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Leave It To Beaver

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49 minutes ago, TheLastKidPicked said:

 

You are right that there is a difference between young Eddie and older Eddie.

As time went on, the writers did a nice job of giving Eddie a backstory.  Once we began to see what motivated him, Eddie's became a much more enjoyable character.  

 

I liked the one where he rented a room and tried to act like he was a man about town and then we see how lonely and sad he was. Really added depth to his character.

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15 minutes ago, peacheslatour said:

I liked the one where he rented a room and tried to act like he was a man about town and then we see how lonely and sad he was. Really added depth to his character.

You have just summed up the Eddie Haskall character!

He is always putting on a front, but underneath is very insecure.

 

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I just watched The Bus Ride episode and I liked it. Just got one question, did Wally really need to tell Ward about what happened in the end? Everything worked out but I would think the Cleavers didn't need to know about what happened and I would think the Peytons would not want to say anything to the Cleavers. 

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Watched the episode of Beaver and Andy.  I thought it was a good episode and it does show that you shouldn't hide things from kids. 

If Beaver knew that Andy was a drunk, what do you think he would have done if Andy asked him for alcohol? 

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Just watched Season 5 Ep. 1 (1961) and low and behold, Ryan O'Neal shows up. I didn't recognize him, but when I saw his name in the credits I went back and you can see a very young Ryan.

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24 minutes ago, chessiegal said:

Just watched Season 5 Ep. 1 (1961) and low and behold, Ryan O'Neal shows up. I didn't recognize him, but when I saw his name in the credits I went back and you can see a very young Ryan.

Who did he play?

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9 minutes ago, peacheslatour said:

Who did he play?

Tom - the husband married to the older sister of a girl Wally was going out with. Plot was Ward and June were worried Wally would think married life was grand. Of course, Wally goes to the young couple's house for dinner and hears them squabbling, so all is well.

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33 minutes ago, chessiegal said:

Tom - the husband married to the older sister of a girl Wally was going out with. Plot was Ward and June were worried Wally would think married life was grand. Of course, Wally goes to the young couple's house for dinner and hears them squabbling, so all is well.

Oh, right. I remember that one. Wally thought it was all cool and very "adult" but then he saw the money troubles, the hassles of the husband's job and the grim slog of the wife and decided to go back to being a teenager.

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On 11/24/2020 at 10:17 AM, chessiegal said:

Tom - the husband married to the older sister of a girl Wally was going out with. Plot was Ward and June were worried Wally would think married life was grand. Of course, Wally goes to the young couple's house for dinner and hears them squabbling, so all is well.

I recall that My Three Sons had a similar episode titled: “Robbie and the little stranger.” To where Robbie was the recipient of said lesson. I only mention it because the girl that played the young married college girl in this episode, was none other than the girl that played Caroline Cunningham (Karen Green) in the LITB episode titled: Eddie’s Girl.

It’s kind of fun to tie the relationship between such shows together.

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1 hour ago, wanton87 said:

I recall that My Three Sons had a similar episode titled: “Robbie and the little stranger.” To where Robbie was the recipient of said lesson. I only mention it because the girl that played the young married college girl in this episode, was none other than the girl that played Caroline Cunningham (Karen Green) in the LITB episode titled: Eddie’s Girl.

It’s kind of fun to tie the relationship between such shows together.

I used to love Uncle Charlie. "Dinner's ready, if you're not out here in ten seconds, I'm throwing it on the floor!"

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On 9/15/2020 at 3:51 PM, peacheslatour said:

I liked the one where he rented a room and tried to act like he was a man about town and then we see how lonely and sad he was. Really added depth to his character.

I felt really bad for the dog.  If Eddie didn't get off on treating kids like crap, I would have had more sympathy for him.  Eddie was the typical jerk that enjoyed intimidating people he could control.  He got off on the power of making others feel uncomfortable, watching them squirm.    That all changed when he got older, that is when Beaver and his friends were no longer intimidated by him.   At that point Eddie was more of a clown than anything else.  The same thing could be said about Lumpy Rutherford.  Beaver and his friends were no longer buying into the bullshit. 

Sure, Eddie had raging insecurity issues, but if he felt he needed to wield power over people he could control in order to feel good about himself, then that is one messed up kid.  Lumpy was equally as messed up.  Though I do get a kick out of Lumpy calling his dad "daddy".

I keep watching these episodes and I am really beginning to hate Ward and June.

I did see Hugh Beaumont on an episode of The Lone Ranger.  Yikes, the writing and the acting across the board was really bad.

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Yes, in some episodes Ward and June can be really annoying.  I remember the episode where Wally turns 17 and he's ready to get his license but I admit, I think it was too soon for him. lol 

Then after he gets his license he wants to go for a drive as Ward and June freak out sorta. 

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The episode that was on a few days ago where Beaver was playing in the car with one of his friends, the brake is accidentally released and the car rolls into the road also happened back in the day at my neighbor's house.  The difference was that my neighbor's driveway was incredibly steep.  When their car rolled down the driveway it crossed the street, and nearly took out another neighbor's front porch.

The more I watch June Cleaver, the more I wonder how she ever got laid.  I can just imagine Ward and June on their wedding night, with June freaking out about the entire process of having sex.  It makes me wonder how Ward was ever able to pick the lock on June's chastity belt.

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The episode that was on a few days ago where Beaver was playing in the car with one of his friends, the brake is accidentally released and the car rolls into the road also happened back in the day at my neighbor's house.  The difference was that my neighbor's driveway was incredibly steep.  When their car rolled down the driveway it crossed the street, and nearly took out another neighbor's front porch.

Is that the one where Beaver and Gilbert were pretending to be parents and they were yelling at the "kids" in the backseat?

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4 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

Is that the one where Beaver and Gilbert were pretending to be parents and they were yelling at the "kids" in the backseat?

Yes.

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On 11/28/2020 at 11:04 AM, peacheslatour said:

I thought so. I think that's the funniest thing they ever did. Or at least one of.

It was funny that Gilbert played the “wife.” But I got annoyed by those people who sat in their cars honking the horn instead of helping the kids out by driving the car back onto the driveway. Instead Wally had to do it, and promptly got a ticket for driving without a license.

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Stumbled across a Ken Osmond interview from a few years ago.  He was so gracious and so self confident, he was enjoyable to watch.

When asked if he takes any kidding from playing Eddie Haskell, he replied,

"Eddie has been very good to me all these years.  Because of playing that character, doors have opened that wouldn't otherwise be open.  Everywhere I go, I'm treated as a long, lost friend."

With all the bad stories you hear about child actors, it's great to hear the cast (especially Frank Bank) benefit from the time they spent on the show. 

Edited by TheLastKidPicked
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Tell it to Ella, was one of the episodes that aired today.  I love Eddie Haskell in this episode.  Tim Mathieson is one of Beaver's friends in this episode.  And yes, that is how his last name is spelled in the closing credits.

Edited by icemiser69
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I like how the writers gave Wally a spine. It was repeated in the all night party episode when Wally's date got pushed into a fountain. When Wally hears his date got grounded for a month, he takes off on his own initiative to talk to her father. Good for you Wally!

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Part Time Genius

In what world did Ward and June think that Beaver was the smartest kid in his class?   He had the second highest score ever in the history of that IQ test being given at that school.   It should have occurred to Ward and June that something was wrong, that there was no way that Beaver was that smart.   And of course, Ward had to gloat like a jackass over Beaver's IQ test score.  As expected, it turned out that the new kid at school put Beaver's name on the test that he had taken.

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On 1/20/2021 at 8:08 AM, chessiegal said:

I like how the writers gave Wally a spine. It was repeated in the all night party episode when Wally's date got pushed into a fountain. When Wally hears his date got grounded for a month, he takes off on his own initiative to talk to her father. Good for you Wally!

They did a nice job of showing Wally as somebody who kids could look up to.  Is anybody  here old enough to remember Highlights Magazine, with Goofus and Gallant?   Wally almost seems based on Gallant.

image.png.7b2c4bce89a0f51a9d22d1f0c20f1f1a.png

 

8 hours ago, icemiser69 said:

In what world did Ward and June think that Beaver was the smartest kid in his class?   He had the second highest score ever in the history of that IQ test being given at that school.   It should have occurred to Ward and June that something was wrong, that there was no way that Beaver was that smart.   And of course, Ward had to gloat like a jackass over Beaver's IQ test score.  As expected, it turned out that the new kid at school put Beaver's name on the test that he had taken.

Hugh Beaumont has said he wants the show to be about the kids growing up, but also about parents learning to be better parents.  I'm impressed that he could set aside his own ego and show Ward to be over the top and a bit unlikeable in this episode.  He needed to do it in order to make a point.  He was setting himself up for a fall with the following lines:

"Well, Willis, they probably only notified the top performers first.  You'll be hearing about your boys in a few days."

And when he was in Miss Rayburn's office and implied that Beaver inherited his intelligence from Ward himself:  "Well, I'm not surprised.  He has the background for it."  You could almost FEEL the eyerolls in the room.

The redemption arc, when Ward learns his lesson, was nicely done.  When Charles admits he switched the papers, and Ward asked why the kids picked on him, you can see the realization in Ward's face when Charles responds,  "I think it's because my parents were always showing up at the school making a big fuss about it." 

The tagline:

"You know, June.  I think I learned something today.  To take our kids as they are, and not wish they were something else or try to make them like ourselves.  That just doesn't work."

It might have otherwise sounded corny, but they did such a nice job of building up to it that it felt very natural.

 

Edited by TheLastKidPicked
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36 minutes ago, TheLastKidPicked said:

They did a nice job of showing Wally as somebody who kids could look up to.  Is anybody  here old enough to remember Highlights Magazine, with Goofus and Gallant?   Wally almost seems based on Gallant.

image.png.7b2c4bce89a0f51a9d22d1f0c20f1f1a.png

 

Hugh Beaumont has said he wants the show to be about the kids growing up, but also about parents learning to be better parents.  I'm impressed that he could set aside his own ego and show Ward to be over the top and a bit unlikeable in this episode.  He needed to do it in order to make a point.  He was setting himself up for a fall with the following lines:

"Well, Willis, they probably only notified the top performers first.  You'll be hearing about your boys in a few days."

And when he was in Miss Rayburn's office and implied that Beaver inherited his intelligence from Ward himself:  "Well, I'm not surprised.  He has the background for it."  You could almost FEEL the eyerolls in the room.

The redemption arc, when Ward learns his lesson, was nicely done.  When Charles admits he switched the papers, and Ward asked why the kids picked on him, you can see the realization in Ward's face when Charles responds,  "I think it's because my parents were always showing up at the school making a big fuss about it." 

The tagline:

"You know, June.  I think I learned something today.  To take our kids as they are, and not wish they were something else or try to make them like ourselves.  That just doesn't work."

It might have otherwise sounded corny, but they did such a nice job of building up to it that it felt very natural.

 

I loved the way Ward was able to see things from the boys side of it. Maybe, in some small way Leave It To Beaver made Americans of that generation, better parents.

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I was watching an episode of Perry Mason last night. He was defending a young woman who looked so familiar. Then I realized it was Miss Landers - Sue Randall.

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On 2/11/2021 at 4:28 PM, chessiegal said:

I was watching an episode of Perry Mason last night. He was defending a young woman who looked so familiar. Then I realized it was Miss Landers - Sue Randall.

She was only 49 years old when she died, lung cancer.   I thought she was the cutest teacher of the bunch.

Larry Mondello kept telling Beaver he was his friend.  He sure didn't act like it.

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3 hours ago, icemiser69 said:

She was only 49 years old when she died, lung cancer.   I thought she was the cutest teacher of the bunch.

Larry Mondello kept telling Beaver he was his friend.  He sure didn't act like it.

Larry had kind of a messed up home life. His parents were obviously older than most of his cohort, his dad seemed to be perpetually out of town, his sister was quite a handful and his mother was neurotic. 

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Last night I saw Gilbert (Stephen Talbot) in an episode of Perry Mason (The Case of the Wandering Widow). I also saw one of Beaver's friends in an episode of Wagon Train, but now I can't remember which one.

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2 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

Larry had kind of a messed up home life. His parents were obviously older than most of his cohort, his dad seemed to be perpetually out of town, his sister was quite a handful and his mother was neurotic. 

Yeah, but he is related to Batman, how bad could that be?

2 hours ago, chessiegal said:

Last night I saw Gilbert (Stephen Talbot) in an episode of Perry Mason (The Case of the Wandering Widow). I also saw one of Beaver's friends in an episode of Wagon Train, but now I can't remember which one.

Rusty Stevens (Larry Mondello) was in the Wagon Train episode, The Sam Darland Story.

 

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Thanks - that was so weird because I never watch Wagon Train. For some reason I turned it on last week. My mother hated Westerns, so they were never on at our house. I remember her being annoyed with her father for watching Gunsmoke when we would visit. She thought Westerns were too violent.

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Yeah, but he is related to Batman, how bad could that be?

Larry was no Bruce Wayne, he was just a messed up little kid.

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36 minutes ago, peacheslatour said:

Larry was no Bruce Wayne, he was just a messed up little kid.

Given how his mother acted, I suppose that gets into the whole "nature versus nurture" argument.   I suspect that it is a combination of both.

I will say that Beaver was so easily manipulated by all of his so called "close friends".  There was a very quick transition later in the series when he thought about going away to school, and all of a sudden classmates treated him like he was the most popular kid in his class, not wanting him to go. 

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40 minutes ago, icemiser69 said:

Given how his mother acted, I suppose that gets into the whole "nature versus nurture" argument.   I suspect that it is a combination of both.

I will say that Beaver was so easily manipulated by all of his so called "close friends".  There was a very quick transition later in the series when he thought about going away to school, and all of a sudden classmates treated him like he was the most popular kid in his class, not wanting him to go. 

I swear, Theodore Cleaver was born without a spine.

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2 hours ago, icemiser69 said:

Yeah, but he is related to Batman, how bad could that be?

 

 Is he though?  Was it every established if Harriet was Bruce or Dick's aunt?   Or did art imitate life and she was just a beard hired by Bruce to keep too many questions from being asked?

 Larry's personality did seem to be influenced by his smothering mother and father never being around.   As opposed to Gilbert, who was just a born shithead. 

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1 minute ago, Maverick said:

Is he though?  Was it every established if Harriet was Bruce or Dick's aunt?   Or did art imitate life and she was just a beard hired by Bruce to keep too many questions from being asked?

I guess I will have to tune in next week to find out, same bat time, same bat channel.

2 minutes ago, Maverick said:

Larry's personality did seem to be influenced by his smothering mother and father never being around.   As opposed to Gilbert, who was just a born shithead. 

I absolutely love this.  A classic.  The first sentence, and then the second sentence zinger.  Truly awesome.

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35 minutes ago, Maverick said:
 

 Is he though?  Was it every established if Harriet was Bruce or Dick's aunt?   Or did art imitate life and she was just a beard hired by Bruce to keep too many questions from being asked?

 Larry's personality did seem to be influenced by his smothering mother and father never being around.   As opposed to Gilbert, who was just a born shithead. 

Aunt Harriet was Dick’s Aunt:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_minor_DC_Comics_characters#Harriet_Cooper

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School Play episode.

Ward and Wally scare the crap out of Beaver talking to him about his role as the yellow canary in the upcoming school play.  They mentioned how if he screwed up it didn't matter.  I think it was Wally that talked about Beaver forgetting his lines in an earlier play.  Beaver was just fine until Ward and Wally talked about worst case scenarios.  Beaver understandably gets upset and real scared and doesn't want to be the canary.

Larry played the frog in the play, and was wearing tights, hopping around on stage.   A big kid like that wearing tights in that era, I am surprised he wasn't teased about it.   Backstage, all of sudden Larry is wearing pants.  Given Larry's lack of self-esteem and whiny personality, I am surprised he was willing to wear tights.

Beaver is too scared to play the yellow canary so the teacher lets him be the mushroom.   The teacher should have found a way to get Beaver to be comfortable playing the canary.   His anxiety over possibly screwing up is only going to get worse over time.  You don't teach kids to run away from their problems, especially something like this.  You can't runaway from problems.  At some point you have to face them.   The sooner that Beaver gets used to that the easier it becomes.

Edited by icemiser69

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I have a quibble with the writers. I know they often have Beaver using incorrect grammar. MeTV is showing Season 3 which has Wally in high school (10th grade I believe, since he was in the 8th grade in Season 1). There was an episode recently where Wally uses incorrect grammar, and June corrects him. Someone that old should not be using incorrect grammar.

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I have a tough time watching this show through adult eyes. I love the kids - Tony Dow was great, as was Jerry Mathers in the earlier seasons. The friends are well cast and Gilbert especially cracks me up.

It’s the parents I have a problem with. They’re so remote and cool towards the kids. There’s not much true affection shown (Ward is better than June in this area). And the kids are always afraid to go to them with the most minor of problems. I know parenting changed a lot between the 1950s and 1970s, when it became more common for parents to be closer to their kids. I’ll take Mike and Carol Brady, who show regularly show affection for their children, any day over the Cleavers when it comes to TV parents.

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3 hours ago, Kyle said:

I have a tough time watching this show through adult eyes. I love the kids - Tony Dow was great, as was Jerry Mathers in the earlier seasons. The friends are well cast and Gilbert especially cracks me up.

I generally like the show and find most of the characters likeable/amusing but sometimes I want to scream regarding Beaver’s behavior especially when he’s encouraged to do something mostly by one of his so called best friends.  I go out for early morning walks and get back by the time the 2nd episode starts on MeTV.   I swear over the last week or two I think I saw several episodes in a row (really every other episode - I missed the 8 am ones) where Larry Mondello encouraged Beaver to do something that got him in a heap of trouble with Ward and June.   Why doesn’t Beaver learn to not let Larry tell him what to do?

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On 4/3/2021 at 11:31 AM, Cobb Salad said:

I generally like the show and find most of the characters likeable/amusing but sometimes I want to scream regarding Beaver’s behavior especially when he’s encouraged to do something mostly by one of his so called best friends.  I go out for early morning walks and get back by the time the 2nd episode starts on MeTV.   I swear over the last week or two I think I saw several episodes in a row (really every other episode - I missed the 8 am ones) where Larry Mondello encouraged Beaver to do something that got him in a heap of trouble with Ward and June.   Why doesn’t Beaver learn to not let Larry tell him what to do?

For whatever reason Beaver had very little growth and didn't learn from past mistakes.  I find Beaver's gullibility far more understandable than the grown adults that always expected the worst from their children.  How many times had Ward and/or June jumped down Wally's and/or Beaver's throat before they had all of the facts?  That happened a lot, and they looked like fools in the process.

Andy Taylor always expected the worst from Opie.   Even when he was proven wrong, he would still expect the worst from Opie.

I know people like Andy Taylor a lot, but I thought he was a horrible parent.

Edited by icemiser69
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Andy Taylor always expected the worst from Opie.   Even when he was proven wrong, he would still expect the worst from Opie.

I just watched Andy the other night. He did what you are saying and then he said "I'm doing it again, aren't I?" and Opie goes "What?" and Andy says "I'm thinking the worst of you without knowing all the facts." I think he did become aware and tried to do better.

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12 minutes ago, peacheslatour said:

I just watched Andy the other night. He did what you are saying and then he said "I'm doing it again, aren't I?" and Opie goes "What?" and Andy says "I'm thinking the worst of you without knowing all the facts." I think he did become aware and tried to do better.

Acknowledging that it is a problem, and then doing something about it are two totally different things.

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Today’s 8:30 episode was “In the Soup”, a favorite of mine.  Yet again Beaver is convinced to do something stupid by one of his “friends”, this time Whitey Whitney.  You can see the look on Whitey’s face when he watches Beaver actually take the dare of checking out if there’s actually soup in the bowl or not, boy is he gullible.  Again, Ward has to tell Beaver he doesn’t have to keep proving himself over and over to people.  

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Beaver has the worst friends. They’re always encouraging him to do something that he shouldn’t, and/or they throw him under the bus later on.

I have to say: I love Gilbert. There is something about Stephen Talbot’s line readings that just crack me up. Apologies if someone has already posted this, but he and Jerry Mathers were interviewed together recently. It was fun to see because Talbot didn’t participate in the 1980s reunion movie or revival (he was one of the few who declined), and because the cadence of his voice is exactly the same. He seems like a super nice guy too.

Jerry Mathers and Stephen Talbot interview

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50 minutes ago, Kyle said:

Beaver has the worst friends. They’re always encouraging him to do something that he shouldn’t, and/or they throw him under the bus later on.

I have to say: I love Gilbert. There is something about Stephen Talbot’s line readings that just crack me up. Apologies if someone has already posted this, but he and Jerry Mathers were interviewed together recently. It was fun to see because Talbot didn’t participate in the 1980s reunion movie or revival (he was one of the few who declined), and because the cadence of his voice is exactly the same. He seems like a super nice guy too.

Jerry Mathers and Stephen Talbot interview

The episode where the two of them are sitting in the car pretending to be parents with their kids is one of the funniest things I've ever seen in my life.

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Oh definitely - with Gilbert as the mother.

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20 hours ago, Cobb Salad said:

Today’s 8:30 episode was “In the Soup”, a favorite of mine.  Yet again Beaver is convinced to do something stupid by one of his “friends”, this time Whitey Whitney.  You can see the look on Whitey’s face when he watches Beaver actually take the dare of checking out if there’s actually soup in the bowl or not, boy is he gullible.  Again, Ward has to tell Beaver he doesn’t have to keep proving himself over and over to people.  

The best part of that episode is the immediate changing of tone from Eddie Haskell when he noticed Ward was standing near him.

Whitey lived a pretty sad life.

17 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

The episode where the two of them are sitting in the car pretending to be parents with their kids is one of the funniest things I've ever seen in my life.

And very real.  I was over a neighbor's house back in the day, and two of their kids were playing in the car.  The neighbor's driveway was very steep.  In any case, the brake somehow got released, and the car rolled down the hill and nearly took out the porch on the house across the street.

Edited by icemiser69
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20 minutes ago, icemiser69 said:

The best part of that episode is the immediate changing of tone from Eddie Haskell when he noticed Ward was standing near him.

Whitey lived a pretty sad life.

And very real.  I was over a neighbor's house back in the day, and two of their kids were playing in the car.  The neighbor's driveway was very steep.  In any case, the brake somehow got released, and the car rolled down the hill and nearly took out the porch on the house across the street.

My parents and their friends used to take their kids to the drive in and while the parents sat in one car, we kids sat in another. One time someone (I honestly don't remember who) released the parking brake and we rolled forward a few yards. We didn't hit any other cars but we did tear the speaker off the post.

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