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Rick Kitchen

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Well I finally finished Ninth House. Admittedly things did pick up in the last 100 - 150 pages. None of the reveals were particularly surprising, just the specifics of them. 

Spoiler

For example, totally called Sandow and Belbum both being guilty but didn't suspect Belbum really being Daisy. 

Ultimately this book was a lot like The Magicians for me, which was also a chore to get through and that's because the author could have shaved off at least 200 pages and it would have been a much better book. Instead it was almost 200 pages of nothing happening but a lot of pretentious and tedious world building.

To the point that when the real action did start, I was already bored out of my mind that I could barely appreciate it. I have no interest in reading the sequel. I will say that the main character Alex isn't in any way as annoying as Quentin for The Magicians. Whose annoying personality was also a chief reason I had no interest in finishing that series. 

But while I didn't find Alex annoying, I could never fully connect with the character. Bardugo tried to make her interesting with the snark and really awful backstory and history but something just never clicked for me. I never found myself rooting for her character, empathizing, laughing with her character, etc. It was all just "okay, cool, that happened". Something was just missing for me to really have the character click. 

Also, I know it was meant to heighten the tension and danger of the story, but honestly, by the third graphic description of Alex getting the crap violently beaten out of her by a man, it became exhausting and uncomfortable to read. 

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17 hours ago, truthaboutluv said:

To the point that when the real action did start, I was already bored out of my mind that I could barely appreciate it. I have no interest in reading the sequel. I will say that the main character Alex isn't in any way as annoying as Quentin for The Magicians. Whose annoying personality was also a chief reason I had no interest in finishing that series. 

Quentin changes a lot, for the better, after the events of the first book. Like you, I was incredibly annoyed by him in the first book and as a result wasn't enthused about continuing on with the trilogy. But I really love the second and third books.

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I did get a sense that The Ninth House was a lot of worldbuilding because it was mostly a setup for the series. In that sense it was tough to get through because you're like, "when is something going to HAPPEN?".

Anyway, I finished Minor Dramas and Other Catastrophes and it was so good! I highly recommend it. It so perfectly captures the absurdity of helicopter parenting and things like parent booster clubs while realizing that for kids, "minor dramas" in high school are a big deal. (This book is not a YA, btw, even though it's about a high school.) There's an interesting social media element that makes it sort of like Gossip Girl for high school drama. There are quite a few characters and POVs, but the characters don't run together like they often do with multiple POV books.

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On 2/21/2020 at 1:00 PM, peacheslatour said:

I have a book called Oscar Wilde and the Yellow Nineties. It doesn't explicitly say it's fictionalized but it pretty much depicts Wilde as being straight. It's evocative of the Belle Epoch but it ends up being very silly. Is the Akroyd book at least accurate?

It's been 32 years since I read it! So I'll refer you to my 1988 review (now dumped into Goodreads) for the details.  https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/103848380

But in general, yes, I think Ackroyd caught both the facts and the personality in a way that seemed consistent with what I've read in biographies and Wilde's letters.

Another fictionalized Wilde is the one in Gyles Brandreth's "Oscar Wilde and..." murder mystery series.  That one's intriguing because the basic premise (Wilde and Arthur Conan Doyle as a sleuthing partnership) is obviously fictional, but it is grounded in an absolutely encyclopedic knowledge of Wilde and his works that shines through with every piece of (fictional) action and dialogue.

Making Wilde straight (or straight-ish) is daft, but I think possibly in our day he might have self-identified as bi, since he maintained an affectionate relationship with his wife (until all hell broke loose), and they produced two sons together. Don't you think?

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Making Wilde straight (or straight-ish) is daft, but I think possibly in our day he might have self-identified as bi, since he maintained an affectionate relationship with his wife (until all hell broke loose), and they produced two sons together. Don't you think?

I do. Wilde was a very complex man. He was brilliant and too unconventional for his time. I think he loved Constance in his way and he obviously loved his children very much. But settling down for a traditional married life was just not in him. He chafed at the restrictions. I see him as being very comfortable living a life much like Mick Jagger's or David Bowie's.

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I just finished America City by Chris Beckett. Set in the future, in an America that is losing habitable territory to desert expansion in the south and super storms ravaging the coast, a charismatic populist starts to campaign for mass resettlement in the northern states. It's an interesting take on how nationalists create external enemies to unite their people and stoke hatred and vitriol, with the intention of riding it to power.

Edited by Danny Franks
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Just finished reading HANNAH’S WAR by Jan Eliasbe. The book concerns the creation of the atom bomb at Los Alamos and the search for a possible spy among the scientists working there. The main character, Hannah, is based on Dr. Lise Meitner who discovered nuclear fission. It is an interesting book, occasionally sinks into “word salad” sentences, but a good look into the WWII mind set. 

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On 2/21/2020 at 11:08 AM, surreysmum said:

Also just finished, and still buzzing around in my brain, the complex and poetical novel about class warfare and public architecture (among other things) in 1920s and 30s Toronto, In The Skin of a Lion, by Michael Ondaatje.  So many pictures left in the mind: a nun falling off a half-finished bridge in the darkness; a convict escaping jail by being painted bright blue all over; subterranean tunnels below a marbled palace that is actually a water treatment plant - yes, that last one existed, still exists and is still very much in use.  A massively nebulous, dreamlike plot, each element of which is firmly nailed down to actual physical places and actual historical dates. I think more Ondaatje has to be in my future, though not till I've puzzled over this one some more.

If you are in Toronto on May 23 -24, you can most likely tour the water filtration plant during Doors Open, although I can't find the final list of buildings. It's a beautiful art deco building. Harris was a thinker far ahead of his time.

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I finished The Westing Game, and I figured it out before the end, which was sort of disappointing. Though I did like the character wrap-ups after the reveal. I'm someone who doesn't really care whodunit—I read mysteries for the story rather than the mystery itself. But it was a fun read up to that point, and I don't feel like I wasted my time as I sometimes do when I guess the ending.

Now I'm working my way through the third and final installment of Don Winslow's Power of the Dog trilogy. I've really liked it so far, but wow, it can be a tough read. Violent, depressing, all that stuff.

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Just finished: Mr. Nobody by Catherine Steadman. Much better than her debut novel, Something in the Water. I was thoroughly invested the whole time, and thought the whole thing wrapped up quite nicely. I got a little confused when the final parts of the mystery were being laid out, but I don't think I needed a firm grasp of the details to appreciate the ending.

Next up: Open Book, Jessica Simpson's memoir.

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On 12/3/2019 at 1:34 PM, DearEvette said:

I just completed Memory, in my epic re-read of the Mile Vorkosigan series.  This is a five star read for me and continues to be excellent every time I read it.  It has one of my favorite lines :

“Some prices are just too high, no matter how much you may want the prize. The one thing you can't trade for your heart's desire is your heart.”

 

I reread this not too long ago, while going through a rough bit, because the whole arc with Miles finding himself and the loyalty of his family/found family really resonates with me. There's one line I always misquote but it stays with me, something about "adulthood isn't a reward you get for being a good kid long enough."

Late to the party but just finished Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir. It was a lot more fun to read than the cover blurb and quotes would have made me believe. 

Edited by AncientNewbie · Reason: added content

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I recently finished All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and someone else. Can’t remember their name. It’s a Young Adult book that takes the same event and writes alternating chapters from a Black teen’s and white teen’s perspective. It was great and I think it’s one I’m going to look to buy a few of for 8th grade book clubs.
Also finished the book about East German punks (Burning Down the Haus by Tim Mohr. Highly recommend.)

Regards, onplanners

Edited by topazann

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Currently pushing through Little Fires Everywhere so that I have it finished before the TV series starts next week. I wish I had read it before the series was announced, because I keep trying to see Reese Witherspoon as Elena and it just doesn't work for me.  Oh well...

Also still listening to A Very Stable Genius in fits and starts...and I have Ovidia Yu's The Paper Bark Tree Mystery going as well, which I am quite enjoying.  I don't know if it is the last in the series, but I hope not.  I quite like the heroine of these books.

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I just finished Sword of Justice by Christian Cameron. The fourth in his series about William Gold, a commoner in 15th century London who Forrest Gumps his way to becoming a prominent knight in Medieval Europe.

It's such a good series, because Cameron deliberately veers off the well-trodden path of historical fiction. He starts with the Battle of Crecy but then delves into the politics of the Papacy, Italian city states and the last remaining Christian outposts in the Holy Lands. I've learned so much reading these books, which are packed with real events and historical figures.

Now I'm starting The Binding by Bridget Collins. Not sure what to expect of this one.

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On 3/9/2020 at 8:33 PM, helenamonster said:

Next up: Open Book, Jessica Simpson's memoir.

I found it surprisingly good. Especially well-written were her years growing up in Texas.

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5 hours ago, Spartan Girl said:

My Dark Vanessa. HOLY. SHIT.

Could NOT put it down.

This is HUGELY hyped but I don't think I could read it because it sounds, well, dark. And really disturbing. 

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I'm troubled by My Dark Vanessa because the author has admitted that she read a memoir that covered this territory. But the writer of that memoir, Wendy C. Ortiz, had a lot of trouble getting a publisher, and when she did, well, it was a small press and the memoir didn't become a blockbuster. Now a white woman who read that memoir turns it into a fictional story and reaps a 7-figure deal from a major publisher. If I ever feel like reading this story, I'm going to go get Ortiz's memoir.

At least when EL James ripped off Stephenie Meyer, she was ripping off someone who had gotten rich herself off her story. James got even richer, but I understood there why Meyer just laughed it off.

I've just started Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. I believe it's been recommended by a couple of people here.

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10 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I've just started Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. I believe it's been recommended by a couple of people here.

I loved it, one of my favs ever.  Savor the imagery.

The other day I finished A Door in the Earth by Amy Waldman.  It's about a recent college grad, Afghan born but raised in the US, who decides to go to a remote village in Afghanistan.  She was inspired by a book written by an American doctor who build a clinic for women there after a patient dies unnecessarily.  The girl arrives only to find things aren't nearly as she imagined and she isn't greeted as a savior.  I hated it.  While the glimpse of life and culture in a remote Afghan village are interesting, the main character's naivete and complete cluelessness are annoying.  Even on the very last page she is still having delusions of heroism, proving she learned nothing.  People died because of her.  The book made me angry.

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I finished The Border, the final book in Don Winslow's Power of the Dog trilogy. It has a rather ambivalent ending, which I think is appropriate for a series about the war on drugs. I've started the latest Temperance Brennan book by Kathy Reichs, with which I'm having the usual issues. I think I've read too many of them to enjoy them much anymore. But it was a freebie, so what the hell.

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16 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I've just started Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. I believe it's been recommended by a couple of people here.

It's next on my list.  It was the last book I picked up from my library, a few hours before they closed for two weeks.

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21 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I've just started Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. I believe it's been recommended by a couple of people here.

I really loved it, although it is a more complex book than The Night Circus.  

Right now, I'm reading Red Letter Days by Sarah-Jane Stratford and am enjoying it.  I haven't been searching out this subject, but it is one of several books about the Red Scare I've read lately.

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On 3/18/2020 at 10:29 PM, Black Knight said:

I'm troubled by My Dark Vanessa because the author has admitted that she read a memoir that covered this territory. But the writer of that memoir, Wendy C. Ortiz, had a lot of trouble getting a publisher, and when she did, well, it was a small press and the memoir didn't become a blockbuster. Now a white woman who read that memoir turns it into a fictional story and reaps a 7-figure deal from a major publisher. If I ever feel like reading this story, I'm going to go get Ortiz's memoir.

At least when EL James ripped off Stephenie Meyer, she was ripping off someone who had gotten rich herself off her story. James got even richer, but I understood there why Meyer just laughed it off.

I've just started Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. I believe it's been recommended by a couple of people here.

Kate Elizabeth Russell the writer of My Dark Vanessa did not rip off Wendy Ortiz.  She was drawing on her own experiences for the book.  She has been working on and off on the manuscript for years.  Here's one link about it.  

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/mar/02/are-novelists-obliged-to-tell-the-story-of-their-private-life

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On ‎03‎/‎18‎/‎2020 at 10:29 PM, Black Knight said:

I'm troubled by My Dark Vanessa because the author has admitted that she read a memoir that covered this territory. But the writer of that memoir, Wendy C. Ortiz, had a lot of trouble getting a publisher, and when she did, well, it was a small press and the memoir didn't become a blockbuster. Now a white woman who read that memoir turns it into a fictional story and reaps a 7-figure deal from a major publisher. If I ever feel like reading this story, I'm going to go get Ortiz's memoir.

Because only one teenage girl ever had a relationship with her high school teacher?  Seriously, there are plenty of memoirs and novels out there covering that same territory.  It's not a unique story.

The author of My Dark Vanessa based it on her own life, not Ortiz' memoir.  Now, you could argue that it's not fair that Ortiz couldn't find a publisher, and that publishing has a serious diversity problem, and I wouldn't argue with you on either point.  But Kate Russell did not rip off Wendy Ortiz.  She may (probably did) benefit from bias/racism in the publishing industry, but she didn't steal from another author.

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Just finished Smoke Bitten by Patricia Briggs, the 12th in the Mercy Thompson series.  A lot going on but I thought the story was exciting and clever.  A good installment in the series.

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1 hour ago, DearEvette said:

Just finished Smoke Bitten by Patricia Briggs, the 12th in the Mercy Thompson series.  A lot going on but I thought the story was exciting and clever.  A good installment in the series.

Glad to hear you enjoyed it. Mine is sitting in an Amazon box waiting for it to be long enough time for any coronavirus on the box & book to be dead. Such is our life now. 😟

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I started Bad Blood, about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Man, she is a piece of work, though I find it somewhat amusing that a young, attractive white woman was able to bamboozle so many middle-aged white men. Plus ça change, and all that.

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On March 20, 2020 at 4:46 PM, proserpina65 said:

Because only one teenage girl ever had a relationship with her high school teacher?  Seriously, there are plenty of memoirs and novels out there covering that same territory.  It's not a unique story.

The author of My Dark Vanessa based it on her own life, not Ortiz' memoir.  Now, you could argue that it's not fair that Ortiz couldn't find a publisher, and that publishing has a serious diversity problem, and I wouldn't argue with you on either point.  But Kate Russell did not rip off Wendy Ortiz.  She may (probably did) benefit from bias/racism in the publishing industry, but she didn't steal from another author.

Yeah, I don't think it was far that KER got so much crap over that. The publishing industry is biased, definitely, but it's not her fault. 

And as if I wasn't clear, the book is great. 

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On 3/11/2020 at 5:24 PM, OtterMommy said:

Currently pushing through Little Fires Everywhere so that I have it finished before the TV series starts next week. I wish I had read it before the series was announced, because I keep trying to see Reese Witherspoon as Elena and it just doesn't work for me.  Oh well...

Read this sometime last year and hated it with the fire of a thousand suns. So I have zero interest in watching the series. No matter how much I always enjoy seeing Joshua Jackson on my screen.

Just completed Where The Crawdads Sing. It was one of those very hyped books from last year that while it sounded interesting, I was mostly "meh" about reading. I really, really loved it. It was a very easy read that just flew by, even if the book was a little over 500 pages. 

Spoiler

I also called the twist that Kya did in fact murder Chase. Taking the shell necklace was the dead giveaway. I also thought it was obvious after he attacked her and she spent a few days in fear of his coming back and she talked about realizing that's how her mother lived until she left her father. And she stressed she couldn't live like that and essentially not be free.

I also thought it was rather poetic justice that the town's bias worked against it so that every theory the Sheriff had as to how she committed the crime, which turned out to be completely true, was dismissed as their being biased and prejudiced. 

 

Edited by truthaboutluv
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9 hours ago, dubbel zout said:

I started Bad Blood, about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Man, she is a piece of work, though I find it somewhat amusing that a young, attractive white woman was able to bamboozle so many middle-aged white men. Plus ça change, and all that.

I loved that book! I read it, got my sister to read it, and then we talked about how crazy it was.

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5 hours ago, truthaboutluv said:
On 3/11/2020 at 5:24 PM, OtterMommy said:

Currently pushing through Little Fires Everywhere so that I have it finished before the TV series starts next week. I wish I had read it before the series was announced, because I keep trying to see Reese Witherspoon as Elena and it just doesn't work for me.  Oh well...

Read this sometimes last year and hated it with the fire of a thousand suns. So I have zero interest in watching the series. No matter how much I always enjoy seeing Joshua Jackson on my screen.

I didn’t know I had a twin!!  Awful, awful book that I read over a year ago, and I still get just as enraged about it today as I did then.

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5 hours ago, Xianders said:

Bram Stoker - Dracula

I was going through my hundreds of (unread) ebooks and found this.  I've seen movies, but have never read the book...I may be remedying that soon.

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I'm planning on starting a re-read of Moreta, Dragonlady of Pern by Anne McCaffrey this weekend.  It seemed rather timely, given that it deals with a worldwide pandemic (maybe that's redundant), and I'll be home all next week due to my essential job's week-on/week-off schedule to prevent my coworkers and me from potentially infecting each other with coronavirus.

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I finished Andrew Shaffer's 2nd Obama-Biden mystery Hope Rides Again, which was frothy silliness--exactly what I needed at the moment.

Last night I started Simon the Fiddler by Paulette Jiles, which I won through a Goodreads Giveaway.  I have yet to read News of the World, although it has been sitting on my kindle for a while, so this is my first Jiles book.  (I do plan to read that before the movie comes out, at least!)

 

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Just finished Excavation by Wendy Ortiz. I struggled because it was so well done and the it just...ended. All the facts were laid out but there was nothing said about the experience.

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On 3/22/2020 at 11:49 PM, Crs97 said:

I didn’t know I had a twin!!  Awful, awful book that I read over a year ago, and I still get just as enraged about it today as I did then.

I feel the same way about Defending Jacob.

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On 3/27/2020 at 12:13 PM, Browncoat said:

Anne McCaffrey's Pern is always good for a re-visit.

Yeah, I love the series so hard.  The last time I did a revisit, I decided to just read   Dragonflight (1st book) and Dragonsdawn (9th book) and then back to back with no intervening books just to see the contrast.

It was an interesting exercise to read them back to back.  Dragonsdawn, altho coming later in the series is the origin story.  But it so fun to read Dragonflight first which takes place so many generations removed from the origin story and see how much time has passed.

I'll put the rest under spoiler just in case...
 

Spoiler

 

To see how much knowledge was ost and how a far a previously tech advanced society had progressed (regressed?) back into an agragrian pre-tech society so much so that even the thought of space-aged tech is as alien to them as it is to a person who lived in the 1500s. 

Then to go on and read Dragonsdawn to see how sophisticated, space faring their ancestors were but who had to adapt to a planet that was hostile to them so we see how many of the 'current' customs we read about in Dragonflight were just expedient things put in place just to survive by day to day with no more meaning than that.

 

 

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1 hour ago, DearEvette said:

Yeah, I love the series so hard.  The last time I did a revisit, I decided to just read   Dragonflight (1st book) and Dragonsdawn (9th book) and then back to back with no intervening books just to see the contrast.

It was an interesting exercise to read them back to back.  Dragonsdawn, altho coming later in the series is the origin story.  But it so fun to read Dragonflight first which takes place so many generations removed from the origin story and see how much time has passed.

I'll put the rest under spoiler just in case...
 

  Reveal spoiler

 

To see how much knowledge was ost and how a far a previously tech advanced society had progressed (regressed?) back into an agragrian pre-tech society so much so that even the thought of space-aged tech is as alien to them as it is to a person who lived in the 1500s. 

Then to go on and read Dragonsdawn to see how sophisticated, space faring their ancestors were but who had to adapt to a planet that was hostile to them so we see how many of the 'current' customs we read about in Dragonflight were just expedient things put in place just to survive by day to day with no more meaning than that.

 

 

That does sound like an interesting exercise.  One of my favorites is MasterHarper of Pern, but All The Weyrs Of Pern

makes me cry every time.

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Just started Smoke Bitten by Patricia Briggs, the 12th book in the Mercy Thompson series. So far, so good.

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Splitting my time between American Dirt and The Splendid and the Vile.  Enjoying both of them very much so far.

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It took me a little longer than ordinarily to finish The Starless Sea - I was in the wrong mood for a couple of days, which was unusual because this book with its stories and mythology is exactly my jam - but then I ripped through the remaining two-thirds quickly.

I'm now about a third of the way through Patrick Radden Keefe's Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland. It's an uplifting read of a country coming together...no, of course not, it's people killing their neighbors for religious and sectarian reasons. It's well-written and interesting, and I'm learning a lot about The Troubles that I hadn't known, but I'm going to need a palate cleanser after this.

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On 3/28/2020 at 6:07 PM, Browncoat said:

That does sound like an interesting exercise.  One of my favorites is MasterHarper of Pern, but All The Weyrs Of Pern

  Reveal spoiler

makes me cry every time.

 

I'm not a big fan of Masterharper of Pern.  Maybe because I found I liked the character of Robinton less the more I knew about his life.  And also because there's what I view as a huge retcon near the end which outright offends me.

All the Weyrs of Pern I like a lot better, and I do find the ending quite moving.  But it still annoys me that

Spoiler

she puts my favorite character, T'Gellan, with one of my absolute least favorites, Mirrim.  Why, Anne McCaffrey, why?!?!?

 

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On 3/27/2020 at 12:57 PM, OtterMommy said:

I finished Andrew Shaffer's 2nd Obama-Biden mystery Hope Rides Again, which was frothy silliness--exactly what I needed at the moment.

Oooooh, there's a second one?!??  The first one was a LOT of fun; thanks for the heads up!  [ETA:  The Kindle edition is $1.99 today, so good timing on the rec!  ETA2:  $2.99, actually...I had a $1 credit 🙂 But still real cheap!]

I'm currently closing in on the end of The Wives by Tarryn Fisher.  Thursday is in a polygamist marriage with Seth and two other women she only knows as Monday and Wednesday.  Twists and turns and craziness ensue.  I needed a break from my podcast rota, and this has been a fun "read."

Edited by Lovecat
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I am on the 22nd book in Peter Robinson's Inspector Banks series (Children of the Revolution) with I think four or so more to go...yes, I have been binge-reading these in order, why do you ask? 🙂

So, soon enough I will need to find a new series in this style/mode and am open to all recommendations. I have already read all the Martha Grimes, Donna Leon, Elizabeth George, P.D. James, Dorothy Sayers, available to date so I am probably missing some great male British writers like Peter Robinson. (I have read all the original and ersatz Robert Parker novels and adore the Robicheaux series over here stateside.) Thanks in advance!

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2 hours ago, isalicat said:

I am on the 22nd book in Peter Robinson's Inspector Banks series (Children of the Revolution) with I think four or so more to go...yes, I have been binge-reading these in order, why do you ask? 🙂

So, soon enough I will need to find a new series in this style/mode and am open to all recommendations. I have already read all the Martha Grimes, Donna Leon, Elizabeth George, P.D. James, Dorothy Sayers, available to date so I am probably missing some great male British writers like Peter Robinson. (I have read all the original and ersatz Robert Parker novels and adore the Robicheaux series over here stateside.) Thanks in advance!

Catherine Aird, Deborah Crombie, Reginald Hill, Jill McGown, Ruth Rendell (Inspector Wexford). & Sarah Ward

Edited by GaT
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Val Mcdermid

A great standalone is A Place of Execution.

Quote

 

On a freezing day in December 1963, Alison Carter vanishes from her rural village, an insular community that distrusts the outside world. For the young George Bennett, a newly promoted inspector, it is the beginning of his most difficult and harrowing case—a suspected murder with no body, an investigation with more dead ends and closed faces than he'd have found in the anonymity of the inner city, and an outcome that reverberates through the years.

Decades later Bennett finally tells his story to journalist Catherine Heathcote, but just when the book is poised for publication, he unaccountably tries to pull the plug. He has new information that he refuses to divulge, new information which threatens the very foundations of his existence. Catherine is forced to re-investigate the past, with results that turn the world upside down.

A Greek tragedy in modern England,

 

She also has a series that was made into a great British TV series-- Wire in the Blood with Robson Green

Tony Hill/Carol Jordan Books

The Mermaids Singing(1995)

The Wire in the Blood(1997)

The Last Temptation(2002)

The Torment of Others(2004)

Beneath the Bleeding(2007)

Fever of the Bone(2009)

The Retribution(2011)

Cross and Burn(2013)

Splinter the Silence(2015)

Insidious Intent(2017)

How the Dead Speak(2019)

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Just finished My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. I loved it, and it's not in my usual wheelhouse at all. 

 

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@BlackberryJam That was an amazing book. I was so sad

Spoiler

that Korede and the coma patient weren’t endgame, and that that idiotic doctor didn’t die. 

 Although there’s room for a sequel, I don’t see it happening. 

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