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I knew there was a reason why I hated the nanny (still don't care enough to remember her name). Girl, you put yourself in that position. Aramis may have seduced you but it was your choice to sleep with him even though you knew it could lead to serious consequences.

 

I know it wasn't supposed to be funny but I laughed so hard at the noises Treville was making while he was being treated. I just couldn't take that scene seriously.

 

I had a serious "I don't want to live on this planet anymore" moment at the end of the episode. What has Rochefort done to deserve King's trust? He spent the whole season plotting how to ruin France and yet Louis still treats him like his BFF. WTF show?

 

I hate villains who never lose.

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I had a serious "I don't want to live on this planet anymore" moment at the end of the episode. What has Rochefort done to deserve King's trust? He spent the whole season plotting how to ruin France and yet Louis still treats him like his BFF. WTF show?

Rochefort is currently the only person in Louis' inner circle who always sucks up to him, always agrees with him, and never so much as hints that he might be wrong about anything. That's why Louis loves him so much. Because Louis has never matured past 8 years of age. It's also the reason Rochefort always wins. He stacks the game by simply doing whatever Louis will appreciate, without regard for any other considerations such as decency or honour or compassion, which is what holds everyone else back - while they're trying to do the right thing and juggling all kinds of different priorities, he's only interested in currying favour and pursues that goal singlemindedly.

 

I couldn't take him seriously, the way he walked out of Louis' room holding his hand up so everyone could see the ring - it just looked childish.

 

Also, while I did appreciate Rochefort actually being proactive for once, I couldn't see his motivation. He's been so passive and reactive all season, just letting things happen around him and taking his opportunities where they arise. So what made him suddenly decide to hire a pair of assassins and start picking off his hitherto unseen rivals for power? Did he just get tired of waiting for Louis to promote him?

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I was thinking that it would have made more sense for Milady to keep the assassin alive, to tell her story about Rochefort being a Spanish spy. Now Milady knows the secret, but there's no one to back her up. Milady could have rescued the woman and taken the story public. I guess Milady had a chance, but chose murder once again. I found the scene mildly disturbing, actually.

 

I like Aramis, but could he possibly be more naïve?

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Richelieu, still right from the grave.

 

Please forward this to BBCAmerica, for the Musketeer t-shirt collection.

 

Aw, hell -- I'm just gonna get a sharpie and write it on a Hanes tagless.

I was very pleased that Aramis was shown to be medically skillful, but only up to a point, and when he reached that point, he owned up to it and gave way to the doctor. All of that seemed like as it should be for a soldier who was frequently left to his own devices in the field.

 

Exactly right, DCWash.  It's little touches like this that add depth & truth to the characters and make this show so darn watchable! despite the bungling of the main villains (who "never lose"; again, exactly right).

Edited by voiceover
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The whole crucifix business was really contrived. The writers didn't need to make Rochefort even more crazy and jealous. It seems OOC of Anne to regift. I did find Rochefort's top really distracting. He really is very sleazy.

 

 

I was thinking that it would have made more sense for Milady to keep the assassin alive, to tell her story about Rochefort being a Spanish spy. Now Milady knows the secret, but there's no one to back her up. Milady could have rescued the woman and taken the story public. I guess Milady had a chance, but chose murder once again. I found the scene mildly disturbing, actually.

 

It was disturbing. Even though we've been served the whole "Milady just wants to be wealthy and more legitimate" storyline lately, that woman is a murderer and ruthless especially when she's down. It's a good reminder about how bad she is and why there is Athos angst in the first place. They have a lot of UST, but watching her kill that assassin drove home how dangerous Milady is.

 

I did find it funny how she said she had many names except she only ever uses her odd Milady de Winter one.

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I did find Rochefort's top really distracting. He really is very sleazy.

 

Just so! I really want for a character like, say, a great-aunt of Louis, a true aristocrat who knows the value of everything and the price of nothing, who respects talent, hard work, fairness, honesty, kindness and courage no matter what the social class, to come along and in her outspoken way ask him about those inappropriate shirts of his. Extra points if she refers to him as a "vulgar little man," because he is. 

 

On the flip side, for every time I want to yell at Rochefort to tighten up the lacing on his tunic, I see Porthos and think how elegant and gallant he looks, without being over the top. They're dressing him this year like someone out of a Velazquez or El Greco painting, and it really works on him. Not all the time--which works, too; I mean, he's got work clothes and he's got dress clothes--but when he's at court. 

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Argh! I went from happiness last week at the Constance and D'artagnan I love you scene to, oh COME ON!, this week when her husband cursed them both with his dying breath. I love this show SO much, but I am going to be seriously pissed off if they continue to allow Rochefort to continue to come out on top over and over.

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I will say that it was not very kind of Anne to give away a cross she had been given by Rochefort. Even more so since she put Aramis on the spot in Season 1 when he gave it to Ninon de la Roque (was that her name?) for comfort ("I did not expect my gift to you around the Comtesse's neck").

Seriously, does she not have another crucifix to give Baby Daddy that wasn't given to her by Rochefort? That shit is cold, Anne. Also, Aramis and Anne getting so smoochy around each other in front of Marguerite last week was not bright. Now you've pissed her off and she's getting black mailed. 

 

I kind of love what a dandy Porthos is. And there was some quality Athos/Porthos detective work. I liked the villains this week. 

 

Constance/D'Artagnan. Trying to care. 

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I saw some comments on Tumblr wondering how Marguerite managed to get the cross from around Aramis's neck without him noticing - it ties in with something I've noticed a lot on this show: no clasps. All necklaces are tied with ribbons, hence how Marguerite was able to remove Aramis's so easily: she just had to loosen the ribbon while hugging him, pretend to be caressing his neck. Much easier than unfastening a clasp! And they probably came loose all the time, which was why it was so easy for him to believe it had fallen off somewhere.

 

The invention of the clasp was a wonderful thing!

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Most clasps are machine-made (there's a steel spring inside). Hand-made clasps tend to be toggle-style, or as stated, a ribbon. Or, a chain long enough to slip over one's head, and if you look at old paintings, yes, long chains.

 

Judging from the length of the crucifix on Aramis, it would have been a single chain that slipped over his head. We're not supposed to ask "how," just accept it and move on.

Edited by ennui

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Judging from the length of the crucifix on Aramis, it would have been a single chain that slipped over his head. We're not supposed to ask "how," just accept it and move on.

Like I said: it's on a ribbon, which is tied around the neck, simple enough to pull loose. We've seen the loose ends of it.

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I did find it funny how she said she had many names except she only ever uses her odd Milady de Winter one.

 

That remark piqued my interest too.  Having never read Dumas' original works, I checked out Wikipedia for Milady De Winter.   According to the novels, she has indeed had several names -- in fact, she was probably using a fake name when Athos met her.    (Ironically, if the show followed the novels, I think the audience would have more sympathy for Milady and might see Athos as a villain for what he did to her -- it's a slightly different story in the novels.)

 

I had to laugh at how the show's treatment of Louis this episode: they sent him to bed.

Edited by millennium

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That remark piqued my interest too.  Having never read Dumas' original works, I checked out Wikipedia for Milady De Winter.   According to the novels, she has indeed had several names -- in fact, she was probably using a fake name when Athos met her.    (Ironically, if the show followed the novels, I think the audience would have more sympathy for Milady and might see Athos as a villain for what he did to her -- it's a slightly different story in the novels.)

 

Yes, she did have a lot names in the book. I'm not sure why they haven't used that aspect of the character. It makes our Milady a bit silly to be honest. Yes, Athos in the books is different, but Milady in the book is still very villainous.

 

It does remind me that I like the core three Musketeers on this show more than I do in the book.

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I had to laugh at how the show's treatment of Louis this episode: they sent him to bed.

I loved Athos's little dig at him earlier when the fake(Louise) said that she haven't seen the king since they were children and Athos comes back with "he's barely changed" lol and his "here we go again with this bullshyt " face when Rochfort started in on them at the church.

Speaking of Rochfort like he done lost his mind long before he was a prisoner but I felt a little sympathy for him when he was talking about Anne and the neckless. But than I snapped out of it.

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Like I said: it's on a ribbon, which is tied around the neck, simple enough to pull loose. We've seen the loose ends of it.

I wasn't disputing your assessment, just thinking about reality.

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Yes, she did have a lot names in the book. I'm not sure why they haven't used that aspect of the character. It makes our Milady a bit silly to be honest.

 

The one I find a bit weird is that we have never learned why she calls herself Milady de Winter - or did I miss something? In the books, it's simply because she was married to a man of that name for a time. But other names are there: Athos has been calling her Anne, which indicates that the show might be going with the name by which Dumas's Athos knew Milady when he met her, Anne Breuil. And she goes by Comtesse de La Fère, which leaves only two other names from the books that the show hasn't used (yet), and she has played Madame de la Chapelle during the Ninon de la Roque case, a name I don't reall from the books. Also, I seem to recall from Season 1 that Athos said that she has gone by many names (in the Rebellious Woman episode) - or is my poor mind mixing up books and show? So maybe there is more to come. I wouldn't be surprised if they did one episode with Lord de Winter sometime (in the books her former husband's older brother).

 

One word on the nanny: I have never liked the character of Marguerite, I think she is silly and needy and frankly rather bland, but I think I am feeling a bit more interested in her, now that she has become Rochefort's spy. What I don't get: if she thinks the shame of hearing about her affair would be hard on her father, why was she fishing for a love declaration from Aramis? Why was she so vexed when he withdrew - leaving aside for the moment the way he did it, which, yes, was a bit generic and without grace ("It's for your own good - we had a good time - let's stay friends")? And was she not worried that she might get pregnant, unmarried? Would that type of shame not also have been hard on her father? Or would she not have cared if she'd had Aramis to ride into the sunset together? I would have appreciated if they had given the character a bit more meat, so to speak, especially since it looks like she is going to have a semi-important role for a while now.

Edited by Marie Claudine
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What I don't get: if she thinks the shame of hearing about her affair would be hard on her father, why was she fishing for a love declaration from Aramis? Why was she so vexed when he withdrew - leaving aside for the moment the way he did it, which, yes, was a bit generic and without grace ("It's for your own good - we had a good time - let's stay friends")? And was she not worried that she might get pregnant, unmarried?

I think she was fishing for a declaration of love, and a proposal. I think she said she got the job at the Louvre to find a good match. If she had gotten pregnant, Aramis would have been forced to marry her, I think.
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I just now started watching this show with season one. So, I haven't even seen season two, but I have to chime in.

 

I haaaate the idea of Aramis and Anne. I know that The Man in the Iron Mask (novel) hints that Aramis may have been Louis XIV's father, while the movie hints it was D'Artagnan. History says the Queen and the Cardinal had an affair, and the Cardinal was the father.

Eh. I just know that #1, I don't particularly like the actress who plays the Queen, and because of her don't like this version of Anne.

Add to that that, for a reason I haven't yet figured out, I just don't need Aramis in a serious romance. It's probably because in most versions and in novel canon, I know he becomes a priest, and I hate to think that in this version, he'll do it because he can't have Anne.

It's the "by a lot" wrong reason to be a priest, and I hope they don't go there.

She's kind of a big fat twit, and I ascribe Aramis, EVERY version, as to having better taste than to be with an airhead.

 

Oh, and MIlady should never, ever be a true ally to the Musketeers. For reasons that I shouldn't even have to explain. But I will: she's a vile murderer and has never shown any desire to be redeemed and I want better for Athos and the others, than to be saddled with that malicious, murderous harpy.

Hated her in the novel, hate her in pretty much every version, as that is how it should be.

I'm personally gonna pop popcorn if they do the canon route of having her executed. Again. :)

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I think she was fishing for a declaration of love, and a proposal.

 

You are probably right. I just thought, the Royal nanny would probably be some kind of noble woman (although I shouldn't keep forgetting that this is the show where the queen makes a random cloth merchant's wife her closest confidante :-)!), and Aramis's "I'm beneath you" speeches also seemed to point towards her higher station. If she were nobility, her father would never have let her marry a musketeer, would he?

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Aramis's "I'm beneath you" speeches also seemed to point towards her higher station

Typical man. "I'm not good enough for you, you can do better, it's not you, it's me."

I think being a musketeer probably had potential. If you do something heroic, the king might grant you a title and some land. I'm just guessing, though.

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From what I've read about the real-life Musketeers, you had to be pretty high-ranking to be appointed to the job. I've had the impression that Dumas and the later interpreters of Dumas pretty much stuck to that, with the exception of Porthos. I've never had the feeling that Aramis and D'Artagnon came from peasant stock, for instance, or could even be classified as bourgeoisie. Which doesn't mean they're the highest of aristocrats, either, but somewhere on the upper end of the scale. As to why Porthos, the kid from the slums, got to be a Musketeer...maybe he saved somebody important's life or something? Something that proved his exceptional ability, at any rate.

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To be honest, I was a bit surprised that Milady de Winter was the one who showed up in the fake Louisa's cell-- I was expecting Rochefort. She would be a liability, given that she knows he is a Spanish spy. Of course, it's possible no one would believe, but even insinuating Rochefort is involved with the Spanish could damage his ambitions. So I thought he would show to kill her. Now that Milady knows, though... ah yes, this is good. I would love it if she helped stick it to Rochefort.

 

While I'm not surprised Constance's husband died, I will admit to it being a lot quicker than I would have thought. When they let him go without killing at first, I figured we'd have to wait awhile before he was gotten rid of.

 

Rochefort with that ring was ridiculous. Ugh, I can not wait until he gets his comeuppance.

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Rochefort with that ring was ridiculous.

 

No kidding! This acting choice, I mean the ridiculous way of raising the hand with the ring like a shield, and that pseudo important look that accompanied it, really made me giggle. I actually usually like Marc Warren, but his choices for Rochefort are not really anything to write home about, at least in my opinion.

 

From what I've read about the real-life Musketeers, you had to be pretty high-ranking to be appointed to the job.

 

I agree. The Musketeers were a junior guard regiment, which means getting in was easier than getting into the Garde du Corps or the chevau-légers (a type of light cavalry). But still, the Musketeers had many, many sons of nobles, usually impoverished nobles and usually second or third sons, who hadn't been eligible for the senior guard regiments, but nobles nontheless. In the novels, all four protagonists are from some kind of noble backgrounds, judging by their full names.

But on the show? When it was revealed that Athos was the Comte de la Fère, Aramis did not react like a fellow nobleman, asking questions about the number of Athos's servants and such. So I am not sure where the show is going with Aramis's and d'Artagnan's backgrounds. But more importantly, they keep saying they have no money and no glory and that they are just soldiers, and Marguerite says she needs a prestigeous marriage. Plus, she kept seeing on a daily basis that the king did not favour his musketeers, so hopes for lands and titles would have been far-fetched. Therefore, it seemed to me that Aramis was never the kind of catch that could have pleased Marguerite's father.

 

But then again, this is the show where the adulterous wife of some city cloth merchant becomes the queen's bestie overnight, because the queen likes the man who is friends with that lady's lodger (a royal connection indeed), and nobody objects :-). So you guys are probably right when you suggest that Marguerite was most likely fishing for marriage.

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Doesn't Aramis character in all adaptions even the book have him in relationships with powerful rich women?

I remember in the book that the Musketeers had to find ways to get money to buy their uniform and weapons.

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Doesn't Aramis character in all adaptions even the book have him in relationships with powerful rich women?

 

Yes, he does. If I recalll though, he is the typical affair guy, going after women who have husbands or other prospects. He's a disgraced former novice (invloving a story with a woman) who I think duelled against the king's rules, therefore had to lay low and become a soldier and has no access to family money; he's funded to a large extent by his rich mistresses and patronesses.

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Porthos uncovers the truth about his parentage and demands answers from his new found father. As he learns more about his past, Porthos questions his place in the Musketeers regiment. However the Musketeers have suspicions about Porthos’ new family, wondering whether he should trust them. Can they save Porthos from the dangers that lie ahead and where do his true loyalties lie?

 

 

BBC1: March 6, 2015.

BBCA: March 7, 2015.

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I do think it was lame that they killed off the husband so Constance is essentially free. I'd rather the show deal with that. However, I think she might have found her calling as a nurse. I loved the entire operation scene. "If I boil the instruments, it's good. I have no idea why." The doctor was so nice to give credit to everyone. 

 

I had no idea the princess was a fake, until the reveal. I liked that she wasn't a total mustache twirler, and seemed to genuinely like D'A. 

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Oh my, the ending was intense! (Eve though it was predictable).

 

For an episode focused on Porthos, it had very little Porthos. Still, I liked the balance between story A and story B. I didn't quite register if Porthos will now inherit the whole estate ("It's bigger than Athos'"), or will it be donated to the state. Probably the latter. Part of me wanted Porthos' father to be a good guy, but I guess Treville had to be in the right. Nice touch with the portrait and childhood memories.

 

I was waiting for the narrative to pick up and start building before the finale, and it seems that it's finally here. Some of the small details from previous episodes finally reappear - I missed this from season 1.

 

Anne and Rocheford finally clash and it's as nasty as one might have suspected. I wonder if the kingdom is so frail a man like Rocheford could just wrap it around his little finger - but he sure acts like nothing could stand between him and what he wants. At least Anne is responsible for his token eyepatch and it's very satisfying. During their scene I was afraid we're going to be treated to a replay from the infamous Reign scene, but - fortunatelly - it didn't come to pass.

 

I still miss Capaldi and his subtle plotting. Rocheford seems to have subtleness of a warhammer, especially when he's dealing with the Queen.

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 I didn't quite register if Porthos will now inherit the whole estate ("It's bigger than Athos'"), or will it be donated to the state. Probably the latter.

I imagine the daughter will inherit, when the father finally dies. Porthos should inherit, as the legitimate son born of his first marriage, but as almost no one knows he actually exists as a son of the house, he'd only have a claim if he chose to make a claim, which he likely won't. His story all season has been about identifying with the musketeers as his only true family, so this story fitted well as the conclusion of that arc, if a little patchily told. I found this episode a little messy, truth be told - a lot of important plot movement going on, but not a great deal of cohesion, possibly for that reason - the story had to do a lot and didn't have a great deal of time to achieve it.

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Knight takes Queen....and in a convent! Aramis has no shame. I guess taking the waters will finally have an effect. Albeit not quite the intended one.

 

This show makes me giggle an inordinate amount.

 

I guess in this case, Richelieu acted a little hastily based on the drunken rants of Louis?

 

I think Athos' final challenge to Richelieu was not too smart. You don't warn the second-most powerful man in the country that you are onto him.

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Best part of the episode: Athos' side eye to Aramis at the pregnancy announcement. If side-eyes could kill, Aramis would have been down.

 

I just tore through the first season in one week. It reminds me of a more grown-up Merlin. It's charming, funny, the chemistry between the leads is off the charts and they are reeeeally nice to look at. I can't wait until Netflix Canada has the second season.

 

And for the first time after many movies and the books, I'm a Porthos fan.

Edited by supposebly
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Porthos' father lied so much and told so many stories, I'm not clear if Porthos is legitimate or illegitimate, if he stands to inherit or not. I did like the dig that his house is bigger than Athos', though. And I do love that we get so many reveals in different episodes of Treville screwing up in his past, in an understandable way, and living to regret it. The implication is that Our Heroes can do the same, even though we don't see them do it since it's a TV show about them being Heroic.

 

I have a sneaky suspicion Constance isn't long for this world. Not only is that true to canon, but it's a convenient romantic story trope that, now that she's confessed her love and is free to pursue it, she'll drop dead of some dastardly or otherwise tragic cause. It seems to me that Milady is being cast as the new Richelieu, in that she's being shown as having complex and not entirely dastardly motives for a villain, so maybe Constance's death wont' be at the hand of her, which is what I've seen in the past, but I think there's some rule somewhere that not heroine can have two decent men in love with her at once and not be punished for it. Besides, she looked like Jo March or Becky Thatcher in that blue dress and with the bangs, and no good can come of that.

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 Besides, she looked like Jo March or Becky Thatcher in that blue dress and with the bangs, and no good can come of that.

 

LOL, the reaction at Casa Millennium to the blue dress scene was "Watch, she'll get killed now."

 

Best thing about this episode was the preview for next week.   And the house where Belgarde lived.

Edited by millennium

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LOL, the reaction at Casa Millennium to the blue dress scene was "Watch, she'll get killed now."

 

I think wearing a baby blue dress in a historic drama is the female equivalent of wearing a red shirt in a sci-fi production.

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I knew Rochefort was making the crucifix into a bigger deal than it really was. It was a symbol of his obsession rather than a deep relationship with Anne. I'm glad the show didn't try to place part of the blame on Anne as I was afraid of that. She was a kid, she's been given countless pieces of jewelry in her lifetime, and it's natural to forget who gave what after years have passed (excluding situations like deathbed or unique gifts). So many other shows would try to justify the obsession by making Rochefort's view be accurate and have Anne be a horrible person who cares so little for others that she intentionally regifts the items she receives. Not going this route is, sadly, a fresh take on the story so bravo show!

Constance looked like Alice. I kept waiting for her to trip and fall through the looking glass.

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I'm disappointed that Anne was so stupid as to tell Constance about the baby being Aramis's. That's the kind of secret that will get both her and the baby killed. Stupid woman.

 

I would hope that Porthos reconsiders his inheritance.

 

When I saw the previews for next week -- eye patch -- I groaned.

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Soooo...I guess the reason Rochefort is such a one-dimensional psycho is that he's a one-season Big Bad.

 

Can anyone remember if Porthos has had that scar from the beginning?  Because I was thinking, it's part of what makes him yummy.  Don't judge me.

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As far as I can remember, Porthos had the scar.

 

I didn't notice their shoulder insignia until Porthos removed it, though, so don't depend on me for details.

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I'm disappointed that Anne was so stupid as to tell Constance about the baby being Aramis's. That's the kind of secret that will get both her and the baby killed. Stupid woman.

I think Anne did it because she is so isolated and along. Now she has a secret that she is carrying all along with no outlet(Aramis doesn't count because she can never really be along with him or share such a secret)she was stressed and needed to talk to someone about it.

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D'Artagnan- slow your roll, dude. The corpse is barely cold. But that doctor is rather cute, so who knows?

 

Hi Liam Cunningham! "Eleanor has her looks, but also her character. Shrewish and spiteful." Porthos' family is really awful- pimps of child sex slaves? Ew! Murdering the girls, too? Ew! Also, telling girls they can be governesses to nice families is still used today when they are trying to get girls. 

 

Take the money, Porthos. It's bigger than Athos', after all. 

 

I find it sort of hilarious that the only consistently clever woman on this show is evil. I'm not sure telling Constance about the baby's heritage was maybe not the best idea. 

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Poor Anne, surely, is the worst protected queen in history (or rather, the history of television?). I know Louis keeps whining about not being protected well enough, but what are they doing with Anne? I get that Rochefort "owns" her guards now, but they still would be there, right? Not in the room with him and her, of course, but in the antechambre. Which means when Constance opened the door, they would have heard the screams. Which means they would have approached, and found Rochefort on top of a struggling queen. And after that, if he said a word about Aramis, everyone would just think that the loon who attacked the queen got even loonier in his attempt to save himself. Alas, the guards where apparantly far away, as was the page of the door.

 

Poor Porthos. Estate or no estate - I'm not sure it wouldn't have been nicer not to have found this family.

 

And I agree: Constance is likely doomed. That blue dress is not a good foreboding for her. As for Rochefort, it seems that either him or Anne and the baby will perish very soon now. So unless they reverse history to the point where the Sun King got murdered in the cradle, Rochefort's prospects seem rather grim.

Edited by Marie Claudine
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The Musketeers must put their lives on the line when the Queen is accused of treason. They have no choice but to steal her away from the Palace to safety, while they search for evidence to prove that Rochefort is a Spanish spy. However it soon transpires that nobody is safe from Rochefort’s grasp, not even the King, with devastating consequences.

 

 

BBC1: March 20, 2015

BBCA: March 14, 2015

Edited by Athena

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I think Rochefort will survive but lose his power and will be reduced to a shadowy figure trying to get his revenge on the Musketeers and Anne. Once disclosed as a Spanish spy, his words against Anne will be rendered dull, so baby Aramis should not be in danger.

 

As for Constance - I'm not sure. I guess what you all say about the blue dress can be foreboding, but... Losing Constance means emo D'Artagnan for Season 3. I'm not sure that's what we want.

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Losing Constance means emo D'Artagnan for Season 3. I'm not sure that's what we want.

 

You are right - not looking forward to that, if it happens. D'Artagnan did get over the violent death of his father in approximately two minutes, but I doubt he would swallow Constance's death quite so easily.

 

Rochefort as a demon in the shadows might be fun. This way, I'd enjoy his obvious personality disorder more than now that he's first minister despite overly evident creepiness and delusions.

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D'Artagnan did get over the violent death of his father in approximately two minutes, but I doubt he would swallow Constance's death quite so easily.

So, you're saying five minutes?

Do we know there's a season 3?

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Finally, a Porthos story! Though too bad his family is batshit crazy. Poor Porthos.

How long has Constance's husband been dead? Sheesh, dudes. I like Dr. Lemay but the proposal seemed sudden and out of the blue; clearly his regard for her has grown but I was expecting a request to court her, not marry her.

I get the feeling that Constance is doomed to, but I hope I'm wrong.

Poor Queen Anne-- Rochefort is one crazy son of a bitch. She probably shouldn't have told Constance, but I think it was bound to happen. I'm glad she stabbed Rochefort, as he totally deserved it for trying to rape her.

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