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thewhiteowl

S04.E15: Local Heroes

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A media savvy crew of bank robbers consider themselves to be a band of modern day Robin Hoods.

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The drama of this episode was really off the charts, with Deacon having to wrestle with the eventual decision to do the right thing. Same thing with Hondo trying to understand why Deacon would even wrestle with that kind of a decision in the first place.

The dramas with the Lucas and the tenants of The Jungle were also well told.

Maybe they were all a bit idealistic, but they were all still well told.

It's that kind of character nuance that sets this show apart and helps bring the characters and their stories to life.

Oh, and I guess Hondo and Nichelle might be back on. I'm guessing Shemar Moore misses doing kissing scenes, but hey, at least he and Rochelle Aytes have actual chemistry together.

As for the actual case...well, it was a nice story and a nice premise (members of the public turning to criminals to solve their problems, similar to the premise to my own story series, The Virus), but I do think the bank robbers needed a bit too much luck to get away (like Tan being confused for one of the robbers).

Still, this story too was well told. I also appreciated seeing Criminal Minds alums Stacie Greenwell (who played Loretta tonight) and Philip Garcia (Hardy) appear in this episode and get to do more than what they did on CM. CM alums are a recurring theme on this show, but it works.

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So, in an episode that featured racists, murderers, and bank robbers, the show apparently thinks the real villain is a landlord trying to collect rent?  Seriously?  I'm getting close to throwing in the towel on this show. 

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24 minutes ago, Bulldog said:

So, in an episode that featured racists, murderers, and bank robbers, the show apparently thinks the real villain is a landlord trying to collect rent?  Seriously?  I'm getting close to throwing in the towel on this show. 

I think the message is they are all bad but in different ways and for different reasons.

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9 hours ago, mommalib said:

I think the message is they are all bad but in different ways and for different reasons.

I'm not going to get into a political discussion, but I fail to see how the landlord was bad in any way, shape, or form.  Was there a moratorium on his mortgage payments?  Was there a moratorium on his property taxes?  Was there a moratorium on his insurance costs?  Was there a moratorium on his maintenance costs?  Was there a moratorium on his utility costs (which he was apparently providing)?  The tenants were claiming they couldn't pay the rent because they lost their jobs.  If they had jobs prior to the pandemic, they were eligible for unemployment plus the enhanced unemployment benefits that have been in effect.  Yes, I realize that in many cases that does not match one's regular salary, but stories abound of people who actually have made more under unemployment than they did before.  And if the benefits are less, then you budget and prioritize.  Except for food and medicine, I would think rent would be the most pressing expense for most people.  And yes, if the tenants were paying their rent with money that was known to be stolen in the bank robberies, then they are just as guilty as the robbers themselves.  Certainly accessories after the fact.  But, yeah, the landlord is the bad one.  

 

ETA: A federal judge just struck down the eviction moratorium as being unconstitutional.   

Edited by Bulldog
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Re the racist cops’ plot, will it create tension/friction between Hondo & Deacon in incoming episodes?

Hondo should take it slow with Nichelle, what he did to her before was stupid, don’t ruin it this time.

When Luca will be getting a love interest? He deserves some TLC too.

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I grant it's subjective, but I don't think the show necessarily portrayed anyone- outside of the Robin Hood gang leader- as outright bad. Everyone had at least pretty understandable reasons for doing what they did, but because their needs were all diametrically opposed, they got tangled in a (natural) conflict. It was just good storytelling on the writer's part.

As far as the landlord himself is concerned, what I will say is that he did happen to resort to an illegal act. I don't know how the law is like in California, but where I live (the Canadian province of Ontario), even if you're behind on rent, the landlord cannot withhold repairs on your apartment or switch off the utilities. If the landlord did so, then the cops can be called and they can compel the landlord to restore the service or make the necessary repairs.

Now, granted, the residents themselves resorted to an illegal act themselves, but, arguably, they wouldn't have had to do that if the landlord had followed the law. It doesn't excuse what they did, but in the hierarchy of "understanding", what the residents did is far more understandable than what the landlord did. I don't know if it's similar in California (though I'm sure it is), but Ontario (which also has a moratorium on evictions) provides subsidies and programs that would allow landlords to alleviate the costs incurred by the pandemic.

Therefore, the landlord didn't have to resort to an illegal act to recoup his costs, whereas the residents essentially had no choice.

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This episode was a cut above the rest and definitely back to the old S.W.A.T. I'd come to love.

On 5/5/2021 at 8:53 PM, Bulldog said:

So, in an episode that featured racists, murderers, and bank robbers, the show apparently thinks the real villain is a landlord trying to collect rent?  Seriously?  I'm getting close to throwing in the towel on this show. 

I didn't see that as the message at all.

I agree with Daniel:

31 minutes ago, Danielg342 said:

Now, granted, the residents themselves resorted to an illegal act themselves, but, arguably, they wouldn't have had to do that if the landlord had followed the law. It doesn't excuse what they did, but in the hierarchy of "understanding", what the residents did is far more understandable than what the landlord did. I don't know if it's similar in California (though I'm sure it is), but Ontario (which also has a moratorium on evictions) provides subsidies and programs that would allow landlords to alleviate the costs incurred by the pandemic.

The only thing they did was show the manager was a d1ck. Which he was. As Daniel said, what he was doing was illegal, cutting off their utilities, etc., and generally making their lives miserable. This wasn't just about the poor man needing to pay his bills.

And I'm pretty sure these people didn't have the kind of jobs that paid a ton of unemployment that let them live high on the hog. Probably a bunch of under-the-table work. These seem like the kind of people who have to scrape for every dime.

And they stopped the enhanced unemployment benefits anyway. But I'm pretty sure these people couldn't just go skipping back to their jobs, which probably went out of business, because they definitely weren't working for Microsoft.

But seriously, the only people they depicted as the "real villains" in this episode were the lead bank robber guy and the rac1st jerk.

I have to tell you, I was disappointed in Deac at first when he said, "Why are you telling me this?" to Hondo when he was showing him the track record of those cops using excessive force. Like, seriously? WHY ARE YOU TELLING ME THIS? I don't know, Deac. Maybe it's because you just told him it was backyard beer talk. Which is exactly what Hondo said. 

But he redeemed himself in the end. 

I love that he worried he was like them and how he realized he tossed off a lot of these comments as "just talk," when it was actually seeping into their jobs. His crisis of conscience was done really well. They let this breathe. In the end, I was happy with them sending Deac into the gray area, because he's usually depicted as the guy who does everything right. Him doubting himself struck the perfect balance. His metamorphosis from the beginning of the show until the end, felt organic. It felt real.

I also like how Hondo dealt with everything. This episode in particular showed a wonderful evolution of Hondo who held back with Deac and let him figure it out for himself. He also went to Nichelle and opened up to her in a vulnerable way, which old Hondo had a hard time doing and was one of the big reasons they broke up.

I'm really glad to see they're not trying to create drama by constantly having Hondo backslide, which would get so tiresome.

 

On 5/5/2021 at 8:23 PM, Danielg342 said:

The dramas with the Lucas and the tenants of The Jungle were also well told.

I'm really amazed that all of this was going on, and yet they still did these little moments with the Lucas, Deac, and Hondo with Nichelle in a great way. 

I have to say I didn't miss Daryl and his dad. I think they drag things down. 

 

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3 hours ago, Sweet Tooth said:

I love that he worried he was like them and how he realized he tossed off a lot of these comments as "just talk," when it was actually seeping into their jobs. His crisis of conscience was done really well. They let this breathe. In the end, I was happy with them sending Deac into the gray area, because he's usually depicted as the guy who does everything right. Him doubting himself struck the perfect balance. His metamorphosis from the beginning of the show until the end, felt organic. It felt real.

My brother and I, we debated what we would do if we were Deacon. It's such a difficult decision I'm not sure there is a right way to handle it.

I think if I was Deacon, the morning after that night in the backyard where he finally learned Durham's true colours, I would have told my union steward right away. See what they have to say about it, since it's an issue involving a unionized member and, having been in a union before, I always knew that if I had an issue with a co-worker, it was better to talk to the union first. Only if the union can't or won't handle it would I have then gone to Hicks myself and see what he says. It probably would have still taken me down the same path Deacon did, but I figure talking with the union reps might at least ensure that I'm doing everything "by the book".

Going to Hondo for anything other than advice is pointless, because there's not much he could personally do about it. He's not Durham's director superior, so he couldn't discipline him. He also couldn't report Durham himself. So Deacon kind of spun his wheels by "simply talking to Hondo".

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16 minutes ago, Danielg342 said:

Going to Hondo for anything other than advice is pointless, because there's not much he could personally do about it. He's not Durham's director superior, so he couldn't discipline him. He also couldn't report Durham himself. So Deacon kind of spun his wheels by "simply talking to Hondo".

Also, he didn't even want Hondo going to Hicks about it. Like, even when he found out Hondo uttered Durham's name to Hicks, Deac went into a tizzy.

At the same time Deac was saying, "Well, I said something to you, didn't I?" he was also telling Hondo not to say a word to anyone else. So yes, the only thing Deac could do was unburden himself, since he didn't really take it seriously. So, I guess he was trying to take the coward's way out by burdening Hondo with what was going on, but then hamstringing him to the point he basically couldn't take action.

Fortunately, he realized that at the end, because I would have hated them ruining Deacon's character over this.

It was definitely a tough decision, and he's going to pay the price for doing the right thing. I do like that they were realistic about this, because yeah, cops who report on other cops are subject to all kinds of abuse.

Edited by Sweet Tooth
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The season began in the early days of the pandemic. I missed when they skipped to the countermeasures being over but the (political discussion 🤫) jobs aren't back. 

In the S.W.A.T. does everything category Deac calls for a rescue ambulance for an officer down and not the partner rendering first aid? And bank robbery case where was the FBI agent on the screen? I guess the actor playing Robbery Homicide detective was due some work. Having gone to the elementary school in "The Jungle" and still living a short walk away from them  the S.W.A.T. version seemed like bizarro universe. But then S.WA.T. never was Southland.

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21 hours ago, Sweet Tooth said:

It was definitely a tough decision, and he's going to pay the price for doing the right thing. I do like that they were realistic about this, because yeah, cops who report on other cops are subject to all kinds of abuse.

I suppose the only thing that gets me about this is that- likely- Deacon's family will be a target of the Imperial Dukes. Tragedy may ensue as a result. Since we've already seen Annie whine this season about how dangerous Deacon's job is, as well as the fact this would be the second time the Kay family is in peril and third time for Deacon himself, there's hardly any reason for Annie to think that Deacon's career can at all continue (without getting to the possibility that Deacon himself would think the same way). This isn't something that you just "bounce back from".

On a darker show, I'd say it sets up Deacon nicely for a "face-heel turn" where the tragedy makes him question whether or not his policing career is worth it anymore, since "doing the right thing" came at a significant price.

I'd also say it's a great storyline to write the Deacon character out of the show.

...but...this isn't a "dark" show. I also don't like the thought of Jay Harrington leaving, though it could provide the benefit of perhaps forcing the writers to devote more time to the severely under-developed Christina Alonso.

So I feel the writers are painted into a corner with this. I guess if something major happens, it'll be in the Season Finale and when S.W.A.T. comes back in the fall there would be enough time for Deacon to process whatever tragedy occurred and be able to "get back to work". I'm just not sure how you do that at a believable level.

Maybe if Luca got involved with the Dukes it'd be easier to write a story with this kind of impact, since he hasn't dealt with an episode of this magnitude like Deacon has. Or maybe Hicks or Rocker, because with Hicks you could target Molly and give Street some angst and with Rocker you could use the opportunity to expand his character.

I don't know...I'll see how it plays out, but the outcome with Deacon worries me.

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2 minutes ago, Danielg342 said:

...but...this isn't a "dark" show. I also don't like the thought of Jay Harrington leaving, though it could provide the benefit of perhaps forcing the writers to devote more time to the severely under-developed Christina Alonso.

Oh, God no. I hope you're wrong.

While I'd love for Christina to get some development, we've seen that they can slowly do it with the complete cast. Like I said, Hondo has had a nice evolution.

I don't think it's time. I think it's that, as you say for Deacon but in her case, they've painted themselves into the corner by making her "the abused one" and "the female." Oh, and now, "the alcoholic." They've spent literal episodes on her, and they just can't get it together. I think they killed off Erika just so they wouldn't have to write another female.

I sincerely doubt they'd go for a major character death at this point.

If Erika's death, someone they barely knew, threw everyone into a giant tizzy to the point they couldn't think or see straight, Deac's death would shut down the show for a month.

However, I agree that the ridiculous thing with Annie begging him to retire thing will rear its ugly head, as I'm assuming Deac's life is about to turn into a living hell. I'm really hoping they don't bring it to the family and instead just keep it to the workplace this time. I think that would be more realistic, as that's what I'm sure happens in real life. They make the cop's life miserable and threaten him at every turn, to the point he dreads going to work. Of course his team will be on his side, but most of the others, probably not. Deac will fall into a guilt puddle, as he'll get his own line about backyard trash talk thrown in his face multiple times.

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9 hours ago, Sweet Tooth said:

However, I agree that the ridiculous thing with Annie begging him to retire thing will rear its ugly head, as I'm assuming Deac's life is about to turn into a living hell. I'm really hoping they don't bring it to the family and instead just keep it to the workplace this time. I think that would be more realistic, as that's what I'm sure happens in real life. They make the cop's life miserable and threaten him at every turn, to the point he dreads going to work. Of course his team will be on his side, but most of the others, probably not. Deac will fall into a guilt puddle, as he'll get his own line about backyard trash talk thrown in his face multiple times.

I don't have a high opinion of Annie but I do think Deacon is smart enough to realize that retiring doesn't eliminate the danger he might face.  In fact, staying on the job surrounded by SWAT is probably a lot safer.   

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8 hours ago, AnnA said:

I don't have a high opinion of Annie but I do think Deacon is smart enough to realize that retiring doesn't eliminate the danger he might face.  In fact, staying on the job surrounded by SWAT is probably a lot safer.   

I don't think it has much to do with Deacon being smart so much as "succumbing."

Even if he points out that leaving might put him in more danger, I don't know if Annie would get on board with that.

I'm hoping I'm wrong, and she realizes him running away isn't the way to solve this at all, as it would set a bad example. A lot of people look up to Deacon. Him quitting when the going got tough would look really bad. And I don't think he would feel too good about himself, either.

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