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SNL Classic: Re-Airings, Past Casts, Past Hosts, Everything Past!

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So NBC announced that they will air one classic episode per season before the live shows at 10pm on Saturdays.  These will be 60 minute edited versions of the original shows.  It might be fun trying to predict which episodes they choose to air.   Each show will feature the musical guest as well.  I heard they are calling these episodes collectively "Vintage SNL".

 

The episode tomorrow night  is no surprise.  It's the Richard Pryor show from the first season.  The musical guest was Gil Scott-Heron.  I think it will be interesting to see how much of the legendary "word association"  sketch  between Pryor and Chevy Chase they will run now.

 

It looks like they are going to jump around with the episodes.  The one scheduled for next week is from the 25th season with Christopher Walken and Christina Aguilera.

 

 

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Ooh - I am curious to see how much they play the word associate sketch as well.  That episode also has my favorite Samurai sketch, where Richard Pryor and John Belushi are hotel clerks fighting to see who will carry the customer's bags upstairs.

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I'm really happy that I hit info on the guide and realized they were going to air vintage SNL 5 minutes before it started.  I'd much rather see the older episodes.

 

I've never seen this episode in its entirety, just the clips that usually make the retrospectives.

 

Your mama-san.  And Belushi breaks character after Samurai Pryor breaks the desk. lol

 

I'm surprised that they didn't censor the word association sketch despite the disclaimer at the beginning about this being the 70s.  Now they need a disclaimer for the early 80s along the lines of 'some of this is not funny, its the early 80s and Lorne quit for a while'.

 

Interesting that one of Eddie Murphy's sketches, where he goes around the city disguised as a white man, had already been a sketch idea in season one.

 

Questions about the Albert Brooks sketch.  Did they bleep the original?  The Doctor's voice seemed familiar, was that someone famous or am I imagining things?

 

SNL did alcoholic Muppets from outer-space who sing the drinking song from Jaws? 

Edited by ParadoxLost
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According to IMDB, the doctor was Harry Shearer.  It was odd seeing the Muppets, but hearing Ralph the Dog and Fozzie Bear's voices.

 

All in all, it was OK. I had seen the Word Association sketch numerous times, and that was still funny, but the rest underwhelmed me. Needed more Gilda.

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All in all, it was OK. I had seen the Word Association sketch numerous times, and that was still funny, but the rest underwhelmed me. Needed more Gilda.

 

The choices made for what sketches to include is kind of interesting.  I think they edited to encapsulate the evolution of SNL instead of going straight to the funniest sketches.  They didn't include the Exorcist sketch which is usually mentioned with word association and Samurai as what makes this episode stand out.  Instead they showed the Albert Brooks short and the Muppets which were supposed to be staples of SNL and eventually got dropped.

 

Early in season one, the cast had episodes they were barely in which is kind of true of this edited down version.  At least we've got four more shots to see more of the original cast.

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Where the hell was the Exorcist sketch? I'm pissed that they left it out and showed that forgettable Albert Brooks bit instead. I was all set to watch it so-thanks a lot for nothing.

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Considering they left in the two segments resulting in three utterances of the N-word (and today I learned that that word appeared multiple times in this episode--good choice with the disclaimer, NBC), I think I would rather have seen the The Exorcist segment over the Albert Brooks one too.  That one just fell flat for me.

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 I think I would rather have seen the The Exorcist segment over the Albert Brooks one too.  That one just fell flat for me.

 

The Albert Brooks sketch was just unbearably long.  I kept wondering if it was referring to some real scandal going on at the time that would have made it funny.

 

Considering they left in the two segments resulting in three utterances of the N-word (and today I learned that that word appeared multiple times in this episode--good choice with the disclaimer, NBC),

 

 

I suspect they felt they had to leave the Chase/Pryor sketch in and unedited because of how famous it is.  I think they left the second stand up in to underline the disclaimer and point out exactly how many times the utterance was made to give themselves more cover on airing the word association sketch unedited.

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"THE BED! MUST BE! ON THE FLOOR! THE BED! MUST BE! ON THE FLOOR! THE BED! MUST BE! ON THE FLOOR! [thud] THE BED! IS ON! MY FOOT!!!!" Damn, thanks for reminding me of the piss-poor decision to edit out The Exorcist II. I mean, good to keep "Samurai Hotel" and "Word Association," but what about something for the people who never saw the reruns like I did as a kid.

 

And it's weird to see Gilda as Emily without her calling Jane Curtain a bitch. Just sayin'.

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I just watched the Exorcist sketch.  What is great about it is that Laraine Newman broke Richard Pryor when she called him a sucker.  He had a huge grin on his face and it took him awhile to recover.  That alone deserves to get it on air.

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Damn, now I'm mad about something that aired before I was born.

 

"YOUR MOTHER SEWS SOCKS THAT SMELL!!" Good times. Why did we need to see drunken Muppets?

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I actually like the Muppet sketch, primarily because I could actually tell they were Muppets (and muppets aren't supposed to be drunk of their asses) before the tag at the end revealed Jim Henson was involved.  Even the sketches that could have been funnier were interesting in a time capsule / ' hey I recognize that but this was before I was born and how is that possible' kind of way.

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It was nice to see an old episode on TV, especially the Richard Pryor one.  The very first Samurai sketch with him and John dueling is a classic.  But dammit, now I miss Richard, John and Gilda all over again :(

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Your mama-san.  Heh. 

 

I think my favorite part of following the forty years will be the weekend update. Nice shot at Bedtime for Bonzo, and so many years before he actually became president and they had another full 8 years to make that joke.

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I enjoyed seeing this Richard Pryor ep again. I saw it originally -- Yes, I'm that old -- and I don't think I'd seen it since. There were so many bits that I'd forgotten about, like Chevy Chase during WU not realizing he was on the air, doing or saying something inappropriate. I liked that the news items were short and almost throwaway, like the photo of clowns as Chevy talked about the Democratic candidates.

 

It was pretty amazing seeing the Word Association sketch, particularly when Chevy says the N-word because nowadays if that happened -- if it ever could -- I'm sure the audience would gasp. 

 

I kept falling asleep during the Albert Brooks film. It was interminable. What was the point of it?

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So the episode this next week will be the one with the Blue Oyster Cult-More Cowbell sketch.

 

Great.  Maybe someone will finally explain to me what Is so spectacular about it.  Its one sketch that is hailed as one of the greatest SNL sketches ever and I've never understood why.  Its ok and mildly funny but I really have no idea why it won awards and makes 'best of' lists.

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My cable guide shows a Steve Martin/Blues Brothers episode from '78 for tonight.

I just checked, and my program guide does too.

 

I apologize for the mix up.  I was using information from a different forum. 

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I think this is the one that has the dancing skit between Steve Martin and Gilda Radner that he showed when he did the SNL tribute after she passed away.

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Oh, that would be wonderful to see again.  I remember him tearing up on SNL the night of the day she died, and him saying about that video, "how great she was, and how young I looked."  It was heartbreaking, and would add a new meaning to seeing that dancing episode again. 

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 My cable guide shows a Steve Martin/Blues Brothers episode from '78 for tonight.

 

Wait, so they totally skipped over Season 2? Weird. 

 

This is considered one of the best SNL episodes of all time and with good reason. 

 

Damn, that dance scene was just so......them and then. Sweet, nostalgic, heartbreaking and glorious.

 

Yeah it really was. I like it when SNL occasionally goes the route of heartwarming and sentimental. Whether it's a short, a tribute, or a sendoff to a cast member who's departing -- it doesn't matter. It's just nice to see them go that route every so often. So long as they don't make a habit of it.

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Except, the 1978 episode was not sentimental -- I saw it then, and it was just funny!  It's only because of 1989 that now it is so heartbreaking.  In 1978 it was just another wild and crazy episode.  And Steve Martin was indeed so young! 

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Yeah I may have misspoke there. I mean it's okay if it's funny but if there's a slight heartwarming vibe to it, that's okay with me. 

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I absolutely love and adore the dance sketch with Gilda and Steve. Its the perfect combination of sweet and funny. The whole episode is wonderful from the Czech brothers to King Tut. 

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What I find most interesting about this episode is that its clear that there is still something very experimental about it.  Its got a lot of different types of voices and comedy.  The Wild and Crazy Guys, Todd/Lisa, and Medieval Barber sketches are pre-cursors to other famous sketches that have been seen again in other forms over the years; but I don't think the Blues Brothers and Martin/Radner sketch is something they'd come up with much less put on air anymore.

 

At the end it was also startling how small and versatile the cast is compared to today.

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That was a good Garret Morris clip. He was one of my least favorite performers. Watching him in the Steve Martin ep confirmed that. However, one thing of his I loved was when he did the WU recap for the hearing impaired. "OUR TOP STORY TONIGHT…!"

 

It was great seeing that Steve Martin ep again. The Wild and Crazy Guys is wonderful. Love Jane Curtain and Dan Ackroyd in WU. "Jane, you ignorant slut," or whatever his variation was. Of course the Martin/Radnor dance was sweet and funny.

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Looks like we are getting Alec Baldwin/ B-52's from 1990 with "The Diner" according to NBC's website.  I'm so glad they changed that around to honor Jan Hooks.

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I attended a panel for Jack McBrayer's show on Adult Swim with Triumph the Insult Comic Dog. They ended it with that sketch . . . Robert Smigel was going on about how good an actress Jan Hooks was. And it was a good sketch. Kinda hard to watch something where two people have passed on (Phil Hartman is in there), but you get to see a young Alec Baldwin, and that's pretty cool.

 

ETA: Was this the first time Alec hosted the show?

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So happy to see them have an episode with Jan Hooks so prominent.

 

On a shallow note; Wow. Young Alec Baldwin was HAWT!

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I'd forgotten how much I loved old SNL.  Phil Hartman and Jan Hooks were magic together.  And as much as I loathe present day Alec Baldwin, 'The Diner' was fabulous.

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Wow! That was an awesome vintage episode! I was watching SNL at the time, but I was in elementary school, so I have vague memories.

 

The only annoying thing is they did 2 B-52 musical performances. Why not sub 1 out for a Weekend Update or another sketch?

 

I don't mind having 1 musical performance in these old episodes, but 2 is too much. The focus should be in the cast. Besides, the first B-52s song wasn't even Love Shack, or a hit.

 

Yes, the tribute to Jan was great. I am awestruck at how beautiful she was.

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Watching Phil Hartman is painful. He was brilliant and amazing in everything he did. I can't watch him without feeling incredibly sad that he was taken far too early.

I'm enjoying the nostalgia in all of these episodes, but there's definitley some sadness throughout.

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It was a great showcase for Jan, with both the "diner" sketch and Greta Garbo.

 

I totally forgot the "Greenhilly" sketch where Alec kisses all the women and then Phil! They set that up perfectly where when he shows up the audience knows whats going to happen.

 

Also love the "nude talk show" sketch. Besides a surprise appearance of a then unknown writer named Conan O'Brien my favorite part is when Nora Dunn's TV executive tells him "sex phone lines won't sponsor a nude talk show!" and Jon Lovitz in a determined way of "I think they will!" Also the part where he's interviewing Jan Hook's porn star and they're both nude and it has that appropriately sleazy vibe.

 

Also forgotten about Mike Myers' character Middle Aged Man. Favorite line is how the difference between him and his father "Retired Man" is that he can hook up a VCR!

 

SNL really was sophisticated and adult back in 1990 and I wonder what happened after that. Then I remember that spring In Living Color came out, which I loved being in middle school and still have great memories for but I think the outrageousness of that show and it's success prompted Lorne to hire younger and more hipper performers the next season.

Edited by VCRTracking
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Aside from swooning over Alec Baldwin circa 1990, it certainly laid the groundwork of him becoming one of the most popular hosts ever.  You probably wouldn't think of most of the sketches aired would become "classics" but I became aware a lot of them later on (Conan has mentioned the nude talk show one ages ago.)

 

Also, what a great show case for Jan Hooks.  The Greta Garbo still has me laughing because it was so physically demanding, which is something that is really lacking now with the current players. 

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That was a terrific ep. The diner scene is fantastic. Everyone in it is great. Kevin Nealon and Phil Hartman are so sweet as Roy and Earl. Of course the banter betw Jan Hooks and Alec Baldwin is perfect. So many great lines. Maybe my favorite is "Sitting on that stool like he's doing it a favor."

 

Did Conan write Nude Talk Show? Also, I was wondering why the audience laughed so wildly at Al Goldstein's Midnight Blue. He says something about Continental Airlines -- Was that in the news at the time? Oh, and was that Al Franken?

 

I didn't see this ep originally. Was Middle-Aged Man a recurring character?

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Yes, this was Alec Baldwin's first time hosting and yes, "Al Goldstein" was Al Franken.

What a great episode. It really does seem like younger blockbuster leading man Alec Baldwin and older sitcom star Alec Baldwin are completely different people. I can't improve upon the comments above on the diner sketch, and I agree it was weird to have left in the two B-52s performances. Did "Middle-aged Man" ever appear again? I'm 41 and was watching fairly regularly by this point, and I don't recall ever having seen that.

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Yeah, Middle Aged Man showed up a few more times. Chris Farley once appeared with him as his sidekick "Drinking Buddy".

Edited by VCRTracking

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Middle-Aged Man appeared at least once more.  I wanna say with George Wendt as Retired Man.

 

Whenever I hear Don Pardo's voice in my head, this is the cast he is reading. Particularly the way he drew out "Joooohn Lovittssss."  I oved everything about this episode, even both B-52's songs.  I thought it was weird they didn't do Love Shack, but then I remembered that Love Shack was big the previous fall, but Cosmic Thing and Channel Z were getting a lot of play then. And frankly I just loved seeing Fred hop around like that.  On the Nude Talk Show sketch, who was the not-Conan guy?

 

I am sure for the next week I am going to have "Pie's never free" going through my head.

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I am sure for the next week I am going to have "Pie's never free" going through my head.

"You shouldn't give away your pie with breakfast. It makes you look cheap."

 

Such great writing.

 

"You better watch it, cowboy."

"I been watching it since you walked over here."

"Yeah, couldn't help noticing what you were looking at, too."

"I'm not looking at anything that ain't showing."

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