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Finishing up Rod Steiger's day with Running the Arrow.  Steiger plays an un-Reconstructed Confederate soldier who heads west after the war.  He falls in with a Sioux played by -- I kid you not -- Jay C. Flippen in a short black wig (think Moe from the Three Stooges).  Flippen speaks English with no accent, and I'm confused as hell.  He and Steiger communicate with no problem.  All is revealed later on, when Steiger's Sioux wife compliments him on speaking her language -- with no accent, even though Steiger is speaking English.  Apparently he and Flippen spent enough time together for Steiger to learn to speak the Sioux language -- without an accent.

So the writers have decided that everyone will just speak English but we're supposed to believe the Sioux are speaking Sioux and Steiger is speaking Sioux when he's with the Sioux.  At least I think that's what happened.

The movie is entertaining, but the language thing is SO weird.  And Jay C. Flippen as a Sioux?  Terrible casting choice, but he's good in the role, and has some really funny lines.

One scene I liked was at the beginning of the movie.  Steiger's character is at Appomattox when Lee signs the surrender.  He picks up a rifle and takes aim at Grant, but is stopped by a doctor.  "If you shoot Grant, you'll have to shoot Lee too, else he'll die of the shame."

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36 minutes ago, AuntiePam said:

So the writers have decided that everyone will just speak English but we're supposed to believe the Sioux are speaking Sioux and Steiger is speaking Sioux when he's with the Sioux.  At least I think that's what happened.

The movie itself sounds strange for sure (now I wish I'd caught it!), but what's described there is how language works in any movie set in a non-English-speaking environment. They speak their own language (German in Amadeus; whatever-they-speak-in-that-galaxy-far-far-away in the Star Wars series), and we hear English. Sometimes a movie switches between scenes from English to Other-as-English, and that's a standard convention too.

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3 hours ago, Rinaldo said:

The movie itself sounds strange for sure (now I wish I'd caught it!), but what's described there is how language works in any movie set in a non-English-speaking environment. They speak their own language (German in Amadeus; whatever-they-speak-in-that-galaxy-far-far-away in the Star Wars series), and we hear English. Sometimes a movie switches between scenes from English to Other-as-English, and that's a standard convention too.

That's true, I hadn't thought of it that way.  The difference is that with westerns, there are usually scenes where we see the characters overcoming the language barrier.  Sometimes there'll be a scout who knows both languages, or something explaining why they can communicate.  Here, it happened so quickly. 

I think if Steiger's first encounter had been with someone who looked remotely Native American, it wouldn't have been so discombobulating.  Jay C. Flippen? 

If it's on again, it's worth watching.  Steiger does a fine Scots-Irish accent, and the theme of "where do I belong?" is done thoughtfully. 

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Wait Until Dark is on tonight? Such a good film!! I first saw a reference to it in Stephen King’s nonfiction book Danse Macabre, where he calls Alan Arkin’s Harry Roat, Jr. one of the best villains in film history. But I didn’t watch it until a few years later when my sister checked it out of the video store and insisted we watch it in the darkened basement with all the lights out. She kept her eye on me and was very pleased to see me leap out of my chair at the appropriate moment. (I introduced the film to a college friend a few years later in exactly the same way, with the exact same reaction from her at the same minute.) 

Seeing Arkin in The In-Laws is such a huge contrast to his turn here.

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Forgot to add (regarding Run of the Arrow), Steiger's mother is played by Olive Carey (Mrs. Jorgenson in The Searchers).  The movie also has Ralph Meeker, Brian Keith, and Charles Bronson.  The movie poster on the IMdB page is atrocious -- a Native American woman wearing a very short leather dress and holding up two arrows in a war-like stance.  Steiger's Sioux wife was not at all like that.

And the movie was directed by Samuel Fuller, who knows how to do a war movie.

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2 hours ago, AuntiePam said:

The movie also has Ralph Meeker, Brian Keith, and Charles Bronson. 

It does?!? Why didn't my DVR grab it for me? It's under orders to find whatever Ralph Meeker it can. (Recently it gave me Paths of Glory, The Naked Spur (unexpectedly good), and an episode each of Route 66 and The Green Hornet.) I've been on a bit of a Ralph Meeker kick lately, after seeing the clip of the original stage cast of Picnic that's on YouTube. (He and Janice Rule were so right for the main roles, it made me hungry for more.) I don't know... maybe it did show up on the DVR and I thoughtlessly trashed it. Thanks for the good descriptions of it, in any case.

Edited by Rinaldo
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Just watched The Petrified Forest (1936). What great movie! Really impressed. Best I've seen Leslie Howard in anything and Bogie was awesome as the gangster. 

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On ‎8‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 6:56 PM, AuntiePam said:

My Name is Nobody is my favorite, but Fistful is a solid #2, especially for Steiger's performance.  What a great character. 

"Once Upon a Time in the West" is my favorite.  It's one of those movies that if I run across it I have to keep watching.  All of Sergio Leone's movies are very watchable (even "The Colossus of Rhodes," one of the better peplums).  "Duck ,You Sucker" is interesting because it is more of a comedy, not what one would expect from Leone, though he had comic moments in other films.

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3 hours ago, Tom Holmberg said:

Once Upon a Time in the West is my favorite.  It's one of those movies that if I run across it I have to keep watching.

Once Upon a Time in the West is my favorite too. (Although I don't know if I could reliably keep watching if I stumbled on it -- that's nearly a 3-hour commitment!!) I saw it under memorable circumstances too: It had achieved nearly mythic status among American movie buffs in the early 1970s, after its heavily cut US release had failed, so that few here had seen it and those few in a mutilated form, even as we heard how highly it was regarded in Europe.

Then in my summer of 1973 in Europe (paid for with my army discharge money), I spent four days in Amsterdam and saw that OUaTitW was playing at full length, in English (unlike Germany, the Netherlands didn't have a big enough audience to justify making dubbed versions). I got walking directions from the hostel desk and made my way there, to enjoy it in the midst of an otherwise Dutch audience. What an experience. The operatic space and time of it (aided by Ennio Morricone's music) and particular -- everyone says it I know, but it's true -- seeing Henry Fonda as an irredeemable monster, for the only time in his career. Just a great experience all around.

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26 minutes ago, Rinaldo said:

Once Upon a Time in the West is my favorite too. (Although I don't know if I could reliably keep watching if I stumbled on it -- that's nearly a 3-hour commitment!!)

Yes, it's a curse!  I have the same reaction when  I stumble upon "Godfather II", I get sucked into watching it.

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