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mansonlamps

Lines That Fell Flat

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I know it seems wrong to criticize anything about Frasier since its probably arguably the best sitcom of all time with some of the most quotable dialogue ever. Once in a while, though, they had a real clunker. Here's what I mean:

Frederick is spending his birthday with Frasier because Lilith got bit on the tongue by a monkey who didn't like her haircut. Great line: (Roz) How bad does a haircut have to be for a monkey to hate it?! Clunky line: Lilith calls with her speech impaired from the monkey bite. (Daphne) Wiwiff? Does anyone here know a Wiwiff? (Frasier) Oh Lilith! Please like Daphne is such am imbecile she couldn't figure that out by herself. Especially since Frederick is there. I expect better out of the writers for this show.

One more. Daphne offering wine to Niles who is in a petulant mood. (Daphne) Wine Dr. Crane? (Niles whining voice) well wouldn't you? That was supposed to be witty or clever? Really?

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I love the "Look Before You Leap" episode, but it bothers me immensely when Frasier says, "It's 80 degrees outside and it's the middle of February!" No, it is February 29th the absolute end of February that you can possibly be. Maybe it is just a nitpick, but it bugs me. Otherwise it is a perfect episode.

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This isn't really a line that fell flat, but something that just bugs me. In the episode in which Frasier and Roz try to fix up their parents, Roz's mother claims that their generation " lived on whiskey sours and bacon cheeseburgers!" Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure bacon cheeseburgers were not a "thing" in the heyday of Martin and Roz's mom. At least where I came from. I don't recall that being a popular food for at least 15 or 20 years later. Plus, in my house at least, sandwiches were not considered dinner. Whiskey sours on the other hand....

Edited by mansonlamps
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I guess it depends on when you think their "heyday" was.  If this is true, it's quite possible that their heyday was sometime after 1963:

 

 

I have personal history with bacon cheeseburgers at diners and burger joints going back to the late 1960s.  My favorite was in a little joint called "Big Burger" on Fordham Road in the Bronx.  I was a total burger freak as a kid.  My mother called me "Wimpie" (old cartoon character that loved burgers).

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I'm guessing early sixties for the heyday, but regardless, you were a kid when you had your hamburger obsession. I just remember adults at that time in my personal experience drew a bizarre line between lunch food and dinner food. I can't imagine my mother coming up with bacon cheeseburgers as a major source of sustenance for her generation, she's probably never had one in her life.

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Ironically, I'd say meatloaf was a staple of that era. Sometimes, it even had bacon in it. Hamburgers were considered a sandwich for a long time. There's an old MST3K where they joked about the diner owner making "hamburger sandwiches."

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I'm guessing early sixties for the heyday, but regardless, you were a kid when you had your hamburger obsession. I just remember adults at that time in my personal experience drew a bizarre line between lunch food and dinner food. I can't imagine my mother coming up with bacon cheeseburgers as a major source of sustenance for her generation, she's probably never had one in her life.

 

Burgers were a big deal in New York when I was a kid in the early 60s.  We had burger joints long before the present burger obsession of "Shake Shack" and "5 Napkin Burger" or even the fast food that came in by the 1970s via McDonalds and Burger King, and these joints were by far not just for kids.  My favorite involved a model train that went around the counter that literally brought you your burger (and there were more adults there than kids!).   We also had tons of coffee shops and Greek diners that served the famous hugely popular "Cheeseburger Deluxe", and if you paid extra you could get bacon on it (that was one of those ooooh, ahhhh things).  They were also the specialty of the many Irish pubs that served food.  I can totally believe Marty Crane, given his "pedestrian" tastes would have lived on bacon cheeseburgers if he had been a young adult in New York in the 1960s (not sure about Seattle, though).  Perhaps things were different where you grew up.  Given some of the references in the Frasier series, I don't doubt that at least one of the writers came from New York or at least lived there.  Naming Niles' apartment building "The Montana" was a reference to the famous "Dakota" apartment building on 72nd St. in Manhattan (where John Lennon lived and was murdered).

Edited by Snarklepuss

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Maybe you are right about one or more writers being from New York. In Chicago's north suburbs hamburgers were lunch or something served at a barbecue for most adults. Even at barbecues I remember kids being served hamburgers and hot dogs, but adults got steak or chicken!

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Today I heard another Frasier reference that alluded to New York when Niles got a position as a critic with a magazine called the "Monocle".  I'm figuring that was a reference to the New Yorker magazine, whose image of an effete 19th century fop in a top hat holding a monocle is legendary.

 

eustacetilley.jpg

Edited by Snarklepuss
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I found this in the trivia on IMDB:

 

 

The show's creators originally planned for the show to take place in Denver, Colorado. But in late 1992, Colorado passed an amendment that repealed anti-gay discrimination laws. (It was later declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court.) The creators did not agree with the amendment and decided to move the show's setting further west to Seattle. The creators did not want the show to take place in Boston, Massachusetts as "Cheers" had because they did not want NBC to ask for frequent guest appearances from that show's characters.

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Frasier's cousin Nikos, a street juggler, is engaged to a rich girl from a snobby family.

 

NIKOS: She likes to play with her parents' heads.

FRASIER: So did Lizzie Borden!

 

No. Just . . . no.

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