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Rick Kitchen

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EGADS!!!!! I had to stop reading Candace Camp's Mad Morelands series. Even though I have one left. Boring ass dreck. And I used to love her back in the day. Yes, she's the author I was talking about in the Unpopular Opinions Thread about changing the eye colors of characters. Honestly, I was only interested in Theo (the heir) and the youngest twins Alex (Alexander) and Con's (Constantine(Father, the Duke, is an antiquarian--interest in Roman and Greek stuff)) stories based on the first book, Mesmerized, which was Olivia's (fifth child (Theo/Thisbe (twins), Reed, Kyria, Olivia, Alex, and Con) story. 

So, because I got the GREAT NEWS that my complex will now allow us to have pets (and I've wanted a doggie for sooooo long!), after finishing Alex's story, I picked up Nora's The Obsession, because I love the way Naomi fell in love and kept Tag, the wonderful Siberian Husky/Lab mix mutt she found. Nora is just so wonderful in how she portrays dogs. It's believable because she's that good and because she's had various dogs over the years. But she's very good at writing cats, too. And yet, she doesn't have any. @DearEvette, Galahad! Believable because I have friends who have kitties who have displayed such characteristics!

After I'm done, I'll go to Anne Stuart's latest historical, which I know will be great fun.

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10 hours ago, GHScorpiosRule said:

So, because I got the GREAT NEWS that my complex will now allow us to have pets (and I've wanted a doggie for sooooo long!), after finishing Alex's story, I picked up Nora's The Obsession, because I love the way Naomi fell in love and kept Tag, the wonderful Siberian Husky/Lab mix mutt she found. Nora is just so wonderful in how she portrays dogs. It's believable because she's that good and because she's had various dogs over the years. But she's very good at writing cats, too. And yet, she doesn't have any. @DearEvette, Galahad! Believable because I have friends who have kitties who have displayed such characteristics!

I never had a cat before October of last year.  So I couldn't speak to how she wrote the cat.  But then a stray began squatting on my back porch and we adopted her and sure enough she is definitely a skinnier Galahad.

As for current reads:  Today is a great release day, there are seven books released today that are on my 'will absolutely read list.'  Among them are a new Mary Balogh, a new Sandra Brown and a new Ilona Andrews.  I am gonna dive right into Emerald Blaze by Ilona Andrews tonight.  I love the Baylor family so hard. 

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On 8/16/2020 at 2:38 PM, Luckylyn said:

I’ve started the historical romance A Delicate Deception by Cat Sebastian.  This is the third in her Regency Imposters series.  This one focuses on the sister of the lead from the first book falling for a man who is keeping a secret.  I really enjoyed the first two books in the series.  

She’s very inclusive and has had leading and supporting characters from the LGBTQ community in her books.  I also read her Seducing the Sedgwicks series that featured M/M pairings. 

I'm reading the third book in the Sedgwicks series now. I'm only a third way through. It's not as charming as the first book, nor as angsty as the second. So far, it's a comfortable read if you're in the mood for a book where not much happens; just two childhood friends getting to know each other again and falling in love.

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57 minutes ago, Snow Apple said:

I'm reading the third book in the Sedgwicks series now. I'm only a third way through. It's not as charming as the first book, nor as angsty as the second. So far, it's a comfortable read if you're in the mood for a book where not much happens; just two childhood friends getting to know each other again and falling in love.

I just finished it and I was surprised that the sex scenes weren't particularly detailed. I've read several of her books and she's usually cheerfully explicit with the sexytimes and yet pulls back in a big way when it comes to Martin and Will. I wonder if she lost interest halfway through and had to force herself to continue and make the deadline?

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6 hours ago, scarynikki12 said:

I just finished it and I was surprised that the sex scenes weren't particularly detailed. I've read several of her books and she's usually cheerfully explicit with the sexytimes and yet pulls back in a big way when it comes to Martin and Will. I wonder if she lost interest halfway through and had to force herself to continue and make the deadline?

I thought the lack of detail made sense because Martin had so many issues regarding sex.  He was so uncomfortable that it took so much to get him to understand that his desires were okay.  There’s a scene where he explains that he hadn’t wanted to want sex and so didn’t know what to do about Will.  Considering how his character grew up and the information he learned about what a predator his father was Martin’s issues worked as an obstacle.  On some level, he was always judging himself for his feelings for Will and feels so unworthy of love because of the lack of it he had growing up.  So it took effort and Will’s love/patience to help Martin get past it to act on his feelings.  I think my favorite of the Sedgwick Series was the first one, but I liked each book a lot.  

I thought the final book in the Regency Imposters series was my least favorite Cat Sebastian book.  It’s not a bad book but the pacing seems so much slower than the others.  I feel like it takes a while to really get going.  I ultimately liked it but it took time for me to connect to the characters.

I recommend Cat Sebastian’s Turner series as well.

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4 hours ago, Luckylyn said:

I thought the lack of detail made sense because Martin had so many issues regarding sex.  He was so uncomfortable that it took so much to get him to understand that his desires were okay.  There’s a scene where he explains that he hadn’t wanted to want sex and so didn’t know what to do about Will.  Considering how his character grew up and the information he learned about what a predator his father was Martin’s issues worked as an obstacle.  On some level, he was always judging himself for his feelings for Will and feels so unworthy of love because of the lack of it he had growing up.  So it took effort and Will’s love/patience to help Martin get past it to act on his feelings.  I think my favorite of the Sedgwick Series was the first one, but I liked each book a lot.  

I thought the final book in the Regency Imposters series was my least favorite Cat Sebastian book.  It’s not a bad book but the pacing seems so much slower than the others.  I feel like it takes a while to really get going.  I ultimately liked it but it took time for me to connect to the characters.

I recommend Cat Sebastian’s Turner series as well.

The sex scene in the second book was "fade to black" too. Perhaps Cat felt it appropriate for characters who were abused. The first book had no such issue because the main character didn't experience abuse in the hands of Martin's creep of a father.

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Possible spoilers for the Donner Party tragedy though I feel like I'm spoiling "Titanic."

I'm reading The Hunger by Alma Katsu, because I read the brilliant The Indifferent Stars Above last year and have been fascinated by the actual realities of the Donner Party tragedy (instead of the glorified mythos that's risen up around it) ever since. Where Stars was nonfiction, Hunger is fiction with a supernatural element added, and where with, say, The Terror, I think the device really worked, here I find it really off-putting and ugly so far. Making Tamsen Donner casually unfaithful and possibly a witch just feels gross when this was an actual person who died horribly after trying valiantly to save her children and watching her husband die. I'm pushing through for awhile but don't mind quitting if I'm just not feeling it. 

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I recently finished two books.  First was Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate.  I know this is a popular book, but it just didn't work for me.  There are a lot of books with historical and contemporary story lines about women in some sort of transition or conflict and the two timelines come together and this was just one more of those.  It was very paint by number.  I was also really put off by the very dated and cliched depictions of African Americans.

The second book was The Cutting Season by Attica Locke.  I've been wanting to read Locke for quite some time and, when I finally got a chance, I decided to go into her back list and choose something that was a standalone.  I really enjoyed this book--it's a well done traditional mystery (as opposed to a thriller or something like that) and I didn't figure it out until the reveal, which is unusual for me.  It also does a great job of blending the past and the present.  But, most of all, Locke does an amazing job of creating the setting of the story.

Next up is Pretty Things by Janelle Brown.  I'm starting it tonight--it has come highly recommended to me, but I'm going in blind on it!

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7 hours ago, OtterMommy said:

 

I recently finished two books.  First was Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate.  I know this is a popular book, but it just didn't work for me.  There are a lot of books with historical and contemporary story lines about women in some sort of transition or conflict and the two timelines come together and this was just one more of those.  It was very paint by number.  I was also really put off by the very dated and cliched depictions of African Americans.

 

We read this last year for our book club, and had the same reaction.  The historical part was interesting to me, as it was based on real events I had not known previously. The modern part was a cliche of every bad Harlequin romance novel.  The other members all admitted they skipped the modern story completely.  We also agreed that those depictions were not good.  I do not understand its popularity.

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@OtterMommy I really enjoyed Pretty Things!

I'm currently reading Wonderland by Zoje Stage and it's weird but I do want to see how it ends. It's got more of a supernatural element than Baby Teeth, which is her other book. I liked the creepy child aspect of that one. Next up after that will be Mexican Gothic. 

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1 hour ago, MaggieG said:

@OtterMommy I really enjoyed Pretty Things!

I'm currently reading Wonderland by Zoje Stage and it's weird but I do want to see how it ends. It's got more of a supernatural element than Baby Teeth, which is her other book. I liked the creepy child aspect of that one. Next up after that will be Mexican Gothic. 

I'll be reading Mexican Gothic in the near-ish future.  My friend and I have started a book club where we only read marginalized authors and that is our October book!

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On 8/26/2020 at 4:03 PM, Pachengala said:

Possible spoilers for the Donner Party tragedy though I feel like I'm spoiling "Titanic."

I'm reading The Hunger by Alma Katsu, because I read the brilliant The Indifferent Stars Above last year and have been fascinated by the actual realities of the Donner Party tragedy (instead of the glorified mythos that's risen up around it) ever since. Where Stars was nonfiction, Hunger is fiction with a supernatural element added, and where with, say, The Terror, I think the device really worked, here I find it really off-putting and ugly so far. Making Tamsen Donner casually unfaithful and possibly a witch just feels gross when this was an actual person who died horribly after trying valiantly to save her children and watching her husband die. I'm pushing through for awhile but don't mind quitting if I'm just not feeling it. 

I read that book a while ago and loved it. The early portrayal of Tamsen did bother me too, but that gets better.

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1 hour ago, Black Knight said:

I read that book a while ago and loved it. The early portrayal of Tamsen did bother me too, but that gets better.

Oh thanks, that's good to know! 

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I just completed The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry. A random book I picked up because it matched my Popsugar Reading Challenge theme, but I really loved it. It was also a great reminder that a book can be amazing without pages and pages of useless fodder.

Don't get me wrong, I've read some long novels that were pretty amazing, but I do think a lot of authors are guilty of relying on too much fodder and over-padding their books with unnecessary details that add nothing to the story. 

In just a little over 200 pages, the story packed a ton of emotion - there was romance, love, loss, hell even a small mystery/twist thrown in. Really, really good book.

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I just started "The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women" by Kate Moore, about the young women who died from radium poisoning in the 1920s from the watch dials they painted using radium paint, the corporate cover-up, and how their suffering and deaths lead to major strengthening of workers' rights laws. The book is relatively well-written, but the author editorializes a little too much (not that I disagree about the evil of corporations) and sometimes her tone is a little too breezy for the story she's telling. I think the author's British, writing in American English, because sometimes British terms slip in, like "Boxing Day" for the day after Christmas.

I also just finished "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot, about Henrietta Lacks, a poor Black woman whose cervical cancer cells were harvested without her knowledge. These cells formed the immortal cell line HeLa, from which many advances in medicine and science have stemmed. The story is partly about Henrietta, partly about her family, and partly about the author's quest to tell the story. Much of the story about Henrietta's children and grandchildren is sad because the cycle of racism and poverty just repeats itself over and over and over. 

I also read the first two books in The Lady Astronaut series by Mary Robinette Kowal: "The Calculating Stars"(book 1) and "The Fated Sky" (book 2). The first starts out with an interesting alternate history premise: in a world where Dewey is elected president, a meteor crashes into the Earth, destroying the East Coast of the United States. The resulting climate changes will eventually lead to the Earth being uninhabitable, and the quest is on to colonize the moon and Mars. The main character was a lady pilot in WWII and she and her fellow lady pilots fight to be astronauts. The first book is fine, but it falls apart in the second, which might have been subtitled: "Look How Woke the Author Is," because she shoved in every ethnic, racial, and sexual group possible while doing 180-degree personality changes on other characters. 

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I think Henrietta Lacks should be required reading for everyone. It was eye opening what rights a patient does and does not have in a desperate situation. 

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Henrietta Lacks also points out how racism affects medical care. It’s reprehensible and unacceptable.

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I recently finished Beach Read and In the Dream House. Two very different books but both intriguing and compelling in their own right. 

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I’m reading The Proposal by Jasmine Guillory .  This book features Carlos who was one of the friends in The Wedding Date.  I’m really enjoying it so far.  Lots of humor and characters with personalities I find interesting.  

I agree that learning about Henrietta Lacks shows so much about the inequalities in how patients are treated and how easy it has been for people to be taken advantage of by doctors they should have been able to trust.  They used her, profited, and she wasn’t informed or allowed to benefit  from the contribution of her cells that was basically stolen from her. 

 

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I just finished Pride & Prejudice & Zombies.  I thought it would either be funny or a good snark read, but it wasn't really either.

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I'm reading The Stepford Wives, by Ira Levin.  I read Rosemary's Baby a few years ago, and I'm sorry it took me so long to get around to this one.  It's a great piece of satire.

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Just arrived in my mailbox, an elegant little chapbook from Faber called "The Part-Time Job", containing two items (previously published but not in book form) by P.D. James, on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of her birth. The first item is a short story with the same title as the book; the second is a brief essay , "Murder Most Foul", on murder mystery writing and writers (dates from 1982).

I'm looking forward to devouring this tomorrow morning as soon as I've had my breakfast!

I

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5 hours ago, Billina said:

I'm reading The Stepford Wives, by Ira Levin.  I read Rosemary's Baby a few years ago, and I'm sorry it took me so long to get around to this one.  It's a great piece of satire.

Interesting. The movie (the original, not the God awful remake) is strictly a horror movie & one of my favorites. I never read the book, so I didn't know if was a satire.

I'm currently reading The Jackal by J.R. Ward, the first book in the Prison Camp series spinoff from The Black Dagger Brotherhood series, & it's a real slog. I usually enjoy BDB books, but this one is just not holding my interest, & I can't understand how this is the first book in a series, are all the books going to take place inside the prison? Yuck.

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4 hours ago, GaT said:

Interesting. The movie (the original, not the God awful remake) is strictly a horror movie & one of my favorites. I never read the book, so I didn't know if was a satire.

I was on vacation many years ago and picked The Stepford Wives book up at a supermarket. I was riveted by it. Can’t really say I liked the 70s movie, though, I thought the director kind of ruined it by casting his frumpy wife.

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I just finished His & Hers by Alice Feeney.  I really liked it and it had a good twist. 

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18 minutes ago, partofme said:

I just finished His & Hers by Alice Feeney.  I really liked it and it had a good twist. 

I'm halfway through this right now! Really enjoying it so far. It's like Se7en meets Heathers/Mean Girls.

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I’m reading At All Costs by David Weber.  It’s part of the Honor Harrington series of books.   The series is fascinating.  The conflict gets more interesting over the series because initially who the good guys were was more clear but as things have progressed there are good and bad people on both sides of the conflict.   It’s been frustrating and enthralling to see the conflict continue because of manipulations, miscalculations, bad luck, and mistakes.  The only thing I don’t love is the lengthy tangents describing the tech.  I understand that the tech is important to the story because technical advantages/disadvantages do effect outcomes. I’m sure there are fans who really appreciate Weber’s attention to detail.   I just think those parts go on a bit too long.  I call those tangents “Tech Porn” and I’ve gotten used to it.  

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54 minutes ago, Luckylyn said:

The only thing I don’t love is the lengthy tangents describing the tech.

I feel that way about Kathy Reich's Temperance Brennan series and the science. At first I kind of enjoyed it, but now it's gotten a bit out of hand for me. I'm also kind of tired of Brennan always getting knocked unconscious and having to extract herself (or get herself extracted). The stories are becoming too similar from book to book.

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On 8/28/2020 at 3:54 PM, Luckylyn said:

agree that learning about Henrietta Lacks shows so much about the inequalities in how patients are treated and how easy it has been for people to be taken advantage of by doctors they should have been able to trust.  They used her, profited, and she wasn’t informed or allowed to benefit  from the contribution of her cells that was basically stolen from her. 

To my knowledge, no one gets a say on what happens to what is considered medical waste removed from their bodies.  Doesn't excuse the medical establishment treating anyone differently because of race, ethnicity or class, but it's not like white people get paid for the use of tumors they have removed either.

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I just finished Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt.

I'm  probably in the minority.  I didn't like it. I found it slow and tedious.

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On 8/30/2020 at 5:56 AM, kariyaki said:

I was on vacation many years ago and picked The Stepford Wives book up at a supermarket. I was riveted by it. Can’t really say I liked the 70s movie, though, I thought the director kind of ruined it by casting his frumpy wife.

I think it worked to cast a frumpy-ish woman to play Joanna, though.  The point is that Joanna is NOT a perfectly put together, big boobed 10 of a woman, which is what all the men in Stepford want.  I still think Katharine Ross was a pretty woman, though, and not really "frumpy", but to each their own.

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3 hours ago, tres bien said:

I just finished Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt.

I'm  probably in the minority.  I didn't like it. I found it slow and tedious.

I didn't like it either. I did like the descriptions of Savannah though.

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48 minutes ago, Billina said:

I think it worked to cast a frumpy-ish woman to play Joanna, though.  The point is that Joanna is NOT a perfectly put together, big boobed 10 of a woman, which is what all the men in Stepford want.  I still think Katharine Ross was a pretty woman, though, and not really "frumpy", but to each their own.

Not her, the actress who played Carol Van Sant was the director’s wife. Katharine Ross was smoking hot as Joanna.

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2 hours ago, Billina said:

I think it worked to cast a frumpy-ish woman to play Joanna, though.  The point is that Joanna is NOT a perfectly put together, big boobed 10 of a woman, which is what all the men in Stepford want.  I still think Katharine Ross was a pretty woman, though, and not really "frumpy", but to each their own.

 

1 hour ago, kariyaki said:

Katharine Ross was smoking hot as Joanna.

I didn't realize that Katharine Ross was supposed to be "frumpy", because I thought she was a very good looking woman. If that's what they were going for, then she was miscast.

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1 hour ago, GaT said:

 

I didn't realize that Katharine Ross was supposed to be "frumpy", because I thought she was a very good looking woman. If that's what they were going for, then she was miscast.

She wasn't. OP was referring to Nanette Newman who played Carol Van Sant. She was married to director Bryan Forbes.

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Just finished Across the Winding River by Aime Runyan.  Newly divorced Beth is helping her 90 year old father go through his photos and other keepsakes when she finds a photo of him in WWII with his arm around a pregnant German woman.  The story shifts between present, her father’s time as a medic in the war, and the tale of two German sisters during the war.

It was enjoyable, but I feel like I have read this story and its variations before.  It was a free book through Amazon prime, and I am not sad I picked it.

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Just finished Aria by Nazanine Hozar. Damn. Every bit as intense as A Burning. A Thousand Splendid Suns, and The Kite Runner.

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On ‎08‎/‎31‎/‎2020 at 1:59 PM, peacheslatour said:

I didn't like it either. I did like the descriptions of Savannah though.

Yeah, that was pretty much the only good thing about the book.

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On 8/30/2020 at 7:18 PM, Luckylyn said:

I’m reading At All Costs by David Weber.  It’s part of the Honor Harrington series of books.   The series is fascinating.  The conflict gets more interesting over the series because initially who the good guys were was more clear but as things have progressed there are good and bad people on both sides of the conflict.   It’s been frustrating and enthralling to see the conflict continue because of manipulations, miscalculations, bad luck, and mistakes.  The only thing I don’t love is the lengthy tangents describing the tech.  I understand that the tech is important to the story because technical advantages/disadvantages do effect outcomes. I’m sure there are fans who really appreciate Weber’s attention to detail.   I just think those parts go on a bit too long.  I call those tangents “Tech Porn” and I’ve gotten used to it.  

Yeah, I glaze over those parts.  I am sure Nimitz-class this and Warchawski Sails-that is important...whatever.  But boring and I don't get it. Brain hurt.  But I agree the human story such ripping good space opera -- the interaction, the conflict, the personalities, the battles  -- that you live with it.

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On 8/30/2020 at 7:17 PM, proserpina65 said:

To my knowledge, no one gets a say on what happens to what is considered medical waste removed from their bodies.  Doesn't excuse the medical establishment treating anyone differently because of race, ethnicity or class, but it's not like white people get paid for the use of tumors they have removed either.

I work in medical research, currently with kidney stones, and patients do get a say now. Even a stone surgically removed (basically medical waste like you said) can't be used without permission. We have to get consent to study the stone and tell them what we plan to do with it. We also ask a separate permission for tissue banking and future experiments that we may think of. But we aren't going to make billions of dollars off patients like in the HeLa situation. A patient can revoke their consent at any time. We would just stop using their sample from that time forward. Studies, consents, and protocols go through committee reviews and audits. If someone or an institution is found to be misusing patients or their samples, labs can be shut down or even all clinical research at a certain institution. 

Tl;dr: We have to get a multi-page consent signed to be able to just see what a kidney stone is composed of (consent for actual medical waste)

I don't think a similar situation like HeLa could happen now (making billions from using something without permission) Someone and/or some place would get sued for some of that money I'm guessing and places shut down.

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On 8/31/2020 at 10:10 AM, tres bien said:

I just finished Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt.

I'm  probably in the minority.  I didn't like it. I found it slow and tedious.

I loved, loved MitGoGaE.  Thought the anecdotes about the quirky characters living there were amusing and the snippets of history were interesting.  And then there was the glorious Lady Chablis (RIP).  His other book about Venice was good, but not as entertaining.

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I think what bothered me most about Henrietta Lacks’ story, and there was so much, is that it was continuing to this day.  Scientists are still calling the family to ask for samples for comparison.  IIRC (and I read it years ago so may be misremembering), one family member didn’t understand and thought a scientist was telling him that he had cancer and needed bloodwork done for his treatment.  Once she took the sample, she never returned his frantic calls.  When the author told the scientist how scared he had gotten, the scientist’s response was basically that she needed more samples from him for her research and suggested the author ask him for her.  I know by the end I was secretly a little gleeful that carelessness with HeLa cells ruin millions of dollars worth of experiments each year.  
 

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21 hours ago, Rilla-my-Rilla said:

I work in medical research, currently with kidney stones, and patients do get a say now. Even a stone surgically removed (basically medical waste like you said) can't be used without permission. We have to get consent to study the stone and tell them what we plan to do with it. We also ask a separate permission for tissue banking and future experiments that we may think of. But we aren't going to make billions of dollars off patients like in the HeLa situation. A patient can revoke their consent at any time. We would just stop using their sample from that time forward. Studies, consents, and protocols go through committee reviews and audits. If someone or an institution is found to be misusing patients or their samples, labs can be shut down or even all clinical research at a certain institution. 

Tl;dr: We have to get a multi-page consent signed to be able to just see what a kidney stone is composed of (consent for actual medical waste)

I don't think a similar situation like HeLa could happen now (making billions from using something without permission) Someone and/or some place would get sued for some of that money I'm guessing and places shut down.

Good to know.  I don't remember being asked about my gallbladder when it was removed, but it was decades ago so either they didn't then, or I just don't remember.

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Just finished The Inheritance Games by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, a new YA that's kind of like Knives Out. I wasn't expecting a whole lot but I was pleasantly surprised. A solid main character (good characterization all around actually) and a fun mystery/quest with puzzles and riddles to entertain the reader along the way.

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Just finished: His & Hers by Alice Feeney. Incredibly dark and well-told murder mystery--upthread I mentioned it was like Se7en meets Heathers/Mean Girls and that stayed true to the end. I was not totally bowled over by the twist--I actually found the climax a little messy as the author kept trying to keep all the suspects in play as possibilities. But the overall tone/mood was very gripping.

Definitely not recommended for those who don't like things too intense. I can usually self-censor when books like this get detailed, but a lot of it had me squirming. It's mostly the murder parts (like I said, Se7en is a good reference point), but also a lot of other elements are pretty gruesome.

Next up: Playing Nice by JP Delaney.

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Late to the party but I just read Dark Matter (Blake Crouch).  It's my habit to read at night until I get drowsy, but this book?  Like a shot of adrenaline.  Holy moley, it's nonstop frantic action.  (It would make an awesome movie).  Good story, but definitely not something you want to read right before bedtime.

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15 hours ago, helenamonster said:

 

Next up: Playing Nice by JP Delaney.


I really want to read this but the NYPL doesn’t have it in ebook yet. 😢

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1 hour ago, partofme said:

I really want to read this but the NYPL doesn’t have it in ebook yet. 😢

I saw it on the NYPL overdrive site.  There is a 7 week waitlist for it.

661830117_ScreenShot2020-09-04at11_56_11AM.thumb.png.be13dd1e7e002cc99555c06d48e20fb5.png

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7 hours ago, DearEvette said:

I saw it on the NYPL overdrive site.  There is a 7 week waitlist for it.

661830117_ScreenShot2020-09-04at11_56_11AM.thumb.png.be13dd1e7e002cc99555c06d48e20fb5.png

Thank you!   I’m sure it wasn’t there yesterday.  But NYPL is being annoying now and only allowing me to have 3 books on hold at a time in Overdrive and 3 in CL when I used to be allowed ten holds meaning I had to cancel another book I had on hold, which is especially annoying when the holds are all at least a month out.  

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