoo folks back into their cars if they try to watch from outside them?  Wireless audio through radios?  

I haven't been to a drive-in since 1987.  How about y'all?  If recently, what's it like?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

On 7/5/2020 at 9:26 PM, Lonesome Rhodes said:

I appreciate the efforts, but I just don't see myself going to the Walmart drive-in parking lots.  Will those stores stay open for night showings?  Are the movies going to be Pixar-/family-heavy?  

Will there be "ushers" who shoo folks back into their cars if they try to watch from outside them?  Wireless audio through radios?  

I haven't been to a drive-in since 1987.  How about y'all?  If recently, what's it like?

I don't see how this will work with all of the light pollution.  All of the Walmarts in my area are surrounded by other businesses, and I don't see them willing to turn off the lights for their parking lots, signs, etc for Walmart to show a movie.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/5/2020 at 9:26 PM, Lonesome Rhodes said:

I haven't been to a drive-in since 1987.  How about y'all?  If recently, what's it like?

I went to a drive-in by myself a few weeks ago to see Empire Strikes Back. It was....OK.

I think it would have been a lot of fun if I went with a group and paid to bring in my own food. You definitely want to go on a night when they're not busy. The drive-in I went to made you keep the windows rolled up if there was another car withing 6 feet of yours. However, if that wasn't the case people with SUV's (or other cars with hatchbacks) could back them into the space, open the the back and basically have a picknick in the back of their car while watching the movie.

  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/26/2020 at 6:32 AM, Lonesome Rhodes said:

It's gonna take a Jaws or first Star Wars to get me motivated enough to go to a theater, pay exorbitant ticket prices, endure half-an-hour of ads as a captive audience member, and risk disease.

Well, Regal is showing "classics," including Jaws and the first Star Wars, for $5.  And with reserved seating, you don't have to sit through any pre-show ads.  Probably not many previews, either.

However, I'm not going because I thought I'd see Unforgiven for $5.  But I looked at the online seating chart.  It's a theater I've been to before (this actual screen, not just the complex).  This screen has regular seats, not recliners.  There are 8 non-stadium rows in the front, then the break for the wheelchair seats, and behind that 7 rows of stadium seats.

So what have they done?  Completely blocked off that entire front portion.  And made the back portion every other row.  So in a pretty big theater with 16 rows of seats, everyone will be in only three of the rows.  And the row that people seem to really like--the first one in the stadium section--is blocked off. 

I like to sit in that front section.  No way I'm going to sit up there with everybody else (even though there's probably not going to be anybody else, and certainly not many people).  But even if I'm the only one in the theater, I want to sit down front.  So I thought I'd just get an "approved" ticket, and move down there, but realized they might have them taped off, which would make the whole thing kind of awkward, and they might actually tell me not to sit down there because they're going to clean only the seats up top.  Although I usually slouch way down so they might not even see me.

Bottom line:  I'm not going to drag my ass all the way over there just to find out I can't sit in a seat I want that also happens to be very coronavirus compliant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

@StatisticalOutlier, you live up to your name!  In the Regal here, no one wants to sit in the front section.  It has always been the last to go.  

I haven't been to the Regal yet, but I have been to a small indie theater.  I sit in the very back row, so no one is breathing towards me.

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

Regal is showing "classics," including Jaws

Ha, that reminds me of what is probably my favorite movie going experience - I saw Jaws in a packed theater. Remember the scene where the face pops up in the bottom of the boat? The girl behind me screamed, leapt forward, and grabbed my head with both hands! I was about to gasp, but instead burst into laughter! I don't think she even realized she did it!

  • Like 4
  • Laugh 4

Share this post


Link to post
13 hours ago, Browncoat said:

@StatisticalOutlier, you live up to your name!  In the Regal here, no one wants to sit in the front section.  It has always been the last to go. 

I do wonder about my preferring the front section--whether I actually like it or whether I resorted to it to get away from the talkers and chompers and slurpers and ice shakers and seat kickers and now texters, and have gotten used to it.  I do like having the screen be huge.  It's kind of challenging for talky movies with subtitles, though.

But I agree with you, and am always crestfallen when I see that even one other person has chosen to sit up there.

Speaking of seat-kicking, that's ONE good thing about every-other-rowing--nobody in the row behind me!  I don't like recliners, but they've been a god-send in that department.

 

12 hours ago, Nordly Beaumont said:

Ha, that reminds me of what is probably my favorite movie going experience - I saw Jaws in a packed theater.

I was in college and saw it on a Saturday afternoon.  There were two boys right behind me who I suspect were just learning to curse.  It was a constant barrage of "Look at that fucking shark!" and the like.  At least it was non-contact!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I drove a long way to see Unforgiven at a different Regal theater.  The online seating chart looked like it would be okay, and they had a showing at 11:45 a.m., so I knew crowds wouldn't be a problem.

Sure enough, had the place to myself.  Man, I love it when that happens.

I had to buy my ticket at the concession stand, and nobody was in line behind me (the kid working there and I felt a bit of a kinship at this point, after suffering through a monk taking forever to buy his ticket and snacks, and then needing someone to fill his drink at the self-service thing around the corner and to help carry his snacks, and taking a second forever to put his wallet in his robe).  So I asked the kid if I got in there and didn't like my seat, could I move?  He said they're being extra strict about people sitting in their assigned seats now, compared to how they used to be.  So I said, "What if I were the only one in the whole theater?"  He kind of hemmed and hawed, and said again they're being strict.  (I didn't really expect him to give me permission--was mainly curious what his reaction would be.)

The manager walked up while we were talking, and I told him about the other Regal theater where they blocked off the entire front section, and he said they were having struggles with seating (I think this is the first week they've been open).  He said he'd heard LOTS of complaints that the first row of the back section is blocked off.  I've always thought that was the most popular row because you can put your feet up on the bar, and he confirmed the fact and the reason (these are non-recliner seats), and added that's where the employees always sit.  But he said they have to block it off because the wheelchair row is in front of it, and they HAVE to keep that one available. 

It's kind of shame, because I'd say the wheelchair row is the least popular row in the theater (other than the front section), and is the least likely to get used, but it dictates all the other seating.  Oh well.

As it turns out, I bought the wrong seat.  I need to confirm that facts before I rant about that, but since I was the only one in there, I sat in the seat I wanted, and in fact moved forward a row after about 10 minutes because I was being bathed in exit light glow, and a lot of the movie is dark.  So I ended up not in the seat I'd reserved AND in a row that was supposed to be unavailable. 

I wouldn't try it in an even remotely populated theater.  But hey, I had my mask on and was in there by myself, so I was complaint about the important things.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I had another private screening of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly at a Regal theater.  I picked a seat that looked on the seating chart to be in the middle of the row, but it wasn't.  So I moved over, which wasn't a big deal in an empty theater, but it illustrates just one of the reasons I don't like reserved seating--you don't know what you're actually getting.

I also went to the local art theater (Landmark) that doesn't have reserved seating, to see how they're handling it.  They're blocking off every other row, which I wish they'd do forever.  A guarantee that nobody will be kicking my row.  What's not to like?

Well, other than the fact that they left all the lights on around the screen.  I had to leave after the movie started to tell them to turn them off, and there were three employees talking in the lobby.  They can't break away for just a second once the movie starts to make sure everything's okay?  Gah.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

So I saw Tenet. Theater was almost sold out (Which means there were 80 people in a 400 seat IMAX theater. We're at a 25% cap, so 100 was the most that could be sold.)

Unfortunately all the seats sold were in the middle and they didn't block off every other row, so I moved to the end. Fortunately, in an IMAX, all the seats are pretty good as far as sightlines. Now as far as explaining the plot...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

21 hours ago, AimingforYoko said:

So I saw Tenet. Theater was almost sold out (Which means there were 80 people in a 400 seat IMAX theater. We're at a 25% cap, so 100 was the most that could be sold.)

Unfortunately all the seats sold were in the middle and they didn't block off every other row, so I moved to the end. Fortunately, in an IMAX, all the seats are pretty good as far as sightlines. Now as far as explaining the plot...

Did they block off seats between groups in a row?

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

Did they block off seats between groups in a row?

They seemed to, but everybody was bunched in the middle (all in their own groups), so it was hard to tell.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I went to an AMC complex.  There was a sign in the theater that said if you're "uncomfortable" with your reserved seat, you can move to another "socially distanced seat" once the feature begins. 

I'm now batting .750 on COVID-era private screenings.  The only one with anybody else there was a Werner Herzog documentary at an art theater: it was me and one singleton and one duo, in the big ground-level section of an old single-screen theater. 

That will be something interesting to examine.  Typically, art theaters are popular with old people, but they're the ones who are probably staying home the most.  (Landmark has four complexes in town, and the two that really draw the oldsters aren't open.)  At the documentary, there were no cotton-tops. 

 

Share this post


Link to post

It’s been interesting seeing how theaters near me are adapting. Most of them are regal and are closed. The other two are both closed mornings. One is offering private screenings starting at $100 and you can stream your own movie. If they are still doing that it December it would be tempting to try and watch Soul on the big screen. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
10 hours ago, Dani said:

It’s been interesting seeing how theaters near me are adapting. Most of them are regal and are closed. The other two are both closed mornings. One is offering private screenings starting at $100 and you can stream your own movie. If they are still doing that it December it would be tempting to try and watch Soul on the big screen. 

AMC theaters announced that they are going to rent out theaters for $100 for up to 20 people, but they have a movie list to choose from.  The streaming is better because you have a greater variety to choose from.  It may work, but I can't see doing it only because if I'm going to a movie theater (even if I can split it up the cost among many people), I want to see something big and new (like Black Widow).  So, for me, until they start releasing new movies straight to streaming and the theaters near me rent out the theaters with streaming capability, I won't be doing it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

After over a year, my mom and I saw a movie at my mall’s Regal. It was fairly empty; only five people total. We ended up not sitting in the seats we were assigned because some guy without a mask was sitting there, which led to us unintentionally sitting in someone else’s seat — we offered to move but they were cool about it. Point is, everyone was spaced out, and even though there were people without masks, I just kept telling myself that we were vaccinated to avoid getting too worked up. Plus, we were wearing masks too.

Oh man, even with the fifteen minute previews, it was so good to be back! We weren’t going to get any food but I apparently still had a free popcorn from my birthday so I took it. I missed that too. And like I’ve said before the tickets were way cheaper than the rental prices of theatrical movies right now.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

I can't wait to go to a movie again.  I think my first one back will be In the Heights

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size