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Mozart In The Jungle

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A place to discuss particular episodes, arcs and moments from the show's run. Please remember this isn't a complete catch-all topic -- check out the forum for character topics and other places for show-related talk.

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Well, damn. I was loving this show until the last 3 minutes of episode 10. I loved Rodrigo's and Hailey's dynamic until then. Stupid show. So unnecessary. And it almost validates Betty's initial assumption of Hailey's presence in the orchestra, instead of it being merit-based.

 

Clearly, changes were made between the pilot and the season. The change in Rodrigo's personality seems to be the big one. He was more commanding in the pilot and more artistic in the season. I guess we got a taste of that at the end of the pilot with him listening to Hailey's pseudo-audition.

 

More Lizzy/Elizabeth, please. She's great fun.

 

The end really left a bitter taste in my mouth. Dammit.

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I agree about the last 10 min, Dust Bunny.  I was hoping that would not come into play.  I hope it was just a glitch and the show runners go a different direction if there is another season.

 

Loved all the quirky characters and the politics vs. art in both the orchestra members (seniority, unions)  and the endless fundraising that goes into keeping the lights on.

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A new Amazon Original Series: What happens behind the curtains at the symphony is just as captivating as what happens on stage. Created by Paul Weitz (About a Boy), Roman Coppola (The Darjeeling Limited), and Jason Schwartzman (Rushmore). Brash new maestro Rodrigo (Gael Garcia Bernal) is stirring things up, and young oboist Hailey (Lola Kirke) hopes for her big chance.

 

http://previously.tv/mozart-in-the-jungle/amazon-pilot-project-mozart-jungle/

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-pilot-213311

 

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I discovered this show while marathoning "Transparent" and "Alpha House". Both of which I liked more than "Mozart". But pilot episodes are notoriously bad as they have to introduce and setup in a limited amount of time. I am hoping this show goes beyond "the symphony is full of pill poppers and people sleeping together" and "hot young crazy new director shakes things up". I do like seeing Gael Garcia Bernal in the role. We shall see. 

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Inspired by Hailey's passion, Rodrigo insists that she play with the orchestra, over the objections of Gloria (Bernadette Peters). Veteran maestro Thomas (Malcolm McDowell) tries to rise above his resentment of Rodrigo, only to face more humiliations. Hailey pays a late night visit to Alex, on the eve of her big day -- the moment she's been waiting for.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-fifth-chair-213326

 

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Rodrigo seeks guidance to rid himself of his "dreadful passion." With Thomas gone on a sabbatical, Cynthia bonds with Betty. In the middle of Alex's showcase -- an intimate dance with his roommate -- Hailey is summoned by Rodrigo to keep him from seeing Ana Maria. When she heads to Alex's apartment later, Hailey doesn't like what she finds.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-im-maestro-213339

 

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As pressure mounts before the launch of the new season, Rodrigo erupts. His behavior alarms the symphony's business advisor, Edward, who warns Gloria to rein him in - just as her star conductor takes the orchestra on a surprise field trip. In the wake of all the drama, Hailey arrives home to find Alex, wondering why she hasn't returned his calls.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-rehearsal-213357

 

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At a fundraising gala at an estate, Edward offers a large sum if Rodrigo will play the violin. Rodrigo ups the ante and turns the tables. Hailey runs into Lizzie, and discovers her roommate has been hiding her upper crust roots -- before spending the rest of the night impressing a man with aristocratic credentials of his own.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-you-go-my-head-213379

 

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When Rodrigo decides he doesn't want Windsor Elliot for his opening night, the legendary pianist confronts him, and ends up helping him realize who he does want. Cynthia is sent to track down Thomas, but isn't quite prepared for what greets her. Hailey gives an intimate oboe lesson to her wealthy new friend, but the session is interrupted by Lizzie, who has some surprising news about her pupil.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-mozart-bacon-213387

Edited by cheyz

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Rodrigo summons Hailey to drive him upstate to find Ana Maria, explaining that she "makes him alive," exactly what the symphony needs opening night. Back in the city, Cynthia takes some pills for her wrist, and ends up seeing a co-worker in a whole new light. Hailey finds Alex, ready to feel alive.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-now-fortissimo-213398

Edited by cheyz

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After a harsh verdict from Betty, Hailey is ready to give up on her dream. But as the crowd fills the hall for opening night, Betty has gone missing. No one in the orchestra is prepared for what happens next. As their tempestuous new soloist, Ana Maria, goes off the rails, Rodrigo is forced to make a choice.

 

http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/mozart-jungle-opening-night-213405

Edited by cheyz

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I'd be more worried if they hadn't just put her with Alex finally. Hopefully this will be passed off as overflowing passion and everything will go back to normal between them. Of course it could also be a reference to the book, but Hailey isn't Blair and the show isn't as cynical as the book was. Looks like the ebook is back to full price, it was discounted down to $1.99 a couple days ago.

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I enjoyed the heck out of this show. Is it ridiculous and flawed sometimes? Sure it is. I just don't care.

I'll admit that I squeed just a bit at the end, which surprised me because I didn't know I wanted things to go in that direction between them until it happened. I do think they were swept up in the moment and taken by surprise by it, which made me like it even more.

I want access to whatever fountain of youth Bernadette Peters is dunking herself in. She looks fabulous.

I hope they continue with season two.

Edited by ReadingZombie
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This was a fun series.  I'm glad things weren't left dangling at the end of the 10th episode in case it doesn't have a second season.  

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Love this show! Only complaint is that the too-short episodes are over so quickly, and there's only 10 of them! With all that New York/whiny-competitive musicians/drugs & relationships fodder, seems like could have easily filled up 10 full-hour episodes. But perhaps budgetary concerns keeps this mini-series so mini. As a professional concert musician myself (we have our own passionate conductor - his name is Dudamel) I can so totally relate to the talent & idiosyncrasies of all the prima donnas from the conductor down to the drug dealing percussionist. The insular world of a classical orchestra is not as universal as, say, the insular world of a woman's prison...but I still hope this series gets as much attention & accolades as Orange Is The New Black.

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I enjoyed this a lot. It was a great binge show, and a nice break after a lot of dark shows I had binged on over the holidays. Between this and Transparent, I am really impressed with Amazon's offerings. This wasn't nearly as dark as Transparent, but like I said I needed a break from dark.

I agree that the ending felt a little bit off. Not so much the kiss, but the stuff with Ana Maria. The fact that she would have a meltdown seemed blatantly obvious, so the more surprising choice would have been to have her NOT do so. I realize that set up things for Thomas to come back, but then it makes Rodrigo look dumb for thinking his wife would ever "conform" to a standard performance in the first place.

Bernadette Peters at times looked to be of an age with Saffron Burrows (Cynthia), despite being about 25 years older, so yes there is some dark magic happening there.

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I'm so disappointed there isn't more interaction and commentary for this show, which I absolutely love.

 

I honestly liked it better overall than "Transparent." I thought that was a great show -- warm, funny and smart -- but I also hated the fucking kids, and even Maura in the end of season 1 was kind of an ass (unfortunately). I still thought it was a great show.

 

BUT.

 

I thought this was better.

 

I admit to being biased -- I am a lifelong classical music student, I sang light opera and musical theatre through my early 20s, and I played cello through college and in a city symphony for one incredibly memorable year in the late 90s.

 

So man, did this get my heart. I totally loved all the sophisticated insight and playful parody of life in a symphony -- it managed to do so with fun but without disrespect.

 

The writing and performances are all superb, there's a genuine warmth and sophistication to the world it paints, and the ensemble is flawless. Best of all, everyone actually looks fairly capable at their classical music jobs.

 

If you haven't watched yet, please do check it out. Everyone's terrific, Saffron Burrows is luminous and charismatic, and everyone is excellent. And best of all, its real love for classical music is palpable.

 

Watch this show.

 

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I loved this because it was so freaking real. There's nothing like being technically proficient and then blowing your big chance in spite of your own ability and training. This world is brutal, and the episode painted that absolutely perfectly.

 

Also, Debra Monk looks marvelous, and her shades of bitchery and total ice-cold unwillingness to support the newbie were fantastic (if horrible).

 

Great episode that had me nibbling my fingernails in stress and sympathy.

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I lived in Queens for two years recently as your typical standard starving writer/publicist, and this brought a lot of that back.

 

I loved the silent symphony moments, as well as Hailey's terrific and much-deserved rant, as well as her impromptu performance with Alex.

 

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My favorite moment here was the contrast between the two guards -- between Malcolm McDowall's total fabulous bitchtastic solo self-involved performance and outburst, and with the new maestro's smooth, smart way of instead creating his own symphony and involving the actual patrons into it in a way that was both sexy and cool.

 

The episode managed to spotlight what's wrong with the industry (especially as it struggles more than ever today) as well as the genuine art and new-media advantages Rodrigo might very well offer to the symphony and its musicians. 

 

My favorite part was the surprisingly sweet farewell between Malcolm McDowall and Rodrigo in the end -- I loved the mutual regard they held for one another and that it was a goodbye with sweetness not despair.

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I loved this episode.

 

I loved Hodgman's character -- initially a potential boor but actually, a lovely and thoughtful guy seeking to connect with the music.

 

I loved hearing Hailey's roommate sing, and realizing that she too is a musician and performer and artist like all the others (versus the "quirky roomie in her undies in most scenes").

 

I love the characters of Rodrigo and Hailey and Cynthia most of all. I love the strength and warmth Saffron brings to Cynthia, this kind of wry acceptance of what she has taken on in this life and industry, and she has this believable poise for the cellist.

 

I also am thoroughly enjoying Hailey and think Burke is as good as or better than her sibling on "Girls" as she isn't just a manic pixie dream girl, she's believably insecure, frantic scared, yet also visibly talented. I love that she is both gorgeous and yet ordinary and approachable from scene to scene, depending on her character's fear (and sweat levels).

 

Most of all, I'm so grateful that this show made Rodrigo a charming, lovable and warm character and not just some asshat who swanned in at the last moment. He loves what he does, he believes in music and in art, and you see that in so many ways. He is a visibly charming yet also lovable character who (yes) does have an ego, but he never lets it overtake him and in fact he consistently does so many sweet and kind things to share his gifts with those around him simply because that is who he is. He's easily my favorite character in the show and such a surprise, when in the first ep, I rolled my eyes, and thought, "Oh, God, here we go..." I was never happier to be wrong.

 

Rodrigo's conversation with the little girl was so fraught -- it was never creepy and was simply his attempt to reconnect with a real and innocent enjoyment of making music.

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I love what this episode showed us about Rodrigo, and loved the way the reactions of the musicians showed us who they are at heart. For me this was, thus far, my favorite episode to date, balancing a love of music with a realistic and sly eye toward the reality of the working musician.

 

I'm especially happy to see some genuine cracks in the ice from Debra Monk's wonderful character toward Hailey, and loved seeing the frustrations of the musicians and finally the wonderful joy of the onlookers and musicians alike as the "1812 Overture" concluded (it was so cute when the drug-dealing percussionist helped Hailey chime in on the cymbals).

 

My single favorite moment in the series thus far, however, was in Hailey just standing there as the first few bars of Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture poured forth. Those first low, beautiful notes, swelling so gorgeously, are among my favorite moments in classical music (I especially love how they begin and then recapitulate as it ends), and to see Hailey stand there, hands at her sides, eyes shut in delight, was wonderful. So many people dismiss the classical 'warhorse' pieces, but, dammit, to quote an oboist friend of mine, "there is a reason they're warhorses."

 

I have always loved the 1812 Overture (and have an especial fondness for the modern variations that include full choirs), and got the chance to play it (to my delight and terror) when I played 4th cello for a city orchestra in the mid-90s, strictly as a semi-talented amateur. I had been a voice major in college before switching to media (I knew I was only as good as thousands of others) and had sung and played recorder for early music ensembles in college, but again -- just for pure enjoyment. So when I quit voice, I took up the cello on an impulse near the end (it suited me, and I picked it up fast as I'd had a few years of violin as a child and a good ear), and four years later got the chance to play with a major South Florida city symphony.

 

I was totally fine for most of it, but I admit that the 1812 (my favorite piece of all time) made me fall to pieces at the first rehearsal, and I didn't make it through very heroically and went off to sob in the bathroom -- I could sight read most of it but there was a key change where there were an alarming number of sharps and I fell to pieces. I will never forget the sweet first chair cellist, an old man of about 70, sweetly cajoling me out of the bathroom to come out and convince myself to keep playing. But it was so hard, because I just was not as good as I wanted to be -- I could play the first 3 Bach Unaccompanied Cello Suites, and warhorses like "Russlan and Ludmilla" or Sousa marches, etc., but I wanted to play Tchaikovsky sublimely and I couldn't. I just didn't have the training or experience yet.

 

But I did get to perform it, and I'll never forget it.  After which, I properly quit and only inflict my cellist-ness on myself or family members. ;-)  But wow, this moment got to me -- I loved the joy of the onlookers as it finished. That's what classical music can do.

 

Anyway. I absolutely love the show, and love the way it reminds us of the gypsy constant life of musicians struggling to both make art and to make a buck, and I love the palpable love for classical music that the creators share with us in each episode.

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Paramitch, here's hoping that buzz for this show and Transparent will continue to be a slow burn. Glad you're posting.

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You too! I always look forward to your posts, and hope more people check these out as well. I'm really impressed at what Amazon's put out in its first year based on this and "Transparent."

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I loved everything about this show (especially the music - can't get the 1812 out of my head)! I binged it, so need to rewatch to appreciate it even more.

Amazon is really in this game to win. I just wish more people were aware of what they have to offer. I was a Prime fan just for the shipping deal way back when. Now with all the book, music, tv, and movie offerings, I'm devoted. I'll keep trying to spread the word and cross my fingers that the award attention for the also awesome Transparent helps people realize what they're missing!

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Paramitch, I love your enthusiasm! This is such a neat show, but I don't have the musical background to understand the technicalities. I'm more a casual fan of classical music, although I've been listening to a lot more since I found all those big box deals on Amazon.

 

Between binge watching and waiting until after the holiday to get this forum up, we missed out on pre-showing posts and episode-by-episode commentary. Hopefully more posters will find their way over here now and we can get more conversation going.

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I really liked the pilot episode. Thanks to kieyra for pointing me toward this show.

Don't know all that much about classical music except that I admire and respect the art, and people who perform it. I also love good acting, writing and the feeling that I'm learning something. I felt that way with Transparent, and this show had me at Bernadette Peters.

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I really liked the pilot episode. Thanks to kieyra for pointing me toward this show.

Don't know all that much about classical music except that I admire and respect the art, and people who perform it. I also love good acting, writing and the feeling that I'm learning something. I felt that way with Transparent, and this show had me at Bernadette Peters.

Glad you're here, Fisher King. I found Transparent and Mozart to be of similar quality, but Mozart is quite a bit lighter. I had to spread Transparent out over a few days, but I think I did Mozart all in one shot. Looking forward to your posts. (I'm used to other people doing the heavy lifting of episode analysis in the threads for the other shows I watch, but our poor under-discussed Amazon shows make me feel I ought to be less lazy. Fortunately paramitch wrote some lovely thoughts for several episodes.) Edited by kieyra
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Thanks, kieyra! I will be posting as soon as I have time to watch more episodes. And yes, I enjoyed paramitch's postings on the Transparent threads.

Edited by Fisher King
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I'm used to other people doing the heavy lifting of episode analysis in the threads for the other shows I watch, but our poor under-discussed Amazon shows make me feel I ought to be less lazy.

 

I'm the same way, will have to rewatch and try to post more. 

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Glad you're here, Fisher King. I found Transparent and Mozart to be of similar quality, but Mozart is quite a bit lighter. I had to spread Transparent out over a few days, but I think I did Mozart all in one shot. Looking forward to your posts. (I'm used to other people doing the heavy lifting of episode analysis in the threads for the other shows I watch, but our poor under-discussed Amazon shows make me feel I ought to be less lazy. Fortunately paramitch wrote some lovely thoughts for several episodes.)

I very much agreed with this. I adored "Transparent," but for those who found those characters (and especially the kids) tough to watch, this show's characters tend to be gentler.

 

Thanks, kieyra! I will be posting as soon as I have time to watch more episodes. And yes, I enjoyed paramitch's postings on the Transparent threads.

That's so nice of you -- I always enjoy yours as well.

 

Paramitch, I love your enthusiasm! This is such a neat show, but I don't have the musical background to understand the technicalities. I'm more a casual fan of classical music, although I've been listening to a lot more since I found all those big box deals on Amazon.

 

Aw, man, this thread is the best. Thanks so much! It's all high praise coming from such articulate and thoughtful fellow posters.

 

One thing that the streaming era has made easier -- the ability to sample classical pieces for style and flow, to see what appeals to you. If you're getting into classical music and looking for other ways to broaden those interests or to discover new works, I have a few suggestions:

 

  • Check out works featuring your favorite instruments -- like, if you like oboe, violin, French horn, harp, guitar, flute, etc.? There's almost certainly a nice assortment of pieces and works featuring that instrument you love.
  • See if you tend to prefer certain eras. For instance, I loved Bach and Vivaldi long before I realized I just really love the Baroque era, and consequently discovered the genius of Purcell, Corelli, and Telemann.
  • If you like one composer, streaming/sampling means you can go check out a wealth of other pieces and compositions with no risk. For instance, I don't love most of Beethoven's works, but I do think his symphonies and piano concertos are absolutely gorgeous.
  • Warhorses may be overplayed but they're warhorses for a reason. I will always love The 1812 Overture and don't care who knows it ("Russlan and Ludmilla" is another story). Sometimes those big, really popular pieces are a great way to jump in quickly and develop a taste for a specific composer or style.
  • See if there's a common denominator to the works that seem to resonate with you from the show. Maybe you'll realize that you prefer emotional approaches versus cooler ones, or that you like playful versus solemn works, etc.

 

Meanwhile, I was actually a bit sheepish about my posts on the show, as my adoration of classical music and its world may have colored my prose with a few (dozen) extra exclamation points. Here and there. Ahem.

 

But I think the pilot's really solid, and does a witty, quickfire job of showing us who these people are, what their world is, and what sets it apart. I definitely disagreed with the recap that found it forced, unpleasant and not worth watching, but -- at the same time -- there is a bit of an artificial Howard Hawks-like, fast-paced quality to this episode, the pilot, that is absent for most of the remaining episodes. Not that they aren't funny -- they are -- but the show's humor tends to be more quiet and observational, not laugh-a-minute, if that makes sense.

 

And yes, it did make me go pick up my cello for more delightful trysts in which I happily massacred Bach's Unaccompanied Cello Suites 1 & 2 and it was just like the first time... I don't know what my neighbors were complaining about.

Edited by paramitch
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I loved the entire season, and thoroughly enjoyed the show from beginning to end. The only nitpicks I have are minor -- I was annoyed that Rodrigo's final arc descended into craziness over his ex, as I never ever believed (1) that Anna Maria was a bona fide option as an opening night soloist, or (2) that she would actually behave long enough to perform for more than 5 minutes in a row.

 

And I hate to be petty, but Nora Arnezeder, the actress who played Anna Maria is one of the worst violin-fakers I've ever seen. She wasn't even able to match the big bow movements, and that's something most performers can at least do after just an hour or two of practice. It really took me out of all her scenes precisely because she's supposed to be this big genius violinist, and the actress is barely able to even hold a bow. It was excruciating for me (right up there with Emily Watson's horrible fake-cello technique in Hilary and Jackie). It makes me grateful for the actors who obviously took the time to learn how to make us believe they can play -- the cast of A Late Quartet, Susan Sarandon in The Witches of Eastwick (making up for Jack Nicholson's terrible violin-synching) Virginia Madsen in Electric Dreams, the cast of The Competition, even Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany in Master and Commander, etc.

 

Meanwhile, on that front, I do want to commend Lola Kirke, who really did a nice job of making me believe she was an oboist. She had the posture, the fingering, the breathing, etc. One of my best friends for years plays the oboe, and Lola really made me like Hailey as someone struggling for both precision and artistic courage at the same time.

 

Well, damn. I was loving this show until the last 3 minutes of episode 10. I loved Rodrigo's and Hailey's dynamic until then. Stupid show. So unnecessary. And it almost validates Betty's initial assumption of Hailey's presence in the orchestra, instead of it being merit-based.

 

I agree with this to a degree. While I loved the way the kiss surprised them both (and that felt very real), I hated that it took place right there in front of everyone, and that, yes, it does mean Betty was at least somewhat right about Hailey's situation. And I really didn't want Betty to appear vindicated when Hailey in fact had been so hardworking and honorable about pursuing her dream. But I'm kind of torn about how I feel about the scene, not least because I felt the actors sold it in a very sweet, understated way.

 

I enjoyed the heck out of this show. Is it ridiculous and flawed sometimes? Sure it is. I just don't care.

I'll admit that I squeed just a bit at the end, which surprised me because I didn't know I wanted things to go in that direction between them until it happened. I do think they were swept up in the moment and taken by surprise by it, which made me like it even more.

I want access to whatever fountain of youth Bernadette Peters is dunking herself in. She looks fabulous.

I hope they continue with season two.

 

I loved the entire season as well, and the final scene between Hailey and Rodrigo gobsmacked me. I liked it, but I would be thrilled if the show came back and both Hailey and Rodrigo realized that the kiss was a wonderful mistake that should not be repeated. One of my favorite things about this season was their increasingly adorable and unhinged friendship, with both being so supportive of the other, and I thought Rodrigo's genius plan to sidetrack Betty for the opening night so that Hailey prove to herself that she was capable was really sweet and funny.

 

And I will always love Rodrigo's desperate cries of "Hai-ah-lay!" whenever he got himself into a jam. So I'm kind of hoping if there's another season that the two won't end up a couple after all.

 

Love this show! Only complaint is that the too-short episodes are over so quickly, and there's only 10 of them! With all that New York/whiny-competitive musicians/drugs & relationships fodder, seems like could have easily filled up 10 full-hour episodes. But perhaps budgetary concerns keeps this mini-series so mini. As a professional concert musician myself (we have our own passionate conductor - his name is Dudamel) I can so totally relate to the talent & idiosyncrasies of all the prima donnas from the conductor down to the drug dealing percussionist. The insular world of a classical orchestra is not as universal as, say, the insular world of a woman's prison...but I still hope this series gets as much attention & accolades as Orange Is The New Black.

 

Wonderfully put. I've played with symphonies and sung with Baroque and Early Music ensembles, and one thing I felt the show really got right was that insular quality where everyone is on the same ship. You have all these artists who are kind of awesome free spirits mixed with the uptight technicians who want every single thing to be perfect. And many of them are also intensely passionate about these very specific odd things, like the tensions of their bows, or the kinds of reeds or resin they use, etc., And then there's the physical aspect, both the good and the bad -- the abilities to use their bodies and hands to create these very technical incredible musical moments combined with the repetitive stress and toll all that practice takes. And I really love that, and it's wonderful and weird to be a part of.

 

I really wished they'd given us more about Cynthia, as I found her character really interesting and likable, and I have seen so many musician friends struggle with tendonitis and pain firsthand. I felt like the show lost its way about her a bit, although I liked her moment with Thomas when their intimacy enabled him to know that she's overdoing the meds -- it made their relationship seem actually real to me in a nice way, although I was never really sure what she got out of it. I'd also liked her moments with Betty previously in the season, and I wish we'd seen more of that, as it would have humanized Betty a bit more.

 

I was very glad Cynthia was kind to the piccolo player and that she wasn't too freaked out about what happened. It made me really uncomfortable that he had no idea she was on substances and that she actually made a decision she pretty clearly wouldn't have made sober. But what surprised me in a good way was the way both handled it -- we've seen that she's something of a sexual free spirit, so she seemed to just sort of note it and move on, and I liked the respectful way the piccolo player understood they weren't suddenly some big love story (a potential development that had me cringing a bit). And Cynthia was really kind to him in their final scene together.

 

I enjoyed this a lot. It was a great binge show, and a nice break after a lot of dark shows I had binged on over the holidays. Between this and Transparent, I am really impressed with Amazon's offerings. This wasn't nearly as dark as Transparent, but like I said I needed a break from dark.

I felt exactly the same way -- this show had a lighthearted sweetness to it, and I was relieved that the finale didn't include any last-minute horrible things happening to people just to give it edge.

 

The only person I really never quite got interested in was Lizzie. I liked her as a peripheral character, but also felt like the show gave us too much Lizzie at the expense of the other main characters, fragmenting their arcs. I was irritated with Lizzie's predicament ("Oh no! I'm suddenly rich!") and would have much rather seen more about Cynthia's struggle with pain/meds, Betty and what made her tick (I always felt like we were on the edge of learning more about her), or even more about Thomas's forays into composition -- was he serious? Was he gifted? etc.? And what was up with Bernadette Peters's character? I wish we'd gotten to know her a bit better -- instead, she just kind of wandered into a few scenes looking fabulous and placating either Thomas or Rodrigo depending on the moment. Instead, we got an awful lot of Lizzie, and in ways that to me just weren't needed and didn't really connect to the rest of the story.

 

All these are minor, however, but they did get me thinking. I think the show could have smoothed out just a few of these edges with a few minutes more of content per episode. I know the episode lengths seemed to vary a lot -- between 23 and 31 minutes -- and that's a huge discrepancy. Several episodes were 27 minutes and I do think that just a little more content could have given us a richer exploration of some of the less-served main characters.

 

Meanwhile, I loved it, and really hope it comes back. At the heart of the show was its sense of camaraderie, of the beautiful intimacy that can come from banding together to create music (especially and poignantly, in a world leaving Classical music and the arts behind). I loved the palpable joy the show was able to create about what it means to make and enjoy music, and I really enjoyed that, and its lighter than air, sunny sweetness.

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All these are minor, however, but they did get me thinking. I think the show could have smoothed out just a few of these edges with a few minutes more of content per episode. I know the episode lengths seemed to vary a lot -- between 23 and 31 minutes -- and that's a huge discrepancy. Several episodes were 27 minutes and I do think that just a little more content could have given us a richer exploration of some of the less-served main characters.

 

 

I'll go one step further and said I think this could have easily been a one-hour show. (Well, 42 minutes or what have you.) I was disappointed as soon as I realized it wasn't. It definitely left you wanting more. 

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I was really surprised that this show was so good. I wasn't expecting that. I was thinking that it would be more like Smash with classical music and it wasn't.

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This is my new favorite show.  Rodrigo is a fitting lead, I love the premise, and I am enjoying the hell out of Bernadette Peters. and Malcolm McDowell.  (Which is odd, because I have never liked either of them too much before.)

 

The only nitpick I have is with the ridiculous Asian Maestro's assistant.  What they do with her character is borderline offensive to me.  And I don't get offended easily.  

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I'm so glad that I ignored the PTV review of this show. I really liked it. I know nothing about the professional orchestra world, but I really dug the characters. Gael Garcia Bernal was terrific, crazy, gifted, kind and I love his smile. Him calling Hailey "jai-alai" never failed to make me laugh. I didn't mind the kiss at the end. I think it was more exhilaration than validation of Betty' s assumption. I'm down for a second season.

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Was bored, needed something light after the disturbing last few episodes of Outlander.

It was perfect! I love everybody!

So glad the show is coming back for 2nd season. SO sad it's still about half a year away...

But perhaps budgetary concerns keeps this mini-series so mini. As a professional concert musician myself (we have our own passionate conductor - his name is Dudamel) I can so totally relate to the talent & idiosyncrasies of all the prima donnas from the conductor down to the drug dealing percussionist.

I read it in few places that Rodrigo's character is loosely based on Dudamel.
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Him calling Hailey "jai-alai" never failed to make me laugh.

 

Well, I just finished watching the season, dubbed in Italian, and I didn't realize the girl's name was Hailey, I thought it was Ali from the way it was pronounced by Garcia Bernal's voiceover person. And now I see that it's supposed to be mispronounced - good to know! Glad to see that the show will be coming back for a second season eventually.

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I just started watching S1, and I love this show!  I've seen people (i.e. p.tv) claim that the horribly ugly/lurid 'flesh and bone' series is the heir of Smash, but I definitely feel it's spirit here far more.  I've been a long-time fan of GGB, from 'The Science of Sleep' onwards, and he is great here.  Hate that bitter, crow faced old bitch of an oboe player, but ff through her scenes and this is great.  So glad I started watching so soon before I'll get to see season 2 as well! 

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Despite months of rehearsal, the orchestra's growth has stalled. A world tour and illicit romances dog the symphony, especially Rodrigo, anxious about his Mexican homecoming. Hailey assumes a larger position in the orchestra, but struggles to find her footing as an oboist and in her love life. A looming labor strike risks pitting friend against friend and it may fall to Rodrigo to create harmony. Season 2 coming to Prime 12/30

 

http://smile.amazon.com/Mozart-Jungle-Season-Official-Trailer/dp/B018JG6JHY/

 

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The New York Symphony Orchestra is midway through their season and on the surface things are going well: audiences are happy and the musicians are playing better than ever. But offstage, things are beginning to unravel.

 

To the outside, Rodrigo's tenure as the new maestro is a roaring success, but the conductor is having doubts. Meanwhile, Hailey works to replace herself as Rodrigo's assistant so she can focus on her new position as substitute in the oboe section.

Edited by cheyz
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