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1 hour ago, funnygirl said:

I don't care if Kim never wants anything to do with the franchise again, it better not be Samantha Jones. I'll keep saying it until I know it's not her. lol 

I agree. My God, that character gave me the courage to feel good about myself after my divorce by letting me know you can be old but you can still have "it".  

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It is the Daily Fail, who is leaving itself a huge opening with "sources claim." I love that the one thing they're willing to state as fact is that Carrie doesn't die in the first episode. No one needs insider knowledge to know that!

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16 hours ago, qtpye said:

My speculation is that Big dies before the divorce and Carrie inherits all his money.

I agree with you. It would allow Carrie to be wealthy and single. I can't think of any other reason for Natasha to return other than for JJP's funeral. 

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1 hour ago, ifionlyknew said:

I would hate this.  I would especially hate it if Carrie ends up with Aiden afterwards.

 

I liked Aiden and Aiden/Carrie together, but I agree. It'd be the show trying to have it's cake and eat it too. Like "she did end up with Big, but then he croaked, and now she gets Aiden in her second stage of life." No thank you. 

I really wish they'd left well-enough alone with Sex and the City. A "revival" would have been nice if we had all four ladies together and it was like a reunion-type thing or a one-off just to see how they're doing now without having to infuse all the twists and turns to disrupt the characters lives and progress to feed a narrative for a movie or series.

But we don't have that, and with the possibility that these 10 episodes opening a door for a season 2, I feel like all that we really loved about the show will be flipped on its head just so they can produce more content. 

Edited by funnygirl
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6 minutes ago, funnygirl said:

I liked Aiden and Aiden/Carrie together, but I agree. It'd be the show trying to have it's cake and eat it too. Like "she did end up with Big, but then he croaked, and now she gets Aiden in her second stage of life." No thank you. 

Exactly.  And if the spoilers are correct Big's death would just make Carrie's life so much easier.  Another plot contrivance I could do without.

7 minutes ago, funnygirl said:

I really wish they'd left well-enough alone with Sex and the City.

I agree. As much as I loved the series and even the first movie the second movie left a bad taste in my mouth and from what I'm hearing about the revival I don't have faith it will be much better.  

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They're really cramming in a lot of bit players considering it's only 10 episodes. In addition to all the new cast members, do we really need to see characters like Bitsy von Muffling again? 

I hated the character assassination they did on Aidan in the abominable second movie. I don't know what they have planned for him, but Carrie's exes sure don't go away. Just waiting for the announcements that Ron Livingston and Mikhail Baryshnikov have joined the cast. 🙄

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2 hours ago, Jillybean said:

Just waiting for the announcements that Ron Livingston and Mikhail Baryshnikov have joined the cast.

I thought about that but more likely Berger will have wrote another book and dedicated it to Carrie.  And Alek will have named some art installation after her.

 

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2 hours ago, ifionlyknew said:

I thought about that but more likely Berger will have wrote another book and dedicated it to Carrie.  And Alek will have named some art installation after her.

 

We will find out that a good deal of the art/literature of cultural importance, in NYC and Paris, for the last 20 years has been inspired by Carrie.

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https://www.cnn.com/style/article/and-just-like-that-fashion/index.html

 

From the article:

The styling may also offer more of a costume-like take on high fashion than today's audiences have the appetite for (think of how Field's full-on styling for "Emily in Paris" failed to wow). In 2021, one can't help but wonder whether a 50-something-year-old Carrie would still sport Manolos and chunky Mary Janes pumps at a time when, it could be argued, stilettos aren't particularly on trend.

Carrie didn't follow trends. She set them.  And speaking as someone who continues to wear heels even though I am 50something I don't give a fuck if they are on trend or not. 

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On 8/5/2021 at 3:26 PM, ifionlyknew said:

I thought about that but more likely Berger will have wrote another book and dedicated it to Carrie.  And Alek will have named some art installation after her.

Hopefully he doesn't mention scrunchies. 

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4 hours ago, RealHousewife said:

Hopefully he doesn't mention scrunchies. 

On that note, I'm skeptical that a male writer referred to a scrunchie in his book and talked about his female protagonist "running around town in a scrunchie." Especially since Berger said "the hair thing?" when Carrie brought it up. Something was off there. And don't get me started on the heavily-Southern-accented scrunchie-wearing woman who was SO flattered when they asked what part of New York she was from. "HONEY! THEY THINK AH'M FROM NEEWWW YORK!"

I guess I should take this post to the SATC thread.

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I just read this whole thread to see if there was any mention of a funeral scene being filmed which I read about somewhere else. [will link relevant info if I can ever remember where and find it again] The reference I ran across stated the person witnessed the filming of a funeral scene and Carrie and Big were in attendance. It was speculated this could have been done  to throw people off if it's actually  Big's funeral. Though reading all the references to Big and Carrie divorcing here, that seems unlikely.

I too hope they don't kill Samantha off. That would get things off to a  pretty depressing start.

 

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On 7/27/2021 at 11:13 PM, WendyCR72 said:

This outfit makes SJP look 75. I am REALLY not feeling these fashion choices.

It’s not just the outfit.  It’s also the hair.  And the face.

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On 8/11/2021 at 4:34 PM, Jillybean said:

On that note, I'm skeptical that a male writer referred to a scrunchie in his book and talked about his female protagonist "running around town in a scrunchie." Especially since Berger said "the hair thing?" when Carrie brought it up. Something was off there. And don't get me started on the heavily-Southern-accented scrunchie-wearing woman who was SO flattered when they asked what part of New York she was from. "HONEY! THEY THINK AH'M FROM NEEWWW YORK!"

I guess I should take this post to the SATC thread.

I always wondered if Carrie ever paid Charlotte back for the loan to buy her apartment.

When she was running around buying designer items for herself and Berger, I thought the writers might have taken the opportunity to address that.

Some of the fashions look okay, others not so much.  I keep reminding myself these women are well above 50 now and perhaps a little more challenging to dress fashionably yet comfortably.  I used to live in 5-inch stilettos 20 years ago.  Now I'd fall off of my shoes and break an ankle.  I hope they're not expecting SJP to run down the street in stilettos, like when she had to chase down Pete, Aiden's dog, in the rain no less.  That should require hazard pay.  

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2 hours ago, Persnickety1 said:

I always wondered if Carrie ever paid Charlotte back for the loan to buy her apartment.

When she was running around buying designer items for herself and Berger, I thought the writers might have taken the opportunity to address that.

Some of the fashions look okay, others not so much.  I keep reminding myself these women are well above 50 now and perhaps a little more challenging to dress fashionably yet comfortably.  I used to live in 5-inch stilettos 20 years ago.  Now I'd fall off of my shoes and break an ankle.  I hope they're not expecting SJP to run down the street in stilettos, like when she had to chase down Pete, Aiden's dog, in the rain no less.  That should require hazard pay.  

lol! Yeah I don't expect the women to be in stilettos all day or to be as thin or wear sexy clothes. I just want them dressed nicely. :)

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Gah, I just read through this thread and I am aghast at many of the fashion choices.  It's really regrettable that Patricia Field couldn't do this series because I'm not happy with her replacement.  It almost feels like they're trying to copy that certain somethin' somethin' of Field's styling but missing the mark in a cringeworthy way.  Field had a certain NY flair to her styling that most of these looks lack.  As a native to the city I always appreciated her work because I knew the history of where it came from and how it evolved.  I get it that puffy sleeves and long pleated skirts are back but Pat would have put her little humorous spin on them to keep the look from skewing dowdy.  It's even more important when styling women over 50.  As one myself I know you can go dowdy and matronly very easily in some of these styles if you don't know how to prevent it.  And I know Field would have prevented it.  How regrettable.  I just hope that other aspects of the show aren't also regrettable.

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31 minutes ago, qtpye said:

I think Nicole Ari Parker is great (and gorgeous!), and I'm fine with her being featured prominently as part of Carrie's friend group. But billing it as replacing Kim Cattrall is a gross overstatement. There is no replacing Kim/Samantha Jones, no matter who or how many new characters are added.

Though we haven't met Lisa Todd Wexley yet, I bet her and Samantha would get along wonderfully. 

Edited by funnygirl
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It seems like "She is replacing Kim/Samantha!" is a media-driven thing. I haven't seen anything from anyone at AJLT themselves putting it in those terms.

The show can have a fourth lead without it necessarily being "a replacement." It seems to me that, more than "replacing Sam" they don't want to have a NYC-set show in which only white women are leads. If Kim Cattrall were doing this show, they'd still probably add a WOC as a lead.

Nicole Ari Parker has looked amazing in the photos so far.

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28 minutes ago, Black Knight said:

It seems like "She is replacing Kim/Samantha!" is a media-driven thing. I haven't seen anything from anyone at AJLT themselves putting it in those terms.

The show can have a fourth lead without it necessarily being "a replacement." It seems to me that, more than "replacing Sam" they don't want to have a NYC-set show in which only white women are leads. If Kim Cattrall were doing this show, they'd still probably add a WOC as a lead.

Nicole Ari Parker has looked amazing in the photos so far.

 

1 hour ago, funnygirl said:

I think Nicole Ari Parker is great (and gorgeous!), and I'm fine with her being featured prominently as part of Carrie's friend group. But billing it as replacing Kim Cattrall is a gross overstatement. There is no replacing Kim/Samantha Jones, no matter who or how many new characters are added.

Though we haven't met Lisa Todd Wexley yet, I bet her and Samantha would get along wonderfully. 

Yes, the actress is fine but calling her a replacement is tacky.

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https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/24/opinions/sex-and-the-city-filipovic/index.html

This article is about the diversity of the new show.  But this line has me puzzled.

 As much as "Sex and the City" -- which debuted 23 years ago (!) and ran for six seasons (with two film adaptations) - defined New York for a certain subset of the population -- White older Millennial women, of which I am one -- it never quite lined up with real-world New York City, or at least not with the New York I've ever lived in.

The original cast was Generation X. The oldest Millennials would have been 16 when the show started.  I have always thought of those women as my peers.  I am soon to be 53.  I'm not saying Millennials didn't watch the show but I think more women in my generation watched and identified with the show.

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2 hours ago, ifionlyknew said:

The original cast was Generation X. The oldest Millennials would have been 16 when the show started.  I have always thought of those women as my peers.  I am soon to be 53.  I'm not saying Millennials didn't watch the show but I think more women in my generation watched and identified with the show.

Most of the original cast was Gen X.  Samantha was a Baby Boomer.  But I agree with you.  I've noticed that Millennials don't even register with Gen X.  Depending on how they feel about a person they either lump them in with Boomers or consider them a Millennial, so if they like you, you're a Millennial like them.  If they don't like you, you're a Boomer.  See where I'm going with this?  Plus she is someone who's written a book with "OK Boomer" in the title......😏

But actually I agree with her in that SATC was never representative of the diversity of NYC or any NYC I ever lived in and I'm a 63 year old native.  None of these characters were natives and their attitudes about not "going borough" were vaguely racist, classist and insulting, as if even the white people from the boroughs were all low class sweat hogs to be avoided or something.  And as someone who grew up in the Bronx that was not lost on me.  So I agree with her that a reality check and adjustment was needed, I just don't like what she's insinuating about the NYC before her time.  It was always diverse and more diverse and inclusive than she is probably giving it credit for, at least for the past 45 years or so.  Unless you're a rich white snob, of course.  But most people are not.

Also, I think she was actually referring to older Millennials as being a generation that grew up watching the show and feeling that it didn't line up with the NYC they knew.  Well of course, but Millennials have a tendency to take credit for noticing things that they are by far not the first or only generation to notice and not appreciate.  They seem to think anyone older than them was OK with discrimination and prejudice, which is just not true and also insulting.

Edited by Yeah No
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26 minutes ago, Yeah No said:

I've noticed that Millennials don't even register with Gen X.  Depending on how they feel about a person they either lump them in with Boomers or consider them a Millennial, so if they like you, you're a Millennial.  If they don't like you, you're a Boomer.  See where I'm going with this?  Plus she is someone who's written a book with "OK Boomer" in the title..

You don't know how many times I have had to remind someone there is a generation between Boomers and Millennials.  It's like we have been forgotten.

27 minutes ago, Yeah No said:

But actually I agree with her in that SATC was never representative of NYC

 

27 minutes ago, Yeah No said:

So I agree with her that a reality check and adjustment was needed.

Yes.  But my hope is any added diversity is organic and not feel like they were trying to meet a quota.  SATC didn't always handle anything that wasn't of the white straight world well.

30 minutes ago, Yeah No said:

Also, I think she was actually referring to older Millennials as being a generation that grew up watching the show and feeling that it didn't line up with the NYC they knew.  Well of course, but Millennials have a tendency to take credit for noticing things that they are by far not the first or only people to notice and not appreciate.  They seem to think anyone older than them was OK with discrimination and prejudice, which is just not true and also insulting.

I blame advertisers for this.  The 18-34 yr. old demographic is always coveted by advertisers.   Whatever they are watching, buying or wearing is thought to be the best things around.    Just because someone is that age doesn't mean they have good taste.

And yes there are some Millennials who think they are the first generation to be "woke".  Which simply is not true.  Samantha and Miranda both saw changes that needed to be made in the world.   Charlotte as she evolved became more aware of the world outside her bubble.  Maybe on the new show Carrie will be more aware.

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5 hours ago, ifionlyknew said:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/24/opinions/sex-and-the-city-filipovic/index.html

This article is about the diversity of the new show.  But this line has me puzzled.

 As much as "Sex and the City" -- which debuted 23 years ago (!) and ran for six seasons (with two film adaptations) - defined New York for a certain subset of the population -- White older Millennial women, of which I am one -- it never quite lined up with real-world New York City, or at least not with the New York I've ever lived in.

The original cast was Generation X. The oldest Millennials would have been 16 when the show started.  I have always thought of those women as my peers.  I am soon to be 53.  I'm not saying Millennials didn't watch the show but I think more women in my generation watched and identified with the show.

I'm so over the SATC discourse and think pieces about how "out of touch" the original series is/was. It's a television show highlighting an overinflated experience. That's the problem with today's entertainment, everyone is so quick to get offended by things if they don't check every box. This isn't real life! There are parts of it that people can relate to in one way or another, but things aren't going to always meet everyone's desires. 

Gen X was definitely the viewer majority age group at the time. Even now. 

The best thing And Just Like That can do is be authentic while also being inclusive/diverse. If they bend over backwards to appease the Twitter mob (who is going to find fault no matter what is done), then that will be to the detriment of these original characters and the show. 

Edited by funnygirl
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5 hours ago, ifionlyknew said:

The original cast was Generation X. The oldest Millennials would have been 16 when the show started.  I have always thought of those women as my peers.  I am soon to be 53.  I'm not saying Millennials didn't watch the show but I think more women in my generation watched and identified with the show.

I am an "older" millennial- I was 12 almost 13 when the show aired (I am 35). For us it was aspirational in the sense that we could not wait to be grown up like these ladies. They were not our peers, they were whom we looked up to and wanted to be like. We thought "when we hit our 30s we are going to be like these women". And when we were gabbing with our GFs in Highschool and College we were big on "are you a Carrie or a Charlotte?" etc etc. I remember when the movie came out I was in law school- it was THE EVENT after finals. 

But the world did change a bit between the type of dating these women did and the dating my peers did once we were of legal age (social media, apps, and internet dating had a lot to do with that), but the interpersonal stuff is quite similar. I definitely think that there is less expectation for women in their 30s/40s to be married now than in the 1990s.

So I think that it was special for us because the women were young enough for us to identify with (they were not our parents generation- yes Samantha was a younger baby boomer*, but she was the Cool Auntie figure) but old enough to have LIVED enough for us to want to emulate. I think Millennials are well aware of the Gen X crowd and their struggles- they were our "big cousins" and "older siblings" who actually knew what we were doing online before our parents caught on.😂

 

*I always thought the baby boomer generation was too large- my Mom was born in 1948, the older boomers lived during segregation and had a WAY different life experience than those born in 1964!

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3 minutes ago, Scarlett45 said:

I think Millennials are well aware of the Gen X crowd and their struggles- they were our "big cousins" and "older siblings" who actually knew what we were doing online before our parents caught on.😂

I didn't want to generalize and condemn all Millennials but there are some who like that author only sees things from her point of view.  I actually think having Carrie, Miranda and Charlotte interact with Millennial women would be something I would like to see.   Lest we forget they did not care for too many younger women during the original run.

25 minutes ago, funnygirl said:

I'm so over the SATC discourse and think pieces about how "out of touch" the original series is/was. It's a television show highlighting an overinflated experience. That's the problem with today's entertainment, everyone is so quick to get offended by things if they don't check every box. This isn't real life! There are parts of it that people can relate to in one way or another, but things aren't going to always meet everyone's desires. 

Friends gets the same criticism.  I've always thought that show and SATC were simply about a particular group of people and their specific lives.  However it was when they would go outside their box that things didn't quite seem to go right.  So hopefully almost 20 years later we can see these three women have more experiences of a wider range.

it is interesting to me Frasier which aired during the same time period doesn't get criticism for not showing more diversity.

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1 minute ago, ifionlyknew said:

it is interesting to me Frasier which aired during the same time period doesn't get criticism for not showing more diversity.

Well you know anything about women and "female coded" interests (romance, fashion, emotionally intense friendships) is judged WAY more harshly than anything androcentric. 

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15 minutes ago, Jillybean said:

Off topic for this thread, but here's a recent article on this very topic. https://www.businessinsider.com/typical-gen-x-debt-net-worth-income-earnings-caregiving-stress-2021-8

I would like to see the women tackle some of these issues. Miranda's mother is deceased, and likely Steve's mother is deceased given her diagnosis- but can they transition from elder & child care to not having those responsibilities? How is Carrie going to handle retirement if she and Big are not together any more? Charlotte is still raising  children (in real time Rose would be 13), but how are she and Harry planning for life when both kids leave the nest?

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As a cusper, I am happy the Media forgot about us.

There was no social media back than and Boomers controlled everything.

They were very insecure that there was a younger generation coming up and just went on about how life peaked in 1965 and anyone who was not a Boomer was a loser and would never be as cool as them.

Nevermind, that they raised most of us. They would give us outdated advice (Okay Boomer) because they refused to believe the world had changed.

One of those pieces of advice was that any unmarried woman over 30 was an old maid and pathetic. This was said to me by a Boomer woman on her 3rd marriage.

 

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1 hour ago, Scarlett45 said:

I am an "older" millennial- I was 12 almost 13 when the show aired (I am 35). For us it was aspirational in the sense that we could not wait to be grown up like these ladies. They were not our peers, they were whom we looked up to and wanted to be like. We thought "when we hit our 30s we are going to be like these women". And when we were gabbing with our GFs in Highschool and College we were big on "are you a Carrie or a Charlotte?" etc etc. I remember when the movie came out I was in law school- it was THE EVENT after finals. 

But the world did change a bit between the type of dating these women did and the dating my peers did once we were of legal age (social media, apps, and internet dating had a lot to do with that), but the interpersonal stuff is quite similar. I definitely think that there is less expectation for women in their 30s/40s to be married now than in the 1990s.

So I think that it was special for us because the women were young enough for us to identify with (they were not our parents generation- yes Samantha was a younger baby boomer*, but she was the Cool Auntie figure) but old enough to have LIVED enough for us to want to emulate. I think Millennials are well aware of the Gen X crowd and their struggles- they were our "big cousins" and "older siblings" who actually knew what we were doing online before our parents caught on.😂

 

*I always thought the baby boomer generation was too large- my Mom was born in 1948, the older boomers lived during segregation and had a WAY different life experience than those born in 1964!

Yes! Another older millennial here, and I remember thinking SATC made single life look more fun than the married with kids life. The women were so glamorous, had one another, went on all these dates and to cool events. It also kind of made me wished I lived in NYC-so much more to do than a random town in the US. 

Kim Cattrall is actually slightly older than my parents, but I never saw her as old when I watched the show, even as a child. I don't know if I even realized she was the oldest. She was definitely too cool and sexy and seemed just a generation above me. 

58 minutes ago, Scarlett45 said:

Well you know anything about women and "female coded" interests (romance, fashion, emotionally intense friendships) is judged WAY more harshly than anything androcentric. 

This is a pet peeve of mine. Our interests alone are often mocked. I think it's what helped create "not like other girls." It's one reason I love Charlotte so much even if I can't relate to her in many regards. 

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1 minute ago, Scarlett45 said:

I would like to see the women tackle some of these issues. Miranda's mother is deceased, and likely Steve's mother is deceased given her diagnosis- but can they transition from elder & child care to not having those responsibilities? How is Carrie going to handle retirement if she and Big are not together any more? Charlotte is still raising  children (in real time Rose would be 13), but how are she and Harry planning for life when both kids leave the nest?

Yes in the first movie Miranda was doing the sandwich thing.  Taking care of an elderly parent (in law) and raising a child.  There is enormous stress that comes with that. Especially if you have a job that requires a lot of time.

And while none of them will likely have financial issues heading into retirement I can see Carrie being out of her depth if it were something discussed.  

We saw Samantha deal with a younger woman out for her job. Charlotte dealt with trying to go back into the work force where there were younger applicants.  If Carrie had stayed at the paper she would have had at some point someone younger gunning for her job.  

I hope the show doesn't ignore the fact these women are older and there are issues that come with that.

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5 minutes ago, qtpye said:

As a cusper, I am happy the Media forgot about us.

I saw a great meme a couple years ago 

It said Boomers see the glass  half full.  Millenials see the glass half empty.  Gen X sees the glass is filled with piss.

That is Gen X in a nutshell.  We see things for what they are and go about our business.

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Just now, ifionlyknew said:

Yes in the first movie Miranda was doing the sandwich thing.  Taking care of an elderly parent (in law) and raising a child.  There is enormous stress that comes with that. Especially if you have a job that requires a lot of time.

Absolutely. I think I read some of the most stressed out people during covid are the ones who are looking after both vulnerable elderly loved ones and children homeschooling. 

 

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5 hours ago, ifionlyknew said:

You don't know how many times I have had to remind someone there is a generation between Boomers and Millennials.  It's like we have been forgotten.

 

Yes.  But my hope is any added diversity is organic and not feel like they were trying to meet a quota.  SATC didn't always handle anything that wasn't of the white straight world well.

I blame advertisers for this.  The 18-34 yr. old demographic is always coveted by advertisers.   Whatever they are watching, buying or wearing is thought to be the best things around.    Just because someone is that age doesn't mean they have good taste.

And yes there are some Millennials who think they are the first generation to be "woke".  Which simply is not true.  Samantha and Miranda both saw changes that needed to be made in the world.   Charlotte as she evolved became more aware of the world outside her bubble.  Maybe on the new show Carrie will be more aware.

Ding ding ding, everything you write is hitting the nail on the head for me!  As a younger Boomer who in many ways has more in common with Gen X I can relate to this.  I too don't love the feeling that the show is responding to criticism in adding diversity.  I blame that on the point of view of its creators, not on New Yorkers of a certain generation, race or income bracket.  I always felt that Darren Starr/Michael Patrick King had outdated or stereotyped points of view on a lot of stuff and I hate it that this is being generalized as "the way things actually were" in that place and time.

2 hours ago, funnygirl said:

The best thing And Just Like That can do is be authentic while also being inclusive/diverse. If they bend over backwards to appease the Twitter mob (who is going to find fault no matter what is done), then that will be to the detriment of these original characters and the show. 

If "And Just Like That" has to force-fit diversity into the show I again blame that on its creators, not their generation, their race or their backgrounds.  It just goes to show how out of touch and in their own rich/racist/hypocrite bubble they are.  But they are not representative of anyone but themselves.  Sure, there are rich white snobs in NYC but these women were only depicted in a little white bubble of a world because that was the unrealistic POV of the creators.  Absolutely no white people in NYC live or lived 20 years ago in that kind of world unless they are filthy rich and able to create their own racist bubble around themselves with the help of their massive wealth. 

I remember the SATC movie - It was obvious that Carrie's assistant Jennifer Hudson was being force fit into the movie.  It really angered me how they depicted her as her step and fetch it and the way Carrie treated her - how demeaning.  Like no black people in NYC were ever given a chance on their own merits without the charity of entitled white women.  Just ugh and again not true to life in NYC since maybe the 1940s.

 

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2 hours ago, Scarlett45 said:

So I think that it was special for us because the women were young enough for us to identify with (they were not our parents generation- yes Samantha was a younger baby boomer*, but she was the Cool Auntie figure) but old enough to have LIVED enough for us to want to emulate. I think Millennials are well aware of the Gen X crowd and their struggles- they were our "big cousins" and "older siblings" who actually knew what we were doing online before our parents caught on.😂

 

*I always thought the baby boomer generation was too large- my Mom was born in 1948, the older boomers lived during segregation and had a WAY different life experience than those born in 1964!

Haha, Kim Cattral and her character are two years older than I am.  I was not even 40 when SATC premiered.  I was still living only an hour away from NYC at the time and was separated for several years so I was dating and in the single mindset.  So these characters were definitely not "too young" for me to identify with.  I personally don't see that much difference in the attitude of these women and sophisticated urban Baby Boomers in my general age bracket.  So I always felt that they were representative of me.  SJP and Kristen Davis are only 6 and a half years younger than me.  Chris Noth is 4 years older and John Corbett (Aidan) is 2 years younger.  So I never felt any generational disconnect whatsoever with SATC.

P.S.  I agree with you that the Baby Boomer generation is too large and have written about this before.  Women born in 1948 might as well have been born 100 years before me in many ways and my life experiences with them have confirmed that for me over and over again.  Sure, I grew up in a progressive family in NYC so perhaps my attitude skewed "younger" as a result, but I know a lot of people my age that feel the same way.  My theory is that anyone that was alive and socialized as a child in the 1950s had a more old fashioned outlook than those who don't remember the 1950s.  If you are too young to have been drafted into the Vietnam war that's another big distinction.  There was a HUGE amount of social change during those decades, especially for women. 

Another generation in between Boomer and Gen X has been proposed called "Generation Jones" - I call it the "Brady Bunch Generation".  If you are the age of one of the cast member kids on the show you are definitely in that generation.  This article will explain it all and it resonates very much with me and most people I know who were roughly born between 1955 and 1965.

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1 hour ago, qtpye said:

As a cusper, I am happy the Media forgot about us.

There was no social media back than and Boomers controlled everything.

They were very insecure that there was a younger generation coming up and just went on about how life peaked in 1965 and anyone who was not a Boomer was a loser and would never be as cool as them.

Nevermind, that they raised most of us. They would give us outdated advice (Okay Boomer) because they refused to believe the world had changed.

One of those pieces of advice was that any unmarried woman over 30 was an old maid and pathetic. This was said to me by a Boomer woman on her 3rd marriage.

Sounds like the advice of women who were socialized as children in the 1950s with what I would consider outdated sexist values.  Women my age born in the late 50s, especially those in sophisticated urban environments like NYC were not socialized like this at all.  We were brought up to believe that marriage and children were optional.  A career was encouraged.  We were the young "yuppie" generation of the 1980s that went to work in suits and running shoes.  We went to college and aspired to careers.  We were not like the women born in the late 40s or early 50s AT ALL.  They were living in the world of "Happy Days" and "Back to the Future" while we were growing up with more progressive attitudes about sex, romantic relationships and ourselves as women in general.  The difference between going to high school in the 1950s vs. the 1970s was like night and day especially for women.  The 1960s were responsible for that.  So I know who you are talking about but I don't agree with the people who would lump me into the same generation with them.

Edited by Yeah No
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38 minutes ago, Yeah No said:

Sure, I grew up in a progressive family in NYC so perhaps my attitude skewed "younger" as a result, but I know a lot of people my age that feel the same way.  My theory is that anyone that was alive and socialized as a child in the 1950s had a more old fashioned outlook than those who don't remember the 1950s.  If you are too young to have been drafted into the Vietnam war that's another big distinction.  There was a HUGE amount of social change during those decades, especially for women. 

I can see where you are coming from. 

According to Wikipedia Carrie was born in 1966, which in my head would make her an early Gen X member- she had her adolescence in the 1980s (right before the HIV epidemic) and was firmly in her adult life before the rise of the internet. 

Yes of course, people are all individuals and families are different. My Mom was told that she better go to medical school because she was not going to get married or stay married, and she needed to be able to support herself in a proper lifestyle- she is still offended that her Mom said that, but she said "My Mom was right." (Her mother loved her very much, but different generations and communication styles I think led her to say that.) My grandfather was happy she was not a boy so he didn't have to worry about Vietnam.

My Mom is way more sexually conservative than Samantha, but loved her style and her freedom, although my Mom chose to have kids it was a CHOICE. Samantha was born in 1958- didn't have to think about being drafted Vietnam, had her adolescence in the 1970s, and may have THOUGHT about what the war meant and the cultural implications she wasnt going to enlist. She entered adulthood in the 1980s- large numbers of women in professional work spaces, the excess, lots of boomers just older than her making large incomes. By the time Sex and the City premiered in 1998, Samantha was "settled" and fabulous.

If we assume Charlotte and Miranda are the same age as Carrie here are my theories:

Charlotte- Raised by a woman who just missed the era of "Mona Lisa Smile",(or caught the tail end) her mother was likely college educated but never expected her use her degree unless it was to be a more charming dinner companion. Charlotte was "living honorably" but her Mom was probably confused as to why such a beautiful well bred young woman wasnt married at 32! She probably expected her to meet someone in college (or graduate school at the latest), be married when his education was complete and be on her 3rd kid by now.

Miranda- something tells me Miranda's mom probably wanted a bigger career than she had, she may have worked, but the pay wasn't good enough to justify her being away from home when the kids were small, and she was glad Miranda could go to such a prestigious law school like Harvard. Her Mom may have applied to law school, but I think they only kept a few spots for women in each class and she might not have gotten in. Miranda was probably constantly told to be "nicer" or she would never find a boyfriend. People probably assumed because she wasn't fawning over men all the time she was a lesbian. Miranda was likely given conflicting messages- caring about her education and career was encouraged, but dont care TOO MUCH, be a high earner, but not too high as not to attracted a proper man.

I want to see more of the ladies backgrounds in the upcoming revival! I want to touch on these issues, I think it would be really interesting, along with the pretty clothes and shoes.

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1 hour ago, Yeah No said:

Sounds like the advice of women who were socialized as children in the 1950s with what I would consider outdated sexist values.  Women my age born in the late 50s, especially those in sophisticated urban environments like NYC were not socialized like this at all.  We were brought up to believe that marriage and children were optional.  A career was encouraged.  We were the young "yuppie" generation of the 1980s that went to work in suits and running shoes.  We went to college and aspired to careers.  We were not like the women born in the late 40s or early 50s AT ALL.  They were living in the world of "Happy Days" and "Back to the Future" while we were growing up with more progressive attitudes about sex, romantic relationships and ourselves as women in general.  The difference between going to high school in the 1950s vs. the 1970s was like night and day especially for women.  The 1960s were responsible for that.  So I know who you are talking about but I don't agree with the people who would lump me into the same generation with them.

I actually love Generation Jones members like yourself and you are spot on. The older boomers were very rigid in what they considered the roles of women.

 

1 hour ago, Scarlett45 said:

I can see where you are coming from. 

According to Wikipedia Carrie was born in 1966, which in my head would make her an early Gen X member- she had her adolescence in the 1980s (right before the HIV epidemic) and was firmly in her adult life before the rise of the internet. 

Yes of course, people are all individuals and families are different. My Mom was told that she better go to medical school because she was not going to get married or stay married, and she needed to be able to support herself in a proper lifestyle- she is still offended that her Mom said that, but she said "My Mom was right." (Her mother loved her very much, but different generations and communication styles I think led her to say that.) My grandfather was happy she was not a boy so he didn't have to worry about Vietnam.

My Mom is way more sexually conservative than Samantha, but loved her style and her freedom, although my Mom chose to have kids it was a CHOICE. Samantha was born in 1958- didn't have to think about being drafted Vietnam, had her adolescence in the 1970s, and may have THOUGHT about what the war meant and the cultural implications she wasnt going to enlist. She entered adulthood in the 1980s- large numbers of women in professional work spaces, the excess, lots of boomers just older than her making large incomes. By the time Sex and the City premiered in 1998, Samantha was "settled" and fabulous.

If we assume Charlotte and Miranda are the same age as Carrie here are my theories:

Charlotte- Raised by a woman who just missed the era of "Mona Lisa Smile",(or caught the tail end) her mother was likely college educated but never expected her use her degree unless it was to be a more charming dinner companion. Charlotte was "living honorably" but her Mom was probably confused as to why such a beautiful well bred young woman wasnt married at 32! She probably expected her to meet someone in college (or graduate school at the latest), be married when his education was complete and be on her 3rd kid by now.

Miranda- something tells me Miranda's mom probably wanted a bigger career than she had, she may have worked, but the pay wasn't good enough to justify her being away from home when the kids were small, and she was glad Miranda could go to such a prestigious law school like Harvard. Her Mom may have applied to law school, but I think they only kept a few spots for women in each class and she might not have gotten in. Miranda was probably constantly told to be "nicer" or she would never find a boyfriend. People probably assumed because she wasn't fawning over men all the time she was a lesbian. Miranda was likely given conflicting messages- caring about her education and career was encouraged, but dont care TOO MUCH, be a high earner, but not too high as not to attracted a proper man.

I want to see more of the ladies backgrounds in the upcoming revival! I want to touch on these issues, I think it would be really interesting, along with the pretty clothes and shoes.

I saw Samantha being similar to my older friend.

Her family was working class. Her mother had to work as an waitress to support her 4 children because her husband would drink away his paycheck. She had to keep the house spotless and have a warm dinner on the table (even though she often never knew when he was coming home) or he beat her.

The police refused to intervene and her community Priest blamed her for her husband’s behavior. He also told her she would no longer be welcome in the Church if she ever divorced him.

This made my friend loathe marriage and religion. She got a good education so she would never be at the mercy of an abusive husband.

Samantha’s upbringing might not be as extreme but it would explain why she was fiercely protective of her independence.

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4 hours ago, Jillybean said:

With all the new co-stars and old guest-stars to cram into 10 episodes, I have the feeling they won't be doing much of a deep dive into these issues.

That’s my fear too. 

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Quote

 We were not like the women born in the late 40s or early 50s AT ALL. ...They were living in the world of "Happy Days" and "Back to the Future" while we were growing up with more progressive attitudes about sex, romantic relationships and ourselves as women in general.  

FYI, as someone born in '50, not true AT ALL. 

Quote

Samantha was born in 1958- didn't have to think about being drafted Vietnam

Also, they didn't draft women.

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37 minutes ago, buttersister said:

FYI, as someone born in '50, not true AT ALL. 

Individuals vary.  The point is that there is no comparison between my first memories being JFK's assassination, then a few years later his brother and MLK, then watching the daily horrors of the war on TV, plus all the social unrest and demonstrations pushing for women's and other groups' rights, and what children grew up with in the '50s.  My childhood was very, very different and it affected people in my age bracket very differently starting at a very young age.  People just 8 years older than me were liberating themselves from an older mentality that they were raised to have, and some achieved a more radical transformation than others.  Some did zero transformation.  People my age didn't have to shed an outdated mentality because for the most part we started out more influenced by the new ways of thinking and didn't listen to the older messages that some in the older generations were clinging to.  The older Boomers affected us deeply from a very early age.  They paved the way for us to internalize as children what they were representing as adolescents and young adults.

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On 8/25/2021 at 2:59 PM, Jillybean said:

With all the new co-stars and old guest-stars to cram into 10 episodes, I have the feeling they won't be doing much of a deep dive into these issues.

Speaking only for myself, I hope this is the case.

I watch shows like this for an escape and entertainment rather than social issues, especially for a fictional show and fictional characters.

Bring on the fashion and events.  I don't need "woke" material from a fictional guilty pleasure.  

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