Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
Rick Kitchen

What Are We Currently Reading?

Recommended Posts

A question:  I decided to purchase Stephen King's The Stand.  I like post-apocalyptic novels, and I recently heard this one recommended.
But, it is over 1,000 pages.  Agh!
Is it worth it?

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post

27 minutes ago, grommit2 said:

A question:  I decided to purchase Stephen King's The Stand.  I like post-apocalyptic novels, and I recently heard this one recommended.
But, it is over 1,000 pages.  Agh!
Is it worth it?

I think it is.  There are aspects that are dated but overall I think it's a good read.

  • Like 2
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
25 minutes ago, grommit2 said:

A question:  I decided to purchase Stephen King's The Stand.  I like post-apocalyptic novels, and I recently heard this one recommended.
But, it is over 1,000 pages.  Agh!
Is it worth it?

Well, I am super biased because I would probably list it as one of my top 20 books ever.  The page count  is necessary because the scope of the story is huge and King really lets his story unfold really well. I think the first half that follows the onset and spread of the plague and how it affects different individuals is the stronger part of the book. It is just really immersive and suspenseful.  The second half that starts the denouement and climax becomes a tick more tropey (but then again I thinking of this in hindsight). But overall, I'd always recommend the book to anybody and I think those 1,000 pages goes by really fast.

  • Like 5
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, grommit2 said:

A question:  I decided to purchase Stephen King's The Stand.  I like post-apocalyptic novels, and I recently heard this one recommended.
But, it is over 1,000 pages.  Agh!
Is it worth it?

I have read it twice (although with a few years in between). I enjoyed it mostly. 
 

   I am now reading The Refugee by Viet Thanh Nguyen. It a Pulitzer Prize winner, although I’m not into it far enough to make any assumptions. 
   I joined a British book club. Every time we complete a book, we put £2 in a jar (I put $3 U.S.). The idea is that we get to take the money that we have accrued at the end of a year and have a splurge. (Hopefully the world will be better and we can really do something with the dosh). 
 

  • Like 2
  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post

3 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

Starting Concrete Rose, the prequel to The Hate U Give and it’s great so far!

Oooh, thanks for reminding me!  **off to the library's website**

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
23 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

Starting Concrete Rose, the prequel to The Hate U Give and it’s great so far!

Put this on hold at my e-library and it will be at least a month. Oh, well. I'm going to start Madeline Miller's Circe meantime. I'm probably the last person in the world to read it, but excited all the same.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I’m listening to the new Anna Lee Huber Verity Kent mystery and I kind of hate it. I think it’s because the narrator sounds like a woman in her early 40s while the main character is 23. It just doesn’t work for me. 

Share this post


Link to post

Currently reading Bram Stoker's Dracula. Technically I read the shortened version many years ago in school, but practically I did not remember anything from the book, so it's like a new read. Can't say that I enjoy it or is anything wow, but I mean I can understand how this would have been good in 19th century.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

Just got an email from my library, Val McDermid's latest Still Life is waiting for me to pick it up.  Page turners make the train commute go quicker!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

With what's been happening, I haven't been able to pick up Obama's book. I NEED to escape into a different and fictional world, so HELLO Nora Roberts' newest trilogy!!!!! The Awakening. Oh Hey, @DearEvette--IRELAND!!! County Clare (where I visited and LOOOOVED!), County Galway!!!

Only Nora can make Ireland come alive and make me feel I'm there! So what if it's a mixture of contemporary and Fey Magick???

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Prequels are tough to write successfully. Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys, is one of the few that works, IMO.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

And when written by women and exchanged for free, this gets mocked as fanfiction...

I loved Wide Sargasso Sea, which just validated my Rochester hate. I love Gatsby but I’m not sure I need more of Nick’s backstory.

Share this post


Link to post
9 hours ago, BlackberryJam said:

I’m not sure I need more of Nick’s backstory.

Same. He's not exactly enigmatic. I don't mean that as a slam; just that I think we get what we need to know from Fitzgerald.

Right now I'm reading Red, White, Blue by Lea Carpenter. It's about a woman who finds out her dad was CIA-adjacent (whether he was an actual employee is a bit unclear) and was involved in shenanigans. The story is told with alternating chapters of her story and how she finds out about her father. It's an interesting way to tell a story. I'm nearly done and don't know where it's going, which is good.

  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post

Well, I just binge-watched Dublin Murders on Starz as I presently have the channel back active in order to watch American Gods. So I have not read any of Tana French's novels previously but this is entirely and completely the kind of thing I love so I have already purchased her next book (in the Dublin Murders series). Wot think any of you who have read the two books on which the TV series was based - should I go back and read them as well or not bother now that I know "what happened"? (I have read the comments on the forum here on Primetimer.)

Just finished reading another absolutely brilliant Jane Casey (in the Maeve Kerrigan series). Between Jane Casey, Val McDermid, Elizabeth George, etc. etc. I feel so lucky to have so much great stuff to read.

 

Share this post


Link to post

As a huge Tana French fan, YES, go back and read the books in order.

There was so much left out or changed in the show, that you don't begin to get a good understanding of the detectives and their relationship. Plus, it will set you up for the rest of the Murder Squad books, because each new narrator was previously introduced as a side character in the previous book.

  • Like 2
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

William Gibson's anthology, Burning Chrome. Short stories he wrote before Neuromancer. And let me just say, they're weird. I only understand the opening story Johnny Mnemonic because I've seen the movie and listen to the minute podcast. Some of the others are more mood pieces, I suppose. Very little narrative. And they just seem to stop rather than end.

He's one of those people who when he dies, I hope he donates his brain to science. People should study it, find out just what the hell was happening in there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Starleigh said:

As a huge Tana French fan, YES, go back and read the books in order.

There was so much left out or changed in the show, that you don't begin to get a good understanding of the detectives and their relationship. Plus, it will set you up for the rest of the Murder Squad books, because each new narrator was previously introduced as a side character in the previous book.

Cosign this completely.

Currently reading Leave the World Behind. It's really good and really unsettling so far.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

So I finished The Awakening (Nora Roberts' new Trilogy) and dammit, she

 

ended it with a cliff hanger! Something she's

NEVER DONE

and now I have to wait until the end of this YEAR to find out what's next. It seems, instead of six characters, you know, a couple's story underpinning the main plot, for each book, this seems to the be the journey of just Breen, what she thought she was, and finding out about her past and her role in the survival of Talamh. For the first time, I barely got the POV from the hero (Keegan), and while I loved how Nora transported me back to Ireland--Drumoland Castle, Cliffs of Moher, Loop Head, County Clare), So much of the other stuff--details within details of what Breen did on a daily basis, just felt like filler.

I'm hoping the last one will come out in the Spring of 2022.

Hey, I may be Nora's Number One Fan, but I'm not one of those that love every single book or series. If I see holes, or a particular characterization or lack of one, I called it out back on the old message board. And I remember Nora's words to me: that whether a reader has a reaction, any reaction, be it loving something or not, it means she's done her job.

So, for me, not enough Keegan, or Keegan and Breen.

Now I have to go Google to find out the pronunciations of the new Gaelic/Irish words!

Edited by GHScorpiosRule
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
15 hours ago, MeloraH said:

Cosign this completely.

Currently reading Leave the World Behind. It's really good and really unsettling so far.

Melorah...
Excellent choice.  Quick read.  Could very well work as the first entry in a series. Enjoy!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Anyone who wants a Dark Cinderella retelling, I'm reading The Charmed Wife by Olga Grushin! I love fractured fairy tales.

  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

Anyone who wants a Dark Cinderella retelling, I'm reading The Charmed Wife by Olga Grushin! I love fractured fairy tales.

If you like dark fairy-tale retellings that are also romances I recommend Entreat Me by Grace Draven.  It is like the Disney Beauty and the Beast except darker, more twisted, more atmospheric and in stereo (there are two romances for the price of one)!  Also the heroine is a widow and kinda gangsta.  I liked her, she would totally cut a bitch.

edited to add:  Also Mercedes Lackey's Five Hundred Kingdom series.  All of them are fractured fairy-tales.  They characters all exist in a world where they realize they are living out different "stories" referred to in the series as The Tradition.  First one is a The Fairy Godmother is Cinderella re-telling where the main character Ella can't live out her destiny because the nearest Prince Charming is only a newborn baby (he himself has to wait for the next Cinderella to come along).  It is a clever series that is fun to read.

Edited by DearEvette
  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post

I love fractured fairy tales, too. Just put a hold on The Charmed Wife at my library. I am currently #7 on the list.

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

Anyone who wants a Dark Cinderella retelling, I'm reading The Charmed Wife by Olga Grushin! I love fractured fairy tales.

Ooh, good to hear, I have that on my list.

Read Circe and it's wonderful. Like why did I wait this long to read it? Amazing female protagonist, themes of power and feminism and taking your own agency when you have not been given any, even when the world conspires to take all your agency away. I'm going to put Song of Achilles on my list as well.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I got Concrete Rose from my library this afternoon -- I was surprised I didn't have to wait for it!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I'm currently reading Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup and A Little Life. The first is about the Elizabeth Holmes/Theranos scandal.  I have to say, it's been surprisingly enjoyable. I started reading it because my reading challenge for the month was to read a book about a topic I know nothing about. And yeah biochemistry, not my thing. But even if my eyes start to glaze over the more scientific talk, the author has written the book in such a way that it's really easy to follow what's going and is really engaging. 

A Little Life has been two years in the making for me. It's a book that I kept meaning to read but just never got around to it. I've now taken a month and a half to read it and I'm only 2/3 of the way through. It's not because of the more than 700 pages count, because I've read books that long in less time. It's taken me so long because of the emotional weight of the story. 

Don't get me wrong, it's a brilliantly written book. But man oh man, those trigger warnings that came with every review were no joke. And so I find that after some chapters, I have to put the book down for a day or two and get back to a space where I can emotionally handle reading more. It's just a lot. Again, brilliantly written novel but holy, emotional wringer. 

Edited by truthaboutluv
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

Bad Blood was a very good book!

 I just finished Troubled Blood - it is too long, but still enjoyable.  Now I am reading Lori Gottlieb’s Maybe You Should Talk to Someone and loving it.  She is a therapist who is in therapy after a bad breakup, and she is describing her life and the lives of some of her patients to explain how therapy works.  Last year I vacillated between trying to read everything and not being able to touch a book or focus on a page; it feels so good to enjoy reading again!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I just finished The Girl in The Mirror by Rose Carlyle and 😳 I read it pretty quickly and it was a good thriller.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Oh boy...not a fun read, but an insightful one: Republic, Lost, by Lawrence Lessig. 
Substantive discussion of money in government.
We all know that money drives government...this book maps out how it works. 

  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post

Having just finished A Promised Land by Barack Obama, I am very much looking forward to part 2.

I started A Royal Holiday by Jasmine Guillory.   This one features Vivian whose the mother of Maddie in t by is book series.  I’m looking forward to a book with a guaranteed happy ending.  I suppose that’s what I love about romance novels.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

Just started reading The Country Girls by Edna O'Brien (the first book in the trilogy).

It apparently caused ructions in Ireland when it was first published in the 60s.  Banned by the censor, publicly burned by priests...I can't wait to get to the good stuff! 

A few chapters in and there's a definite 'feel' to the setting and imagery.  In school we covered a lot of short stories written/set in the same time and there's just something very familiar about that era

  • Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post

I'm currently reading Tomorrow Will Be Better by Betty Smith. 

Smith is the author of A Tree Grows In Brooklyn  (an all time favorite of mine) and Joy In The Morning (which I recommend if you haven't read it).

This book was originally published in 1948 and takes place in the same area of Brooklyn as A Tree Grows In Brooklyn but takes place in the 1920s.

This book gets excellent reviews since it was republished but I can't say I'm loving it. Mostly because of life for women and children (of a certain social station) in the '20s could be genuinely difficult and depressing. Smith does not sugar coat the reality. 

 

Edited by tres bien
  • Like 2
  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post

I had an epiphany about Betty Smith not long ago...that I don't care for her books, because, even though they keep you glued to the page, they are just so bleak. I came to this realization after reading her book, Maggie Now. It just seemed so pointless and bleak of a story. (Maybe I should be posting this in the unpopular literary opinion thread??)

  • Useful 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post

For everyone that loved Circe, A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes just came out. I’m reading it and just loving it!!!

Beyond happy that there will be more feminist Greek mythology retellings coming out this year!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Just to add, about my Betty Smith angst...I don't need a happily ever after story. My favorite kind of read is usually a  bittersweet ending (with maybe a hint of redemption). Like, I am currently rereading one of my favorite novels, Sea Glass, by Anita Shreve. It's sad and heartbreaking to read (and it's more or less the same time period as Betty Smith's books) but it's never bleak or depressing.

  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

I dumped Tomorrow Will Be Better by Betty Smith.  Too much of a downer. 

I just started I'll Take You There by Wally Lamb. I feel better already  🙂

  • Laugh 1

Share this post


Link to post

I am reading Grave Witch by Kalayna Price, the first book in the Alex Craft series. The final book in the series, Grave War, recently came out, so I decided to reread the series first because it took so long for her to get around to writing it, I couldn't even remember what the series was about. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

My four week library wait for Tana French's The Searcher is finally over!  After reading a couple of fast-paced thrillers, I am so in the mood for a slow-moving, well-written mystery.

  • Like 2
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

After a lot of people talking about it, I've started reading The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires. I don't read a lot of horror type books so I think that's why I'm having some trouble getting into it. I kind of skip over the really gory stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
On 1/24/2021 at 9:49 AM, Starleigh said:

Just to add, about my Betty Smith angst...I don't need a happily ever after story. My favorite kind of read is usually a  bittersweet ending (with maybe a hint of redemption). Like, I am currently rereading one of my favorite novels, Sea Glass, by Anita Shreve. It's sad and heartbreaking to read (and it's more or less the same time period as Betty Smith's books) but it's never bleak or depressing.

Then, whatever you do, don't read Angela's Ashes.

Edited by peacheslatour
  • Laugh 4

Share this post


Link to post

I finished Concrete Rose -- it was a very well-written prequel.  Now I want to go back and reread The Hate U Give, but I started Perestroika in Paris instead  It's very whimsical so far.  A horse named Perestroika escapes her stable near Paris and lives near the Eiffel Tower with her new friends Frida the dog, Raoul the raven, and Sid and Nancy, the mallards. 

I'm picking up World of Wonders from the library this afternoon.

  • Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

Then, whatever you do, don't read Angela's Ashes.

Too late....

I read it years ago when it was the hot book everyone was reading. I agree completely with your assessment, haha. I'm not ever touching the movie with a ten foot pole.

Edited by Starleigh
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Starleigh said:

Too late....

I read it years ago when it was the hot book everyone was reading. I agree completely with your assessment, haha. I'm not ever touching the movie with a ten foot pole.

Right? Talk about depressing. My great grandfather was the president of a coal company in PA. He told stories like that. The men would get paid in cash every Friday night and they would go spend it all at the bar while their wives and children went hungry. He instituted a policy of giving the money directly to the wives.

  • Like 4
  • Useful 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post

I’m starting The Rise of Magicks by Nora Roberts which is the conclusion of her Chronicles of the One trilogy.  

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size