Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
Rick Kitchen

What Are We Currently Reading?

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Haleth said:

One of my favorites ever.  Beautiful story.

Later today is when I plan to start reading it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I'm currently reading books by two Julies:

Home Work: A Memoir of my Hollywood Years, by Julie Andrews.  Andrews writes the way she sings, in a very precise, very modulated way that can leave you feeling a little distanced from the underlying emotion. But she has had a fascinating career, and I had no idea that she and Blake Edwards had made such a remarkable blended family, including two adopted orphans from Vietnam.  And I'm grateful to have youtube so that I can find concerts,  TV shows and lesser-known movies to enjoy as I'm reading about the making of them.

Dear Committee Members, by Julie Schumacher. Light, funny and very clever. I come from an academic family, and it was my brother (who is a senior academic and administrator at an American university) who gave me this novel for Christmas. It's written all in the form of recommendation letters  from a professor of creative writing and literature (but because he writes extremely snarky and sometimes personal letters, you learn a great deal about his own life and views). I'm still only half-way through, so I'm not sure how much plot development there will be, but honestly I don't care much as long as I continue to giggle at Professor Fitger's oh-too-true and oh-too-inappropriate letters.

Edited by surreysmum · Reason: fixed a word choice
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
22 hours ago, surreysmum said:

I'm currently reading books by two Julies:

Home Work: A Memoir of my Hollywood Years, by Julie Andrews.  Andrews writes the way she sings, in a very precise, very modulated way that can leave you feeling a little distanced from the underlying emotion. But she has had a fascinating career, and I had no idea that she and Blake Edwards had made such a remarkable blended family, including two adopted orphans from Vietnam.  And I'm grateful to have youtube so that I can find concerts,  TV shows and lesser-known movies to enjoy as I'm reading about the making of them.

 

I listened to this as an audiobook. While I love Andrews' voice, tone and modulation, the book somehow lost all power and emotion. She read the entire thing as if she were reading a fairytale to a child. There was no power or emotion, even when she discussed her own time in analysis. She said things like, "I cried for two hours in my analyst's office, discussing why I was so unhappy with Tony" and she could have been saying, "Reginald the fluffy bear danced under the acorn tree until one plopped on his head." I have never had an author reading a book somehow take the power and emotion out of it. However, listening to her read this has me excited for her as Lady Whistledown in the Bridgerton series.

In contrast, listed to Inside Out read by the author, Demi Moore. It's good, self-reflective, but at the same time, a bit obtuse about herself during the Ashton years. She really did get rogered by the press when she started making piles of money and fuck that. There is nothing wrong with a woman making as much or more than a man for the exact same work. 

Next up for a listen is Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari.

I'm currently reading the latest Rosalind Thorne book by Darcie WildeAnd Dangerous to Know.

  • Like 1
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just finished up The Nickel Boys. That book broke my heart. It's going to take me a few days to get over it. I'm so disgusted that the real life place it was based on is part of my state's history.

 

  • Like 1
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post

I'm reading Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha, a novel based on the Latasha Harlins shooting and oy. Powerful stuff. A definite read for anybody that loved The Hate U Give.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Just started The Guardians by John Grisham.  Its about a non-profit group, akin to the Innocence Project, trying to get releases for innocent prisoners.  The main plot seems to be about a black man (of course) framed for murder by a drug cartel.  there's probably more to it.

 

Finished The Testaments. Nice ending to the story.

Its a bit hard to sync Aunt Lydia of the book with the show. And I was a tad surprised that Gillead lasted a relatively short time, but i really might have been harder to overthrow the longer it went on and all women lost the ability to read. But I suppose that makes sense when its not really a philosophy guiding the leaders, but just a hunger for power. plus an inability to completely subjugate a good 50% of the population.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just coming to the end of The Ember Blade by Chris Wooding.  The first book in a new fantasy series that seems like a welcome throwback to fantasy where you aren't asked to put up with an irredeemable arsehole as your protagonist, on to read about a world where everything is grey and there are no good people.

Wooding writes well, although he does suffer from the fantasy author weakness of taking paragraphs to describe a room or landscape. But the set up - a bunch of desperate people thrown together, and stumbling into the role of fomenting a rebel uprising against their imperial overlords - is fun.

Share this post


Link to post
On 1/14/2020 at 10:09 AM, Hanahope said:

Finished The Testaments. Nice ending to the story.

Its a bit hard to sync Aunt Lydia of the book with the show. And I was a tad surprised that Gillead lasted a relatively short time, but i really might have been harder to overthrow the longer it went on and all women lost the ability to read. But I suppose that makes sense when its not really a philosophy guiding the leaders, but just a hunger for power. plus an inability to completely subjugate a good 50% of the population.

I'm just watching the show now and I'm wracking my brain trying to figure out how the show will get there to the events in The Testaments (if it even tries since there would have to be a big time jump).  Trying to reconcile Aunt Lydia is even harder.

Share this post


Link to post

I finished The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek, which was good, but not perfect.  The overall story was good--and I spent a fair amount of time googling the Kentucky Blue People--but some of the secondary plots either felt underdeveloped or unresolved.  I'd still recommend it to people who want a historical fiction novel.  

I DNF'd Alexa Martin's new romance (Blitzed) and am now reading You Were There Too by Colleen Oakley.  So far, it is a pleasant, but light, read...but I'm not yet convinced that the whole premise will deliver.  We shall see!

Share this post


Link to post

I am reading Lord Peter Views the Body by Dorothy L. Sayers, it's the first collection of Lord Peter short stories.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I don't read a ton of YA, but I am reading Monday's Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson and next up for me will be anything else she's ever written. 

Share this post


Link to post

I passed up A Gentleman In Moscow when it was available and now am on a weird wait list. Has anyone read Rules of Civility ? It is a previous book by the same author. Both of those books keep calling to me but I haven't taken the plunge yet.

I am now on a 6 month wait list for the Red White and Royal Blue mentioned here.

@surreysmum I keep dancing around downloading Dear Committee Members so a review after you finish will be appreciated. 

Edited by LucindaWalsh
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I loved Rules of Civility, but I will say I loved it more than my other book club members did.  They enjoyed it, but didn’t rave about it like I did.  I find him to be a very slow read, but it’s because I want to immerse myself in his writing.  I can ruminate on some of his passages for days.  This sounds crazy, I know, but I had to put away Gentleman because my life was too busy to read it as slowly as I wanted.  Just beautiful turns of phrases.

  • Like 3
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

I also loved Rules of Civility. It's definitely a book that you read for the writing, not for the plot, because there isn't much of a plot. The one "twist" is utterly predictable, but I think Towles meant for it to be that way. And the things Towles has to say about life are just so terrific. I saved several passages to my Evernote notebook. I'll put two snippets here in spoiler tags, although there are no actual spoilers - it's more to save space so that people who want to skip by can:

Spoiler

As a quick aside, let me observe that in moments of high emotion - whether they’re triggered by anger or envy, humiliation or resentment - if the next thing you’re going to say makes you feel better, then it’s probably the wrong thing to say. This is one of the finer maxims that I’ve discovered in life. And you can have it, since it’s been of no use to me.

Spoiler

Life doesn’t have to provide you any options at all. It can easily define your course from the outset and keep you in check through all manner of rough and subtle mechanics. To have even one year when you’re presented with choices that can alter your circumstances, your character, your course - that’s by the grace of God alone. And it shouldn’t come without a price.

I love [REDACTED} . I love my job and my New York. I have no doubt that they were the right choices for me. And at the same time, I know that right choices by definition are the means by which life crystallizes loss.

  • Like 3
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

It’s phrases like those that make me stop, shut the book, close my eyes, and ponder.  Then I find my poor husband (or sometimes wake him up) and read it to him.  Since he loves me beyond reason, he always responds appropriately. 😌

  • Like 3
  • Laugh 1

Share this post


Link to post
27 minutes ago, Crs97 said:

It’s phrases like those that make me stop, shut the book, close my eyes, and ponder.  Then I find my poor husband (or sometimes wake him up) and read it to him.  Since he loves me beyond reason, he always responds appropriately. 😌

I do that too. Hehe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

8 hours ago, Crs97 said:

I loved Rules of Civility, but I will say I loved it more than my other book club members did.  They enjoyed it, but didn’t rave about it like I did.  I find him to be a very slow read, but it’s because I want to immerse myself in his writing.  I can ruminate on some of his passages for days.  This sounds crazy, I know, but I had to put away Gentleman because my life was too busy to read it as slowly as I wanted.  Just beautiful turns of phrases.

It gives me so much pleasure that there is someone else out there like me who thinks about books like this. I do the exact same thing, the putting away to slow down the experience of a book. 

6 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I also loved Rules of Civility. It's definitely a book that you read for the writing, not for the plot, because there isn't much of a plot. The one "twist" is utterly predictable, but I think Towles meant for it to be that way. And the things Towles has to say about life are just so terrific. I saved several passages to my Evernote notebook. I'll put two snippets here in spoiler tags, although there are no actual spoilers - it's more to save space so that people who want to skip by can:

  Reveal spoiler

As a quick aside, let me observe that in moments of high emotion - whether they’re triggered by anger or envy, humiliation or resentment - if the next thing you’re going to say makes you feel better, then it’s probably the wrong thing to say. This is one of the finer maxims that I’ve discovered in life. And you can have it, since it’s been of no use to me.

  Reveal spoiler

Life doesn’t have to provide you any options at all. It can easily define your course from the outset and keep you in check through all manner of rough and subtle mechanics. To have even one year when you’re presented with choices that can alter your circumstances, your character, your course - that’s by the grace of God alone. And it shouldn’t come without a price.

I love [REDACTED} . I love my job and my New York. I have no doubt that they were the right choices for me. And at the same time, I know that right choices by definition are the means by which life crystallizes loss.

Between the first post and the above post with the for the writing not the plot reviews, I think I am going to enjoy both Gentleman and Rules books. It gets a little tedious wading through Goodreads, looking for descriptions of books like you both gave here.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, LucindaWalsh said:

@surreysmum I keep dancing around downloading Dear Committee Members so a review after you finish will be appreciated. 

I was pleasantly surprised to be somewhat moved by the ending - it's not super-dramatic, but there are definitely developments. I think you'll enjoy it if you decide to go ahead.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I absolutely adore A Gentleman in Moscow.  Such a sweet story about generally kind people and finding a family under difficult circumstances.  I also enjoyed The Rules of Civility but wouldn't list it as one of my top 10 favorites ever as I do Gentleman.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
19 hours ago, surreysmum said:

I was pleasantly surprised to be somewhat moved by the ending - it's not super-dramatic, but there are definitely developments. I think you'll enjoy it if you decide to go ahead.

Now I am intrigued by your review! Being somewhat moved is not what I would be expecting from the book (I have read maybe seven pages and keep putting it up for later). 

10 hours ago, Haleth said:

I absolutely adore A Gentleman in Moscow.  Such a sweet story about generally kind people and finding a family under difficult circumstances.  I also enjoyed The Rules of Civility but wouldn't list it as one of my top 10 favorites ever as I do Gentleman.  

I have a long waiting list before I can get it but you talk like I talk about books I like so I am sure I will be kicking myself for not starting and finishing it when I had the first chance!

You are all giving me the kind of feedback that gets me excited for books. I started Dark Matter (a kind of parallel universe plot) and it is okay but I just realized I am half way through and it isn't as involved as I thought it would be. I thought I was still in the beginning stages of the setup (I didn't have my kindle settings for this book to show progress) and to be almost finished? Not a good sign. The Hunting Game, Lucy Foley was auto downloaded over the weekend after being on a waitlist for a few months and I started the first few pages last night. I wanted to read more but had to sleep so that's a good sign.

Share this post


Link to post

Finished You Were There Too and, unpopular opinion according to the reviews I've read, I found it schmaltzy and eye-rolly.  I mean, it wasn't bad, it just was kind of ridiculous.

Now I am finally reading Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl.  I adore her writing!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, OtterMommy said:

Now I am finally reading Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl.  I adore her writing!

I can't wait to read this, because she spills the tea on how great/horrible things at Condé Nast were. I'm all for as much dirt as she wants to dish.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Just started The Library Book by Susan Orlean. 

For lovers of books and libraries, this is a fascinating and sad story of the devastating fire at The Los Angels Public Library on April 28, 1986.

  • Like 3
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
20 hours ago, OtterMommy said:

Now I am finally reading Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl.  I adore her writing!

Thanks for the recommendation. After I read this and @dubbel zout's post,  I borrowed the e-book from the library. I am loving this book so far! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Finished The Guardians by John Grisham.  Turns out, there were a couple if little twists in the drug cartel frames black man for murder of white lawyer, but those twists weren't explored too much, or really explained as to why one of the primary players chose to try and stop the exonneration when i'm sure absolutely nothing would have happened to that player if he had just ignored it all.  and really, none of the other primary players should have cared either.  as the protagonist kept saying, it was over 20 years ago, those involved are long gone in some sense one way or another, why care?  but sure, it sounds nice when those that did it get caught.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Just finished Where the Crawdads Sing. Big sigh.

There are certain tropes I hate, and one is the child raised alone in the wild who grows up to be both brilliant and beautiful. The use of the trope had some giant plot holes for me. The first is basic: dental hygiene. The author deals briefly with an infection issue, slightly with puberty but totally ignores dental hygiene. No discussion of toothbrushes. Or floss. Raised as she was, Kya would have had horrible teeth. And yes, my standards of beauty require at least decent teeth. 

The second was her brilliance. I get that Tate taught her how to read and sound out words, but we are talking Latin here. And English is a hot mess when it comes to pronunciation matching spelling. I needed Kya to mispronounce a few words because she’d never heard them spoken.

My third big problem was the POV structure. When Kya is six, in her thoughts, she identifies the make and model of the car that brings the truant officer to her door. She can neither spell nor does she have experience with cars. There were dozens of things like that which kept pulling me out of the story.

Next comes Kya’s ability to go to a library, check out books, be aware of back taxes and real estate but that she apparently doesn’t even know how a court room is set up and her lawyer has to draw her stick figures. That was an insulting pile of nonsense.

I also found the ending predictable. Of course that’s what happened. Of COURSE.

As I read back over this, it makes it seem like I didn’t enjoy the book. I did enjoy it. I just didn’t think it was very good. I felt the potential in the author, but this book seemed underbaked. 

  • Like 9
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
50 minutes ago, BlackberryJam said:

Just finished Where the Crawdads Sing. Big sigh.

 

My book club decided to read this this year...I had already planned to skip that meeting.  Everything I've heard about this book from bloggers I respect say pretty much what you said here and that is a big NOPE for me.

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, OtterMommy said:

My book club decided to read this this year...I had already planned to skip that meeting.  Everything I've heard about this book from bloggers I respect say pretty much what you said here and that is a big NOPE for me.

 I went to Goodreads to look for some other reviews to see if I was alone. I'm not. Someone described it as Manic Pixie Marsh Girl and that the main character is a Mary Sue. Totally on point descriptions.

 It's a soft easy read, but that doesn't make it a great book.

I've just started "All the Real Indians Died Off" by Ruth Dunbar Ortiz. So far it's… OK. It's apparently not written for anyone who knows anything about Native American heritage.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

On 1/23/2020 at 7:39 AM, BlackberryJam said:

I've just started "All the Real Indians Died Off" by Ruth Dunbar Ortiz. So far it's… OK. It's apparently not written for anyone who knows anything about Native American heritage.

Quoting myself. I found this book disappointing. Some of the myths she was debunking seemed silly, juvenile and obvious, like "Thanksgiving proves that the Indians and settlers got along," or some similarly worded nonsense. The fact that Thanksgiving wasn't a fun love fest and that the settlers were atrocious to the Indians was even part of a silly film like Addams' Family Values. Yet the author of this book approaches it as if people actually believe that Thanksgiving was wonder for the Indians. I mean..what?

I did some further research after finishing and there was apparently some statistical manipulation. That doesn't necessarily bother me. I mean, whites have been doing it for decades.

On the other hand, I felt like this book was an airing of grievances with no guidance on how to move forward. 

  • Like 1
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just finished: Run Away by Harlan Coben. I like books with seemingly unconnected plots that eventually find their way to each other, and I enjoyed it here too. I got nervous towards the end that a lot of questions would remain unanswered, but things wrapped up nicely with at least a few surprises (I predicted a few things, though).

One thing that kind of drove me crazy (not really a spoiler since it concerns the beginning but putting behind tags just in case):

Spoiler

The book's "cold open" as it were, where Simon finds Paige at the park and gets arrested for beating up Aaron, the whole thing going viral, etc....didn't feel like it had anything to do with anything. Yes, it sets up the main players and their relationships/backstory, but it's such a big way to start a narrative that it feels strange that it has no connection to the actual main plot of the book.

Also, the book takes place in New York, where I live, and it can be fun for locations you know to show up in a work of fiction (I used to walk down the street that the Greene family lived on to get to work every day, so I could picture it perfectly). But at a certain point it got to be too much, especially when the geography of New York doesn't really factor that much into the plot. Like, we don't need multiple passages of Simon doing the math on how long a subway vs. Uber will take him, complete with turn by turn directions. It was wholly unnecessary.

Next up: Conviction by Denise Mina

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just completed One of Us is Next. It was okay but definitely not as good as One of Us is Lying. The biggest issue is that the main characters in One of Us is Next weren't nearly as interesting as the main characters in One of Us is Lying. Bronwyn, Nate, Addy and Cooper were all awesome, which is one of the things that made the book so good. Because by the middle of the book, you didn't want any of them to be guilty. 

Phoebe and Knox were okay but Maeve was really disappointing for me, especially as she was kind of awesome in her very small presence in One of Us is Lying. Her romance was meh and I just didn't find her that interesting. 

I figured out the main twist/mystery a lot quicker in this one than the first book. The only thing I didn't see coming was 

Spoiler

the brother being involved. It's like gee, way to make that whole family fucked up. As if the dad dying and the sister becoming an alcoholic who tried to get a guy killed wasn't bad enough. 

Currently reading Ninth House. *sigh* Once again, my streak of being meh about super popular, hyped books continues. It's not a bad book and I can tell the author put in a lot of work and research for the whole world building she's created in the story. 

And maybe things will be more interesting in the sequels, where she's not bogged down by having to set up the whole backstory/history for everything, since it's obvious this is not going to be a one-off. But for this first one, man it's rough. 

But the main thing making the book a struggle for me is the main character. I'm more than 1/3 of the way through the book and my feelings about Alex is general indifference. That is not a good thing for a main character because it means that I have no investment in the story, no investment in where it's going, what's going to happen, etc. 

Edited by truthaboutluv

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, truthaboutluv said:

Currently reading Ninth House. *sigh* Once again, my streak of being meh about super popular, hyped books continue. It's not a bad book and I can tell the author put in a lot of work and research for the whole world building she's created in the story. 

And maybe things will be more interesting in the sequels, where she's not bogged down by setting the whole backstory/history for everything, since it's obvious this is not going to be a one-off. But for this first one, man it's rough. 

And the most important thing making the book a struggle for me is the main character. I'm more than 1/3 through the book and my feelings about Alex is general indifference. That is not a good thing for a main character because it means that I have no investment in the story, no investment in where it's going, what's going to happen, etc. 

That pretty much sums it up for me. I read the book a couple of months ago & recently tried to recall the plot & couldn't remember a thing about it. I had to look it up on Amazon to see what it was about, & I'm pretty sure I've forgotten most of it again.

Share this post


Link to post
17 hours ago, truthaboutluv said:

One of Us is Next

The office where I freelance had a copy of this in the freebie pile as well as a book called Who Is Next, so of course I put them together. Hee.

  • Laugh 2

Share this post


Link to post

Just finished 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle and it was a ride.  And odd.  And not a favorite.

  • Like 1
  • Useful 1
  • Laugh 1

Share this post


Link to post

I loved 95% of 7 1/2 Deaths, but the ending is such a letdown.

(I'm still not sorry that I read it, though, and I'll read it again for the brilliance of the first 95%.)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I told my kids halfway through that the book is a high wire act that absolutely, positively HAS to stick the landing.  I’m glad you can go back and enjoy the 95% because, for me, the 5% just left me hanging and completely meh.

Share this post


Link to post

I finished Save Me the Plums today and loved it.   Reichl is far and away my favorite food writer and I'm now sorry I didn't read Gourmet when it was in business.

I was planning on starting Cilka's Journey tonight (which would have been appropriate as it is Holocaust Remembrance Day), but then I discovered that it is a follow-up to The Tattooist of Auschwitz, which I have not read but will do soon when my book club does it.  So, instead I think I'm going to start American Royals instead and revisit Cilka's Journey in a few months.

Share this post


Link to post

Just finished Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.  recommended on another forum site in honor of the coronavirus.  its a story about another flu bug that killed 99.9% of the population.   definitely makes you want to stock up on water and nonperishable food and hope you don't need electricity and medicine to survive.  but even then hard life.  but the theme,  survival is insufficient, comes through.

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post

Just started Know My Name by Chanel Miller. I have it on audio and she has such a powerful delivery and her words are gut wrenching. I am done with chapter one and feel just as raw and exposed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
10 hours ago, Hanahope said:

but the theme,  survival is insufficient, comes through.

I really liked that about Station Eleven. I read it the year it came out, and I've been thinking of giving it a re-read this year, particularly for one of the scenes near the end.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I just finished Many Rivers to Cross by Peter Robinson, the 26th book in the Inspector Banks series. Didn't really enjoy it. The story is a continuation of the previous book, CareLess Love, & I'm bored, Also, after 26 books, I'm tired of hearing about Alan Banks' musical, food, & alcohol choices. It may be time to wrap this series up, especially since it seems like the next book is going to be another continuation.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
20 hours ago, Hanahope said:

Just finished Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.  recommended on another forum site in honor of the coronavirus.  its a story about another flu bug that killed 99.9% of the population.   definitely makes you want to stock up on water and nonperishable food and hope you don't need electricity and medicine to survive.  but even then hard life.  but the theme,  survival is insufficient, comes through.

 

Good book.  I'm still waiting for her to write a sequel.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
12 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I really liked that about Station Eleven. I read it the year it came out, and I've been thinking of giving it a re-read this year, particularly for one of the scenes near the end.

I could totally see this being made into a TV show/movie with future episodes on the adventures of the Traveling Symphony.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Hanahope said:

I could totally see this being made into a TV show/movie with future episodes on the adventures of the Traveling Symphony.

It is being made into a TV show, although I think it will be limited to the story of the book.

I only made it a handful of pages into American Royals before DNF'ing it.  However, this truly was a case of "It's not you, it's me."  I think it is an inventive premise and the writing was good, but my mind was just not going there with the alternate history so contrary to reality.  Even in those few pages, my mind kept going through things like "What about slavery?  What about the Civil War?"  

Instead, I picked up What the Wind Knows which a number of friends rated highly on Goodreads.  I wasn't so sure about it when I started, but now it is starting to work for me.

Share this post


Link to post

My biggest problem with American Royals is that I didn't find any of the characters particularly likeable. They were kind of flat and dull except for maybe Daphne, who is about the only one who made anything happen. I would have appreciated more scheming and Gossip Girl-style plots. 

Share this post


Link to post

PBI  if you liked Save Me the Plums, you might enjoy two books by Laurie Colwin.

Home Cooking and More Home Cooking.  I was introduced to her  as a reader of Gourmet Magazine.  She was an occasional columnist. 

Edited by tres bien
  • Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
12 hours ago, Minneapple said:

My biggest problem with American Royals is that I didn't find any of the characters particularly likeable. They were kind of flat and dull except for maybe Daphne, who is about the only one who made anything happen. I would have appreciated more scheming and Gossip Girl-style plots. 

Good to know.  I didn't get far enough in to form any opinions about the characters, but this would have really bugged me. 

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Customize font-size