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There was a re-release to theaters, sometime in the 80s, I think, of a few Hitchcock pictures for which the rights had been somewhat in limbo,if  I remember correctly.  Rear Window, Vertigo, and Rope were the ones I caught in a theater, and yes, they certainly had a wallop beyond a TV screen, especially one of that time.  

 

Rear Window is probably my favorite Hitchcock---Stewart and Kelly and my beloved Thelma Ritter worked together so well and gave the movie a kind of human warmth that could be missing from other Hitch works. 

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Rear Window, Vertigo, and Rope were the ones I caught in a theater, and yes, they certainly had a wallop beyond a TV screen, especially one of that time.

The only one I saw during that run was Vertigo - but that is my own favorite. I had seen it a theater before, but not in the great theater (the Ziegfield in NYC) where it was shown.   Also, I saw this  with Mr Rat and two of my best women friends - and all three of us women were just weeping, while Mr Rat - was not.  He still prefers Shadow of a Doubt.

Edited by ratgirlagogo

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The only one I saw during that run was Vertigo - but that is my own favorite. I had seen it a theater before, but not in the great theater (the Ziegfield in NYC) where it was shown.   Also, I saw this  with Mr Rat and two of my best women friends - and all three of us women were just weeping, while Mr Rat - was not.  He still prefers Shadow of a Doubt.

 

I hate to say it, but I'm kind of on Mr. Rat's side on this one. I never thought Vertigo acknowledged that this was her tragedy more than his, since he objectified "her" as much as anyone else in her life did. Shadow of a Doubt was a tragedy for everyone concerned.

Edited by Julia
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I hate to say it, but I'm kind of on Mr. Rat's side on this one. I never thought Vertigo acknowledged that this was her tragedy more than his, since he objectified "her" as much as anyone else in her life did.

This is  what Mr Rat thinks.  I don't agree -  that whole scene where she emerges from the bathroom seems to be shot to make the point that this man objectified her MORE than anyone else in her life did - and yet she loves him so much she is willing to falsify herself, if that's what it takes for him to love her.  It is heartbreaking.  And plus, , I think the musical score acknowledges her tragedy from the first bar.

Edited by ratgirlagogo

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Watching Camelot right now (but not for much longer; I'm sleepy) and need to ask this: does anyone else find Richard Harris' performance at tad annoying?  What with every other line being spoken in a breathy, whispery way?

 

Also, I can't help but see Cersei Lannister when I see Vanessa Redgrave as Gwenivere (sorry about the spelling).

Edited by bmoore4026

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Watching Camelot right now (but not for much longer; I'm sleepy) and need to ask this: does anyone else find Richard Harris' performance at tad annoying?  What with every other line being spoken in a breathy, whispery way?

 

Also, I can't help but see Cersei Lannister when I see Vanessa Redgrave as Gwenivere (sorry about the spelling).

Aw I kinda love Camelot. Went to see it 3 times in the theater back in the day. And Franco Nero looks so yummy (still does.) Vanessa Redgrave was never more beautiful.

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Oh, many have found Richard Harris hard to take in Camelot. I mean, the movie as a whole is not well loved (though for some of us, like me, the stage show is). Lots of questionable choices in there. One amusing feature on the DVD, which I admit I have used: you can watch and listen to it without any speaking or singing (except for the chorus, which is on the orchestra track). Alfred Newman's orchestrations and underscoring are a treat, and it can be an advantage at times to not know too specifically what's being said.

 

Rachel Kempson, Lady Redgrave, has an entertaining chapter in her autobiography about traveling to LA to see her daughter Vanessa film Camelot. First, it's clear that she already loved the score of the musical, just like any fan, and was tickled to have a family "in" to the shooting, hearing it all in person. But she also remarks that when she saw Franco Nero enter as Lancelot, her first thought was "Oh dear, I bet Vanessa's going to fall in love with him." And so it proved, of course.

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This is  what Mr Rat thinks.  I don't agree -  that whole scene where she emerges from the bathroom seems to be shot to make the point that this man objectified her MORE than anyone else in her life did - and yet she loves him so much she is willing to falsify herself, if that's what it takes for him to love her.  It is heartbreaking.  And plus, , I think the musical score acknowledges her tragedy from the first bar.

 

And even (for the sake of argument) that the film had no sympathy for Madeleine/Judy, and concerned itself entirely with Scottie's feelings--it would still stand as a magnificent, probing exploration of the psychological disease of sexual objectification.

Edited by Milburn Stone
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I finally watched the second half of Lady Be Good. I don't think it ranks up there with the really classic movie musicals but it's definitely on par with some of the Astaire/Rogers movies and I prefer it to a lot of Gene Kelly movies. No, the story doesn't hold together and I don't find Eddie and Dixie compelling. Heck, I don't even have faith that they won't end up in divorce court again. But it has excellent musical numbers, excellent music, and excellent dancing. I want to look up more Eleanor Powell movies. I saw the Fascinating Rhythm dance in one of those compilation things. Honestly, I think it loses something in the way it was staged. To me it doesn't read that well. It should be an impressive spectacle but I can't really tell what's happening so all I see is the curtain sort of moving and it's distracting from a very impressive tap number. Same thing for the singer at first. I prefer the dance number with the dog. I'm such a sucker for adorable dogs in old movies! I would totally watch Lady Be Good the next time they air it. Maybe skip the plot and focus on the musical numbers but yeah, if I had more room for DVD's... or if I ever had time to watch them I'd totally get this one.

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Prisoner of Zenda starts now on TCM. Colman, Doug Jr, Raymond Massey and others. Fun The most gorgeous voice (RC) and one of the most beautiful faces (Doug Jr). 

 

Off I go.

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I finally watched the second half of Lady Be Good. I don't think it ranks up there with the really classic movie musicals but it's definitely on par with some of the Astaire/Rogers movies and I prefer it to a lot of Gene Kelly movies. No, the story doesn't hold together and I don't find Eddie and Dixie compelling. Heck, I don't even have faith that they won't end up in divorce court again. But it has excellent musical numbers, excellent music, and excellent dancing. I want to look up more Eleanor Powell movies. I saw the Fascinating Rhythm dance in one of those compilation things. Honestly, I think it loses something in the way it was staged. To me it doesn't read that well. It should be an impressive spectacle but I can't really tell what's happening so all I see is the curtain sort of moving and it's distracting from a very impressive tap number. Same thing for the singer at first. I prefer the dance number with the dog. I'm such a sucker for adorable dogs in old movies! I would totally watch Lady Be Good the next time they air it. Maybe skip the plot and focus on the musical numbers but yeah, if I had more room for DVD's... or if I ever had time to watch them I'd totally get this one.

 

That's Entertainment! 3 shows how the "Fascinatin' Rhythm" number was done, and wow, what a workout it was for the people who moved the sets! 

Edited by Wiendish Fitch

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I am so very sad and broken to write this to you:
My darling dad died last night from complications from surgery.

I am in agony right now, and stupid with it.

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voiceover, I can't physically reach out to you right now but I'm reaching out in spirit. I hope you're around loved ones who can offer comfort and solace at this difficult time. Be well. :)

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My heart dropped into my stomach when I read that, voiceover.  Your shock and sorrow must be overwhelming.  Whatever help words of sympathy from a stranger over the internet can be, you have mine; I am terribly sorry to hear of your loss.

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aradia22, I always thought Eleanor Powell was badly underserved by her choreography in most of her movies. By far the best, I think, was Broadway Melody of 1940 with Fred Astaire, not just for the legendary Begin the Beguine number but for a challenge dance with just the two of them and a jukebox. There's a bit too much George Murphy for my taste, but he's supposed to be unlikable, which helps.

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Julia, I've always thought this Eleanor Powell number from Ship Ahoy (featuring Buddy Rich) was pretty darned impressive:

 

https://youtu.be/vBflKvu7ZdM

 

There's also a clip out there of Powell dancing as a "cowgirl," lassoing with a lariat, etc., that blew me away, but I don't know what movie it's from and I can't seem to find it on YouTube now.

 

There's something amazingly sexy about her.

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There's also a clip out there of Powell dancing as a "cowgirl," lassoing with a lariat, etc., that blew me away, but I don't know what movie it's from and I can't seem to find it on YouTube now.

 

Is this it? Because, seriously, way to take control of the lasso.

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I would guess that it's "So Long, Sarah Jane" from I Dood It (new to me before I looked it up just now). And my goodness, the tapping seems almost the least of her skills here: how about lassoing a hitching post eight times perfectly in one shot? and much more.

 

 

(One slight imperfection: the sound of the taps -- which of course must be post-dubbed in a movie musical, as the whole soundtrack was pre-recorded and we hear no "live" sound -- aren't always perfectly timed, and that breaks the illusion a bit.)

 

I must admit, I don't get the "sexy" -- she seems like such a healthy, wholesome, athletic girl. But I'll admit that I wouldn't be the one to pick up on it, so I'll take your word for it.

 

[Edited to add: Messages crossed!]

Edited by Rinaldo

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I'm watching the tail end of The End of the Affair, and wow, what a brutally depressing movie. 

 

Did Deborah Kerr ever make a movie where she wasn't a gently raised british woman with a noble spirit and a spine of steel who honorably renounced happiness when her life was scarred by heartbreak? It seems like a shame. I think she could have been pretty funny if they'd let her.

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I think she could have been pretty funny if they'd let her.

 

Kerr did satire in The Hucksters, and had the lead in the underwhelming romantic comedy Please Believe Me.

 

But that's about all I can think of.

 

Have you seen her playing the multiple roles in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp?  It's not my kind of film - epic war drama - but I like it and she's great in it (although I've also always wondered how Wendy Hiller, whom I adore, would have done in the roles had she not had to bow out).

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I'm watching the tail end of The End of the Affair, and wow, what a brutally depressing movie. 

 

Did Deborah Kerr ever make a movie where she wasn't a gently raised british woman with a noble spirit and a spine of steel who honorably renounced happiness when her life was scarred by heartbreak? It seems like a shame. I think she could have been pretty funny if they'd let her.

 

 

Kerr did satire in The Hucksters, and had the lead in the underwhelming romantic comedy Please Believe Me.

 

But that's about all I can think of.

 

Have you seen her playing the multiple roles in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp?  It's not my kind of film - epic war drama - but I like it and she's great in it (although I've also always wondered how Wendy Hiller, whom I adore, would have done in the roles had she not had to bow out).

 

Don't forget her turn as the adulterous army wife in From Here to Eternity (not a comedy, but against type).

 

I think once Greer Garson aged out of her "gently raised British woman with a noble spirit and a spine of steel who honorably renounced happiness when her life was scarred by heartbreak" (love that description, Julia!) image and her career cooled off, Deborah Kerr, another naturally refined, elegantly attractive European redhead, unofficially carried the torch. 

 

Like Garson, Kerr had plenty of critics who scoffed at her abilities, but I think she was a fabulous actress, especially in The Innocents.

Edited by Wiendish Fitch
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I would guess that it's "So Long, Sarah Jane" from I Dood It (new to me before I looked it up just now). And my goodness, the tapping seems almost the least of her skills here: how about lassoing a hitching post eight times perfectly in one shot? and much more...

 

I must admit, I don't get the "sexy" -- she seems like such a healthy, wholesome, athletic girl. But I'll admit that I wouldn't be the one to pick up on it, so I'll take your word for it.

 

 

That's the one! Thanks, Rinaldo.

 

As for the sexy, I think it has something to do with the proud, haughty, yet welcoming smile and eye-contact she manages to have on her face no matter how insanely difficult the routine. The more insanely difficult the routine, the more power over the viewer that smile and eye-contact convey. They're not far removed from the proud, haughty, yet welcoming smile and eye-contact of a Vargas Girl.

Edited by Milburn Stone
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Like Garson, Kerr had plenty of critics who scoffed at her abilities, but I think she was a fabulous actress, especially in The Innocents.

They were both very good actresses, although I far prefer Kerr.  Being cast in all those "refined lady" roles did little for her critical reputation, yes - although when you think about it she did plenty of less "refined" work, as in Eternity.    I like her a lot in The Sundowners, even though the movie seems to not kind of go anywhere in an odd way - I love her chemistry with Robert Mitchum. 

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Like Garson, Kerr had plenty of critics who scoffed at her abilities, but I think she was a fabulous actress, especially in The Innocents.

That's just the movie I'd point to, myself. And it's a tribute to her gifts that after a decade of frequent overexposure in the same sorts of roles, she could play a teacher (just what she'd played before, and would again) and be flat-out great in the role. (A word, too, for little Pamela Franklin as Flora -- a great actress whose career eventually kind of fizzled out.)

 

For comedy... it's not much of a movie, but she's a bright spot in it: Casino Royale (1967). There's a lot of labored spoof material in this, but she once again managed to rise above her material, and evoke genuine smiles (laughs might be going too far) when those around her were only trying to.

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For comedy... it's not much of a movie, but she's a bright spot in it: Casino Royale (1967).

I was going to mention that one too - so gorgeous in the lingerie.

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I am so very sad and broken to write this to you:

My darling dad died last night from complications from surgery.

I am in agony right now, and stupid with it.

Voiceover, I am so sorry. My prayers are going out to you and your family.

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I'm watching the tail end of The End of the Affair, and wow, what a brutally depressing movie. 

 

Did Deborah Kerr ever make a movie where she wasn't a gently raised british woman with a noble spirit and a spine of steel who honorably renounced happiness when her life was scarred by heartbreak? It seems like a shame. I think she could have been pretty funny if they'd let her.

Apparently she was funny in real life. When she passed, someone described her as being earthy and having a salty sense of humor, and not very much like the roles she played.

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As for the sexy, I think it has something to do with the proud, haughty, yet welcoming smile and eye-contact she manages to have on her face no matter how insanely difficult the routine. The more insanely difficult the routine, the more power over the viewer that smile and eye-contact convey. They're not far removed from the proud, haughty, yet welcoming smile and eye-contact of a Vargas Girl.

 

I wouldn't maybe use the word haughty, so much, while she's dancing - I associate that more with ballerinas, like Cyd Charisse and Leslie Caron - but she does seem to be very much in touch with her own awesomeness. I love that she's making a connection with the audience, like a headliner, instead of with a partner. I don't think many woman dancers got to do that in the movies, with the exception of Ann Miller, whose range wasn't nearly as broad. 

 

She also, apparently, had a Fred Astaire/Gene Kelly-level work ethic. Esther Willams told a story of watching her rehearse for her big comeback in Duchess of Idaho until there was blood coming out of her shoes.

Edited by Julia

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You're right, Julia, "haughty" isn't exactly the right word to describe what I meant. I was looking for something beyond "proud." "In touch with her own awesomeness" gets at it, but that in-touchness also includes "I'm not the only one here who knows how awesome I am--you do, too." But not in an arrogant way. More in a way that the viewer is helpless to disagree.

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Yes, she had that self-assurance that doesn't come across as conceited, because she and we know it's the plain truth.

 

There are numerous stories about her partnership with Astaire in Broadway Melody of 1940. My favorite is that he, ever-so-slightly intimidated by her as the only female dancer in the movies with a technical perfection to match (or surpass?) his own, treated her on the set with exquisite formality and politeness at first: "Miss Powell" and all that. She (respecting him likewise, of course) returned the courtesy for a day or two, but then finally said, "Look, we'll never get anywhere this way. I'm Ellie, you're Fred, we're a couple of hoofers, let's get down to work." And they did.

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Today was Abbott and Costello day!  Among the films shown was their version of Jack and the Beanstalk, which features forty-something Lou Costello gadding about in flesh color tights (didn't know they made tights for mildly overweight guys) as Jack.

 

Well, the blonde guy who played the Prince looked hot in a pair of tights, in spite of the horrible Prince Valiant wig.  I have that, at least.

 

There was a website called Cold Fusion Video that had a pretty funny review of the movie.  Unfortunately, it's been twelve years since I read that review and now Cold Fusion Video is no more and I tried archive.org's Wayback Machine to see if they had it and, while they had the site, they didn't have the review.

 

So I'm rather down.  And Arrow doesn't come one until 8 Central in the St. Louis area.

Edited by bmoore4026

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voiceover, I just saw your post tonight, I am so very very sorry over the loss of your dad.  All of you are in my prayers and may he rest in peace.  I am sure he knew he was very loved.

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bmoore4026, can't have that. Here you go.

ETA: Hully gee whiz, the Wayback has the whole movie.

 

Yay!  Thank you, Julia.  Yeah, I'm amazed a Warner Bros. movie would be in the public domain.  Then again, when you see it, you kind of understand why.

 

I suggest you all watch this while on something that'll make you loopy as hell (flu medicine and the like), it'll enhance the movie watching experience.

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Love The Wizard of Oz, and I love the vaudevillian humor.

 

"I'm all but lame from the bite on my leg!" (grrr, I hate Miss Gulch)

"Y'mean she bit ya?"

"No, her dog!"
"Oh... she bit her dog, eh?"

 

Or this gem, when the Lion is attacking Scarecrow and Tin Man:

 

"Now, that's getting personal, Lion!"

"Yeah, get up and teach him a lesson!"

"W-what's wrong with you teaching him?"

"Well, I hardly know him!"

 

 

Gosh, I could go on all day if I'm not careful.

 

Wonderful piece of trivia: Liza Minnelli was once married to Jack Haley, Jr. That's right, Dorothy's daughter married Tin Man's son! Is that not the most beautiful, poetic thing you ever heard?! Yeah, they divorced, but still!

Edited by Wiendish Fitch
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I'm a bit late but I wanted to express my sympathies to voiceover's loss.  I hope you're holding up ok.

 

The review of A&C's Jack & The Beanstalk is cute (and accurate), although the writer mentioned that A&C didn't interact much .  There were a few other films in which this occurred, I'm guessing it was due to their own strained relationship at the time. 

 

A&C movies were a big part of my childhood!  I grew up seeing their films every Sunday morning on WPIX.   "Who's on First" is still a funny routine!  I was thrilled to see a marathon on TCM!

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It's Easter, so we've got lots of Biblical Epics today.

 

Roma Downey and Mark Burnett can kiss off for all I care.  King of Kings and Jesus of Nazareth all the way, baby!  I just wish they didn't get such a handsome actor to play Jesus.  Jeffrey Hunter = Be still my heart.  Oooooo, I'm gonna go to Hell for liking my sexy Jesus.

 

And like many life of Jesus movies, all the Romans are British.  And Salome can't act to save her own life.

 

You'd think they'd get a more passionate and angry sounding actor for John the Baptist though.  Michael York in Jesus of Nazareth did a much better job.  Olivia Hussey as Mary, too.

 

One thing I noticed about King of Kings is that women, especially Mary and Mary Magdalene and Martha, aren't terribly involved.  I found this to be kind of disappointing.

 

It's too bad Jeffrey Hunter's career wasn't bigger than it was.  He was handsome.  He could act a bit.  He died rather young though (36, I believe).  Would things have been different had he been the star of Star Trek?  Better remembered, I mean.

 

I'm torn.  Tonight at 7 Central is Easter Parade but The Ten Commandments is on ABC at 6.

 

Fred Astaire and Judy Garland singing and dancing or Ann Baxter and her cardboard acting?  Again, I'm torn.

 

EDIT: Jeffrey Hunter was actually 42 when he died.  Thank you to Cobb Salad for the correction.

Edited by bmoore4026

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It's Easter, so we've got lots of Biblical Epics today.

 

Roma Downey and Mark Burnett can kiss off for all I care.  King of Kings and Jesus of Nazareth all the way, baby!  I just wish they didn't get such a handsome actor to play Jesus.  Jeffrey Hunter = Be still my heart.  Oooooo, I'm gonna go to Hell for liking my sexy Jesus.

 

And like many life of Jesus movies, all the Romans are British.  And Salome can't act to save her own life.

 

You'd think they'd get a more passionate and angry sounding actor for John the Baptist though.  Michael York in Jesus of Nazareth did a much better job.  Olivia Hussey as Mary, too.

 

It's too bad Jeffrey Hunter's career wasn't bigger than it was.  He was handsome.  He could act a bit.  He died rather young though (36, I believe).  Would things have been different had he been the star of Star Trek?  Better remembered, I mean.

 

Jeffrey Hunter was in his 42 when he died (due to a blow to the head that later became serious enough to cause a stroke that killed him). He was also in The Searchers with John Wayne, and gave a good performance. I'm not sure if Star Trek would have made him a big TV star but it would have been a different series since he was no William Shatner!

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