Jump to content
Forums forums
PRIMETIMER
candall

"LITERALLY!" and Other Offenders on the Grammar Police Docket

Recommended Posts

So I guess this isn't really grammar, but it is more news flubs about words. This apparently happened in Portland, and I don't want to post the picture here because its huge, but there was a story on the local news there about shits being fired at Lloyd Center Mall.

 

That must have been some laxative.

Edited by Cobalt Stargazer
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

...there was a story on the local news there about shits being fired at Lloyd Center Mall.

 

That must have been some laxative.

Hee. Or too many bean burritos?
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

From the news tonight: "Coming up - The Board of Supervisors has a new plan to grow the North State (this section of CA), literally." I expected a plan to annex territory from Oregon and Nevada, but it was just a program to encourage agriculture.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

This apparently happened in Portland, and I don't want to post the picture here because its huge, but there was a story on the local news there about shits being fired at Lloyd Center Mall.

Maybe they were just laying off some of the more disagreeable employees?
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I watched the latest UFC and was reminded of how much I hate southpaw. It's left-handed, damnit! What's wrong with calling it that? It's not a paw, it's not south. Left-handed.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

I watched the latest UFC and was reminded of how much I hate southpaw. It's left-handed, damnit! What's wrong with calling it that? It's not a paw, it's not south. Left-handed.

I'm left-handed, but, to be fair, Joe, you do appear to be a tiger with four paws. ;>)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

In a story on an antique Ferrari that was auctioned off a BBC News reporter informed us that the purchaser wanted to remain anominous. I would assume that means the state of being a person who does not nom; a breatharian.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

(For some reason the forum won't let me edit my post above)

 

Almost as soon as I saved the above post, some financial idiot on the PBS Newshour uttered the following regarding new unemployment numbers: "We've got a nice tail-wind going into 2015...and that's a lot more paychecks to cushion us and buffer any headwinds..but headwinds are out there. We have a strong dollar ...and a lot more turbulence that could come from abroad, and we don't want those tremors to come up as tidal waves on our own shores." The trouble with a mixed metaphor like that is that I'm not sure whether to get ready for earthquakes, high winds, or tidal waves.

 

Also from the same analyst: "People starting to spend more discretionary spending."

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post

Does EVERYTHING have to be a "hack" these days?  Is it so shameful to refer to something as a tip or a shortcut?

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

I, too, am sick of "hack". I'd also like to know when "creep" became "creeper" and "snow blower" became "snow thrower". And why.

Share this post


Link to post

Every time I see "Opps!" I think, "Yes, I know you meant 'oops,' but it sure sounds like 'opps' in my mind."

This doesn't come up literally on TV (see what I did there?) but does occur on message boards that discuss TV, as well as in email in general.

I think it bugs me so much because the people who do it are often the same ones who pride themselves on never misspelling a word or using incorrect grammar.

Share this post


Link to post

Yesterday a BBC News anchor asked a tornado expert about "the ferocity of 250 kilometer winds." I guess the long ones are worse than the short ones.

Meanwhile, one of our local car dealerships is advertising "double the inventory than ever before!"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

So here's kind of a weird question. Is 'worser' a word? I was talking to someone who said it, and I've been wracking my brain to decide if its a legitimate word or not. Help!

Share this post


Link to post

Believe it or not, "worser" appears in my Webster's Unabridged. It used to be considered a proper word, but not so much these days.

Share this post


Link to post

If it is, it shouldn't be. I suppose you can have even worse, but it still feels wrong.

Share this post


Link to post

Believe it or not, "worser" appears in my Webster's Unabridged. It used to be considered a proper word, but not so much these days.

If it is, it shouldn't be. I suppose you can have even worse, but it still feels wrong.

I'm guessing "worstest" is not a word outside of the speech of cartoon characters.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Americans tend to default to i when they see ai.  But "dame-ler" is the German pronunciation, I believe, and also the British...  

Speaking of British pronunciations, I heard a guy on MasterChef Canada say "tonight we are making tacos" but with his British pronunciation of "tack-os".  I can't stop saying tack-o now. Even my poor kids stopped questioning me about saying it that way. Although to be fair, they don't care what I call them as long as it is tack-o night.

Edited by JTMacc99
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

On tonight's news the guy who usually isn't a dummy said during a local story that "Tons of garbage is being hauled away." No word on how many tons there is.

Share this post


Link to post

Forgive me, non-native speaker here, but can't it just mean "a lot"?

 

Or are you peeved about "tons is" instead of "tons are"?

 

One could argue since they are not talking about a literal number of tons but "a lot of garbage is being hauled away" it would be ok?

Share this post


Link to post

...One could argue since they are not talking about a literal number of tons but "a lot of garbage is being hauled away" it would be ok?

I was thinking that might be acceptable too.

Share this post


Link to post
...One could argue since they are not talking about a literal number of tons but "a lot of garbage is being hauled away" it would be ok?
I was thinking that might be acceptable too.

No, it wouldn't.

Share this post


Link to post

So I had never seen the infamous episode of L & O where Julia Roberts guest-starred, and so I always wondered why it annoyed people, other than, well, it was Julia Roberts. I just watched it on the Sundance channel. Will someone please tell me that she didn't say the word 'Pantheon' instead of the word 'Parthenon'?

Share this post


Link to post

I don't recall the episode (haven't watched L&O for a long time), but there is an ancient building in Rome called the Pantheon. It's been in continuous use for about 2000 years. Quite a tourist attraction.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

If you mean the definition, a dais is a platform for a lectern, seats of honor, or a throne.

Thanks!  I honestly never heard that word before.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I don't recall the episode (haven't watched L&O for a long time), but there is an ancient building in Rome called the Pantheon. It's been in continuous use for about 2000 years. Quite a tourist attraction.

 

Well, I'll be damned. There's a Pantheon and a Parthenon, the latter of which is in Athens. Learn something new every day.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Normally I don't watch the ABC national newscast, but tonight I tuned in just long enough to hear this: "In the west, record high temperatures (are) exasperating the region's drought."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Speaking of British pronunciations, I heard a guy on MasterChef Canada say "tonight we are making tacos" but with his British pronunciation of "tack-os".  I can't stop saying tack-o now. Even my poor kids stopped questioning me about saying it that way. Although to be fair, they don't care what I call them as long as it is tack-o night.

 

This reminds me of when I vacationed in Ireland last summer and upon going through security for my flight home the agent asked me if I had an "iPod," so of course I pulled out my tiny iPod Nano and then she chuckled and I realized she meant an iPad (which I didn't have.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

The title iZombie irritates me. The "i" prefix is associated with technology! Something with that particular prefix is meant to be tech-related. A show called iZombie should be about, I don't know, a zombie that's also an Internet personality. Or something.

 

To be fair, I'm only halfway through the pilot, so for all I know, the main character becomes an Apple junkie and surrounds herself with iPods, iPads, and iPhones. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Along with "I seen", I fear the acceptance of "should've went" for should've gone.

Always cringeworthy to hear but even worse® when uttered by a well-educated person.  What's really driving me nuts for the past few years is the unnecessary usage of the word "more".  Examples: I'm feeling more sick today than yesterday (what happened to sicker?)  The weather is more warm this afternoon (warmer?).

Share this post


Link to post

In a story about Robert Durst on my local news last night, the anchor pronounced 'heir' as 'hair'! I thought that was a word just about everyone was familiar with, but apparently not. 

Share this post


Link to post

Dear local newscaster,

The wrong way to say it: "It is unclear during which part of the process the arsenic is coming from."

The right way: "It is unclear which part of the process the arsenic is coming from."

Also, you get bonus points for pronouncing prevalent as pree-VALE-ant during the same report. I won't even get into the unnecessary use of passive verbs...

Share this post


Link to post

The right way: "It is unclear which part of the process the arsenic is coming from."

 

 

Surely you mean "from which part of the process the arsenic is coming" ????

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Surely you mean "from which part of the process the arsenic is coming" ????

It is no longer unacceptable to end a sentence with a preposition.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Apparently it is "no longer unacceptable" to go out in public in your pyjama pants. That doesn't make it right.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Good one, Quof.  However, it's a losing battle.  I once thought, "Surely it is a fad to write words without any vowels.  That would never be acceptable, would it?"  And yet - seems like it won't go away.

 

Neither will this hashtag business, which I still don't understand, and find extremely jarring when spoken out loud.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×